Note: iOS 9 + Facebook users w/ trouble scrolling: #super sorry# we hope to fix it asap. In the meantime Chrome Mobile is a reach around
hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

Platform games

Ratchet & Clank photo
Ratchet & Clank

Ratchet & Clank has some great aesthetics, channels its inner Star Fox

Barrel rolls lookin' fine
Oct 30
// Brett Makedonski
As a part of the on-going Paris Games festivities, Insomniac put out a nice little gameplay video for the upcoming Ratchet & Clank game. The tropical setting really pops on PS4, and everything generally looks great....
Mirror's Edge delay photo
Mirror's Edge delay

Mirror's Edge Catalyst pushed back to May 2016

What's another few months?
Oct 29
// Darren Nakamura
Mirror's Edge Catalyst, the long-awaited reboot/sequel/whatever to 2008's Mirror's Edge is almost upon us. We've been sitting idly, hoping to play as Faith again for seven years. The wait just got a little bit longer. Catalys...
Super Mario Maker photo
Super Mario Maker

Game Center CX level coming to Super Mario Maker in all regions

Yes, outside of Japan
Oct 28
// Chris Carter
When November 4 hits, you'll probably want to boot up your copy of Super Mario Maker. In addition to checkpoints, a new power-up creation tool, and a Course World overhaul, it looks like we're getting a new premium level. It'...
AeternoBlade 2 photo
AeternoBlade 2

A sequel to AeternoBlade is in the works for the 3DS and Vita

Still an eShop-only game
Oct 28
// Chris Carter
AeternoBlade may have had issues, but I found it to be a fun little action game for the 3DS eShop when it was released last year. Thankfully, developer Corecell Technology has announced that a sequel is in the works, which wi...
Mario Special photo
Mario Special

Obscure Hudson-made Mario Special recreated in Mario Maker

All it takes is one dedicated fan
Oct 27
// Chris Carter
The Super Mario Maker homages continue to roll in. Previously we saw someone recreate every e-Reader level, now someone has gone and crafted every stage from Super Mario Bros. Special, released in 1986. Special ...

Review: Penarium

Oct 23 // Alissa McAloon
Penarium (PC [reviewed], PS4, Xbox One) Developer: Self Made Miracle Publisher: Team17 Released: September 22, 2015 MSRP: $9.99 The controls, like much of Penarium, are outwardly straightforward but still offer a lot of room for unique play-styles. Willy is only able to run left and right and can also double jump in the air. PC players have the most freedom here and can use WASD, the arrow keys, or some combination of the two to get around. But know that Penarium is brutal, no matter what platform it's played on. Unlike similar titles that favor a gamepad, the game has the somewhat unique distinction of being equally playable on both controllers and keyboard. Though Penarium offers three game modes, its campaign is easily its meatiest experience. The story is told through thirty levels spread across three different arenas. Things start slow and simple, but quickly evolve into chaos. Different objectives, such as breaking barrels placed throughout a level or popping balloons in a specific order, become increasingly difficult as a myriad of different traps enter the equation. Homing missiles, deathly icicles, sticky platforms, barrel-stealing birds, terrain destroying electricity, or a roaming swarm of bees could all complicate whatever task Willy has to complete. Overall there aren't a ton of traps in the game, but it is fond of throwing multiple traps at Willy at once to keep things interesting. Conquering one pair of traps isn't enough after a few levels. Eventually objectives will have you collect thirty barrels, but rotate in a new set of traps every five. This is where the unforgiving element of Penarium comes in. Dying on the final set of traps, maybe even seconds before completing the task, kicks you right back to the beginning of that level. There are no checkpoints between trap-sets, and no rewards for making it so close to victory. The difficulty is punishing, but at the same time never feels impossible. Persistence, skill, and a tiny bit of luck are all necessities if you want to clear all thirty levels. Campaign offers players a variety of fun tasks to conquer, which makes it all the more of a shame that multiplayer shares none of that uniqueness. Two players either compete or work together to capture a series of randomly placed buttons, each with their own trap combinations to overcome. The whole package isn't terrible for the first few rounds, but after a while it becomes apparent that repetitive multiplayer mode lacks that stressful charm that Penarium built its campaign on. Arcade mode is a somewhat fuller experience, but still falls short when compared to the campaign. Playable on any of the three arenas, arcade mode endlessly tasks you with collecting as many barrels as possible before an eventual death. Traps rotate out every five barrels to keep things interesting, but it still had a hard time holding my attention. Even with the arcade-exclusive ability system that exchanges coins for random use skills, the scoreboard focused mode fails to offer anything to really keep players engaged. Penarium is incredibly fun, but could have been even better if the multiplayer and arcade modes had taken some inspiration from the campaign. But even then, what's left is overall a fantastic experience. The game is difficult, but I haven't found myself so lovingly furious with a game since Spelunky. It works well within the scope of its own mechanics to create a game that stays consistently challenging, without ever feeling truly impossible. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Penarium photo
Unforgivingly cruel in the very best way
Fans of soul-crushing platformers like Super Meat Boy and Spelunky will feel right at home within the sadistic circus rings of Penarium. The 2D arena survival-fest puts players in the shoes of a young farmer named Willy, who ...

Mighty No. 9 photo
Mighty No. 9

Inafune promises no more Mighty No. 9 delays, talks sequel

I bet the anime won't be delayed
Oct 22
// Chris Carter
The Mighty No. 9 situation is just silly to me at this point. After multiple delays, including a last-minute one that was perfectly timed around the Red Ash project's end, and an "apology" Flash game, it's almost li...
Octodad on Wii U photo
Octodad on Wii U

Octodad: Dadliest Catch to get Wii U release on October 29

Just in time for Halloween
Oct 21
// Darren Nakamura
While children are dressing up as Marvel superheroes and/or Disney princesses and adults are doing the same but with sexy versions (think Ant Man but with assless chaps), one humble cephalopod will be dressing up as a regular...
Yoshi music photo
Yoshi music

Yoshi's Woolly World is such a happy game

This song is going on repeat
Oct 19
// Jordan Devore
I'm about halfway through Yoshi's Woolly World and I am so grateful to have a dedicated co-op partner. There's this intoxicating contrast between the cute, handcrafted aesthetic and our innate desire to screw one another over...
Mushroom 11 screenshots photo
Mushroom 11 screenshots

Mushroom 11's world is beautiful desolation

Have some screenshots
Oct 17
// Darren Nakamura
Every so often a game comes along that lends itself to a big ol' screenshot gallery. To fit the bill, a game obviously needs to look good, but it also helps if it has a simple control scheme that allows easy access to the F12...

Review: Mushroom 11

Oct 17 // Darren Nakamura
Mushroom 11 (Linux, Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: UntamePublisher: UntameReleased: October 15, 2015MSRP: $14.99Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit Creation through destruction is a central theme in Mushroom 11, represented both in its story and its gameplay. Here, players control a green slime mold with a peculiar trait: it will always try to maintain the same number of cells at all times. If one dies, another one grows anew. The kicker is that the new cell can appear next to any other currently living cell, so long as there's space for it in the environment. It can show up near where the original cell died, appear on the other side of the organism, or manifest in a totally different location if the mold has been split into two or more chunks. Instead of direct control over the blob, players are given what's basically an image editor erase tool. Click in a spot to designate a circular area that will destroy any cells within. Right click for a smaller circle and finer control. That's all there is to it. What results is a reversal in thinking in terms of movement across the desolate landscape. You don't have control of where it goes; you have control of where it doesn't go. Destroy in one place so you may create in another. [embed]316036:60766:0[/embed] The control scheme sets up for some great physics-based puzzling. Early on, the challenges are in reaching high objects, climbing steep walls, and clearing small gaps. Most are small feats of engineering, requiring the creation of towers and bridges with the ooze. Sometimes, this brings about a sort of "leap of faith" situation, where it can take ten or more minutes carefully constructing a shape that fits a puzzle's needs and very nearly clears an obstacle, but for the last push it requires a quick erasure of everything but the tip. It's a huge relief when it works, but an incredible bummer when it fails. Those who err on the side of caution may spend a lot of time tediously trimming cells one by one, hoping with each destroyed square, the new one will pop up in a desirable location. That example is a subset of one of my biggest problems with Mushroom 11. The cardinal sin of a physics-based puzzler is when the player knows the solution but cannot manage the execution. The tedium of the slow approach is one thing, but a small handful of puzzles get downright infuriating due to the semi-random nature of the cell growth. There was one in particular in the seventh stage that had me second-guessing my solution after almost an hour spent on it. I had the right idea, I was just not quite fast enough. When I finally did complete it, I didn't feel like I had done anything fundamentally different that time than I had during the hundred previous attempts. In broader terms, the difficulty of Mushroom 11 was a surprise. The first couple levels can be easily completed in less than a half hour. The next few clock in at under an hour. The seventh stage took me as long to complete as the other six combined. It is not messing around. Early on, a lot of the greater challenges are optional, rewarding players for exploration or going the extra mile. At the end, some of the mandatory challenges almost made me quit and the optional ones seem damn near impossible. I eventually had to take a break because my finger was sore from how hard I was holding down the mouse button. It's almost as if Mushroom 11 transitions from being a puzzler to an action game during the final act. Not only do some of the sections require precision, they also demand speed. The control scheme can provide for either on its own, but having both at the same time can take a bit of luck. The world this all takes place in is strangely beautiful. It paints a picture of an earth after humanity, full of desolation and decay. Each level has its own look to it, but the trend is toward less machinery and more nature as the game progresses. Humans may be gone, eradicated or forced to flee, but life still goes on in their wake. Again, creation from destruction. Overall, Mushroom 11 is a worthwhile experience. It has its missteps, most notably when its puzzles favor brute force over elegance or when it doesn't play to its unique control scheme's strengths. But its uniqueness is its greatest asset; there isn't anything else quite like it out there, and it takes a different kind of thinking to get through. I wouldn't be surprised to hear some may abandon it before finishing due to its difficulty, but I also wouldn't be surprised to see diehards pop up, going for the no-death and the 100 percent runs. For me, I'm totally happy with my single playthrough. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Mushroom 11 review photo
Doesn't quite go to 11
From the beginning, Mushroom 11 establishes itself as something different. Though it has been done before, the whole concept of traveling from right to left in a 2D game can still be jarring simply because of its rarity. It s...

Yoshi's Woolly World photo
Yoshi's Woolly World

There are some unsettling amiibo outfits in Yoshi's Woolly World

Sleep with one eye open
Oct 16
// Jordan Devore
Yoshi's Woolly World has been out in Europe since June, but it's only now available in North America. During that wait, I mostly forgot about the game's extensive amiibo support. Compatible amiibo grant a new look for Yoshi, ...

Review: Yoshi's Woolly World

Oct 16 // Laura Kate Dale
Yoshi's Woolly World (Wii U)Developer: Good-FeelPublisher: NintendoMSRP: $49.99Release Date: June 26 (EU) / October 16 (NA) Sitting at around 10 hours to complete, Yoshi's Woolly World is a delightful journey through a world full of pleasantly enjoyable surprises. Colours are bright, wool textures are detailed, and animations are always fluid. The game's world is polished where it needs to be, but isn't afraid to have the kind of natural rough edges present in a game about thread and sewing materials. From loose threads that unravel when pulled to fabrics that fold in asymmetrical ways, the game world just feels like an incredibly tangible physical space. Woolly World really shines when it takes advantage of the design aesthetic. From Shy Guys brandishing crochet hooks threateningly to fish spitting out water that, thanks to being made of wool, can be run along, the game excels when it fully commits to its core design concept. Mechanically, Woolly World is at its best and most challenging when it pushes Yoshi out of his comfort zone. Yoshi's abilities are all designed to keep him out of harm, from eggs that can dispatch enemies at a distance to a very forgiving and lengthy jump arc. The times when Yoshi's Woolly World forces you to take a leap of faith that pushes that jump to its limits, requires you to fight enemies in close quarters and experiments with the characters weaknesses are some of the best moments of Yoshi gameplay out there. It's just a shame those moments are few and far between. [embed]295585:59414:0[/embed] The vast majority of Yoshi's Woolly World doesn't push the titular hero's moveset in ways that really challenge the player. While levels frequently throw minor new gimmicks in that freshen up the feel of progression, they rarely have any real effect on the challenge of playing the game. It's not necessarily a problem; if you're looking for a calm and relaxed exploration of new mechanics in a colourful world then this certainly delivers that in spades. But yeah, be aware that the challenges are often spread out for the player. There are a bunch of collectibles to go after in the game, most of which are monotonous to collect and offer very little reward. The main exception to this is collectibles that allow you to re-skin your Yoshi, which are pretty enjoyable to seek out. The game's co-op mode does give you the benefit of being able to use your partner as a source of wool if you run low, but the levels in the game were very clearly designed to be played single player and more often than not, your secondary player will feel like they're hindering progression rather than helping with it. Yoshi's Woolly World is best described as easy, beautiful, and inventive. While the times it offers challenge are a little too spread out for my liking, the game looks and sounds stunning, and offers players a variety of new sights to experience along their journey. If you're looking for something to play to unwind, something pleasant and positive, this would be a pretty darn solid choice to go with. [This review is based on a retail build of the game purchased by the reviewer].
Yoshi's Woolly World photo
Pleasantly fluffy
Yoshi's Woolly World is the epitome of adorable. From Yoshi's cute, easily read facial expressions to the bright colourful world he inhabits, the intricate minor details to the tactile physicality of the world, this game took...

Looks cool! photo
Looks cool!

Stick it to the Man! creator hid alpha for new game in Zombie Vikings

How to access it and gameplay here
Oct 15
// Jed Whitaker
Stick it to the Man! and Zombie Vikings developer Zoink! is already working on a new game simply called FE, and you can play it right now if you own Zombie Vikings. The above video shows how to access the hidden FE ...
Mario Maker photo
Mario Maker

Please let this Mario Maker outfit leave Japan

Oh my GOD!
Oct 15
// Jordan Devore
Nintendo sure is having fun with Japanese costumes in Super Mario Maker. First there was Famitsu's Nekki, then GameCenter CX's Arino, and now there's this magnificent little ditty. The outfit is based on Yukio Sawada's manga ...
Wanderer photo

Feast your eyes on sci-fi platformer-RPG Wanderer

Lo-fi Firefly
Oct 14
// Darren Nakamura
When it comes to pixel art, there is good stuff and there is bad stuff. Recently launched on Kickstarter, Wanderer falls easily into the former category. I just love the look of the pixelated characters on the more painterly ...
Mario Maker photo
Mario Maker

When a Mario level is named 'P is for Pain,' you're in trouble

F is for...
Oct 09
// Jordan Devore
We've got another diabolical Super Mario Maker level for you to marvel at and probably not play. I like this one not only for its name, "P is for Pain," but for its use of limited tools. It's designed almost entirely around P Switches and spikes. The challenge isn't so much figuring out what you're supposed to do as it is just staying calm and pulling off intricate jumps, one after another.
Shovel Knight photo
Shovel Knight

Shovel Knight's Xbox One retail version is in limbo due to publishing policies

And that's not all
Oct 08
// Jordan Devore
Yacht Club Games has hit some snags with the retail versions of Shovel Knight. For starters, the studio has abandoned plans for a physical copy on Xbox One this holiday. "We really gave it our best effort, but unfortunately, ...

Review: Chibi-Robo! Zip Lash

Oct 08 // Ben Davis
Chibi-Robo! Zip Lash (3DS)Developer: NintendoPublisher: NintendoReleased: October 9, 2015MSRP: $29.99 In Chibi-Robo! Zip Lash, pint-sized aliens have invaded Earth, stealing resources along with everyone's favorite snacks, and it's up to Chibi-Robo and his partner Telly (who is now shaped like a computer) to save the day. Chibi-Robo will travel the globe, putting a stop to the aliens' plans and rescuing any snacks he might come across (all based on real name-brand snacks and candies from around the world). To navigate the areas around him, Chibi-Robo uses his plug as a whip to destroy enemies, collect items, grapple onto certain surfaces, or helicopter across pits. The plug can ricochet off of walls as well, opening up a lot of possibilities for interesting platforming as the player tries to angle the perfect shot in order to reach distant objects. The cord starts off rather short at a measly 6 inches at the beginning of each level, but it can be lengthened up to 120 inches by collecting blue orbs. [embed]314129:60631:0[/embed] Aside from the plug mechanics, there are plenty of jumping sections, puzzles to solve, enemy hordes to destroy, items to collect, and even a few levels which have Chibi-Robo skateboarding, wakeboarding, and traveling by balloon to reach the end. There are also some pretty cool boss fights to round out each world. Just looking at the platforming mechanics alone, Zip Lash is a perfectly competent entry to the genre. Each world changes things up with new ideas and interesting layouts, so that the gameplay doesn't become stale too quickly. Once again, Chibi-Robo's health is indicated by his power supply, which slowly depletes as he's moving around and decreases significantly if he falls into a pit or gets hit by an enemy. He can recharge at any outlet by inserting his plug, which will cost a few watts (watts are earned by recycling trash). He can also buy spare batteries as a backup. For the completionist gamers out there, each level is filled with several hidden collectibles to find, including the aforementioned name-brand snacks, special medallions, Chibi-Tots playing hide-and-seek, toys to talk to, and trash to clean up and convert into energy. If something is missed the first time through, levels can be replayed in order to search more thoroughly, but only after certain conditions are met. Which brings me to my least favorite aspect of Chibi-Robo! Zip Lash. Most platforming games like this feature a map with each level laid out on a path, which are then played sequentially. Zip Lash tries to subvert this common feature by implementing the "Destination Wheel." After each level, Chibi-Robo will spin the wheel to select a number. This number determines the amount of spaces he'll move on the map, which in turn determines the next level to play even if it's not the next level in the sequence. Once every level on a map has been discovered and beaten, the player can then proceed to the next map. Basically, this means that most people will be playing the levels out of order, which could have been a neat idea. The problem, however, is that maps are laid out in a circle, and if the player loops around and lands on a level they have already played, they will be forced to play it over again in order to proceed and pick another level. Because of this, this one simple idea of the Destination Wheel single-handedly demolished my excitement for Zip Lash. Being forced to replay levels due to bad luck is not a fun mechanic. The only reason I can think of for this to exist in its current state would be to artificially extend the game's length, and that's not something I can get behind. They even included a separate wheel to spin for boss levels, which is completely pointless and a waste of time as there's only one space on the entire wheel. The Boss Wheel might have been a funny joke if the Destination Wheel wasn't already such an annoyance. Granted, there are ways to sort of bypass the wheel. Wheel numbers can be purchased with moolah (the in-game currency) so that the player will be more likely to land on a number they want. It's also possible to get more than one spin, assuming the player was skilled enough to hit the gold or silver flying saucers at the end of the last level. Finally, once every level has been beaten and the world has been cleared, players will no longer have to spin the wheel for that world and can freely select whichever level they wish. If only it were possible to do that from the start... Unfortunately, the Destination Wheel wasn't the only problem I had with Zip Lash. As if being forced to replay levels due to poor spinning wasn't enough, certain areas of each level will only become accessible after the levels have been completed. These areas are totally optional and are only used for the chance to obtain costumes for Chibi-Robo (which can also be obtained by finding codes posted on Miiverse), but it still sucks to have to replay every level again, possibly for a third time or more if the player is really unlucky, just to find everything. I also had some problems with the lack of checkpoints during the skateboard/wakeboard segments, but that seems like a comparatively small issue next to everything else. All that wheel nonsense sadly soured Zip Lash for me, which is a huge shame because almost everything else about the game is fun and charming. The new platforming mechanics work well, the boss fights are exciting, and Chibi-Robo himself is as cute as always. I would have been content with this game had it not been for the awful Destination Wheel. If you're a die-hard Chibi-Robo! fan, or if the possibility of having to replay the same levels over and over again doesn't bother you too much, then Zip Lash might be for you. Unfortunately, it's tough for me to give this game a good recommendation after the frustrating time I had with it. I still love you, Chibi-Robo, but this was not your best effort! [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Chibi-Robo review photo
Poor little robot...
I've been a fan of Chibi-Robo! ever since the original was released for the GameCube back in 2006. It was a weird, adorable adventure game with a tiny robot who was tasked with cleaning up an enormous house, with happy musica...

Dust: An Elysian Tail photo
Dust: An Elysian Tail

Dust: An Elysian Tail, a fantastic metroidvania, is coming to iOS

'Very soon'
Oct 07
// Chris Carter
Dust: An Elysian Tail, released originally on XBLA in 2012, is one of my favorite metroidvanias in recent memory. The fact that it was developed by one guy, basically, is still insane to me, given how deep the game is mechani...
Super Mario Maker photo
Super Mario Maker

Someone remade those wonderful e-Reader stages in Super Mario Maker

Oct 07
// Chris Carter
Man, I'm glad my e-Reader still works. For those of you who think I'm speaking gibberish, the e-Reader was an accessory Nintendo developed for the Game Boy Advance, and it was actually one of the first forms of DLC. Players w...
Super Meat Boy photo
Super Meat Boy

Super Meat Boy devs tease a Wii U port

'Wii haven't forgotten about U'
Oct 06
// Brett Makedonski
Super Meat Boy made its way to PlayStation 4 and PS Vita today, but those might not be the last platforms it hits more than five years after its initial release. Team Meat still has its eyes on a Nintendo console. In a s...
More Sonic on PC photo
More Sonic on PC

Sonic Lost World heads to PC next month

Other 'past Sega titles' to follow
Oct 06
// Jordan Devore
Sega is bringing Sonic Lost World to PC on November 2, 2015. It's priced at $29.99 and the NiGHTS-infused Nightmare Zone, a stage available as DLC for the Wii U version, is included. In his 2013 review for Destructoid, Jim St...
Mario Maker photo
Mario Maker

Mario Maker player subverts guilt-trip level to save every Yoshi

Take that, Ross
Oct 05
// Jordan Devore
Some level creators are using Super Mario Maker as a platform to make us feel guilty. They're dreaming up courses that put Yoshi in harm's way and have it so Mario can't reach the end without sacrificing his faithful companio...
Conker photo

Before Conker's Bad Fur Day, there was Twelve Tales

Rare reminisces about the N64 days
Oct 02
// Jordan Devore
Rare has shared another behind-the-scenes video about Conker and this one sure brings me back. Conker's Quest, as it was originally called before undergoing a name change to Twelve Tales: Conker 64, debuted at E3 in 1997. It ...
Mario Maker video photo
Mario Maker video

GameCenter CX takes on Mario Maker

And now I want to play more
Oct 01
// Jordan Devore
Japanese TV show GameCenter CX collaborated with Nintendo on a funny little costume in Super Mario Maker, but that's not all! There's an episode themed around the game on YouTube. Host Shinya Arino spent half an hour playing ...
Unbox photo

I like the look of this 3D platformer about, uh, boxes

Self-delivering cardboard boxes
Sep 30
// Jordan Devore
If we can be bread, we can be anything. Looks like sentient boxes are next. I don't pay much attention to what's happening on Steam Greenlight these days, but the occasional game still rises from the depths and onto my radar....
Chibi-Robo photo

Zip Lash may be 'the last chance' for Chibi-Robo

That's the latest word from Nintendo
Sep 30
// Jordan Devore
I have a browser tab open for a used copy of Chibi-Robo, and I don't trust myself to walk away. It's one of the few GameCube games I regret missing. But $60, if I'm lucky? I don't know. My mind is on the delightful household ...
PS Plus free games photo
PS Plus free games

Super Meat Boy and Broken Age will be October's free PlayStation Plus games

'Meat Boy and meet boy' -Steven Hansen
Sep 30
// Darren Nakamura
I'm torn on Super Meat Boy at this point in my life. On the one hand, it probably controls better with a PlayStation 4 d-pad than it ever did on the Xbox 360. On the other hand, I already went all the way through it when I wa...
Freedom Planet photo
Freedom Planet

Freedom Planet finally has a new Wii U release date

This week
Sep 30
// Chris Carter
Freedom Planet has had a rocky porting process to say the least. Just before launch recently, developer Galaxy Trial caught a major bug, and delayed the release a few times to an unspecified date. Now, we know that the g...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...