Game database:   #ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ         ALL     Xbox One     PS4     360     PS3     WiiU     Wii     PC     3DS     DS     PS Vita     PSP     iOS     Android


    New     trending       featured       controversial       weirdest       by author       freebies       |       following



1:00 PM on 03.24.2015

The Talos Principle bringing more deep thoughts with Road to Gehenna expansion

Players who took the time to really explore The Talos Principle might recognize the name Uriel. Though the base game is seen through the eyes of a particular simulation participant, evidence of others exists in the form of QR...

Darren Nakamura



Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker's amiibo functionality adds a small incentive to replay every level photo
Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker's amiibo functionality adds a small incentive to replay every level
by Chris Carter

Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker launched its amiibo compatibility this week, and I've found a new reason to revisit the game. It's as simple as adding in a "Hide-and-Seek" mode, enabled by tapping the newly minted Toad amiibo to the GamePad as you're selecting each stage.

After a quick tap the minigame will start, tasking you to find a "Pixel Toad" while playing the level as normal. All you have to do is locate it and tap it on the GamePad to complete the extra mission. Hide-and-Seek will work with all three core episodes, but it is not compatible with the bonus stages. After finding the Pixel Toad, you'll earn a new stamp in your notebook for that page. 

view full story + comments


10:30 AM on 03.17.2015

Pokémon Shuffle limiting Mega Lucario to a contest

Pokémon Shuffle is a pain to get through without constantly playing the waiting game, but if you're keen, Nintendo has been running occasional events to net special Pokémon. The newest promotion is a contest to ...

Chris Carter

10:00 PM on 03.16.2015

Oh, didn't see you there

We got a review code in today for a hidden-object game called Frankenstein: Master of Death. Darren expressed tentative interest, noting that it looks "terrible and fun at the same time?" Naturally, I went to investigate. Please send help.

Jordan Devore




Magnetic: Cage Closed let me fling myself around with physics photo
Magnetic: Cage Closed let me fling myself around with physics
by Darren Nakamura

"It's not a gravity gun; it's a magnet." Guru Games, developer of Magnetic: Cage Closed, stressed this to me at PAX East. It works like a real magnet, with fields radiating out in all directions, rather than affecting only a forward-facing space.

In practice, it functions similarly in a lot of cases. Attract to pull objects closer, repel to push them further. It's a bit of an oversimplification, but the magnet gun is central to solving the puzzles found in Cage Closed. However, puzzles aren't all the title has going for it; Magnetic also features more action-oriented sections, branching pathways, and a focus on player choice.

view full story + comments




Tumblestone is the most intelligent 'match three' game I've ever played photo
Tumblestone is the most intelligent 'match three' game I've ever played
by Patrick Hancock

The first impression of a game matters a lot at PAX. If people aren't intrigued almost immediately, they may never play the game at all. My first impression of Tumblestone was "oh cool another match-three game." I don't play many of them, so I barely had any interest.

However, knowing that Tumblestone and The Bridge, a brilliant indie puzzle game, share the same developer, I just had to give it a chance. Thank goodness I did, too, because it was easily the most intelligent game on the show floor.

view full story + comments


3:00 PM on 03.10.2015

Final GDC DLC launches with massive bugs, Mountain Dew shotgunning

Destructoid has launched its fifth and final GDC Daily Lunch Chronicles and interim cameraman Mike Cosimano again screwed up the sound. Instead of letting him get cute with ragtime music and title cards like last time, we're...

Steven Hansen



Affordable Space Adventures is the Wii U experience I imagined in 2012 photo
Affordable Space Adventures is the Wii U experience I imagined in 2012
by Darren Nakamura

When Nintendo first unveiled the Wii U, my mind raced with ideas for games that could be created with the two-screen interface. A lot of the cool stuff that the DS did could be transferred to the big screen. Better yet, titles like those that made use of Game Boy Advance-to-GameCube connectivity could surface in a more accessible format.

In practice, it has taken a while for developers to do really interesting things with the GamePad. A lot of the most lauded titles would work fine without the second screen. Affordable Space Adventures is one of the few Wii U titles that feels like it could not be done on another platform. It plays to the console's strengths, finally producing the type of experience the Wii U was made for.

view full story + comments


8:00 PM on 03.08.2015

GDC 15 DLC #4: Pita wraps, damn good fries and ragtime

We didn't have usual cameraman Kenny Redublo during our fourth lunch of GDC (see us dining with Dale here) and things went a bit awry. Our substitute cameraman Mike Cosimano had some fun with it, though, with some silent mov...

Steven Hansen

4:45 PM on 03.08.2015

GDC 15 DLC #3: Japanese katsu curry with Dale

Look on ye hungry and despair. Familiar face Dale North joined us for the third Daily Lunch Chronicles (watch the last one here). Back behind the camera, Kenny managed to empty his plate before both of us while shooting, but...

Steven Hansen



Planet of the Eyes is a treacherous place for Polaroid robots photo
Planet of the Eyes is a treacherous place for Polaroid robots
by Darren Nakamura

Crash landing on an alien planet is the worst. There's hazardous flora, deadly fauna, and even rock formations that seem to have some sort of blood lust. That just piles on top of the existential crisis of being a robot with an unknown purpose. Such is the existence on Planet of the Eyes.

I played through a couple of demo sections at PAX East. One showed off puzzles while the other demonstrated more action platforming. Both were rife with opportunities for robot death and dismemberment. At the very least, the planet is beautiful as it is repeatedly and mercilessly trying to kill me.

view full story + comments






1:30 PM on 03.05.2015

GDC 15 DLC #2: Oily hamburgers and Cranberries

The second lunch of GDC was much messier than the first, which you can watch here. Today (well, two days ago, actually) we went with an American staple, the "Hammed Burger," so named for the first woman who ever went totally...

Steven Hansen



Review: Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Tipping Stars photo
Review: Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Tipping Stars
by Darren Nakamura

A little more than four years ago, Nintendo released Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Mini-Land Mayhem! on the original DS. It continued the series' focus on the miniature Mario robots, to the chagrin of fans of the platforming in the original. In our review, Jonathan Holmes said "It didn't make me feel much, or think much, or have much of a memorable effect on me at all."

Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Tipping Stars plays the same as Mini-Land Mayhem!, but with a few new features. It remains a puzzle game that acts as filler; it can be picked up and played just as easily as it can be put down and forgotten.

view full story + comments




Smash Bros. dev bringing blocky puzzler BOXBOY! to 3DS photo
Smash Bros. dev bringing blocky puzzler BOXBOY! to 3DS
by Steven Hansen

HAL Laboratories (Super Smash Bros., Mother) has been busying itself with a couple Kirby games recently, but it looks like someone over there had an idea for a lil puzzle game and rolled with it.

BOXBOY! (already released on the 3DS eShop in Japan) is minimal outside of its charming animations. It is black, white, and mostly made of squares. You can walk Qbby left and right in an overworld with a Ms. Pac-Man-esque bowtied Qbby trailing behind. Enter doors to start a world, most of which seem to be designed around a particular technique. Five worlds (with around seven levels each) were playable during my GDC demo. There are 17 in total.

Aside from running and jumping, Qbby can bud blocks from his body. Each level gives you a limit to how many blocks you can produce at any given time, while there is also an overall number of blocks you can use on a stage. Getting to the end while collecting one or two black crowns will net you a "perfect" rating (and give you currency to unlock fun extras).

When you start, you can produce one block from your body and usually throw it to use as a step to reach a higher platform. As the levels go on and the block limit gets higher, you use new techniques. One section is themed around using blocks as a hook. That is, you produce three stacked blocks straight up, followed one to the right, forming a hook atop your head. You can then latch that last block onto a high ledge and have Qbby contract up to that latched block like folding in one side of the accordion.

I'm fine with the absentee art style (and Qbby's dumb lil feet as you move the box back and forth), but I never felt stumped throughout the first five worlds. It was more relaxing than puzzling. Maybe that's the point. Or maybe the later worlds will combine the various techniques a bit more, or make it so the limit of blocks you can produce per stage actually feels like a restriction; I never ran out.

view full story + comments




Review: Pneuma: Breath of Life photo
Review: Pneuma: Breath of Life
by Brett Makedonski

Pneuma: Breath of Life is, through and through, a creationist tale. There's no theory of evolution, carbon dating, or Darwinism to cause debate. It's one god and the world that he brought into existence mere seconds earlier.

As it turns out, being the only inhabitant of a world is a dull affair.

view full story + comments


3:30 PM on 02.24.2015

Besiege brings its funny, sexual, weird medieval siege engines to Mac and Linux

AT-AT by Poroh I thought Besiege looked good based on the developer-made gifs and videos, but the game's community has elevated the title to new heights with its ingenious, often times so-wrong-they're-right medieval creation...

Jordan Devore