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Rhythm Heaven

Rhythm Tengoku photo
Rhythm Tengoku

Rhythm Tengoku: The Best + features an appropriate crossover


Pose for the fans
Aug 23
// Jonathan Holmes
Not too long ago, I asked you all if you were getting sick of Nintendo's near constant release of crossovers. The answer was a resounding "Nope!" Excited reactions to Super Mario Maker's multiple crossovers have worked to bac...
Rhythm Tengoku photo
Rhythm Tengoku

Eat away your sorrows with this Rhythm Tengoku trailer


;_;
Jun 03
// Darren Nakamura
Sometimes life gets you down, and all you want to do is sit on the couch while eating peanut butter with a spoon and watching Netflix. Or if you are "Heartbreak Bear Hen" (as translated by Google), you would rhythmically alt...
Rhythm Heaven photo
Rhythm Heaven

The next Rhythm Heaven has a story mode, woodcutting cat


Time to get tappin'
Apr 19
// Jonathan Holmes
When word got out that Rhythm Heaven/Tengoku music director Tsunko was diagnosed with laryngeal cancer, fans were sent into a state of fear for both the man and the series he co-created. Thankfully, he has reportedly re...
Rhythm Heaven 3DS photo
Rhythm Heaven 3DS

Hell yes, hell yes, Rhythm Heaven 3DS


Coming to Japan in 2015 with a mix of new and old minigames
Jan 14
// Steven Hansen
During Japan's Nintendo Direct, Nintendo president Satoru Iwata announced there would be a new Rhythm Heaven game for 3DS this year. It will feature over a hundred minigames, 70 of which comes from past entries in the series, 30 of which are new. It's coming to Japan this summer. Hopefully we get word of a North American release.  Hopefully this makes it in:

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Smash Bros.

Rhythm Heaven enemy surfaces in Smash Bros. 4


Smash Run enemy may portend of reveals to come
Jun 13
// Jonathan Holmes
Buried under all the other E3 news this weekend as the eagle-eyed observation that one of the Sneaky Spirits from the original Rhythm Tengoku/Heaven on GBA is an enemy in the Smash Run mode of Super Smash Bros. for 3DS....
Rhythm Heaven photo
Rhythm Heaven

Rhythm Heaven music producer diagnosed with Laryngeal cancer


Plans to continue to work
Apr 06
// Jonathan Holmes
The Rhythm Heaven series hasn't become a household name outside of Japan (yet), but in its native country, the games sell in the millions. That success is due in no small part to the work of Tsunku, the singer/songwriter/prod...
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It's a My Little Rhythm PaRappa Pony Heaven freak out


Applejack is my homeboy
Oct 16
// Jonathan Holmes
Rhythm Heaven Fever is my favorite game of 2012. I love Fez and Retro City Rampage and Fatal Frame 2 and many, many other games that were released this year, but none of them have made a permanent change to my dail...
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Rhythm Heaven comes to Europe in English and Japanese


Apr 21
// Jonathan Holmes
One the only things that kept Rhythm Heaven Fever from getting a perfect score was the game's lack of language options. Unlike the cartridge-based Rhythm Heaven on the DS, there were no space constraints on the Wii...
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Live show: WTF? Wii games on Mash Tactics


Mar 28
// Bill Zoeker
It's going to be a jam-packed "WTF Wednesday" on Mash Tactics today. King Foom is running a gauntlet of questionable Wii games. He'll be subjecting himself to titles like Chicken Shoot, Petz Sports, and Ninjabread Man. But do...
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The ponies have stormed the gates of Rhythm Heaven


Feb 22
// Jonathan Holmes
It looks like there is a mod for Rhythm Heaven Fever that swaps the native graphics for My Little Pony characters. That's what the description of the above YouTube video says anyway. Does anyone out there want to follow...
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Get your groovy ass on the Rhythm Heaven Fever webpage


Feb 20
// Jonathan Holmes
Rhythm Heaven Fever hit last week, and it's been great to see the Western world's reaction to the game. As you can see in these launch event coverage videos (one from Dtoid and one from Nintendo), some people are practically...
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The DTOID Show: Rhythm Heaven Fever party!


Feb 17
// Tara Long
Happy Friday, everyone! In addition to being my all-time favorite day of the week, today also happens to be Rhythm Heaven Fever dance party day, which is a holiday I just made up in order to justify playing Rhythm Heaven Feve...
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There were a lot of Dtoid'ers at this party. You may spot many familiar faces in this video (maybe even your own), but that's not why I'm saying that everyone is beautiful at the Rhythm Heaven Fever launch party. I'm saying ...

Review: Rhythm Heaven Fever

Feb 13 // Jonathan Holmes
[embed]220990:42680[/embed] Rhythm Heaven Fever (Wii)Developer: Nintendo, TNXPublisher: NintendoReleased: February 13, 2012MSRP: $29.99 Unlike other music games that try to simulate the physical act of playing an instrument, Rhythm Heaven Fever imparts onto the player how it feels to play music. Have you ever heard a musician say something like, "When I'm playing, sometimes I feel like I'm flying over the ocean at supersonic speeds, in the middle of a wrestling match with a giant flaming octopus, or making love to a beautiful, ethereal being while riding a cloud to heaven"? I sure have, but I've rarely seen a rhythm game take those emotions and try to directly express them to the player. That's just the start of what makes the Rhythm Heaven series so special -- it dares to give you a peek inside the emotional state of a truly passionate musician (in this case, that musician is Tsunku, the series' musical director). While this game doesn't have any flaming octopi, it does feature a samurai battling a hoard of spectral demons, pets flying high above the ocean at supersonic speeds while playing badminton, an extremely aroused-sounding pair of cloud-riding wood elves, and plenty of strange times with a variety of enthusiastic simians. Rhythm Heaven Fever brings those kinds of surreal, intangible flights of fancy and interprets them literally, all while set to undeniably infectious beats. With something that strange, you have to really work to make it all palatable. Rhythm Heaven Fever seems to know this and works extra hard to be accessible. The visuals are well-crafted yet extremely easy to digest in a manner of seconds, like a well-designed traffic sign. The music is also fairly simple yet very strong and comes in just about every style you could think of. It's extremely expressive stuff, though never in a potentially offensive or annoying way. The same goes for the sound effects. While they aren't quite in the same spotlight as the visuals and soundtrack, they are just as important in the big picture. Every sound in the game has an undeniable "oomph" and were clearly chosen (along with the title's multiple bizarre scenarios) for how much direct pleasure they can evoke from the player, not on how much sense they make. For example, you'll have a grand old time helping three metal dummies "donk-donk" into each other in order to power their otherworldly space blimp. It's fun in a way you that could never see coming -- inexplicably bizarre yet undeniably satisfying. The controls are also more fun than they probably deserve to be. Inputs don't come much more simple than this -- everything is triggered by either pressing A, pinching A and B together, or holding both then letting go at just the right time. It doesn't require memorizing the layout of a three-plus button controller like the GBA Rhythm Heaven did, and it doesn't require any really fine motor dexterity like the flick motions in the DS title. While Rhythm Heaven Fever can be extremely difficult at times, that difficulty is never due to the controls. If you fail at this game (and trust me, you will), it will always be due to your inability to keep the beat. Playing through each regular stage is like learning one part of a longer, more complex song. After four regular stages, you play a "remix" stage that re-appropriates the four previous scenarios and fuses them together into an all all-new, full-length composition. While I really enjoy the individual stages, these remix levels are where the game really shines, as they test your ability to remain fluid and focused in even the most unpredictable sonic climates. Like any good videogame, Rhythm Heaven Fever gently but firmly teaches you how to play, gradually cultivating your level of skill so that, by the end, you can pull off feats of superhuman rhythm that you probably never thought were possible. That's a goofy way of saying that the difficulty scaling in the game is just about perfect. This largely comes from the surprisingly large variety of ways that the game sees fit to challenge the player's internal beat. Sometimes the visuals are there to assist you in keeping the rhythm, but then they'll suddenly flip the script on you, potentially throwing you off time and forcing you to really flex your internal metronome. Conversely, there will be times when the tempo changes radically, so you'll need visual cues to help you stay on beat. In particularly tough stages, the visuals and the beat will alternate in throwing you off and hooking you back onto the beat, truly testing your capacity to follow the rhythm regardless of distraction and intimidation. That's just the start of how the game will make you sweat.  Later on, the game starts layering auditory and visual cues, requiring you to keep track of two or more things at once. There are layers of book-wielding cheerleaders, layers of bouncing footballs, and even layers of adorably wiggling seals. They'll force you to simultaneously think fast and think ahead, all while keeping your unwavering tempo alive. All of a sudden, the downbeats will change to upbeats, forcing you to appreciate the negative rhythmic space that you had previously worked to avoid.  Then there are the "Simon says" cues, anticipation cues, fake-out cues, and the sudden evacuation of all cues, making you rely on muscle memory and instinct. Once you get used to that, you'll be tasked with switching from hitting A to pinching A and B together to letting go of your pinch at just the right time. Between all the visual, auditory, and tactile mix-ups, there is almost always a new challenge to experience in Rhythm Heaven Fever. I've played through the game twice already (once with the Japanese import and again with the English localization), and I still have trouble surviving some of the later stages. As tough as the game can be, it still prioritizes the player's joy over any focus on reaching an end state like a high score. Just like playing a real concert (and unlike other games like Guitar Hero or PaRappa the Rapper), you don't instantly stop playing your tune after you make too many mistakes. No matter what, you'll never be kicked out of the band mid-performance. Also like playing in a real band, you'll never know exactly what the audience thinks of your playing. There are no in-game meters or other gauges to indicate how well you're playing. You'll only get a rating once a song is complete, after which you'll be asked to play it again, be permitted to move on, or be praised with honors. What exactly you did right or did wrong is rarely spelled out for you, because as any musician who has tried to please an audience knows, the tastes of music fans is never that easy to read. That's pretty much everything there is to say about the main "campaign," but there is a lot more to Rhythm Heaven Fever than that. There are tons of unlockables, most of which are all-new endless games that can be played for the rest of your life if you're good enough. They'll test not only your rhythmic skill but also your rhythmic endurance. I'm sure that you'll find that, when it comes to keeping a beat, some of you are sprinters whereas others are long-distance runners, and finding out which of the two you are helps you to assess your musical strengths and weaknesses. Then there are the two-player modes, a new addition to the series. The regular two-player levels are pretty fun, but there are conspicuously few of them. It wouldn't have been that tough to make every level in the game playable for two, but instead, we get a fraction of that number. These levels also don't challenge the players to do anything all that differently than what they do in the one-player mode. Thankfully, the endless two-player levels are really fun and truly test your ability to work in conjunction with one another to a beat. They are a unique experience in the Rhythm Heaven world, and I can only hope that the next game in the series has more of them. Also on the downside, a few of the levels seem a little too similar to some from the GBA and DS titles to be considered continuations or tributes to those past experiences. If you haven't played the handheld games before, this won't be a problem for you, but if this is not your first Rhythm Heaven, you may feel a little annoyed that the robots-on-a-conveyor-belt stage is almost identical to one in the DS game. There are differences, however -- instead of filling the robots with fluid, you now screw their heads on and make their E.T.-like hearts come to life. As much as this stage may feel like a modified rerun, it's undeniably still fun and arguably better than the one present in the DS title. The sound effects are more satisfying, the music is catchier, and the beat mix-ups are trickier. Later on, the stage is brought back for a second round, adding new visual twists to test your rhythm. Though not as fresh as the rest of the game, it's still a surprisingly engaging and eye-opening experience. Hmm, that didn't really sound like much of a downer, did it? Let me try again. Rhythm Heaven Fever is a relatively short game, but that's like saying that the new three-hour CD box set you just purchased is "relatively short." Just like with a new CD, it's understood that this game was meant to be listened to (and played) over and over again. It will take most players many hours to get through the game once and much, much longer to unlock all of the the additional content, including four stages from the original GBA title and an endless mode that you can only unlock once you get perfects on each and every stage. It may sound like a pain but it's not. Even if I didn't have any external motivation to play through these stages again, I'd still be sure to return to the game every few months, just like I pick up my favorite movie or CD every few months for a repeat experience. Rhythm Heaven Fever is the kind of game that may be "over" in less time than other AAA titles, but you'll be singing the songs to yourself, be visualizing the scenarios in your mind, and be tempted to play them all again for many years to come. Again, I failed to express a true downer. I'll take one last crack at it.  Rhythm Heaven Fever lacks the option to play the game in Japanese. This will probably only bother people (like myself) who imported the Japanese title a while back and have grown to love its unique sound. The English localization is pretty great, though. Sometimes it's slightly less expressive than the original, sometimes it's slightly funnier and more involving due to the translation. Regardless of whether it hits high or hits low, it always hits pretty close to the target. Still, I imagine that whichever version you're most familiar with will be the one you prefer. There is also one endless level from the Japanese build that is missing, one about a weird Japanese standup comedy duo. These comedians are birds. One smacks the other in the face sometimes. I love that mini-game. It's been swapped out for Mr. Upbeat, one of the more boring endless mini-games from the GBA title. That is an undeniable downer, but it's still just one small missing thread in what is otherwise an excellently woven localization. Just as I still sing classic Sesame Street songs to myself when I'm in a particularly good mood, or as I can watch old Terry Gilliam animations whenever I need a quick smile-inducing experience, I think I'll be playing Rhythm Heaven Fever on a periodic basis for at least the next 30 years. Thirty bones is a steal for this level of high-quality fun. You'd have to be a completely foul-brained life hater to pass this one up. Rhythm Heaven Fever offers the simplicity and elegance of "One Note Samba" or "Blister in the Sun," the directness of the art of Mike Mignola or Pendleton Ward, and the understated but endlessly variable gameplay design of arcade titles like Pac-Man Champion Edition DX or Super Mario Bros. It's one of my favorite games of this generation -- a title that offers a much stronger education in game design and a more pure, direct, and genuine experience than most games on the market.
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What does it take for a game to be universally enjoyable? That's the question most game developers would love to be able to answer, but it's easier said than done. My guess is that it comes down to exploiting the medium for w...

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Rhythm Heaven Fever special edition unboxing


Feb 03
// Jonathan Holmes
Did you know that Rhythm Heaven Fever was getting a special edition? Neither did I. Then I got this box in the mail this morning. I'm pretty sure that this special edition won't be sold in stores, but if Nintendo decides to change its mind on that, they're sure to make a killing when the game hits stores on February 13th. Check out the video and you'll understand what I mean.
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Rhythm Heaven Fever launch event in LA at iam8bit


Feb 01
// Dale North
Nintendo will host a launch event in Los Angeles on Feb. 10, 6-10 p.m., for Rhythm Heaven Fever, and hands-on sessions and giveaways are planned for the event. They're teaming up with iam8bit and Giant Robot to throw a party ...

Preview: Rhythm Heaven Fever induces grooving

Jan 31 // Wesley Ruscher
Rhythm Heaven Fever (Wii)Developer: Nintendo, TNXPublisher: NintendoRelease: February 13, 2012 The idea behind Rhythm Heaven Fever is fairly straightforward: complete a visually off-the-wall music rhythm challenge with as few mistakes as possible. Each stage, for lack of a better term, contains its own unique look and musical style that is a cross between WarioWare, Inc. and PaRappa the Rapper. The game's presentation is quirky, but with its simple two-button controls -- no motion needed -- it's hard not to become quickly captivated by its charm. The first minigame I played was called Hole in One. Sports lovers and fans of The Lion King will easily be amused by this challenge that sees monkeys tossing, or in the case of the larger Rafiki-esque baboon, chucking golf balls at you. The goal of the stage is to hit each ball with perfect timing in order to achieve a hole-in-one. It's fairly basic at first, especially with the little monkey gently lobbing golf balls at you, since there are visual cues a player can look for if they just aren't feeling the beat. But for those who want to obtain the "Superb" ranking for the stage, reliance on visual cues will only get one so far. In my experience, I most successfully found the rhythm when I closed my eyes and listened to the music. Everybody processes sounds differently, and in the case of Hole in One, the visuals actually distracted me. In the game First Date, the player has to keep bouncing balls from intruding on a date at the park. Basketballs, soccer balls, and footballs -- each with their own bouncing beat -- are set to come crashing in and scare away two cute golfers on a date. As the balls bounce in, pressing the A button has the guy trying to impress his date by nonchalantly kicking away the balls while she stares at the furry little critters. There is a visual cue for the soccer ball and football -- when they reach the apex of the player's knee, quickly press A -- but for the basketball and its double beat bounce, well, it's all up to mastering the rhythm. Here, Rhythm Heaven Fever makes itself a rewarding experience. You really have to find the rhythm to be successful, but there are still tricks to follow in the game's clean Flash-like animations, so players don't get overly frustrated. Mastering each stage takes rhythmic skill, but having fun is easy for anyone who just wants to enjoy the eclectic and sugary visuals. For those who want to share the experience of becoming a rhythm master, Rhythm Heaven Fever offers a handful of cooperative games as well. From what I could tell, there are five games for friends to sink into. The first, of two, that I was able to take a stab at was Fork Lifter. The goal is to catch as much food that comes flying by, lightning-fast, as possible. It's a more frantic game than any other that I had played, but one that becomes easier once the flow is figured out. The other multiplayer game I tried was Micro-Row. This game was more musically inclined than the previous minigames I had played. Hitting the A button in time pushes tiny single-celled organisms around the environment in unison, like synchronized swimmers. As the song continues on, the level zooms farther out, making the reliance on actual rhythm more important than any visual sign a player may have been using. The look of Micro-Row was abstract yet accessible, and reminded me a lot of the underappreciated Electroplankton. Outside of the main game and multiplayer, bonus and endless games that are equally as challenging, if not more so, can be unlocked throughout the game. Toy Car (which is all about timing), Police Call, and Mr. Upbeat (a new addition for the game's North American release) are just a few of the extras to discover. Nintendo was pretty hush-hush on what most of the games are like, but from what I could tell, each looks to provide an extra distraction to help round out the overall package. With over 50 games plus a cavalcade of extras, there is definitely a welcome variety for fans of the series. While the majority of the Rhythm Heaven Fever is single-player, it lends itself extremely well to the party atmosphere. I only had a chance to play a small sample of the game, but its intoxicating Japanese style had me dancing and nodding my head to every song. Look for Rhythm Heaven Fever very soon, as it hits stores on February 13. Wubudubudubudubudub!
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We've all had a song -- sometimes one we don't even like -- stuck on repeat as we go through our daily routines. It can be agonizing at times, but there is a reason even the worst song becomes infused in the recesses of our s...

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Rhythm Heaven Fever's orgasmic wood people CONFIRMED


Jan 28
// Jonathan Holmes
Here's a compilation of some footage of Rhythm Heaven Fever, the English language version of Minna no Rhythm Tengoku. How do you think it sounds? Personally, I like the English voice work here, but I think I'll still prefer ...
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I'm obsessed: Rhythm Heaven Fever's ball kick love song


Jan 25
// Dale North
I love the Rhythm Heaven franchise and I'm frothing at the mouth in anticipation for upcoming Wii release Rhythm Heaven Fever. As a musician I am drawn to their mix of rhythm play and great music, and the silly visuals does ...
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Is this our first look at Rhythm Heaven Fever?


Jan 16
// Jonathan Holmes
I keep forgetting that Minna No Rhythm Tengoku (the Japanese Rhythm Heaven game on the Wii) and Rhythm Heaven Fever are technically two different titles. When it comes to gameplay, they're the same game, but when it comes to...

Destructoid's most wanted Wii / Wii U games of 2012

Jan 11 // Jonathan Holmes
Rhythm Heaven Fever (Wii) Developer: Nintendo SPD Group No. 1, TNXPublisher: NintendoRelease: February 13, 2012 Minna no Rhythm Tengoku (renamed Rhythm Heaven Fever for the US) was one of my favorite games of 2011; it's the only game of 2011 that I'm sure I'll be playing over and over for the rest of my life. I brought the game to several parties over the winter holidays, and despite the fact that I was playing to generally non-gamer crowds, the game still went over like gangbusters. It's instantly fun, endlessly replayable, and packed with content, and it plays upon gaming's greatest strength -- the ability to use controls, visuals, and sound to create a seamless bond between the player and the game. That's something that a lot of rhythm games do well, but I think Rhythm Heaven Fever does it better than almost all the rest. At its budget price, you would have to be a true hater of goodness and light to pass it up. If you think it looks too "weird" or "casual," do yourself a favor by ignoring your own perception and relinquishing your judgment to me. Buy this game as soon as you can. You won't regret it (unless they screw up the English localization again, in which case just import it). The Last Story (Wii) Developer: Mistwalker, AQ InteractivePublisher: NintendoRelease: February 24, 2012 (EU) Speaking of imports, I've already imported The Last Story, and I can say that it stands alongside Super Mario Galaxy and Skyward Sword as one of the best-looking, most painstakingly crafted games in the Wii's library. Sadly, my Japanese is crap, so I'll be importing this game from Europe or, hopefully, picking it up in the US later this year. I need to know what the hell is going on! Fans of Hironobu Sakaguchi's prior games (Final Fantasy I-IX, Lost Odyssey, etc.) or anyone who loves inventive third-person action-RPGs owes it to themselves to check this one out. It's not everyday that you get to witness one of the most influential developers in the history of the medium reinvent the genre that they helped create. Dragon Quest X (Wii, Wii U) Developer: Square Enix, Armor ProjectPublisher: Square EnixRelease: 2012 (Wii) / TBA (Wii U) We still don't know a ton about Dragon Quest X other than the fact that Square Enix has been working on it forever, as well as how it aims to combine the strengths of MMOs with the traditional single-player RPG experience for something that will please both audiences. The game is about one of two twins who is magically transformed into one of the game's other races, sort of like the Melvin Van Peebles classic Watermelon Man, only less racist. That's all well and good, but what I really want out of Dragon Quest X is the opportunity to explore a huge, Akira Toriyama-created world alone or with friends, experiencing all its fine details and, in doing so, creating my own story.  Honorable Mentions: Kiki Trick, Pandora's Tower, Retro City Rampage Xenoblade Chronicles (Wii) Developer: Monolith SoftPublisher: NintendoRelease: April 2012 See what happens when a company digs out its ears and listens to the fans? It was pretty much like pulling teeth with Nintendo, but now Xenoblade Chronicles is on its way to the US. Sure, I could have imported the European version, but having a cheaper option is always nice. I'm stoked, and I'm not even that big of an RPG guy! I've played several Final Fantasy titles, tried and failed to get into the Tales series, enjoyed Golden Sun, and dabbled lightly elsewhere. Still, all the positive word of mouth from our friends across the Atlantic is making it really hard to not get overly excited. La-Mulana (WiiWare) Developer: Nigoro, NicalisPublisher: NicalisRelease: 2012 Speaking of games that have been out in Japan forever, here's indie platformer La-Mulana. The game is finished, having gone through some last-minute bug fixes following the Japanese release, and now is waiting on Nintendo of America to give the go-ahead. Who knows how long that will take. There is non-console port on the way (PC, though a likely platform, isn't actually specified), and it would be a laugh riot if it came out before the WiiWare version. It's no secret that my poison of choice is a nice, juicy 2D platformer with wonderful pixel art and a hefty amount of challenge. A game that tosses Castlevania, Metroid, and Indiana Jones into a blender and hits "frappé"? Obviously, it's going to be a winner. If you want to play the game right now, the original has been available online for free since 2005. However, as with Cave Story, I'm curious as to the extent of the changes and upgrades in the remake. Retro City Rampage (WiiWare, Xbox Live Arcade) Developer: Vblank EntertainmentPublisher: Vblank EntertainmentRelease: 2012 I feel bad for Vblank's Brian Provinciano. I like to joke about Retro City Rampage's lengthy development, and I enjoy hitting Brian up on Facebook with such constructive comments as, "What are you doing right now? BREATHING!? When you should be WORKING!?" In all honesty, I don't envy his situation. The game has been in the works for nearly a decade, back when it was known as Grand Theftendo. Since then, Brian has had to jump through so many hoops just to see his baby through. Next time I see the man, I have to treat him to a steak dinner or at least some froyo. At one point, Retro City Rampage was a Grand Theft Auto parody. I don't know what it is anymore -- it defies classification. It's a love letter to 80s, an homage to videogames throughout the ages, and the debut of many Destructoid editors as game characters. You ask Brian to include something in the game, and the guy will probably find a way to squeeze in that reference. If nothing else, Retro City Rampage is going to be huge. Honorable Mentions: Rhythm Heaven Fever, The Last Story, Pandora's Tower, Rodea the Sky Soldier As for the Wii U, no real exclusives have been firmly announced for the thing yet, though we'll be keeping a close eye for more news on Pikmin 3, Smash Bros. Wii U / 3DS, and Miyamoto's new secret project. Then there is the promise of an enhanced Wii U version of Dragon Quest X, Batman: Arkham City, Darksiders II, Aliens: Colonial Marines, and many others. I'd also be highly surprised if we didn't get a compilation of some of the Wii U "experiences" that were on display at E3 2010. I'd love to see that Metroid-themed multiplayer shooter, Mario-themed hide-and-seek, Rhyhm Heaven-style pirate game, and (Shannon's favorite!) Measure Up, all crammed into one Wii Sports-style, minigame collection pack-in. Then there is No More Heroes 3, which Suda51 told me TO MY FACE is still headed to the Wii U. So while there is still a lot left to see confirmed, there is plenty to be excited about in 2012 for the wacky, wonderful world of Wii U.   Additional staff picks for the Wii / Wii U: Chad Concelmo: Rhythm Heaven Fever, Pikmin 3 Sean Daisy: LEGO Batman 2: DC Super Heroes, Dragon Quest X, Darksiders IIAndrew Kauz: Dragon Quest X, Xenoblade ChroniclesTara Long: Retro City RampageKyle MacGregor: Retro City Rampage, Rhythm Heaven Fever, The Last StoryAllistair Pinsof: Xenoblade ChroniclesMax Scoville: Actual Wii U games that aren't tech demos about birds and cherry blossoms Josh Tolentino: Xenoblade Chronicles, The Last Story 
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There were a few excellent third-party releases on the Wii in 2011 (Bit.Trip Complete immediately comes to mind), but for the most part, last year marked the end of an era for the console. The Wii didn't even get th...

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My Little Pony and Gabe Newell get Rhythm Heaven Fever


Dec 17
// Jonathan Holmes
Rhythm Heaven Fever continues to spread, and has now overtaken Valve's Gabe Newell, the King of Hyrule from the Zelda CDi games, and Applebooty Sugarbottom (or whatever her name is) from My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic.&...
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Team Fortress 2 and Camacho get Rhythm Heaven Fever


Dec 03
// Jonathan Holmes
As much as I'm looking forward to picking Xenoblade (again), it doesn't hold a candle to my most anticipated Wii game of 2012; Rhythm Heaven Fever. Like Xenoblade, this is a game that I've already imported, but I s...
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The DTOID Show: Infinity Blade 2 & Dragon Age Multiplayer


Nov 30
// Max Scoville
Hey guys! I'm BACK! And I still sound sort of funny.  On today's very special Destructoid Show, we address the rumors foating around about EA's new stuff, such as Frostbite 2 powered Dragon Age multiplayer, with playable...
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Rhythm Heaven Fever infects North America February 2012


Nov 29
// Kyle MacGregor
Friends, we've weathered hard times these past months. Nintendo faithful across the land have endured quite the drought. So few compelling titles may have tested the resolve of less devout fans, but not us. No, we patiently w...
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Someone put me in the best video ever made


Nov 14
// Jonathan Holmes
Sometimes I really want to pack it all up and quit while I'm ahead.  That's how I felt when I first heard that I'll have a bit part in the upcoming XBLA/PC/WiiWare title Retro City Rampage. I wasn't sure it could get an...
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The best video ever made


Nov 08
// Jonathan Holmes
Sometimes people ask me why I like Rhythm Heaven Fever so much. It's a hard thing to explain. Like with so many rhythm-action games, you really need to play it to understand why its great.  Nest time the topic comes up,...
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Rhythm Heaven Wii is now Rhythm Heaven Fever


Oct 30
// Jonathan Holmes
In Japan, the latest Rhythm Heaven game is called Minna No Rhythm Tengoku, which roughly translates to Everybody's Rhythm Heaven. It looks like Nintendo of America is going with a different direction for the game's Western lo...
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Spoilers: Rhythm Heaven Wii's biggest secrets unlocked


Aug 21
// Jonathan Holmes
I've been working on a import review of Minna no Rhythm Tengoku (known as Rhythm Heaven Wii in the U.S.) for almost a month now. Problem is, I just don't have the skills to unlock everything in the game. Though it has incred...
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Oil up: Rhythm Heaven Wii gets a 4 disc soundtrack


Jul 31
// Jonathan Holmes
[Image from Nintendo Japan's official Minna No Rhythm Heaven wallpapers] Since receiving my import copy of Rhythm Heaven Wii last week, a day hasn't gone by by when I haven't gushed about how awesome its monkeys are (usually...

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