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Trials Fusion photo
Trials Fusion

This teenager is building a functional instance of Minecraft in Trials: Fusion


This is truly the opposite of ADD in action
Aug 23
// Brittany Vincent
A 16-year-old Trials: Fusion savant, PneumaticBog484, is building a functional version of Minecraft within RedLynx's racer. In the past PneumaticBog484 has also built both a procedurally-generated infinite track, and a Titan...
Trials DLC photo
Trials DLC

Ride hard and crash harder in the new Trials Fusion DLC


Looks like Tetanus City
Jul 29
// Brett Makedonski
RedLynx's Trials Fusion gets an injection of Borderlands flavor today, as the game's first add-on takes players to the outskirts of society where rogues reside in the wastelands. Titled Riders of the Rustlands, the...
Trials photo
Trials

Trials Fusion passes one million sales


The editor now supports Supercross tracks
Jul 24
// Jordan Devore
I liked Trials Fusion quite a bit, but I didn't stick with it for long. Been meaning to get back in there to see what the community of track creators has been up to -- impressive things, I'm sure. RedLynx released an update t...

Trials Fusion photo
Trials Fusion

Trials Fusion rides to the Rustlands on July 29


It's just one of six stops
Jul 02
// Brett Makedonski
Hey, you have that Trials Fusion season pass yet? It's your ticket to keep riding your cute little bike across absurdly dangerous locales. The first guided tour takes place later this month, and there may even be some mu...
Trials Fusion photo
Trials Fusion

Trials Fusion's first update makes it even more competitive


Friendships will be broken, maybe
Jun 18
// Brett Makedonski
Games in the Trials franchise have a way of bringing out the unbridled competitiveness in people. Knowing that you're just a tenth of a second off of a friend's score, you might play the same track over and over to make ...

Review: Trials Fusion

Apr 17 // Jordan Devore
Trials Fusion (PC, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360 [reviewed], Xbox One)Developer: RedLynx, UbisoftPublisher: UbisoftReleased: April 15, 2014 / April 24, 2014 (PC)MSRP: $19.99 / $39.99 physical release with Season Pass (Xbox One, PS4) To be clear, more of the same in Trials' case is by no means a bad thing. In fact, it's mostly what we want. The motorcycles you'll drive and hop across crazy puzzle-like environments feel as tight as ever, but if you hope to best the hellish post-credits Extreme levels, you'll need a mastery of the game's precision controls. And patience. That hasn't changed one bit. Getting up to that point -- the point at which Trials is at its absolute best, becoming less of a straightforward motorbike racing game and more of a methodical, notoriously difficult platformer -- will be a smooth ride for long-time players who have maintained most of their muscle memory from prior installments. As for newbies: godspeed. The difficulty and complexity of levels ramps up a bit slower than I would have liked as a returning player, but the bigger issue for me was that they feel less varied, less interesting than those featured in Trials Evolution. There's a lot of stuff going on in the background, some of it eye-catching, but the visual design this time around is a downgrade. It seems less inspired. [embed]273366:53453:0[/embed] Now, it's worth stressing that levels can be made significantly harder by going after new optional challenges. There are three per level and they range from "Always hold the gas pedal down and don't use the breaks" to "Don't lean, ever" to "Perform 10 flips without faulting." These objectives are tough even on the earliest of tracks and should help extend Fusion's replay value beyond the monstrous amount of time it will take to rack up Gold and eventually Platinum medals. Unfortunately, challenges are one of the few welcome additions to the tried-and-true Trials formula. Fusion places a heavy emphasis on a new futuristic setting which, in theory, could have worked okay. In reality, it just ends up feeling boring and, again, uninspired. While there are themed stages -- arctic, urban sprawl, and rainforest, to name a few -- even then you're still beaten over the head with the future theme. An attempt was made to weave a light story in by way of AI narration (again, "future!") but this dialogue adds little of value to the experience. Franky, I'd recommend turning it off -- lines annoyingly repeat if you restart at a checkpoint. Another seemingly big feature is the ability to perform tricks using the right analog stick. Once again, this concept really could have worked for Trials. Could have. There are specific levels built around the new FMX system in which you pull off insane moves while trying to keep a combo going for maximum high-score potential. Sadly, they're not challenging, rewarding, or even much fun. I can't quite put my finger on why, but performing tricks feels off, somehow -- especially compared to the precision found elsewhere in Trials. Thankfully, there are very few of these FMX levels so you'll burn through them quickly. I appreciate that RedLynx was trying something new here, but the effort falls short. Maybe next time around. Similarly, there's a new quad bike in certain levels that might sound like a potentially solid addition to Trials. It's all right. While it does have a different weight and feel compared to the other vehicles, it's not that different -- and the courses you'll use it on are more of the same. At this point, I'm starting to worry that it sounds like I dislike Fusion, when that's truly not the case -- it's just that most of what's brand new to this installment adds little to the terrific core gameplay foundation. But let me be clear: the core of the game is still terrific. The wacky Skill Games return, now one per each stage, and those serve as enjoyable distractions. There are tons of bizarre secrets to uncover, like a tennis minigame. (Seriously.) A new leveling system ties experience points to medals and challenges, allowing you to feel a further sense of progression and unlock new cosmetic items for your rider and bikes. Multiplayer also returns, albeit in a four-player, local-only capacity. And there's the hugely important level creator, which I've never been able to properly wrap my head around -- it's back, and since the Trials community has proven itself capable of making high-quality, even ingenious levels, it's fair to expect more of that in the coming months. I'd also expect RedLynx to be great about curating levels as it has been in the past. Trials Fusion is a good game -- and I can only see it getting better over time as user-made levels excel and DLC is released -- but what's there now, at launch, is a step down from Trials Evolution. It's disheartening, then, to see the game come in at a higher price point than its predecessor and also try to sell users on a $19.99 Season Pass in-game right out of the gate. Trials fans will want to play Fusion, that's a given -- but everyone else should wait.
Trials Fusion review photo
Losing speed
There's nothing quite like Trials and, after several games in the popular racing/platforming series, fans know what to expect from developer RedLynx: more of the same. Yes, there will be a stupid, amazing theme song you'll ha...

Trials photo
Trials

Trick-filled new trailer for Trials Fusion


Closed beta currently in operation
Mar 25
// Conrad Zimmerman
Ubisoft has released this new trailer for Trials Fusion, with a look at some of the flips, grabs and holds possible with the game's new FMX trick system. Trials may not have needed more ways to screw up a landing, but t...
Trials photo
Trials

Trials Frontier to arrive on iOS April 10


Free-to-crash
Mar 24
// Conrad Zimmerman
Trials Frontier, the first mobile version of RedLynx's acrobatic motorcycle series, now has a release date of April 10 for iOS devices. An Android launch of the free-to-play racing title will arrive at a later, as yet undisc...
Trials photo
Trials

Trials Fusion will be late on PC, but there's a beta soon


Included with pre-orders
Mar 20
// Jordan Devore
Originally slated for an April 16, 2014 launch across PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Xbox 360, and PC, Trials Fusion is now going to be a bit late on the latter platform. It's a Ubisoft game, after all. The new date for PC is April...
MotoHeroz photo
MotoHeroz

MotoHeroz races to Android, goes free-to-play on iOS


The little brother of Trials, on the go
Sep 25
// Darren Nakamura
Late in the Wii's life, Trials developer RedLynx released MotoHeroz on the console, which was similar to the legendary motorcycle platformer, but a bit simpler and more focused on party style multiplayer. The following year, ...
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Here's a better look at Trials Frontier


Trials for smartphones and tablets
Sep 10
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Trials Frontier was announced during Ubisoft's E3 press conference and here's our first real look at the game. Surprise, it looks like a Trials game. This one has a wild west setting thing going on, which is kind of funny gi...
Trials Evolution photo
Trials Evolution

This custom Trials Evolution track boggles the mind


Go home, Illusion 1800. You're drunk
May 20
// Darren Nakamura
When Trials Evolution released last year, I played around with the level editor enough to see huge potential in it and also to understand that I could never personally tap into that potential. Thankfully, there are people li...
Trials Evolution: Gold photo
Trials Evolution: Gold

Trials Evolution: Gold Edition finds home on PC in March


Series boasts 4M units sold
Jan 17
// Jordan Devore
RedLynx is finally returning to PC after a well-received stint on Xbox Live Arcade with Trials HD and Trials Evolution. On March 21, 2013, Trials Evolution: Gold Edition -- which includes all tracks from the prior title recr...
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Trials Evolution 'Riders of Doom' DLC drops soon


Travel to the Big Sand Lands this December
Dec 05
// Jordan Devore
RedLynx has another piece of downloadable content on the way for its rage-inducing Trials Evolution, and it's running with the whole "end of the world" theme. Priced at 400 Microsoft Points, Riders of Doom will further expan...
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Trials Evolution gets 36 more tracks in 'Origin of Pain'


Oct 05
// Jordan Devore
When downloadable content was announced for Trials Evolution, I got nervous. The last thing I want to do right now is go back to see how badly my times are performing on the leaderboards, especially knowing that there's noth...
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Trials Evolution sets new record for day-one XBLA sales


Apr 23
// Jordan Devore
The people at Ubisoft who made the decision to pick up Trials developer RedLynx probably had a pretty terrific weekend. It was recently revealed that Trials Evolution broke the record for "highest grossing day-one sales" amon...

Review: Trials Evolution

Apr 20 // Jordan Devore
Trials Evolution (Xbox Live Arcade)Developer: RedLynxPublisher: Microsoft StudiosRelease: April 18, 2012MSRP: 1200 Microsoft Points As much as I still love Trials HD, looking back at it now is rough. Trials Evolution makes its art style appear drab and unappealing and its scope entirely limited by comparison. For those reasons alone, I'd be quick to recommend that new players simply skip ahead to this game should they feel compelled to get into the series. Don't be turned off by the annoying intro song; it's the worst part, by far. The standard Trials formula, a mixture of delicate platforming and risk-reward racing, is left largely untouched. Similarly, the movement of your character is as sensitive as ever. I hesitate to comment too much about the controls because I'm not certain what behind-the-scenes tweaks were made, if any, but some of the more technical moves do seem noticeably easier to pull off. While that could just be my imagination, it was surprising how quickly I was able to get situated in Evolution having not touched Trials HD in quite some time. Simply put, the controls feel right. Those of you who never got accustomed to the physics are likely to face similar hurdles here. [embed]226171:43445:0[/embed] The most welcome change has got to be the levels themselves, both in terms of their look and layout. I won't go so far as to say every single course has a unique aesthetic or gameplay hook, but it's staggering how many absolutely do. Taking Trials outdoors was a wise decision indeed. One track captures the pure essence of Halloween, while another looks like it was ripped right out of Limbo. Beyond this diversity in styles, levels also -- for once -- feel alive. Thanks to smart camera placement and action which happens all around you, Evolution's courses never come across as static or uninteresting. I can't wait until everyone gets to play the Inception level. On the whole, pacing is excellent and much improved. Tracks are unlocked in groups; to get the next set, you'll need to acquire a certain amount of medals, with Gold being worth more than Silver and Bronze. They also have you play through a tutorial level every so often that includes explicit instructions on how to perform increasingly advanced moves (e.g., bunny hops and riding straight up steep slopes). Those worried about not having the skills necessary to unlock all of Evolution shouldn't be, necessarily. Don't get me wrong, the game does eventually get brutal, but the difficulty is spread out nicely. I'd wager most of you reading this will -- with a little persistence -- be able to earn access to all but the final set, which is made up of the sinister Extreme tracks. I let out many a naughty word in the process of getting to this final tier. Although mini-games are back, they're not exact duplicates of the ones found in Trials HD. A few examples include a Marble Madness-esque game and one in which you pilot a flying saucer. These are enjoyable enough during the first handful of attempts, but I think most of us will move on after we earn the obligatory Gold medal. Speaking of custom game types, there's a track available for download that is essentially a working shmup. Granted, it's not very fun, but the fact that it was built using Evolution's level editor -- which comes in a beginner and advanced version -- is crazy. Creative types will want to give this thing a serious look; all of the game's levels were made by RedLynx using these same tools. (Look over some of the studio's tutorial videos to see for yourself.) Of course, user-generated content would be meaningless if it was difficult to discover. Thankfully, accessing other players' creations is about as intuitive as it can be. I'm eager to see what the community comes up with in the long term, because designing courses is not one of my hidden talents. Though I previously referred to the new tracks as Evolution's big selling point, I know that some of you are more excited about the game's multiplayer component, and for good reason -- it's pretty neat, if a little basic. As great as it is to see friends' names zip around as you play through a level in single-player, going head to head against ghostly representations of fellow players in real time is a nice step up. The multiplayer also allows you to play with three competitors simultaneously on tracks that are more racing-oriented as opposed to ones filled with tons of puzzle-like obstacles. The beauty of this mode is that each player gets their own individual lane so there isn't that same disconnect found elsewhere in Trials. The game takes on a different (i.e., somehow more tense) vibe when you can't lazily rely on the reset button and other human beings are watching you. Right now, matchmaking seems to be on the slow and sometimes janky side. I've heard reports of other launch-week oddities but have not encountered any of those issues myself besides the occasional screen tearing and texture pop-in. Trials Evolution feels fresh and makes its predecessor look dated while simultaneously keeping the core gameplay the same. This type of skill-heavy experience will infuriate some people who struggle to pick up on its subtleties, but the end result of clearing a particularly challenging track is remarkably satisfying. Multiplayer is a fine addition, as is the new focus on providing genuinely creative, diverse level designs. Evolution is a must-buy for fans of Trials and it also serves as a terrific starting point for new players. It can, at times, be maddening beyond belief, but the payoff is so worth it.
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When I reviewed Trials HD back in 2009, I wasn't so sure the game would see the level of success I and other fans felt it deserved. Those concerns were ultimately unwarranted, as it now sits among the all-time best-selling ti...

Preview: Trials Evolution will ruin my life

Apr 15 // Darren Nakamura
Trials Evolution (Xbox Live Arcade)Developer: RedLynxPublisher: Microsoft StudiosReleases: April 18, 2012 For the uninitiated, Trials has a pretty simple premise. Players ride on motorcycles with the ability to accelerate, brake, and lean forward or backward. While it sounds shallow, it takes a good amount of practice to get a good feel for velocity and weight distribution, and it ends up being incredibly deep, largely due to varied level design. Therein is one of the biggest improvements in Evolution. Where Trials HD took place entirely inside of a drab warehouse, Evolution opens up to an impressive variety of environments. Players can race across dirt tracks, beaches, jungles, and of course, absurdly dangerous man-made constructions. While the diversity in environments doesn't have any groundbreaking impact on gameplay, it's refreshing to finally see the outside of the warehouse. The big gameplay addition to Trials Evolution is the inclusion of a four-player multiplayer mode. RedLynx has some experience with adding multiplayer into their signature platform-racing with MotoHeroz. The main difference between the multiplayer modes in Trials Evolution and MotoHeroz is that each player has his own lane in the former while every player shares the road in the latter. The result is a much more skill-based affair, which might not necessarily translate to great pick-up-and-play party gaming. Where MotoHeroz had rubber banding built into the courses, Trials Evolution keeps less skilled players on screen by spawning them at checkpoints should they crash or fall too far behind. A point penalty is given, but it introduces an element of strategy to the races. Racers can play it safe and drive slowly or be more reckless and hope for a first place finish. When racing against others, I found myself pushing my bike harder than I normally would so I could maintain a lead. As could be expected, this usually led to hilarious crashes. One last element of strategy added to the multiplayer is the ability to complete a track without a motorcycle. Bailing has always been an option in Trials, and it was used in some of the minigames in HD in order to get one final push for a high score. In Evolution's multiplayer, it is used to the same effect. Players can explode off their motorcycles for a high-speed push toward the checkered flag, but by doing so, they run the risk of falling short and not finishing the race at all. It almost becomes a tactical mind game, where each player wants to bail earlier than the others, but not so early that he kill his chances. The ragdoll physics make an opponent's body slumped just a few feet in front of the finish line even more satisfying. Included in Trials Evolution is a pretty robust looking level editor, so there will likely be an incredible amount of content to enjoy. There's really not much more to say about Trials Evolution. There will be new, presumably ridiculous minigames to play around with, but at its heart, this is more Trials. And for fans of the series, that's really all it needs to be. Trials Evolution releases this week on Xbox Live Arcade.
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Trials HD caught me completely by surprise. It released during Microsoft's Summer of Arcade promotion in 2009, and it took a distant third place among those games as far as my hype level goes. In fact, were it not for constan...

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Trials Evolution level editor has an intimidating trailer


Apr 12
// Conrad Zimmerman
I might need one of you to hold me for a while. I've just watched this latest trailer for Trials Evolution, demonstrating the game's level editor. The scope is staggering and I can't wait to see what skilled users wind up cr...

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