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Rage

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Rage iOS all kinds of free for about a week


Aug 18
// Nick Chester
Would you look at that: more than 100,000 people have "liked" Rage on Facebook, and id Software and Bethesda are making good on their word.Because of the love fans have shown, Rage for iOS is now completely free for a week. That's like a two dollar value or something! The game is okay, but when we're talking free it's totally awesome. So go get it while you have the chance!
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An evening with id Software at the Sydney Opera House


Aug 18
// David Rayfield
Unexpectedly, it seems the Sydney Opera House has become the place to be in Australia when it comes to videogames. RAGE creative director Tom Willits will be speaking at the venue on September 14 about the history o...

Interview: Talking Rage with Tim Willits

Aug 14 // Allistair Pinsof
What’s your current role on Rage? I’m the creative director. It’s very similar to what we did to Doom 3. Matt Hooper is the design director so I work with him. We basically built Doom 3 together -- remember it was only 33 people. That’s the great thing about id: it’s a small group of guys. Me and the other guys rolled right into Rage. I do a lot of similar things, but Matt does a lot of the heavy lifting. Much like Doom 3, one of the most impressive things about the game is the animation. Enemies have elaborate animations where they fall down and shoot you or jump from cover to cover -- can you explain how that came about? Where the game shines is in both our combat animations and AI system and how well they work together. When you were playing, you might have shot a guy and he grabs himself like this [Willits grabs chest] or you shoot them in the back and they do this [reaches for back], or you see them fall down. You think they are dead, but they slowly crawl to cover or shoot you from the ground. That’s awesome. It adds a whole layer to the system. Then all the characters you meet are keyframed which is amazing because keyframing is a lot of work these days. It adds over-the-top animation that draws a lot of character into those NPCs [non-playable characters]. So it’s a mix between great keyframing for our main characters and good AI and animation for the enemies. What was the thought process behind letting enemies jump from cover to cover, while the player cannot? We started with one cover system that was interactive. You went up there, hit a button and went into cover. Then you hit another button and got out of cover. That kind of slowed the game down. Then we added an automatic cover system where you would go to flagged points and you’d lock-in to cover, but it really slowed the pace. You can think about in your mind and go, “How is that going to really slow the pace down,” but we actually had it in and the pacing just didn’t feel right for us. So, we had two systems in that were fully functional and then poof. Gone! Same thing with getting into vehicles. You’d go up to your buggy and it’d trigger this animation where you climb in. It was really cool about the first three times you saw it, but then you just want to get in and go. So we got rid of that. Same thing with the Wing Stick; we originally had a complex animation for that but it slowed it down. It just wasn’t fast and responsive. That’s the great thing about id. We put stuff in, try it, test it out and if it doesn’t work -- great, we throw it out! One of the things that most impressed me about the time I spent with Rage was the cinematic score. What is the story behind that and who is the composer? Christian Antkow is our sound and music director and he works with a number of guys. What Christian did was he worked with the programmers to create multiple layers of music based on what you are doing. So, if the combat intensifies, the music intensifies. If you combat in vehicles, you hear the combat vehicle music. We don’t have a soundtrack that triggers based on maps or anything like that. We have context-aware music tracks. What are PC players going to get that they wouldn’t be able to do on a console? The great thing about Rage is that all the assets that the guys at id create are all the same, regardless of the platform you play on. But, on PC what you can do is crank up the resolution, anti-aliasing, and increase the texture bumpers to get higher-res textures farther out. Then, you can take your cores and apply them to to transcoding, so those textures come in fast. Then, after we ship, you can download the SDK, but you need to have 64-bit. You guys never built a full world like this before. The intro of Doom 3 had something going on, but not like this. Where did you start with Rage? Historically, our games start here and end here, but with Rage we wanted to setup a world where you can feel things happened before you got there and things will happen after you leave. We went as far as to do a three-part comic book series with Dark Horse. The book’s story takes place ten years before you even show up; it’s all about Elizabeth and Cavassier who you meet in the game. We also have the novelization of Rage, if you want to read more about the game’s backstory. It’s been a very conscious effort for us to make this world more than a single game experience, which really sets us up for anything we may want to do. Has Bethesda consulted id, while you guys were making this world? The great thing about the executive leadership at Zenimax and Bethesda is that they are letting us make this game. Todd Howard works a lot like we do. They said, 'You guys been making games for a long time -- keep doing that! We will support you, we will let you build the new Doom team and we’ll help sell the games. You guys just do what you do best.' So, it’s really worked out great. Do you see Rage being a game that people play at QuakeCon? The vehicle combat in multiplayer is quite fun. I like it a lot. So, hopefully we’ll see it being played. Is there any sort of fast travel you unlock in Rage? No, but if you are in the wasteland and your car gets stuck or destroyed you’ll have to call the tow truck.  But, it’s expensive. If you want to get back to the town faster you can call the tow truck but it ain’t cheap. What voice actors are involved in the game? John Goodman. He’s the first guy you meet and he’s perfect. If you can have one actor that is perfect for a post-apocalyptic world, of course you have to pick John Goodman.  He kind of looks a lot like Dan. There is some very good voice talent and a lot of guys we worked with in the past. We also have a lot of guys who had major roles in other games like Cain from Diablo, Drake from Uncharted -- it’s fun to play and go, “Hey, that’s Drake and that’s Cain!” Are there any missions or areas you can miss on your first playthrough? Yes, sewers are definitely one of them. I bet you missed them when you played them. I bet you drove past all three [He’s right!] That’s three levels you missed and then there are the post-it jobs, the Stanley Express missions ... there’s a lot of stuff. If you look around and listen to what the NPCs say and go out and find stuff, you’ll be rewarded. Id has always been innovative in its enemy design, but how do you keep that intact when all the enemies are human? [Lost a bit of the recording here: Willits describes the various clans leading up to ...] The Uncharted clan are not afraid of anything, they will hold their ground. One guy will drop a shield and another guy will step-up behind him and use him as cover. Then of course with mutants, skinny mutants and giant mutants they all have their very unique attacks. Rage is a long game but you won’t grow bored with fighting. Does it feel weird to show off a single-player game at QuakeCon? No, because the QuakeCon fans all love good games. If they didn’t like good games, they wouldn’t be at QuakeCon. I am excited about our multiplayer offering in Rage. It’s different. It’s not the cookie-cutter formula again -- well, the formula we invented. Besides, people at QuakeCon just want to see good games. Now that you have Hi-Rez showing off Tribes and all the Bethesda games here, QuakeCon feels a bit more like an expo. Does it feel different to you? Well, we’ve always had different games being shown here. Valve showed Left 4 Dead here, originally for the first time, and that was awesome. We’ve had various strategy games shown before. It’s always exciting to see great games come to the show. Are there any other games we’ll be seeing with the id Tech 5 engine, any time soon? Well, the id Tech 5 engine is exclusive to the Bethesda family. There are other studios who are working with it but – everybody knows Doom is using it. Further down the road, I really can’t say. When you were making Rage, you must’ve still hit some limits of what the hardware is capable of doing. Have you looked into what could be possible five years from now? One of the great things about id Tech 5 is that it’s very scalable. John Carmack believes as we look to the future, we’ll be able to reutilize this engine and its capabilities. We push the 360 and the PS3 right to their limit. We encourage gamers to install the game to their hard drive. There’s a lot of legs to this tech and you’ll see it around for a long time. I know you got your start as part of the Doom modding community. I was wondering if you’ve seen any of the crazy things people have done with the Doom engine the last couple years? Yes, there are some very neat Doom mods out there that are very advanced. Modding games is still the best way to get into the industry. Pick an engine you like and make something cool with it.
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My interview with longtime id Software member Tim Willits began with my pitch for a Destructoid crossover-promotion with id and the Hilton that houses QuakeCon. It’s called “GET RAGED!” The rules are whoe...

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Buy RAGE used, miss out on extra content forever


Aug 12
// Jim Sterling
RAGE will not be instituting an online pass, but it will feature codes for brand new buyers that will provide extra content. id Software's solution happens to be a great idea and an example of the sort of thing companies shou...
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Rage behind the scenes: The sound and art


Aug 11
// Liam Fisher
Hey guys, heads up: The world of Rage isn't a place you'd want to take your parents on vacation. I know it's tempting with the game's myriad mutants and bandits, but you must resist. Meanwhile, in their newest behind the sce...
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The DTOID Show: Kim Jong-il and the Army of Cyberhackers


Aug 08
// Tara Long
Good evening, and welcome to the 160th episode of The Destructoid Show! You'd think after 160 episodes we would've run out of introductions for our show posts, and you'd be right. I'm terrible at these things. Let's talk som...
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Bethesda promises that RAGE runs fine on PS3


Aug 08
// Jim Sterling
There has been some buzz around the Internet concerning the PS3 version of RAGE, with reports that the Blu-ray's latent loading is contributing to an inferior product. We contacted Bethesda to see if there was a real issue at...
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Carmack 'frustrated' that 360, PS3 are weaker than PC


Aug 08
// Jim Sterling
We all know that computers are more powerful than consoles, but id Software's John Carmack is sick of it. Citing the struggle to get RAGE running on PS3 and Xbox 360, Carmack has admitted to being "extremely frustrated" by ha...
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Rage Xbox 360 install is 22GB


Aug 08
// Jim Sterling
If you're looking to buy Rage on the Xbox 360 and you like to install your games, you're going to need to do a sh*tload of deletion first. id Software's John Carmack has stated that you'll need to shove 22GB of information do...
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Interview: id President Todd Hollenshead vents his Rage!


Aug 05
// Max Scoville
Last week, I got some hands-on time with the first three hours of id Software's new post-apocalyptic first-person shooter Rage. Afterwards, I got to interview Todd Hollenshead, id's president, who was kind enough to tell me ...
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Clothe your Xbox avatar in some pretty sweet Rage apparel


Aug 04
// Liam Fisher
In a not so surprising turn of events, it seems people are really excited about id's open-world FPS Rage. So excited, in fact, that a set of Xbox Live avatar items has been released to the wilds of the Marketplace. Now your a...
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Latest Rage trailer is serious... serious about action!


Aug 04
// Nick Chester
"The fiend in his own shape is less hideous than when he rages in the beast of man."What's this? A trailer for an id Software game that starts off with a quote from the Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story, "Young Goodman Brown...
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If Rage gets 100,000 Facebook likes, iOS game goes free


Aug 04
// Nick Chester
id Software's Rage Mutant Bash TV for iOS is pretty good. Not great, not bad, and at the very least a great example of what Apple's hardware can do in the right hands. If you want it for free, fire up those Facebook accounts ...
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The DTOID Show: Borderlands 2 and hands-on with Rage!


Aug 03
// Tara Long
[The Destructoid Show gives a rundown of all the top news from Destructoid.com every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Subscribe to us on YouTube, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.] Hey, guys and g...

Preview: Hands-on with the first three hours of RAGE

Aug 02 // Steven Hansen
Rage (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [Previewed], PC) Developer: id Software Publisher: Bethesda Software To be released: October 4, 2011 Rage begins with the main character waking from a prolonged sleep and exiting the Ark, the name given to the spacecrafts select members of humanity where shuttled off in to protect them from whatever impending apocalypse gave birth to the game’s wasteland. As you emerge into the world, you’re instantly blinded by the flood of natural light rushing in, which produced the cool effect of me actually having to look away from the bright screen, squinting, while partially shielding my eyes from the influx of sunlight -- plus one immersion point. After a few seconds of exploring this unfamiliar land, the main character is promptly attacked, and then rescued by the man that will be assigning you the majority of your early quests -- after all, you owe him. Little else is covered with respect to the backstory during the first three hours of gameplay, other than the fact that Ark survivors are “special” and will fetch a high price if turned over to the seedy-sounding, foreboding “Authority.” The gameplay structure seems similar to a lot of open world RPGs, including Borderlands and Fallout 3, two games Rage is often compared with. Various people will assign you tasks, which are accessible from the game’s main menu. Select a quest and the mini-map will lead you to where you need to go. The game seems to be fairly open after you complete some of the first tasks of the game and get yourself armed -- the guy playing next to me actually ended up in a wildly different location than I did by the time my hands-on time was through. Along with that, an NPC hinted at what could be considered even further divergent side-quests in the form of traversable sewer hatches, relics of a bygone era that are strewn about the wasteland and are said to contain some phat loot and powerful adversaries. Still, while comparing Rage to its contemporaries in terms of its open world gameplay structure seems appropriate, the game is an unabashed first-person shooter, unlike some of the game it draws comparisons with. As is to be expected from this team, the game plays great. The first-person perspective has an appropriate wobble to the camera when moving and the gunplay feels rewarding. Each weapon I got my hands on was incredibly detailed -- something that I always felt was surprisingly rare in games where you spend the entire time looking at the gun -- and had a palpable sense of weight behind it due to some excellent sound work. It might have just been the fancy TRITTON headphones I was experiencing for the first time (they’re awesome), but I almost jumped because of the resounding boom that echoed in my head the first time I unleashed my boomstick on some poor soul. The arsenal, while being largely comprised of videogame mainstays -- assault rifles, shotguns, etc. -- seemed to have a distinct personality all their own because of these subtle touches, while the various ammo types, easily selectable on the fly, definitely liven up gameplay. Of course, the game does have some sweet, unique weapons, too. Towards the end of my time I got my hands on the crossbow, which was loads of fun to stealthily eliminate enemies with and had a satisfying twang after every bolt I let loose. The wingsticks, essentially bladed boomerangs, were also fun to use thanks to their excellent decapitating power (fun fact, decapitated heads will dissipate, dead enemy bodies don’t). Thankfully, the game also provided me with a satisfying sniper rifle that had plenty of zoom; because that’s the only way I’m getting headshots in an FPS. There is also a cool revival mechanic, cleverly tied back to your character’s status as an Ark survivor. If you die, your character seems to be imbued with a defibrillator, which is used to revive yourself via properly executed button prompts, though it has to be recharged after each use, so it can’t be completely abused and doesn’t take the challenge out of the game. How much health you’re given back is dependent on how well you executed the button prompts and the device also emits an electric shock capable of killing nearby enemies. I thought it was a clever touch, especially considering it has a legitimate basis for being there per the narrative, and a good way to keep from any potential frustrating deaths that lead to a large loss of time or progress. The one thing that bothered me during my hands-on time with Rage was the enemy AI, which seemed to be completely reactionary and dependent on my maneuvers. For some reason, there were a lot of instances when the enemies somehow spotted me long before I could see them, yet all they would do is yell something like “I see him” or “He’s here,” and they never seemed to actually get a jump on me. All it did was alert me to their presence and ensure I would go look for them. Conversely, however, there was one instance during a firefight where I was dispatching enemies pretty handedly, and instead of waiting to be slaughtered, a couple of the enemies that were left actually retreated to a room where there were more enemies waiting for me, which I thought was sort of cool. In addition to the core shooty bits, vehicular combat has an important place in Rage, as it’s the main means of transportation across the sprawling wasteland. You start out with a loaner ATV before upgrading to your very own heap of a buggy, which becomes a much more formidable vehicle once you begin upgrading it and outfitting it with weaponry. There’s a race circuit in Rage and winning races gives you the credits you need to upgrade your vehicle. The vehicle control is tight and it’s fun to blow up other cars with your car. One of my favorite things about driving, however, was that Rage actually encouraged me to drive a bit carefully. For instance, I drove my ATV against some metal sidewall, which led to sparks flying and a cacophonic sound emitting from the headphones, which led to me actually feeling bad about messing up my vehicle -- another plus one immersion point? Aside from shooting stuff being fun, the thing that struck me most about Rage was the level of detail in the world. To put it simply, Rage has the prettiest wasteland I’ve ever seen. While there are the appropriate amounts of brownish and orange hues, they often carry inherent warmth to them, thanks in part to some dynamic lighting, and there is enough subtlety and variety in the colors to keep Rage from feeling oppressively brown and drab. The game excels graphically, but it’s also surprisingly pleasing aesthetically. There are an enormous amount of little touches I noticed in the game that added to the immersion factor and help make the world of Rage one worth exploring. For example, I walked up to a decrepit fountain soda machine and was able to discern a unique flavor of soda on each of the little nametag squares. There are also unique, clever gambling ventures in the world which appeal to the gambling addict in me, including a completely made-up card game that uses cards found around the game world (it’s something out of Final Fantasy VIII, basically) and another game that involves rolling dice and hologram characters -- it’s neat, kind of adorable and adds to the unique flavor of the game world. The sound work I touched on earlier also adds to the experience of the game as a whole. While strong sound effects lend weight to the gunplay, they also add character to the rest of the world. For example, going into a person’s place of residence and hearing somewhat different kinds of music helps to characterize those characters. Ambient sound effects and inter-NPC chatter make the world feel as alive as a shotgun’s rewarding boom or the delicious shattering of bullet ridden glass in combat. In the same vein, the game also has some topnotch voice work. If you’re anything like me, you’re going to spend a while trying to place the first voice you hear frequently in the game, before coming to the shocking conclusion of just who it is. You’ll also probably notice Steve Blum. The strong voice acting works in tandem with Rage’s graphical prowess. The character models are all varied and detailed, while the character animation deftly manages human-like subtlety. When talking to characters, the facial animation is incredibly nuanced, resulting in some surprisingly life-like performances, while the NPCs also move around fluidly, making hand motions and the like, keeping them from looking like robots. While the deeper workings of the plot are still entirely nebulous to me and I don’t know how deep the narrative is, Rage (or at least the tech behind it) definitely has the potential to deliver a strong narrative. Rage is definitely a modern shooter, yet there were some interesting things about it that brought me back to earlier days of gaming, such as a cleverly implemented mini-boss (health bar and all) and the fact that the game is aiming for a 15-20 hour campaign (compared to the modern shooters that seem to get away with a fourth the time and even less actual content.) If you like first-person shooters, I don’t see why you wouldn’t like Rage, because it’s a tight, well done FPS. At the same time, it’s a game that someone like me, someone who burned out on this generation’s love affair with first-person shooters by the time of the first Modern Warfare, can enjoy. It’s fun, there’s a lot to do, and the tech behind it is incredible.
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Rage has a lot of pedigree behind it, which many people turn to when hyping it up. Conversely, a commensurately large group seems to be sleeping on the game, dismissively drawing comparisons to Fallout 3 and Borderlands....

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Latest RAGE dev diary takes a look at the enemies


Jul 28
// Jim Sterling
Here's a new dev diary for the incredibly promising RAGE. This time, we're taking a look at the various enemies that will conspire to ruin your day.  One thing that really jumped out at me when RAGE was first shown was ...
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New RAGE developer diary talks about story


Jul 07
// Jim Sterling
Here's a new developer diary in which id Software discusses the story of RAGE. The video's titled "The Dawn" and it should help get you pumped for what's looking like a really exciting game.  Wonder how the world of RAGE gets destroyed and turned into the mutant-spawning rot-hole that it is? Check out the video and see!
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id and Bethesda bringing Rage, Skyrim to QuakeCon 2011


Jul 07
// Nick Chester
Today Bethesda and id Software have revealed the details of the events that will shape the upcoming QuakeCon 2011. And if there are any surprises, they're not letting loose with them just yet. As per usual, the event will jum...
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Video on Rage: 'The best thing id has ever done'


Jun 30
// Dale North
Do you want to get excited about id's Rage? This video will do the trick. There's a lot of technobabble on why the game will be the best and a bit of back patting, but we'll let that slide. The folks at id did invent the g...
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RAGE special edition spotted in the wild


Jun 30
// Jim Sterling
A special edition version of id Software's RAGE has been revealed by Australian retailer EB Games. It's priced at $108.00 in Australia Money and it's got some stuff in it! According to the product listing, RAGE's special edit...
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First issue of Rage comic now available


Jun 22
// Nick Chester
The first of the three-issue comic series based on id Software's Rage is now available in comic stores.Written by Arvid Nelson and drawn by Andrew Mutti, the comics should give a bit more insight into the world of the upcomin...
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Interview: Hollie versus id's Rage


Jun 19
// Maurice Tan
Our own Miss Bennett got a chance to ask id Software about Rage at E3. The more I hear id talk about how they came up with Rage, the more it sounds like it is a game created around an engine and that they just decided to thr...
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RAGE screens can be looked at if you click on them!


Jun 16
// Jim Sterling
Here is the latest batch of screens for id's upcoming RAGE. In speaking to people on the E3 showfloor, the game was getting mixed reactions -- possibly because it was unfortunate enough to be playable directly after the ludic...
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E3: Month delay for Rage, idTech 5 unsuitable for Skyrim


Jun 10
// Maurice Tan
Rage has been delayed by a month from its September 13rd release date to October 4th (October 7 for Europe), Gamasutra reports. John Carmack has also pitched in on the fact that id Tech 5 would only be used in-house at Bethes...
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E3: id's John Carmack is already talking about Rage 2


Jun 08
// Jordan Devore
Despite the fact that Rage doesn't release for another few months, you can't silence id Software's John Carmack. Not even when he wants to delve into sequel talk. GameSpot has quoted the technical director as saying "yes," th...
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L.A. Clippers' Blake Griffin wants to get into RAGE


May 19
// Conrad Zimmerman
Blake Griffin, power forward for the Los Angeles Clippers and 2011 NBA Rookie of the Year, seems to be a fan of the videogames. In this humorous video, Griffin stands outside of id Software's offices in a desperate bid to be...
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Pre-order RAGE, get the Anarchy Edition with bonus gear


May 19
// Jim Sterling
If you pre-order RAGE, you'll be able to get your hands on the Anarchy Edition at no extra cost. So far this has been announced in the UK and Australia. Confirmation for other territories will hopefully come soon (Edit: It wa...
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Rage will ship with full modding tools on PC


May 05
// Maurice Tan
When it comes to PC games, one thing the platform has always had over its console brethren -- other than better graphics -- is mods. Since Rage is an id Software game, creative director Tim Willits has told PC Gamer that the ...
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Latest RAGE trailer makes the most of drones


May 05
// Conrad Zimmerman
Hot damn if that doesn't look sweet. This new trailer for RAGE shows segments of a mission to disrupt the bomb making capabilities of a group called "The Shrouded." There's a brief bit of rather exciting vehicle gameplay sho...
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Doom 4 won't be a 're-skinned' Rage, says id


Apr 19
// Jordan Devore
Rage continues to look terrific, and also continues to be id's main focus, at least in terms of where the studio's marketing muscle is at. Following a few brief statements about Doom 4, which pin it as not a direct sequel to ...

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