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Dr. Mario photo
Dr. Mario

Japan is getting a new Dr. Mario game on 3DS today


'New'
May 31
// Chris Carter
During today's Japanese Nintendo Direct, a new Dr. Mario game was revealed for the 3DS platform, and was subsequently released after the presentation. I'll use the term "new" lightly, as it doesn't really look fundament...
Desktop Dungeons photo
Desktop Dungeons

Brilliant puzzle roguelike Desktop Dungeons now portable


$10 for iPad and Android tablets
May 28
// Jordan Devore
With Desktop Dungeons now available for iPad and Android tablets, I can easily see it becoming an obsession all over again. This is $10, straight up; no in-app purchases, no bullshit. The Enhanced Edition's daily challenges a...
Pokémon Shuffle photo
Pokémon Shuffle

New Pokemon Shuffle update makes the game slightly less sleazy


But it's not enough
May 27
// Chris Carter
One of the biggest problems with Pokemon Shuffle, beyond its exploitative item system, was the energy mechanic. In short, you could only play a scant five rounds at a time before you had to wait 30 minutes per round to rechar...
Mushroom 11 photo
Mushroom 11

New Mushroom 11 trailer and details out now


Rocket ship, catapult, release window
May 20
// Darren Nakamura
I have been pretty keen on Mushroom 11 since I first saw it at PAX East 2014. Since then, just about everybody on staff who has played it has come away with positive thoughts. Hamza called it one of his favorite games at PAX...
You Must Build a Boat photo
You Must Build a Boat

10000000 sequel You Must Build a Boat out on June 4


'10000001' too on-the-nose
May 19
// Darren Nakamura
You Must Build a Boat has been in the works for a while. Originally planned as a free update to hit match-three puzzle game 10000000, it eventually ballooned into something big enough to be its own thing. That was more than ...
Adventure Time photo
Adventure Time

Adventure Time Puzzle Quest releasing on mobile this summer


Match three in the Land of Ooo
May 19
// Darren Nakamura
Adventure Time Puzzle Quest. That really says all it needs to about what to expect. It's going to be the addictive match-three puzzling that we have been doing for years, with the familiar faces of Jake the dog and Finn the h...
Kickstarter photo
Kickstarter

Dimension Drive's trolled Kickstarter is back for more


It's time for Jack to let 'er rip!
May 19
// Mike Cosimano
Dimension Drive, the indie game famous for having been trolled by a fraudulent 7,000 euro pledge, has returned to Kickstarter for another shot. "We've had [support] from all over the world. People calling us, sending us ...

Review: Schrodinger's Cat and the Raiders of the Lost Quark

May 18 // Darren Nakamura
Schrödinger's Cat and the Raiders of the Lost Quark (PC, PlayStation 4 [reviewed], Xbox One)Developer: Italic PigPublisher: Team17Released: May 12, 2015MSRP: $9.99 Raiders of the Lost Quark takes place in the quantum world, zoomed in so far the elementary particles of matter are visible. Previous knowledge about quantum physics is not required to play, though it does enhance the experience a bit. For instance, there are six flavors of quarks: up, down, top, bottom, charm, and strange. Schrödinger's Cat uses the first four flavors of quark in his platforming adventure (charm and strange are much rarer), and just like in real life, the quarks combine in groups of three. This central mechanic is smart. It allows Schrödinger's Cat to employ a lot of different abilities, using only the four shoulder buttons. It starts off with basic combos: three up quarks form a propeller that will carry the cat upward, three down quarks form a drill that will destroy terrain downward, three top quarks form a protective bubble to safely pass through hazards, and three bottom quarks form a platform to stand on. From there, quarks of different flavors can be mixed and matched. Two ups and a down (or two downs and an up) will form a missile that can be fired in any of the four cardinal directions. It ends up being one of the most useful abilities. With all of the combinations, there are 14 different abilities. Though it sounds confusing, it all comes fairly naturally, and there is a helpful quick reference on the pause screen detailing all of the different constructs. [embed]292295:58563:0[/embed] At its best, Quark takes the quark combination mechanic and applies it to a puzzle platformer. Half of the levels are designed, giving the player a specific set of quarks to overcome a specific task. Though several quark groupings can achieve similar outcomes (the copter, base, and bounce constructs will all help Schrödinger's Cat move upward), a limited supply of quarks means having to choose wisely, considering what will be left for other tasks. If it were just the puzzle platformer levels, Schrödinger's Cat would a tight little game that does its thing well. It's unfortunate that between the puzzle levels are procedurally generated filler areas. Though they still make use of the quark combination mechanic, the abundance of quarks takes away any sort of interesting decision making or a need for much forethought. Though there are 14 different abilities, I found myself mostly using the same 4 in these sections. There's no need for creative problem solving when the copter, missile, bubble, and net can do everything that needs to be done. It highlights the drawbacks of procedural generation. It can be a powerful tool for two types of games: enormous sandboxes that would be unreasonable to hand-design (Minecraft) and short, replayable experiences that reward experience over memorization (Spelunky). Raiders of the Lost Quark is neither of these. The procedural levels aren't interesting enough to merit a huge open world and aside from some new dialogue there isn't a whole lot of reason to replay it after going through once. Another downfall that stems from the procedural generation is in the environmental art. The destructible terrain and the chunky grid look outdated in the best cases. At worst, the environments are almost nauseating in their color choices and design. This come in stark contrast with the character artwork. Cutscenes have a sharp cartoon look, and the animations are smooth and visually interesting. Schrödinger's Cat's movement and combat animations are particularly good. The supporting cast members have really inventive designs, bizarre enough to fit well in the weird and wonderful subatomic universe. The art for the quark combinations is noteworthy as well. Looking closely at each construct, players can pick out which quark is performing which function, as they all stretch, bend, and combine together. It even helps from a gameplay perspective, where each design is memorable enough on its own that it helped me recall which quarks to summon for a particular ability. Even with the ones I used less frequently like the parachute, I can picture which colors go into it and use that to activate one without having to pause for the reference. Though the overall story is silly, the writing is good. Comedy in games is difficult, but Raiders of the Lost Quark had me laughing out loud a few times. That said, I'm a science geek, so your mileage may vary when it comes to the physics jokes. On a more disappointing note, I did run into a handful of notable bugs during my play through. On multiple occasions I got stuck in the level geometry. Sometimes there would be a creature listed for capture but that creature wasn't actually present, leading to unnecessary time wasted scouring the area. The Bosons were especially hard to work with; they are supposed to attack one another when brought too close, but I had several that wouldn't budge. None of these issues were gamebreaking; a reset to the last checkpoint or leaving and returning to an area fixed all of them. They still hurt the experience through wasted time. None of those waste as much time as the procedurally generated levels, which are easily the biggest flaw in Schrödinger's Cat and the Raiders of the Lost Quark. They take up about half of the play time, present very little worthwhile gameplay, and feel like a drudge by the end. If it cut all the fat and featured only the smart puzzle-platforming found in the hand-designed levels, Raiders of the Lost Quark would be a leaner, more engaging, and ultimately much better game. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Schrödinger's Cat review photo
A superposition of good and bad
"Schrödinger's Cat" refers to an old physics thought experiment that highlights the weirdness of the quantum theory. Though it generally applies to very small particles, a device could be designed that leverages the prob...

Review: Stretchmo

May 15 // Chris Carter
Stretchmo (3DS)Developers: Intelligent SystemsPublisher: NintendoReleased: May 14, 2015Price: Free-to-play with microtransactions ($9.99 for everything) The way Stretchmo's microtransaction setup works is very confusing at first glance. Initially, you'll have access to a select few intro puzzles. After that, there's one 100 level pack for $4.99, three 50 level packs for $2.99 each, and the option to buy all of them for $9.99 upfront. If you buy each add-on individually, there's a small discount for purchasing more. My guess is that the series didn't perform as well as Nintendo would have hoped outside of Japan, so they want to give international players a chance to "get a taste" for a few bucks. Whatever the case may be, it's not a bad idea as it basically functions as a demo, outside of the fact that there is no way to sample individual packs. As for the game itself, it's pretty much business as usual outside of one new addition. Our heroes will have to solve various block puzzles and reach a predetermined goal (usually at the top of the heap) by pulling and pushing them into submission to create new paths to jump and cross. In this edition you'll have the power to "stretch," blocks on the side, which actually adds quite a bit of depth to the proceedings. You'll soon learn that blocks can be manipulated in a multitude of different ways from every single angle, creating some of the most taxing puzzles yet. Intelligent Systems also brought back the convenient zoom feature, as well as the effective 3D technique, which makes it very easy to move about each creation. Beyond that one new mechanic Stretchmo's gimmick is found in its various level packs, which all have a different theme and character. The 100 core levels are hosted by Mallo, and are actually the easiest of the bunch -- some of which are even remedial. If you enjoy the core Pushmo experience, I'd recommend picking them up, but they aren't anything special. [embed]292153:58540:0[/embed] Poppy is next in line, with items that are themed after real-life objects. While her 50-stage gauntlet has a bit of charm to it it's only marginally more difficult than Mallo's adventure, and I wouldn't say that it's essential in any way. Corin on the other hand kills it with the Fortress of Fun. This add-on brings in more gadgets, including full-on enemy characters to deal with. They remind me of the Sackbots from the Little Big Planet series in that they're crudely designed and only sport a base-level AI, but they're probably the most innovative addition to the series yet, because nearly every level is crafted around avoiding them and jumping on their heads. It adds a degree of twitch action that wasn't really present before. Papa is the last pack in the bunch, and his theme is old NES classics. You'll find levels designed around retro art like an 8-bit Mario head, much like the maps that so many players have created and shared on their own. This add-on however has the benefit of being the most difficult set of levels in the game, and when you add in the stretch ability, I'd be comfortable with making the claim that they're actually some of the biggest challenges in the entire series. For those who are interested, yes, Stretchmo still has a creation studio (that's enabled after you make one purchase). It can read QR codes just like the old iterations, and your gadget unlocks are tied directly to your progress in each pack. In other words, if you want enemies you'll have to buy Corin's levels, and so on. [embed]292153:58557:0[/embed] While all of this is generally pretty great, there are a few downgrades in comparison to the previous version. In particular, the Pushmo World Fair feature from the Wii U release is sorely missed. Although the idea of socially sharing your QR codes with one another is cool, I loved the ability to instantly jump in and casually browse through online creations, even if I didn't play all of them. I also miss the screen real estate provided by the GamePad, which has since spoiled me. Still, the new concepts presented in two of the level packs (Fortress of Fun and NES Expo) make up for it. If you've never given Pushmo a fair shake before, trying out the free stages in Stretchmo is a great way to start. While I'd generally recommend going the full mile and buying the whole thing outright, you can also just spring for the Fortress of Fun for a few bucks and come out on top. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Strechmo review photo
Sure, I'll push some mo'
Nintendo has been silently crafting some killer franchises over the years. While he may not light up sales as much as Mario, after four years, I'd consider Pushmo's Mallo to be a fully-fledged Nintendo character. Now he's back in his fourth game on the 3DS in the form of Stretchmo, which adopts a rather odd free-to-play scheme that essentially functions as a demo.

Evoland 2 photo
Evoland 2

Evoland 2 is part shmup, part platformer, part RPG, part puzzler...


Cute little microcosm
May 14
// Jordan Devore
After watching this debut trailer for Evoland 2: A Slight Case of Spacetime Continuum Disorder, I regret missing the first game. The basic concept of an adventure that evolves from 2D to 3D and spans multiple genres is the s...

Review: Puzzle & Dragons Z + Puzzle & Dragons: Super Mario Bros. Edition

May 14 // Chris Carter
Puzzle & Dragons Z + Puzzle & Dragons: Super Mario Bros. Edition (3DS)Developer: GungHo Online EntertainmentPublisher: GungHo Online Entertainment (JP) / Nintendo (EU, US)Released: April 29, 2015 (JP) / May 8, 2015 (EU) / May 22, 2015 (US)MSRP: $29.99 It's not just a checkmark on the side of a game box -- this 3DS package really is two full games in one. You'll get the traditional Puzzle & Dragons experience with Z, as well as a Super Mario Bros.-centric romp. But even the former feels like it was severely influenced by Nintendo, which is definitely a good thing. In the world of Z, Dragon Tamers roam the land in search of adventure, much like Pokémon Trainers. Hell, it even has the option to choose between a male and female protagonist, and the story starts off in your house with a conversation with your mom. It gets even more on the nose from there with a "D-Gear" instead of a Pokédex, and the presentation of red, blue, and green monsters as your first party members. Truth be told, despite how familiar this setup is, and how much the generic story drags at times, it's far more endearing than the gambling nature of the free-to-play mobile game. The events of the story are set in motion by a massive earthquake from the evil organization Team Rocket Paradox, but the world is more captivating than the actual characters or events involved -- odds are you'll be skipping a lot of dialogue. Thankfully, the creature designs in Puzzle & Dragons are interesting to fight and discover, as they look wholly unique, and even while battling static monsters with just a few animations on-screen the game still has a ton of charm. If you do happen to dig the story though, you'll quickly suffer a degree of disappointment, as it takes a backseat in favor of dungeon crawling and constant battling. [embed]291810:58494:0[/embed] Remember, the core principle is to match three orbs on a grid to damage your enemies. You'll drag and drop them on the bottom screen using your stylus, and said orbs will initiate attacks based on elements that you match. So for instance, a simple activation of three fire orbs will kick off a small fire attack from your appropriate party members, but a huge combo of red and blue will see a stronger counter from multiple party members. Matching more than three will also queue up more devastating attacks, and so on -- you've seen this before. Puzzle & Dragons does have a few nuances in place to differentiate itself though, like an active time gauge to keep you on your toes (allowing you to create combos while you're at it), the ability to target specific enemies with the D-pad, and a rock-paper-scissors mechanic with the elements involved. It also has a light amount of party building, as the best way to succeed is to diversify your setup to allow the most coverage in terms of orb attacks. Each character also has a super that can be used every so often, like a direct-damage power or an ability to change up colors of specific orbs. It's not incredibly deep, but there's some meat to it, especially when you pick up more characters and start making decisions on who to use, as well as who to upgrade, and who to sacrifice to make existing party members stronger. As it turns out, the Super Mario Bros. portion of the game is fairly remedial. If you've never played a match-three before or have children, you'll want to play this one first. It has the same basic gameplay, but with a new "story" that involves Mario and the rest of the Mushroom Kingdom, including the lovable Koopa Kids. As usual the plot is fast-tracked here, with Bowser once again capturing Peach due to the power of "mysterious orbs" from the P & D franchise. That swift pace carries on throughout the experience, and it's rather jarring to go from the sprawling Z to this.Remedial as it may be, it has some challenging spots, and it's still worth playing if you dig puzzle games. The thrill of building a party is still present, and although the world isn't all that engaging (it feels as lifeless as the first "New" game on DS), most Nintendo fans won't pass up the chance to fight and capture classic characters like Goombas or Piranha Plants. It's disappointing that the Mario part isn't as fleshed out, but it's more excusable when you add in the fact that the core Z experience is worth the price of entry alone.Puzzle & Dragons Z + Puzzle & Dragons: Super Mario Bros. Edition isn't likely to wow anyone, but it's a pretty comprehensive package that would make a great gift to any match-three addict. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Puzzle & Dragons review photo
Two games in one
Puzzle & Dragons came out some time ago in 2012, and has since taken the world by storm. Although its origins started as a humble match-three puzzle game, GungGo Online cleverly added in slot machine-like addictive qualit...

Pushmo photo
Pushmo

The fourth Pushmo game is out in Japan, free-to-play


Interesting
May 13
// Chris Carter
The first three Pushmo games were pretty fantastic, and as of this week, Japan has another entry in the series. It's called Pushmo: Hippa Land, and it's a free-to-play release for the 3DS. No, it's not completely free -...
Carpe Fulgur photo
Carpe Fulgur

I've never seen anything like Carpe Fulgur's new project


This Starry Midnight We Make
May 07
// Jordan Devore
Carpe Fulgur introduced Recettear: An Item Shop's Tale to hundreds of thousands of players in the West and, last we had heard, was helping XSEED Games localize The Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky Second Chapter. Now the ...
Puzzle & Dragons 3DS photo
Puzzle & Dragons 3DS

If the demo is anything to go by, Puzzle & Dragons: Super Mario Bros. Edition is great


Expect thoughts on the final version at launch
Apr 30
// Chris Carter
Free-to-play games often have a bad reputation, especially on the mobile platform. Puzzle & Dragons is one such game to rise to the occasion, offering up a good amount of gameplay for free, and has completely dominat...
Celebi photo
Celebi

Pokemon Shuffle hits 3.5m downloads, enjoy a new Celebi event


1000 Coins
Apr 27
// Chris Carter
With Pokemon Shuffle as a free download on the 3DS with a huge IP behind it, why not give it a try? It appears as if 3.5 million people have done just that, as Nintendo has announced in-game that it has hit that very mileston...
Puzzle & Dragons photo
Puzzle & Dragons

Puzzle & Dragons: Super Mario Bros. Edition is still looking rad


Nice strategic twists
Apr 23
// Chris Carter
Puzzle & Dragons: Super Mario Bros. Edition is still on the horizon, and it's looking better every time I see it. This newest video from Nintendo highlights some of the deeper aspects of the puzzler, including party memb...
Capcom photo
Capcom

Capcom pulls a bait and switch for newly announced Ghostbusters Puzzle Fighter


Wait, this isn't Puzzle Fighter
Apr 22
// Chris Carter
I was in the middle of dinner, eating some mashed potatoes, and someone texted me "hey, there's a new Puzzle Fighter coming out from Capcom." Holy shit! You're telling me that Capcom is resurrecting one of my favorite pu...

Review: MonsterBag

Apr 22 // Steven Hansen
MonsterBag (PlayStation Vita)Developers: IguanaBeePublisher: IguanaBeeReleased: April 7, 2015MSRP: $9.99 Suitably impressed with the trailer's art style, I was still a bit sure how the game actually worked until I played it. Levels are set up with a line of folks to jump between. Reaching Nia, always at the end, is the goal. Tapping left or right flits you across bystanders one at a time, but some are a bit more attentive, requiring you to pause and wait until they aren't looking your way. A series of unfortunate events en route to some kind of alien apocalypse in a narrative escalation reminiscent of Tales from Space: Mutant Blobs Attack means you never quite reach Nia, even when you get to the end of levels. Complicating things beyond increasing sets of hungry eyes per level are certain puzzle elements that make use of V's telekinesis. Various items in the stages can be tapped on if you're in range and then thrown at the NPCs. This starts off innocently enough by fulfilling the character's desire as indicated by little thought bubbles. The angry old man who won't let you pass becomes amicable if you chuck something at the guitarist, causing the latter to throw his axe to the old man, who then shreds and chills out. Soon, though, you're sending spears through people, exposing their internal organs as further items with which to progress. Or beheading scientists to pass retina scans. Levels have a flow of, "get to the first accessible item without being caught, use it on an NPC, then get to whatever item that might've opened up." Only once did I find myself screwing up the combination that I had to restart a level, reaching an impasse without any interactable elements left. [embed]290782:58276:0[/embed] The difficulty, then, comes as more and more enemies are out to get you, which slows your progress as you have to wait for them to avert their gaze to get to one side of the level and often have to then make it back to the start. It can get a bit grating on wider levels, especially when enemies' -- in particular, the later alien monster things -- patterns sync up and you find yourself waiting longer and longer for smaller openings. Getting seen means instant death and regression to a checkpoint, which I occasionally wished were more frequent. Spicing up the puzzling elements are sections where speed is a necessity and those were the most frustrating, not helped by some additional, finicky uses of the Vita touch screen to rotate bits and pull levers. Requiring speed when the distance between two points of character-cover is so heavily watched meant I tried to force more openings with barely-desynced enemy vision patterns, which led to a lot of frustrating deaths. Later levels also introduce more abstract, more complex button-pushing puzzle elements that feel thematically distant and get away from the charming, cobbled together cause-and-effect puzzles that I enjoyed, like tossing lemonade on a thirsty girl or throwing an alien's flaming head to melt down a bigger alien. MonsterBag is a nice bit of light puzzles and charming slapstick, at least until the narrative drives it towards something more serious and mechanical that ups complexity and challenge, but almost feels like a different, less personable game. That backpack is one of the cutest characters in recent memory, though, thanks to its infectious grin and happy hiss, murderous tendencies be damned. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
MonsterBag review photo
Cartoon violence
Animaniacs was all trios and duos (and one solo sexy rat thing) playing off each other for comedy and I couldn't help but think of the Buttons and Mindy skits while playing MonsterBag. Mindy would toddle off into harm's way, ...

Final Fantasy photo
Final Fantasy

Final Fantasy bosses make an appearance in Puzzle & Dragons


Yay Cloud of Darkness
Apr 22
// Chris Carter
Puzzle & Dragons' crossover power cannot be stopped. In addition to Squall and Ace making their way into GungHo's puzzler, more Final Fantasy characters are invading the game -- specifically, a few final bosses. Clou...
Snakebird photo
Snakebird

You had me at 'Snakebird'


An apple a day keeps the Snakebird at bay
Apr 21
// Jordan Devore
A snake that is also a bird. Snakebird. How utterly adorable. The creator of Nimbus is back with Snakebird, a game about contorting narcoleptic creatures through 50-some puzzle worlds. It's releasing super soon: May 4, 2015 ...
Circa Infinity photo
Circa Infinity

I'm trying to wrap my head around Circa Infinity


With marginal success
Apr 21
// Darren Nakamura
At a base level, I think I understand what's going on in Circa Infinity. While on the outside of a circle, the player character needs to get to a wedge to move inside. While on the inside of a circle, the player character ne...
Pokémon Shuffle photo
Pokémon Shuffle

Pokemon Shuffle keeps on shufflin', adds Safari event


You can still redeem that code too
Apr 20
// Chris Carter
When you're allowed to play it, Pokémon Shuffle is pretty fun. The new Safari event is a good excuse to boot it up as well -- then promptly turn the game back off after your hearts wear off in a minute or so. Whil...
Steam photo
Steam

Chip's Challenge and its long-lost sequel are coming to Steam in May


I didn't even know there was a sequel!
Apr 17
// Jordan Devore
After finishing development of the classroom favorite Chip's Challenge, creator Chuck Sommerville got to work on a sequel and, two years later, finished it. But before the game was released, the rights were sold to a new owne...
Trine 3 photo
Trine 3

Trine 3 will use Steam Early Access to nail its new 3D gameplay


It's headed to PC first and other platforms later
Apr 17
// Jordan Devore
There are certain games I wouldn't expect to appear on Steam Early Access. Trine is one of them. The puzzle-platformer series has done tremendously well for itself on PC and consoles, and from what we've seen of the third tit...
Affordable photo
Affordable

Peep the three roles in the new Affordable Space Adventures trailer


Science Officer, Pilot, and Engineer
Apr 02
// Darren Nakamura
Affordable Space Adventures is coming out in one week, so developer KnapNok Games has released a new trailer for the cooperative sci-fi puzzle action title. In my time with it at PAX East, I found the use of the Wii U G...
Talos Principle photo
Talos Principle

A Serious Sam voice pack for The Talos Principle is weird and awesome


And free
Apr 01
// Brett Makedonski
The Talos Principle is a puzzler that requires deep and philosophical thought. Serious Sam is, well, it's pretty much the exact opposite. That's why it's so excellent that the latter will be doing voicework for the ...
Talos Principle expansion photo
Talos Principle expansion

The Talos Principle bringing more deep thoughts with Road to Gehenna expansion


Follow Uriel in a previously hidden section of the simulation
Mar 24
// Darren Nakamura
Players who took the time to really explore The Talos Principle might recognize the name Uriel. Though the base game is seen through the eyes of a particular simulation participant, evidence of others exists in the form of QR...

Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker's amiibo functionality adds a small incentive to replay every level

Mar 21 // Chris Carter
[embed]289368:57872:0[/embed] Like the checkbox that appears after grabbing every crystal and completing the extra objective, it's easy to become addicted to filling out every entry. It sounds like an overly simplistic little thing, but it emboldened me to replay every map again and find that damn Pixel Toad. It's a nice way to get people to return, and it doesn't hurt that the core game is already great to begin with. Get a quick look at the functionality in the video above, and note that other amiibo function as power-ups of sorts, earning you extra lives with a tap. Of course, the best part about this particular amiibo mechanic is that Toad, the physical toy, isn't impossible to find. While retailers knew ahead of time that select exclusives wouldn't be replenished for weeks, if not months (I'm looking at you Target), Toad is readily available at every location I've visited. Heck, even his scalped price online is roughly $18, a far cry from the $60 or more asking price of the Trinity and other select rares to this day. I'm also a fan of the way Shulk was handled in Xenoblade Chronicles 3D, since you can replicate the amiibo bits by way of Play Coins and StreetPass. If Nintendo is going to add amiibo support in future games, it needs to either plan ahead of time if the figures are going to be retailer exclusives (Meta Knight's unique features in Rainbow Curse being lost to most of the market is still a tragedy), or allow unlocks through other means (no one is missing out not having Shulk for Xenoblade).
Captain Toad amiibo photo
Oh, and you can actually buy the figure too
Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker launched its amiibo compatibility this week, and I've found a new reason to revisit the game. It's as simple as adding in a "Hide-and-Seek" mode, enabled by tapping the newly minted Toad amiibo ...

Pokémon Shuffle photo
Pokémon Shuffle

Pokémon Shuffle limiting Mega Lucario to a contest


Only 20,000 served
Mar 17
// Chris Carter
Pokémon Shuffle is a pain to get through without constantly playing the waiting game, but if you're keen, Nintendo has been running occasional events to net special Pokémon. The newest promotion is a contest to ...
Frankenstein photo
Frankenstein

Oh, didn't see you there


#GamesInOneScreenshot
Mar 16
// Jordan Devore
We got a review code in today for a hidden-object game called Frankenstein: Master of Death. Darren expressed tentative interest, noting that it looks "terrible and fun at the same time?" Naturally, I went to investigate. Please send help.

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