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Resistance

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Resistance

This is your last weekend to play the Resistance trilogy online


Trophy completionists, be warned
Apr 04
// Jordan Devore
I vaguely recall Sony announcing that it would pull its servers for the Resistance trilogy on PlayStation 3 this year and it's happening soon. Real soon. Consider this your last chance to play those games online (including co...
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Online features for GT5, Resistance games being dropped


Too bad, so sad
Dec 27
// Harry Monogenis
Come 2014, Sony will be discontinuing online support for Gran Turismo 5, Resistance: Fall of Man, Resistance 2 and Resistance 3. Yes, that means that you'll no longer be able to play these games online; Sony is essential...
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Resistance

Why Insomniac decided against making Resistance 4


'[It] wasn't going to be the right game for us at that time,' says CEO
May 17
// Jordan Devore
Although Insomniac Games finished its work on the Resistance series with Resistance 3, that didn't stop Burning Skies from happening, unfortunately. It's possible (plausible, even) that another studio will take on the franchi...
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Resistance Collection will be available early next month


Includes three games and downloadable content
Nov 20
// Jordan Devore
Previously targeting a vague winter release, the Resistance Collection has now honed in on December 5, 2012 for its debut at retail. The $39.99, three-disc compilation comes with the PlayStation 3 trilogy plus downloadable co...
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Miss out on Resistance? PlayStation 3 collection incoming


Oct 04
// Jordan Devore
As detailed on the PlayStation Blog, the Resistance Collection will combine all three of Insomniac's PlayStation 3 titles in one box when it releases later this winter for $39.99. Beyond the core games themselves, the Afterma...
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Sony has 'no definitive plans' for Resistance franchise


Jun 26
// Dale North
Like Resistance? I do, though it was never that big blockbuster franchise that I think Sony wanted it to be. It did well enough for them, and most of the games (not Resistance 2 or the Vita title) were pretty good. That said,...

Review: Resistance: Burning Skies

May 28 // Jim Sterling
Resistance: Burning Skies (PlayStation Vita)Developer: Nihilistic SoftwarePublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: May 29, 2012MSRP: $39.99 Set in 1951, Burning Skies takes us to the Chimera's initial invasion of North America, as firefighter Tom Riley finds himself caught in the vanguard of the twisted mutant menace. Armed with a sturdy axe and whatever firearms he can find, Riley's only concern is reuniting with his wife and child, who went missing during the early civilian evacuations.  The game's poor story, interspersed as it is with vapid attempts at emotional depth, is indicative of what Burning Skies is -- little more than a poor reflection of the original console trilogy, a cheap copy that, had it not been officially licensed by Sony, could be mistaken for some illegal, plagiarizing, knock-off. As Riley fights through five short levels, players will find little more than dull, slow-paced shootouts against small collections of enemies through a range of pointless corridors, utilizing a bland cover system that the opposition will mostly ignore.  Most of the fighting isn't exactly terrible, it's just mediocre and predictable. Every battle feels slow and restricted, as a small number of Chimera regularly show up to shoot and die with little fanfare. Thanks to a scarcity of action onscreen, things feel lackluster and uninspiring, a far cry from the atmospheric and chaotic struggles seen in the highly enjoyable Resistance 3. Much of Burning Skies' campaign simply goes through the motions, providing absolutely nothing we didn't see in the genre years ago while adding none of the thrills and excitement we're used to seeing in many modern titles. In many ways, it feels like quite an old shooter from generations past, but not one of the lasting classics.  [embed]227980:43765[/embed] Touch controls have been forced in wherever possible, but unlike Unit 13's smart use of the screens, Burning Skies doesn't take player comfort into account. Opening doors requires touching a small icon in the center of the screen, while the alternative fire modes for every weapon need enemies to be individually prodded or gun bodies to be slid across, even in the middle of a fight that would require hands to be on the real controls. Being able to touch the grenade  and melee icons at the side of the screen is a smart move, as these virtual buttons are conveniently placed and open up the control scheme, but everything else feels contrived, and included at the expense of usability.  Things get worse toward the end, where it begins to look like the developers just stopped caring. The closing sections are happy to just keep throwing the player into big rooms without cover and spawning larger numbers of Chimera in a rather embarrassing attempt to manufacture a sense of challenge. The last level in particular straddles the line between exasperating and tiresome, culminating in one of the most insipid and pointless boss encounters I've witnessed in quite some time. Game design doesn't get more basic and uninspiring than Burning Skies.  The disappointing campaign could be forgiven if the multiplayer was any good, but once again, it feels like a lifeless shadow of its console brethren. The basics are in place -- three game modes (deathmatch, team deathmatch, and infection), with up to three customizable loadouts and a compulsory experience system -- but basics are where the game begins and ends. Once you get into a match, you're forced to fight in confined, visually unstimulating, ill designed maps, where no care was taken into setting sensible spawn points or providing anything other than a series of rooms in which bored people can shoot at each other.  The online experience is laggy, with a framerate that makes everything feel like it's in slow motion, and scoreboards don't work properly (in one match, the enemy team kept showing up as having zero points, when in fact it was winning). I once died thrice in a row, collapsing dead to the ground as soon as I spawned, with the same player shown as having killed me and no indication as to how. Another time, players were frozen in place, and there have already been problems with people getting booted out of a session.  As far as presentation goes, in both the campaign and multiplayer, Resistance: Burning Skies feels unfinished. Severely unfinished. Don't believe the screenshots attached to this review -- this is an ugly game, and it doesn't look anywhere near as good as several of the Vita's launch titles (tellingly, this game blocks the Vita's screen capture software). Environment textures and features on NPCs are bland, flat, and lacking in color. The only modicum of effort seems to have been put into the guns, which look relatively nice, and there's a pleasant bit of lighting here and there, but the Chimera lack much in the way of detail and human faces are creepily devoid of texture, making them look rubbery and nightmarish. Compared to a game like Uncharted: Golden Abyss, the graphics found here are despicable and embarrassing.  Even worse are those moments where it's just obvious that a feature was left blatantly incomplete. From the mouths of NPCs not moving to environments displaying hideous artifacts along edges and corners, there's a lot missing in Burning Skies that you usually only see left out of obscure budget games. You can sprint, but after a while Riley will stop dead in his tracks. He won't return to a walking pace, he won't slow down before needing a breather, he will literally just stop dead in his tracks and you'll have to take your finger off the stick in order to move him again, since absolutely nothing was added to portray a loss of stamina.  In multiplayer, there is no animation or sound effect for melee kills. If you're killed by a melee attack, you'll abruptly die in silence, and it actually took me a few deaths to work out why I kept falling over for no reason. When enemies die, their frozen corpses will slowly glide along the floor before suddenly and sharply disappearing. Cutscenes play at the start of every level and cannot be skipped, even if you're replaying a stage or loading from a checkpoint halfway through, and they're compressed to a disgusting degree. In short, the whole thing feels like some sort of pre-alpha build mistakenly released as a real game.  Resistance: Burning Skies may hope that its flaws are overlooked due to the novelty of being the Vita's first FPS, but even with nothing on the system to directly compare it to, any fool could see just how pathetic this game is. The best that can be said is that the shooting itself is fairly competent. It works. However, it works in a pedestrian and insignificant little game that seems as if it was desperately rushed in order to meet a deadline.  If, like me, you've been waiting to see how a first-person shooter feels on the Vita, then I can say that this game proves the potential of the genre. However, if you'd like your first Vita FPS to actually be good, then wait for something else, because Resistance: Burning Skies is far from acceptable. It is visually atrocious, interactively vapid and incomplete to a degree that a full retail price is an insult. It's tempting to buy this just to have something new on the system, but good things come to those that wait, and it's hard to imagine anything not being good compared to this mess. 
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For a long time, Sony has wanted to bring the console experience to handheld devices, and the PlayStation Vita represents its most successful attempt to date, armed as it is with impressive visual capabilities and a wealth of...

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Last week, I went out and shot some gross aliens in Resistance: Burning Skies, the first honest-to-goodness FPS to hit the Playstation Vita. While there, I spoke with Nihilistic Games' Charles Henden, who's a gameplay programmer on the multiplayer portion of the game. It certainly looks like a promising title, but you don't have to take my word for it -- go read Abel's preview too.

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Resistance Trilogy exposed by Amazon


Apr 25
// Jim Sterling
Amazon's French wing has spilled the beans on a new compilation coming from the Sony camp, Resistance Trilogy. It'll collect Insomniac's three PS3 shooters -- Resistance: Fall of Man, Resistance 2 and Resistance 3 -- in one s...

Resistance: Burning Skies is ready to set the Vita ablaze

Apr 23 // Abel Girmay
Resistance: Burning Skies (PlayStation Vita)Developer: Nihilistic SoftwarePublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentRelease: May 29, 2012 Burning Skies puts players in the boots of Tom Riley, a firefighter on a mission to protect his wife and daughter during the Chimeran invasion. Taking place between Fall of Man and Resistance 2, Burning Skies' story is set during the first three days of the Chimeran blitz. Although Europe has all but fallen, until the Chimera show up, America is still living in its Norman Rockwell ideal. Whereas past games in the series have always placed players in the thick of the conflict, Burning Skies aims to lead players through the transition of day-to-day 1950s America to the war-torn hell hole it becomes as the Chimera bum rush the Eastern seaboard. With their big push, the Chimera bring along a few new enemy types. There weren't a whole lot of new enemies shown in this demo, but there will be new breeds of Chimeran infantry and boss monsters mixed in with the series' mainstays. In my time with the game, I was reacquainted with old friends like the Executioner, LongLegs, and the good old Hybrid. Joining the series is the Impaler, a melee-focused enemy who loves to rush and, as the name implies, impale people. The dreary setup is in place, but Burning Skies couldn't be a Resistance game without some crazy weapons. All the tried-and-true classics are back such as the Auger, the Bullseye, and the Carbine, but a few new toys enter the fray. The standout new weapon I saw was a shotgun/crossbow hybrid called the Mule. A beast at close and medium range, this two-shot double-barrel weapon lays out any enemy like a good shotgun should. Its secondary function shoots explosive crossbow bolts over long and medium ranges. Apart from being incredibly fun to use, the Mule also shows off the design philosophy behind the new human weapons. [embed]226263:43480[/embed] Speaking with Nihilistic's Robert Huebner, the Mule and other weapons were "meant to have this home brew feel to them." Acquired early in the game, you get the Mule from a bartender who's just attached a crossbow to a shotgun so he could protect his home and business. It's these smaller details that go to sell the desperation of the people you encounter during the story. Not be outdone by the opposition, the Chimera bring some new guns as well. The one we got our hands on was the Sixeye, a burst-fire sniper rifle that shoots remote charges as its secondary function. Setting and detonating the charges both use the Vita's touch screen, as do all the secondary fires. To make up for the fewer buttons on the Vita versus a PS3 controller, Nihilistic has mapped a great deal of Burning Skies' controls to the touch screen and back pad. To put up an Auger shield, for instance, you place your thumbs on the center of the screen and swipe them away from each other. Or if you want to tag a target with the Bullseye, just tap on screen which target you want marked. Melee and grenades both have their own onscreen icons that you tap to use, and sprinting is done by tapping on the rear pad. As you can see, there is a ton of functionality tied to the touch controls. Thankfully, it all works well. While there is some initial awkwardness to overcome, once you get accustomed to the controls everything works incredibly smoothly. In fact, it's because there is so much touch functionality that it all works so well. Constantly having to use it for even the most basic mechanics makes it feel all the more normal. All told, the single-player looks to be in great shape, but what about the multiplayer? In a word, slim. Burning Skies will ship with a decent six maps, but will only come with three modes -- two of them being Deathmatch and Team Deathmatch -- with support for up to eight players over a Wi-Fi (no ad hoc support) connection. In our demo, we got a look at two of the game's six maps, playing Deathmatch and Survival mode. Deathmatch in Burning Skies is as straightforward as you would imagine. It's a free-for-all race to the top as you try to get the most kills before everyone else. Survival mode pits two Chimeran players against six human players to see how many members of the latter group can survive before time is up. Every kill that a Chimeran player gets infects the human and respawns them as another Chimera. It's a fun diversion, but like similar modes (such as Halo's Living Dead), it's over quickly. The meat of the multiplayer, then, is in its leveling system. It works pretty much how you would expect: you earn XP for completing challenges, getting kills, assists, ending another player's kill streak (which is even called buzz kill), etc. You unlock new weapons and upgrades (essentially perks) to improve your weapons until you hit the level cap of 40. One cool feature is Burning Skies' Infection system. As you play games, you can get get XP boosts, called infections, from other players. The way the boosts works is that you get a set multiplier for a predetermined amount of time. Values of infections range from getting 1.5x more XP for a few games, to getting a 10x boost for a whole weekend. It's a rather ingenious incentive to keep people playing. You can also pass infections to other players either in-game or with the Vita's Near functionality. Depending on how long the community lasts -- and with so many ways to spread them -- infections could travel far, like herpes. Unlike herpes, though, you can choose which infections to keep and which to throw away, ensuring you can discard lower-level infections in favor of higher ones. With about a month until release, Resistance: Burning Skies looks to be in good shape to set the Vita ablaze. The multiplayer can feel anemic, especially when it comes to modes, but what's been shown of the single-player has been simply awesome. Whether you love first-person shooters or not, Burning Skies is one title any Vita owner cannot afford to let slip under their radar.
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With a relatively thin PlayStation 3 launch line-up, Resistance: Fall of Man was a saving grace for early adopters. Almost six years later, the Resistance franchise has gone on to be a critical mainstay for Sony's systems. Wi...

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Resistance: Burning Skies trailer showcases multiplayer


Apr 13
// Jim Sterling
I am hugely looking forward to Resistance: Burning Skies. I'm eager to see just how good a first-person shooter feels on the PlayStation Vita, and Resistance is a good a series as any to take the first step.  The above ...
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Resistance: Burning Skies is coming to Vita in May


Feb 13
// Jordan Devore
I don't think we've had quite enough PlayStation Vita-related posts up on the site today, so here's one more: Resistance: Burning Skies has been given a release date of May 29, 2012. This sticks out in my mind as one of the e...
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The DTOID Show: Wii-U madness and Pokémon Photoshops


Jan 27
// Tara Long
Happy Friday, everyone! Hopefully you all tuned into our live show today and won an XBLA code for the latest Orcs Must Die! DLC, but if not, don't worry! There will be plenty more giveaways in the near future - and that's a ...
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Insomniac: 'We won't be making any more Resistances'


Jan 26
// Dale North
Damn, son. Just put it all out there. Insomniac CES Ted Price told VG247 how it would be from here on out, in the most direct way possible: "We won’t be making any more Resistances." Resistance 3 was easily the best of ...
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Black Friday: Target has some great deals


Nov 19
// Brett Zeidler
We are now officially less than a week away from the post-Turkey Day madness. If you're set on stopping by either Walmart or Best Buy I can't blame you for that. Here's why you should still give Target a chance though: $139....
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Best Buy: Buy two select PS3 collections, save $20


Sep 26
// Brett Zeidler
Ever wanted to check out the Uncharted, Resistance or God of War series and are picking up the ICO and Shadow of the Colossus Collection tomorrow anyway? Well, this is a better time than any because if you stop into Best Buy ...
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The DTOID Show: Diablo III beta playthrough!


Sep 23
// Tara Long
Okay, maybe not an entire playthrough - but hey, it's a guaranteed ten minutes! If you've been curious how the Diablo 3 beta is stacking up, Max led us through the first ten minutes of it today while I had a discus...

Review: Resistance 3

Sep 22 // Jim Sterling
Resistance 3 (PlayStation 3)Developer: Insomniac GamesPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: September 6, 2011MSRP: $59.99 Resistance 3 plants us in the United States, with the Chimera still firmly in control of Earth. Joseph Capelli, the man responsible for killing former protagonist Nathan Hale, has been dishonorably discharged from the Army and is hiding with a group of survivors in Haven, Oklahoma. Naturally, his eked-out existence doesn't last forever, and the revelation that Chimeran forces are freezing the planet prompts him to head to New York to try to save humanity from a fatal winter.  With Resistance 3's campaign, one gets the sense that Insomniac has finally brought its "A" game to the series. Taking place across twenty chapters that will take around eight hours to complete, Resistance 3 starts solid and gradually ramps up the vivacity to tell a story that consistently improves as it progresses. Its range of set-pieces, variety of levels, and sometimes-overbearing intensity of combat makes for a game that feels so much more involving than past Resistance titles, with a fluid progression that feels natural and well-paced, as opposed to sluggish and monotonous. Fans of the first game will be thrilled to note the welcome return of features nixed in Resistance 2. For a start, regenerating health is out of the door and persistent damage is back. Those used to modern shooters will find the reliance on health packs quite jarring, but Insomniac has done a great job of providing just enough pickups to get the job done, but nowhere near enough for it to feel easy. Also returning is the weapon wheel, with over eight firearms to collect and keep at the ready. Familiar guns such as the target-tracking Bullseye and explosive Magnum are joined by new armaments, and each can be upgraded twice to gain new useful abilities.  Of the new weapons, the Mutator easily takes center stage. After charging up a shot, it can be fired at a regular enemy to rapidly mutate its body, turning it into a pulsing mound of warped flesh that can be shot and exploded. It can also fire a hanging fog that transforms a group of foes, and may be upgraded to turn mutants into puppets that seek out uninfected enemies and pass on their condition. In terms of sheer sadistic entertainment, the Mutator is an utter joy, allowing one to revel in malevolent glee as the victim screams in terror and begins to bubble with pustules. It's a work of art. One thing that truly stands out with Resistance 3 is just how atmospheric it is. There are moments where it feels like a horror game, as players explore abandoned towns or take haunting boat rides in levels that remind one of the famed "Ravenholm" section of Half-Life 2. As zombie-like Grims and exploding Leeches stalk the player, their soggy footsteps growing closer, Insomniac has a very good chance of scaring the pants off its audience. Even during the action-heavy sequences, there's a foreboding, bleak moodiness running throughout. For fear of spoilers, I won't go into the prison-based chapter, but I'll say it provides the exact moment where Insomniac's narrative goes from enjoyable to enthralling.  With beautiful graphics and accomplished sound that provides excellent player feedback in terms of when enemies are defeated and where attacks are coming from, Resistance 3 is a sleek and sexy affair. Unfortunately, the otherwise high production values are marred by notable glitches. On multiple occasions, I had to restart checkpoints due to events failing to trigger and trapping me in an area. The sound can also falter on occasion, suddenly growing silent or falling out of sync with the visuals to a noticeable degree. While none of these errors truly ruin the overall experience, they are definitely annoying, and frequent enough to hinder what is normally well-crafted gameplay.  The game can be played cooperatively, either via split-screen or online with a friend. Drop-in/drop-out cooperative play is not featured, however, which is a real negative for games these days. Having to invite friends, rather than leaving my game open for randoms, is a needlessly old-fashioned and convoluted way of doing things. There is also PlayStation Move support, which works quite well, save for the garishly huge targeting reticule that it uses. As always, motion control makes it far easier to hit targets, at the cost of feeling more awkward to use. A patch is coming that lets players move the screen while using a gun's sights, which it currently does not. Naturally, multiplayer is a big part of the experience, with 16-player matches taking place across a range of familiar gametypes. Standard deathmatches, capture-and-hold, and attack/defense modes are all in place, and while the PvP combat isn't exactly innovative or spectacular, it's plenty of fun. The true joy of Resistance 3's multiplayer is that every player is overpowered to some degree. The ostentatious weapons and immensely useful special abilities make each character, no matter how long they've been playing, a formidable opponent. Even a starting player with a bargain-basement loadout has the tools to make some noise.  Players unlock pre-packaged loadouts as they earn experience points, but also gain Skill Points with rank increases. These points can be used to unlock weapons and powers for custom loadouts, allowing players to tailor a character to their play style. Whether they want to heal allies, spot and mark enemies, cloak their bodies or throw up shields, there's a range of powerful abilities that can create some unique players. Oh, and you can fill your body with parasites that burst out to attack opponents upon death. Naturally.  I really dig Resistance 3's online mode, and its commitment to chaotic gameplay and overpowering weaponry adds a level of involvement that many online shooters have started to lack. Unfortunately, Resistance 3 uses an online pass that cannot even be redeemed in-game, and I find that particularly obnoxious. As far as I'm concerned, Sony's first-party titles have no business partaking in the online pass parasite party as long as Sony cannot make its PSN functions more integrated and fluid. Resistance 3 forced me to exit to the XMB once I beat the campaign and wanted to try the multiplayer -- I had to enter the PlayStation Store, redeem my code, download and install the add-on, and then fire up the game again. Furthermore, Resistance 3 takes over forty-five minutes to get started, requiring two lengthy mandatory updates and then a forced installation before players are even allowed to see the menu. Considering that glitches and loading times are still apparent in the game, I see no excuse for this. It definitely provided a detriment to the overall experience and caused harm to a game that is beautifully put together -- once the walls that Sony erected around it are broken down.  The real question is this -- is Resistance 3 good enough to be worth the hassle? To that question, I would say yes. However, that doesn't mean the game should get off scot-free. Having slogged through so many barriers to get into the game, it was definitely a fun ride, but a ride that was paid for not only with money, but frustration. Adding bugs into the mix certainly degrades the overall entertainment value.  What should be hailed as a masterpiece is therefore recommended as very, very good. That is, however, a positive thing and should be taken as evidence that the game is truly excellent enough at its core to be worth the hassle. It is confounding, as my instinct is to harshly punish a game that is full of such enormous corporate-flavored problems, but it would be wrong of me to do so while ignoring what an august product lies within.  Resistance 3 is held back by issues that lie with both the developer and publisher, but when the problems are weighed against the triumphs, Insomniac's latest comes away with a net win. Its campaign is a thrill ride of rollercoaster-like set-pieces, huge boss battles, and consistently fast-paced action, and its multiplayer is a solid, enjoyable, anarchic complement. If you own a PS3 and you love first-person shooters, you would do well to add this one to your collection. Review Score: 8.0 -- Great!
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Resistance has always been a bit of a strange series for the PlayStation 3. As an exclusive, it's always enjoyed added exposure and attention from press, but divisive opinions on its quality and the dated nature of its gamepl...

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Resistance 3 'Survival' DLC coming October 3


Sep 06
// Nick Chester
Resistance 3 hits PlayStation 3 today, and Sony's already on top of announcing the first DLC for Insomniac's first-person shooter. The "Survival" pack will be hitting the PlayStation Store on October 4, and will be bringing a...
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Freddie Wong's PS3 really DOES do everything!


Sep 04
// Tony Ponce
Freddie Wong, special effects guru and maestro of magic and sunshine, has modified his PS3 to enable real 3D gaming. Equipped with a PlayStation Move inserted in a Sharp Shooter controller shell, Freddie takes to the streets...

Resistance: Burning Skies PAX impressions

Aug 26 // Wesley Ruscher
The bulk of the demo mainly showcased the game's use of the Vita’s power -- both visually and technically -- but fans of the console games will feel right at home with this new entry in the series. The traditional dual-stick shooter set up is in use; the triggers zoom and shoot, and the face buttons handle things from weapon switching, jumping, and crouching. While the Vita may lack the extra buttons a DualShock has, it more than makes up for it with its touch-screen controls. An axe icon is always on the screen in the lower left hand corner which allows for instant melee attacks with a quick tap. The fact that it is so close to the buttons as well makes it far from cumbersome to use. My only gripe really with the playability of the demo on hand was currently there was no way to sprint. Hopefully this gets worked out as the game is still far off, but since the analog sticks on the Vita don’t double as buttons this does pose a small design threat. Where the Vita’s design shines in Burning Skies is in its use of touch during combat. Resistance’s guns have always been about their awesome secondary fire modes and the Vita’s touch makes them even sweeter. The Bullseye gun in the demo was the only gun which showed off the touch control, but the experience was fun nonetheless. Swiping a finger over a group of enemies highlights them and tapping fire unleashes the furry of the Bullseye’s homing shot. While using this function does take your hands off a stick, the accuracy, quickness, and added level of interactivity of this feature made the action feel even more personal. Resistance: Burning Skies looked and played fantastic and the added interactivity of the Vita’s touch screen only further enhanced the experience, while not feeling tacked on. The game is still pretty far off -- as no date was given -- but from what was playable at PAX, it’s shaping up to be another stellar installment for the FPS franchise.
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Playable for the first time in the good old U.S. of A, Resistance: Burning Skies brings the much-loved Insomniac shooter to Sony’s sexy little Vita. Developed by Nihilistic, Burning Skies is a brand new game in the seri...

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These Resistance 3 shots have a distinct lack of monsters


Aug 18
// Jim Sterling
When I get given Resistance 3 shots, I want only one thing -- pictures of really gross Chimera, so I can look at them and say, "Eeww, those Chimera are really gross!"  Unfortunately, somebody at Sony felt we needed to lo...
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Resistance: Burning Skies screens emerge out of gamescom


Aug 18
// Nick Chester
At its gamescom press conference, Sony showed off the Nihilistic-developed Resistance: Burning Skies for PlayStation Vita for the first time. The demo looked good, and if you're a fan of Insomniac's franchise, it seems like i...
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Resistance: Burning Skies announces for PS Vita


Aug 16
// Nick Chester
At its gamescom press conference today, Sony revealed the Nihlistic-developed PS Vita title, Resistance: Burning Skies. Built in conjunction with help from Insomniac Games, the developer is calling it a "no compromises first-...
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MotorStorm game replaces Resistance 3 in PS 3D TV bundle


Aug 05
// Dale North
Remember that PlayStation 3D display that was announced during Sony's press conference at E3 this year? They told us that the 24", $499 set bundle would come with a pair of 3D glasses, an HDMI cable, and a copy of Resistance ...
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Resistance 3: Gone gold, day one patch, comes with demos


Aug 04
// Dale North
Would you like some fresh cut demos with your alien invasion shooter sequel? Well, you're getting it, like it or not. Lots of demos and other content are packed into Resistance 3, which Insomniac says has just gone gold. That...
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Get your Resistance 3 beta codes right here!


Aug 01
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
[Update: Contest over! Check your PMs to see if you got a code!] The Resistance 3 beta has begun, for those of you that bought SOCOM 4 new or are a PlayStation Plus member that is. Lucky for you we have ten codes to give out ...
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Insomniac launches web-based Global Resistance game


Jul 25
// Nick Chester
Insomniac Games has launched a browser-based game called Global Resistance. The title will tie-in to the upcoming Resistance 3, giving players the opportunity to garner a number of in-game rewards. Global Resistance has playe...
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Resistance 3 beta starts first week of August


Jul 22
// Nick Chester
At San Diego Comic-Con this week, Insomniac Games has confirmed that the multiplayer beta for Resistance 3 will kick off during the first week of August. Yup, that's only two weeks away. The beta will feature two modes -- Tea...
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New Destructoid Episode: 3DS Netflix, Popcap, and Aliens!


Jul 13
// Max Scoville
Ahoy, all! Or something. I really am totally out of cute ways to introduce the show in these silly, silly posts I do. Video game news! [fart noise] First, PopCap Games has been acquired by EA, for MILLIONS of dollars. Or pos...

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