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Destiny photo
Destiny

Try before you buy with Destiny's The Taken King


Bungie offers preview of Crucible modes and maps
Sep 04
// Vikki Blake
Destiny players will be able to access a taste of the upcoming expansion, The Taken King, for free next week. Bungie confirmed that while you won't be able to test out any new super abilities or increase the level 34 cap...

Hob is a fascinating departure from Torchlight

Sep 03 // Jordan Devore
My demo at PAX Prime was short, and left me with questions that almost certainly won't be answered until I get to play the finished game, whenever that will be. It's still a ways off. I was dropped into an early area of the game -- but not the actual opening, it's worth pointing out -- and started hopping up hills and climbing vines. Hob is presented from an overhead view, but its camera dynamically zooms in on focal points. It pays to check out every tucked-away area for health, stamina, and weapon upgrades, sure, but also to take in the sights. Eventually, I happened upon some basic creatures and then a boss. My Souls instincts kicked in and I rolled, rolled, rolled. You can never be too cautious, y'know? The bigger foe was fairly easy but, in general, "The idea is that all of our monsters will basically destroy you unless you actually figure out how to beat them," according to Runic president Marsh Lefler. Moving on, I worked my way underground to an area like the one shown in this concept art, and used my arm to grapple around. The world is, in part, mechanical. It doesn't sit still. You might come back to a spot you've already gone through only to find that it has been altered. Runic wouldn't give much away about the story, but teased something unexpected. "What makes this game unique is what it hints at -- we have some pretty big ideas for it," said Lefler. He also believes the team is "going to blow people's minds when we start showing them what we're going to be actually doing with manipulating the world to the Nth degree." While there will surely be a Torchlight III one day, I'm happy we're getting Hob first. It sounds like the folks at Runic are genuinely happy to take a break from RPGs, too.
Preview photo
A new adventure from Runic Games
Zelda. Ico. Shadow of the Colossus. Even a little Metroid. Runic Games has borrowed concepts from these iconic adventures for its next PC and console game, Hob. Why "Hob?" Well, the name has a dual meaning that refers to litt...

Uncharted 4 photo
Uncharted 4

Uncharted 4's getting single-player DLC because it worked in The Last of Us


'We rose to the challenge'
Sep 03
// Brett Makedonski
Naughty Dog will try something new with Nathan Drake's adventures in Uncharted 4: A Thief's End -- a story outside of the base game's story. Earlier this week, the developer detailed Uncharted 4's downloadable conte...
SOMA photo
SOMA

SOMA handles horror differently than Amnesia


Frictional compares the two
Sep 03
// Jordan Devore
In June, I told myself to stay away from watching and subsequently covering any more trailers for SOMA. That was going well -- until today. Curiosity got the better of me, but at least this "Environments" trailer is abstract ...

Rocket League photo
Rocket League

Rocket League is giving names to the nameless


New patch coming soon
Sep 03
// Jordan Devore
Psyonix is prepping patch 1.05 for Rocket League. While the full notes aren't ready just yet, the developer has talked about some of the changes coming in "two weeks or less." Notably, there will be a Find New Match option in...

Review: Nobunaga's Ambition: Sphere of Influence

Sep 03 // Kyle MacGregor
Nobunaga's Amibition: Sphere of Influence (PC [reviewed], PS4, PS3)Developer: Koei TecmoPublisher: Koei TecmoRelease Date: September 1, 2015MSRP: $59.99 My journey began by acquainting myself with Sphere of Influence's comprehensive (perhaps a tad too comprehensive) tutorial, before jumping headlong into one of the title's nine historical campaigns. There, players have the opportunity to act as one of Japan's elite families during the country's "warring states" period in the 16th century. Whether you choose to recreate history as the Oda clan or blaze your own trail, the aim remains the same -- to unite the fractured nation. How you get there will require a careful synthesis of conflict, management, and diplomacy, as the path toward bringing dozens of warring territories under a common banner requires a multi-pronged approach. This begins with building up a small province, developing it into a rich, bountiful launching pad that can support a growing empire. The backbone of the realm is the labor force, which is, of course, limited in supply. Daimyos must allocate their workers to projects mindfully, whether that means paving new roads, constructing new buildings, improving fortifications, focusing on trade or food production, the list just goes on and on. Rest assured, manpower is always at a premium. That line of thought extends to the nobility as well as the commoners. With only so many officers to go around to carry out diplomatic missions, govern territories, lead military units, and oversee civic projects; managing the ruling class is of the utmost importance. Individual leaders have varying skills, and knowing how and where to employ them can make a drastic difference in how quickly and effectively a clan enacts the wide swathe of policies these officers must take charge of. [embed]305046:60241:0[/embed] If that sounds incredibly intricate and exacting, well, that's because it is. Despite being a game where the end goal is conquering (or subduing) an entire nation spanning dozens of factions and hundreds of settlements, Nobunaga's Amibition doesn't shy away form minutiae. No task, from appeasing the local hill tribes to planting an orchard or setting up a suggestion box for citizens to voice their concerns, is too small a concern to deal with. And in the aggregate these sorts of seemingly minuscule moves tend to pay dividends when clashing with neighboring daimyo or getting them to join your coalition. It isn't all about raising armies and sending them off to battle. Not that combat isn't a large part of the game, because it most certainly is. After players finish managing their towns, the experience switches from a turn-based affair to a real-time one, where armies will march off to besiege enemy villages or clash with hostile forces on the battlefield. The battles play out automatically (as depicted above), but can be controlled manually, with players taking control of each individual army as a unit on the battlefield. This facet of the experience might seem a little primitive in comparison to some of its genre peers, but it's not entirely without depth. While there isn't much in the way of unit variety, each commander has his or her (no, you needn't marry off all your daughters to forge political alliances) own abilities that buff their troops with improved defense, melee attack, and a myriad of other temporary strategic supplements. Skirmishes aren't always a numbers game, either. I've frequently found myself using guerrilla tactics, surrounding a large battalion with several smaller ones and harassing them from all sides. This negates their numerical superiority, since a block can only attack in one direction at any given time, while forces with smaller, more plentiful detachments possess the ability to be more nimble. Throughout the experience, players are treated to historical vignettes, which not only follow key events pertaining to your chosen faction, but other clans as well. If significant affairs are happening across the country, chances are you'll be given a front row seat. These aren't always assassinations and coups d'état, though, sometimes they're a tad more trivial, pertaining to the romantic lives of clan leaders or the arrival of western missionaries spreading Christianity in certain provinces. There's a lot going in Nobunaga's Ambition: Sphere of Influence, to be sure, and much of it is done well. After pushing through some initial bewilderment associated with coming to grips with its mess of elaborate systems, I discovered an experience that rewarded the time I put into it in spades. Its pace may be too plodding for some and it certainly seems somewhat backwards or dated in relief with other modern strategy games, but Nobunaga's Ambition: Sphere of Influence still remains an ornate and absorbing title that kept me engaged for hours on end and surely will continue to do so. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Nobunaga's Ambition photo
Sublime Sengoku-era strategy
My first experience with Nobunaga's Ambition: Sphere of Influence nearly broke me. I collapsed into a heap over my keyboard, weeping softly, wondering just what I had got myself into this time. Even as a seasoned strategy gam...

Metal Gear Solid V photo
Metal Gear Solid V

This is why you should input a fake birthday in Metal Gear Solid V


Look how happy he is
Sep 03
// Chris Carter
Like a total chump I put in my real birthday date at the start of Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, so I won't be seeing this extra for a while. If you did the same, you'll probably want to catch this Easter egg above --...
Arkham Knight photo
Arkham Knight

Batman: Arkham Knight PC patch pushed early, seems to work


Still not fully live yet
Sep 03
// Chris Carter
You all know the story by now -- the PC version of Batman: Arkham Knight launched, and for most people, it straight-up didn't work, or bugged out at the attempt to run it on higher settings. Thankfully WB pulled the game...
Metal Gear Solid V photo
Metal Gear Solid V

Spoiler: This final chapter was cut from Metal Gear Solid V


Watch it after you beat the game
Sep 03
// Chris Carter
Evidently, there's an extra chapter to Metal Gear Solid V that was cut from the game. It's not playable in any form, contains incomplete assets, and you can only watch it on the Blu-ray extra that was included with the S...
Mortal Kombat X photo
Mortal Kombat X

It looks like four more characters are coming to Mortal Kombat X


'Who's Next?'
Sep 03
// Chris Carter
Mortal Kombat X might be canceled on PS3 and Xbox 360, but that isn't stopping NetherRealm from developing more DLC! Ed Boon sent out a tweet yesterday indicating that there will be four more characters coming, ominously prom...
Dishonored 2 photo
Dishonored 2

Harvey Smith points out things we'd missed in the Dishonored 2 reveal trailer


Revenge really DOES solve everything!
Sep 03
// Joe Parlock
Every time I remember Dishonored 2 is coming, emotions my normal grumpy demeanor are simply not used to emerge. Emotions I have never felt before like… like… sheer excitement. Playing as Emily Kaldwin being a b...

Tearaway Unfolded faithfully breaks the DualShock 4th wall

Sep 02 // Steven Hansen
Tearaway used fourth-wall breaking about as much as Metal Gear Solid, which still, with the recently released Phantom Pain, has a character tell you to, "use the stance button to stand up." That you are playing a video game is addressed, here through the physicality of the thing. Your own face in the sky, representations of your fingers popping up in the world. Unfolded's entire opening is new. It plays off the home console's position as a living room box, likely hooked up to a television with some kind of cable network. The two voices that narrate the story switch through a fake cable TV guide, hastily bypassing shows called "Rubbish" and flicking through commercials before coming to the conclusion that there's nothing to watch, that there's no good story. So we'll have to make our own. Actually, it's almost like the beginning of Metal Gear Solid 4. The first new PS4 feature is light. The triggers produced a beam of light in the world that reflects the light emitted by the DualShock 4. It even keeps the same triangle shape and shows up in the world as if you were pointing to the front of the controller like a flashlight. So far it's one of the only useful reasons for that light existing, save for draining battery life and then blinding me every time I tilt the thing up to find the charge port. [embed]308798:60230:0[/embed] The You's -- that's you -- light has different effects, from simply illuminating the new, dim intro to making plants grow to scraping inky newspaper Scraps from the construction paper world to hypnotizing enemies that will follow the beam of light off a cliff. It doesn't have the same punchy feel as poking at them with giant fingers from below, but it does its job of grounding the player in both the game world and real world in a novel way. It's too hell with immersion and that's fine. Due to my lack of the PlayStation camera, I did find myself wanting with regard to my self-portrait showing up in the hole in the sky. Even if on the Vita it was grainy and always the least flattering angle (I never held my arms parallel to the ground when I played), it is missed, here. Same with the ability to, say, reupholster an elk by taking a picture of my cat. Of course, if lower case you have a camera, it's possible to sustain these touches, or if you have a mic at the ready you can record an intimidating yell for your scarecrow. A new gust of wind ability replaces your ability to physically leaf through the environment. Instead of swiping a platform down on the Vita screen, you swipe the DualShock 4 touchpad in the desired direction you want to the wind to blow. Atoi, the messenger you guide through Tearaway, can also throw enemies and items up "through" the TV screen and into your controller, and then you can aim a reticle and swipe forward on the touchpad to shoot the projectile back onto the map, whether to bash an enemy or solve a puzzle. The touchpad is also used for the paper craft segments where you're tasked with making wings for the local butterflies or snow flakes to pepper your mountain climb (I went again with some nice pink cherry blossoms). It works alright, but the lack of real estate makes precision hard. You might consider the companion app, which would give you (or a friend) a larger drawing surface, but, again, I don't want to be fiddling with three extra pieces of technological accessories just to get the same effect the Vita bundled up. Tearaway Unfolded isn't as elegant or holistic an experience as it was on Vita because of additional technical needs, but significant effort has gone to reproducing the same effects in new ways. It's pretty as hell, too, holding its own with anything on the PS4 despite its humble beginnings. New areas have been built from scratch, parts extended, others cut. No more log rolling troubles, which is the only Vita feature that bugged the hell out of me. A lot of care went into Unfolded. It may be another tacit admission that the Vita is dead, but at least this incredible, surprising game did not die with it.
Tearaway PS4 port photo
Challenging PS4 port flashes Metal Gear
Tearaway was the zenith of the PlayStation Vita. While many fine games have hit the platform since, few have been exclusive and original, and none used every inch of the Vita's additional capabilities to as good effect. That ...

What happens in Vegas  photo
What happens in Vegas

New Vegas almost beat Fallout 4 to player romance


What happens in Vegas is a bad joke
Sep 02
// Steven Hansen
As we learned in "No fucking the robot," Fallout 4 will have romance options for the human percentage of its 12 companion characters. Obsidian almost beat Bethesda to the punch in 2010. Fallout: New Vegas lead designer Josh S...
Phantom Pain photo
Phantom Pain

Watch where you drop your supplies in Metal Gear Solid V


Horsin' around
Sep 02
// Steven Hansen
That horse, post clonking, is how I feel all the time. This mistake (or, let's be real, I'm sure this was intentional) is still better than when I tried to be cheeky and knock out an enemy like this, only to have him casually...

Meddle in the affairs of others, control their minds in Randall

Sep 02 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]308786:60224:0[/embed] Randall (releasing on PC, PS4, and Vita) takes place in a world where everyone's been brainwashed by the authoritarian powers that be. A corporation has the citizens under its control, but the populace is completely unaware of the oppression at hand. We The Force wasn't willing to go too far into the story, but hinted at a "bigger things are at play" angle. One person is acutely aware of the oppression, however. That's the titular Randall. In a "taste of your own medicine" type of twist, he's trying to take down this faceless juggernaut through the use of mind control. It's this mechanic that takes Randall from an action-platformer and injects a puzzle element into it too. Rooms will often have a throng of enemies in them that need to be cleared out in a particular order. A rudimentary example was an area with one foe on the ground and two on platforms above who could shoot projectiles. Those platforms were unreachable from the floor, but if you controlled the bottom enemy, you could jump off of him and up to the top. Order of operations is important to figure out. It was obvious in that instance what needed to be done, but later encounters surely won't be as telegraphed. Most of these guys won't just allow themselves to get taken over, though. They require a quick beat-down. This comes in the form of simple button-pressed combos. We were shown an earlier level, but there was a definite sense that tactics would have to be switched up as the game progresses. That's only half the battle. Studio head Cesar Ramirez Molina told us that the developer's aiming for about a 50/50 split on combat and platforming. The platforming aspect isn't as intuitive as it could be, and it took several deaths before I got the hang of it. There's likely a better learning curve and teaching process in the full game than in the quick slice I played. Fortunately, Randall checkpoints graciously and there wasn't too much lost progress. There's promise in Randall, but there's more promise in what Randall represents. We The Force Studios is one of the few video game developers in Mexico. Currently, the scene is dominated by software and web developers. It's a much safer prospect to follow the established market than to risk your family's security pursuing what no one else is. That's why We The Force was doing web development up until it made the bold decision that it wanted a legacy. That's why the team started creating games. Randall is its first project, and Molina lamented what a tough transition it has been. He spoke about how challenging it is to make a decision about gameplay and then have to do all the research to figure out exactly how to implement it. Seasoned developers already know the technical side, but Molina and his crew have learned most of it on-the-fly. Randall is projected for a release sometime in 2016. It's a loose window, but it needs to be considering that the studio's inexperience possibly makes it more subject to delays than others. Regardless of when it launches and how it turns out, it's admirable that We The Force went out on a limb to pursue a dream while sacrificing safety. Just like its protagonist, these developers are going against the grain and chasing what they believe in.
Randall preview photo
Freedom fighter
Clerks has a scene where Randal Graves, an irresponsible and indifferent video store employee, tells a customer that he finds it best to stay out of other people's affairs. The laissez-faire approach isn't a noble a...

Code name Kenshin photo
Code name Kenshin

It's the big one: PlayStation 4 firmware 3.0 detailed


Now batting, Herb Guy
Sep 02
// Steven Hansen
The PS3 firmware 3.0 was probably amazing, the PS Vita 3.0 firmware changed your life, and now it's time for the PlayStation 4 to hit the big three oh (same) as detailed in the PlayStation Blog. Taking the piss with respect t...

Review: Mad Max

Sep 02 // Chris Carter
Mad Max (PC, PS4 [review], Xbox One)Developer: Avalanche StudiosPublisher: Warner Bros. Interactive EntertainmentReleased: September 1, 2015MSRP: $59.99 Mad Max is, at its heart, a revenge tale. You aren't going to get much high commentary here (like Beyond Thunderdome's exemplary exploration of the power of language and speech), just a good old fashioned showdown between series protagonist Max Rockatansky, and Scabrous Scrotus (which, as silly as it is, is par for the Mad Max course), who happens to be a son of Fury Road's Immortan Joe. That's about where the link with the film series ends, though, as the game is not a direct tie-in, and mostly benefits from that fact. Max is scorned by Scrotus, who takes everything he owns and destroys his prized car. Teaming up with the psychotic, yet harmless Chumbucket, it's up to the player to hunt down Scrotus, and rebuild your ride in the form of the greatest car known to man, the Magnum Opus. What I like about this setup is that it allows Avalanche to tell a new tale of the wasteland without having to retread on certain areas. I mean yes, there are a few re-used locations like Gas Town, as well as some familiar thematic elements, but for the most part, this is an encapsulated tale. The enhanced Avalanche Engine is quite the achievement, and I can see why the developer opted to shuck the PS3 and Xbox 360 versions of the game. Screens simply don't do this game justice, especially when you're scouting out far away locations high up in a hot air balloon while the scorching sun beams down on you, or when vicious sandstorms pop up. A built-in camera capture mechanic (on top of the PS4's standard capabilities) is the cherry on top. Taking a different approach to the typical open world formula, Mad Max's core gameplay is built around driving. Any racing game fan will instantly find themselves familiar with the control scheme, and the vast majority of the vehicles operate similarly to some of the best racing titles out right now. Car combat is handled well, since your companion Chumbucket rides along with you, repairing the car and using weapons in real time -- so it's both cinematic and functional. While the "slo-mo" feature is pretty much dead at this point, it allows players to actually get some hits in while aiming vehicle-centric weaponry, and blowing out enemy tires or harpooning them right out of the driver's seat is satisfying in all the right ways. The customization aspect also feels justified here, since changing up your car will significantly alter how it functions. There's hundreds of options here, from ramming grills, to spikes that protect your car from boarders, to new paint jobs and bodies, to explosive harpoons. The way the concept of the Magnum Opus is presented actually fits inline with this bit of the game, and I never felt pressured or compelled to go out and seek other cars to use. You can basically just drive and switch up your own custom car from start to finish, and it's easy to get attached to certain elements of your ride. Where Mad Max starts to falter is the on-foot sections, or more specifically, how these areas were designed. Combat is basically a carbon copy of the Batman: Arkham games, albeit with more brutal finishers, so that works well enough, but it's the actual zones -- where you can't bring the car mind you -- that often feel uninspired and bland. Since Max can only climb on certain surfaces, and only exhibits a pathetic GTA-style "hop" when pressing the jump button, on-foot sections feel out of place and gamey. It reminds me of the Prince of Persia reboot, which gave you this awesome-looking, sprawling world, and forced you to only explore it within a rigid set of rules. There are also a few other issues I had with these sections, like collision detection problems while climbing, and annoying mechanics like the fact that Max limps for a few seconds after falling the smallest distances. Exploring these zones simply isn't as satisfying without say, the aerial prowess of Talion, or the wonderful toys of Batman, to use direct comparisons to similar open-world WB titles in recent memory. While the story is engaging enough to string you along, a lot of the other activities aren't all that intriguing. It's like the team took the typical Ubisoft blueprint and stuck with it -- radio towers (balloons), fortresses, collectibles, sidequest races, smaller towers to knock down to lower "influence" -- it's all there. That's not to say that the game is mostly boring, far from it actually, as driving around is always a joy given how great the vehicular mechanics are, and there are a lot of naturally occurring events out in the wild to keep things interesting. I went back and forth in terms of my assessment multiple times throughout my time with Mad Max. I'd be having a blast in the car, and then I'd get to a particularly samey part on foot, and so on. But ultimately, I did enjoy my time in the wasteland, even if it doesn't offer up a whole lot that we haven't seen before. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Mad Max review photo
Who run Bartertown?!
I grew up with Mad Max. It was one of the first R-rated film series I viewed as a child, and naturally, I saw Fury Road, and enjoyed it like everyone else on the planet. My infatuation with the films is mostly due to George M...

Shutshimi photo
Shutshimi

Shutshimi: Seriously Swole coming soon to Wii U


Choice Provision's great goldfish shmup
Sep 01
// Alessandro Fillari
Just last week, we were graced with the release of Shutshimi: Seriously Swole on PC, PS4 and Vita. In this bizarre tribute to classic shooters, players take control of a team of gun-toting goldfish with memory issues as they ...
Dead or Alive fan vote photo
Dead or Alive fan vote

Dead or Alive Xtreme 3's smallest chested volleyballer leads polls


Looks like all the youngest leading
Sep 01
// Steven Hansen
Dead or Alive Xtreme 3, which may come west and will feature women in bikinis playing volleyball on the beach, is filling out its swimsuit roster by way of fan vote. And, perhaps surprisingly, fans of the series known for its...
MGSV LBP3 DLC photo
MGSV LBP3 DLC

LittleBigPlanet gets Metal Gear Solid V DLC, fat Ocelot is great


Cute enough to look at once, never buy
Sep 01
// Steven Hansen
Remember LittleBigPlanet? Sony had a hit on its hands, and then it didn't, between a lackluster Vita game, a weak kart racer, and a third entry abandoned by the original creator for newer, more interesting ideas (Tearaway!)....

Banner Saga 2 is 'basically the same' as the first

Sep 01 // Kyle MacGregor
[embed]308796:60226:0[/embed] It might have been a refreshing moment of honesty, you know, if the statement were actually true.  While The Banner Saga 2 may not be a drastic revision that goes out of its way to reinvent the core experience, intimating it's a carbon copy that merely continues the story might be underselling it. In my limited time with the game, I witnessed a number of notable tweaks to the existing formula that figure to go a long way in addressing players' complaints about the original being somewhat of a repetitive slog. The sequel feels like a more dynamic, varied evolution on what's already been established, thanks to little touches like how battles arise and play out. The Banner Saga 2 reinforces one of its predecessors greatest strengths -- how consequences born from player choice ripple throughout the experience like stones cast into a pond -- by having them directly bleed into combat, starting out battles with scenes that stem from your decisions, rather than have them play out exactly the same way regardless of how a particular situation came to pass. Once a skirmish begins, you'll encounter new foes, such as four-legged creatures that can cloak themselves and ambush more fragile units (such as archers) that you figured were safe behind the front lines. New support units will also force you to make difficult decisions between targeting the enemy's bruisers or the guys making them even more imposing than they otherwise would be. Even outside of battle, players will have new options to manage their caravan. Clansman seem to be of more use this time around, as they can be recruited as fighters. However, much like everything in Stoic's universe, there are drawbacks to this; these new warriors will no longer focus on collecting supplies, making your caravan's precious resources dwindle at a faster clip. At a glance, it may not seem that too much has changed since The Banner Saga launched in early 2014, but upon closer inspection, the development team at Stoic appears to be making subtle, yet impactful changes to a blueprint that already worked in an effort to take its game to the next level.
Bad PR photo
Except not really
Game previews are an inherently strange part of this business. You wouldn't read a few pages from an unfinished book and render judgement about the final product. Likewise, we don't often have the opportunity to sample a song...

Street Fighter V photo
Street Fighter V

Fan complaints seem to have changed Cammy's Street Fighter V look


More anime-looking
Sep 01
// Steven Hansen
While everyone was flush with wanting to fuck bearded "Hot Ryu"/"Dad Ryu" -- I wrote that as "breaded" originally, which made me also want to fuck him -- Cammy's retailer exclusive pre-order costume (above and still a bogus p...
MGSV photo
MGSV

Kojima: 'I always felt that every chapter I made would be the last'


Director on Metal Gear Solid V
Sep 01
// Steven Hansen
Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain's director Hideo Kojima has done a "Debriefing" video timed with the release of his latest and, presumably, last entry in the series. And it appeared on Konami's channel, no less. (And Ko...
TGS 2015 photo
TGS 2015

Sony announces Tokyo Game Show PS4 and Vita lineup


Two more weeks
Sep 01
// Steven Hansen
Wow, just a few more weeks until I'm eating curry twice a day and peeing in sexy anime nurse urinals. Also, playing video games over at the Tokyo Game Show (September 17-20). This list is likely missing some super secret game...
Resident Evil 0 photo
Resident Evil 0

Resident Evil 0's Wesker Mode is absurd


Look at him run!
Sep 01
// Jordan Devore
The Resident Evil series is no stranger to silly modes, and I'm glad to see Capcom continue down that path with Wesker Mode in next year's Resident Evil 0 HD remaster. Uroboros? Uroboros. In the new mode, Albert Wesker fills in for Billy Coen and oh my god, his sprint is hilarious.
Assassin's Creed photo
Assassin's Creed

Newest Assassin's Creed trailer shows the game's best feature


And none of the stabbing
Sep 01
// Brett Makedonski
Without a doubt, the best part of every year's Assassin's Creed game is the setting. It was certainly the case for Unity's Paris. Ubisoft generally does a great job of making these city sandboxes feel lived-in and livel...
Bloodborne art photo
Bloodborne art

Bloodborne never looked so good


Hunt the Great Ones
Sep 01
// Jordan Devore
I'm not usually one to buy merchandise at PAX, but had I seen this Bloodborne piece by Kyle Fewell at the Fangamer booth, I would've changed my tune so fast. I adore those colors. If the style looks familiar, you might've seen his earlier piece, Ghibli Souls. It's exactly what it sounds like. And while not strictly Souls-related, this Adventuring set evokes similar feelings of wonder.
Batman: Arkham Knight photo
Batman: Arkham Knight

Batman: Arkham Knight Crime Fighter pack DLC is out


Part of the Season Pass
Sep 01
// Chris Carter
The next batch of Batman: Arkham Knight DLC is out today -- the Crime Fighter Challenge Pack #1. In short, you're basically getting six AR missions, featuring Robin, Catwoman, Batman, and Nightwing. If you bought the Sea...
Star Wars: Battlefront photo
Star Wars: Battlefront

EA provides details for Star Wars Battlefront October beta


Coming to PC, PS4, and Xbox One
Sep 01
// Chris Carter
EA  has spilled some details for the upcoming Star Wars Battlefront beta. It'll be available in early October on the PC, PS4, and Xbox One platforms, and is a technical test that will feature 40-person battles on Hoth, p...

Video Review: Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

Sep 01 // Myles Cox
[embed]308699:60215:0[/embed]
Metal Gear video review photo
Standing on the edge of the crater
In case you haven't seen Chris' written review of The Phantom Pain (or you're not fond of reading), I've prepared a relatively* spoiler-free video review of the long-awaited final(?) entry in the Metal Gear Solid series. *All gameplay footage is spoiler-free. All cutscene footage has been shown in previous trailers.


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