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Dying just makes Super Rude Bear Resurrection easier

Sep 28 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]312542:60542:0[/embed] After any given death, the titular Rude Bear's body will by lying across the trap you just succumbed to. There's a fair chance it was a spike trap; Super Rude Bear has a lot of spike traps. On the next attempt, you can platform on the corpse which shields you from those pesky spikes. Super Rude Bear just got easier, albeit for only the briefest of moments. For a game about a rude bear (curiously, we haven't seen any ill-behaved mannerisms apart from a backward hat and a permanent scowl), this isn't as light-hearted and blithe as one may expect. Actually, it's quite entrenched in the macabre. Coffins serve as checkpoints and are even more appreciated than coming across your freshly dead body. There are some extra mechanics offered up to guide along the platforming. Rude Bear is forever followed by a wizard, as he's the one who actually transported you back to medieval England and put you in this dire situation. It's possible to take control of him and scout ahead. How thoughtful, Guy Who Is Directly Responsible For Me Dying Thousands Of Times. Likewise, in the event that your corpses pile up too high to clear some sections (yes, that will happen), he can clear them one-by-one or with a single powerful blast. Again, how thoughtful. This is actually the second time we've seen Super Rude Bear -- originally, it had the "Resurrection" withheld from the end. The first was at Tokyo Game Show 2014. There was obvious care put into the controls, but everything was made up of placeholder art. Also, the jumping on your past failures part is new, which is why we've seen the game fittingly re-titled. Super Rude Bear Resurrection has come a long way in the year that has passed. Now, it's a game that I'm actually excited to play, even as infuriating as it's likely to be. The game's site currently lists projected platforms as PC, PS4, PS Vita, and Xbox One. Wherever you find yourself playing, don't be afraid to die; it's all part of the process.
Super Rude Bear photo
Expect to do a lot of it
A corpse is typically not a welcoming sight, but in Super Rude Bear Resurrection it absolutely is. That decomposing body (which is yours from seconds ago, by the way) means that maybe you can skirt a particularly challen...

Super Mario Maker photo
Super Mario Maker

Nintendo patches Super Mario Maker invincibility glitch

No more spike exploit
Sep 24
// Chris Carter
Because people will literally find anything, a glitch was uncovered in Super Mario Maker that allowed players to become invincible. You can trigger the glitch by building a door above a spike pit, then power-up Mari...
Art photo

True hardest Mario Maker level asks: Will you save your son?

Definitely the hardest Mario Maker stage
Sep 23
// Steven Hansen
False prophets are not new. Jordan told you all that this was one of the hardest Super Mario Maker levels, but it's all twitch-based reflex video games 101. Any gamehead worth her salt could polish that bad boy off, at least...
Free game photo
Free game

Grab Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee while it's free on Steam

24-hour deal is in effect
Sep 23
// Jordan Devore
Now through September 24, 2015 at 10:00am Pacific, Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee is free to download and keep on Steam. It's free free -- not one of those only-good-for-the-weekend promotions. Naturally, this deal is a way to get O...
Super Mario Maker photo
Super Mario Maker

If you see this level in Mario Maker, run away

Mastery required
Sep 22
// Jordan Devore
Bomb Voyage blew my mind. While watching Bananasaurus Rex's triumphant run, I could hardly fathom what I was seeing on-screen, much less imagine myself ever possessing the skill needed to pull off those tricks in perfect sequ...
Super Mario Maker photo
Super Mario Maker

Mario Maker invincibility glitch discovered

Firewalk with me
Sep 21
// Jordan Devore
As outlined by GameXplain, there's a glitch in Super Mario Maker that grants invincibility. The process involves taking damage and walking through a door placed over spikes. The trick is in the timing -- you can't enter the d...
Super Mario Maker photo
Super Mario Maker

This has to be one of the hardest Mario Maker levels

Have mercy on us all
Sep 21
// Jordan Devore
It took Bananasaurus Rex, the guy who can do the impossible in Spelunky, "about four hours from start of practice" to clear this absurdly difficult Super Mario Maker level. Just watch.
Mighty No. 9 photo
Mighty No. 9

Comcept confirms Mighty No. 9 demo delay

I hope you like delays
Sep 18
// Chris Carter
Hey remember that Mighty No. 9 demo delay that was snuck into a contest post? Well it didn't give people much information, hinting at a possible delay for some users. Now, thanks to a backer email (read: I'm a backer), we hav...

It's mostly Ratchet and very little Clank at Tokyo Game Show

Sep 17 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]311251:60420:0[/embed] Ratchet caused a racket though, armed to the teeth as if he were a guard at the on-ramp. Barrages of missiles and wild melee attacks brute forced the way through the demo. Nuts that serve as a currency spilled out of everything and magnetized their way to the lawless lombax. Clank's presence was diminished even further during the second half of the demo. Dropped into a hellish pit against some sort of Rancor-esque boss-thing, Clank clearly wanted nothing to do with it. Ratchet swung, swung, swung away at the feet of the monster, as it reared up and down but did very little harm. It was kind of like getting under a Souls boss and doing way more damage than you probably deserve to. It didn't stay like that forever, though. Two times during the fight, he disappeared and summoned swarms of battle toads before coming back to the fray. Toward the end, he spit fire at me so I pulled out a flamethrower and we had a neat back-and-forth of slowly jumping over walls of flame while facing the other. His health meter plummeted a lot quicker than mine, so I was the victor -- no Clank required. In all likelihood, Clank will prove to be more useful and prevalent in the final game. This demo was probably skewed a bit too far in its omission. Ratchet was the star of the day, and his platforming and action work quite well. Once Clank gets properly added into the mix, the 2016 installment should feel right at home alongside all the other games in the series. 
Ratchet and Clank photo
Par for the course, right?
As far as the action bits go, Clank generally takes the backseat while Ratchet is doing his thing. Sure, Clank facilitates some of it, but it's a tempered role. He's a sidekick who knows his job. That makes the relationship w...

Mario Maker photo
Mario Maker

Good news, now Super Mario Maker can give you nightmares

A Goomba's life can be a terrible thing
Sep 17
// Nic Rowen
You can make fun little levels in Super Mario Maker. You can make challenging levels to test player's skills. You can make trolly Cat Mario style levels that play cheap shots for laughs. But what about a level that will leav...

Review: Shovel Knight: Plague of Shadows

Sep 17 // Chris Carter
Shovel Knight: Plague of Shadows (3DS, PC [reviewed], PS3, PS4, PS Vita, Wii U, Xbox One])Developer: Yacht Club GamesPublisher: Yacht Club GamesRelease Date: September 17, 2014MSRP: Free (with $14.99 Shovel Knight purchase) The main draw here is the new campaign, with a completely playable Plague Knight. As a note, you're required to beat the original story to unlock it, but there's also a code available that will likely be widespread after the expansion's release. For the purposes of this review however I didn't use the code, as I wanted to replay the entire base campaign so I could directly compare it while it was fresh in my mind. Whereas the original story involved Shovel Knight's quest to defeat the evil Enchantress, Plague of Shadows is an alternate timeline of sorts, where our hero was bested (but not killed), and evil rules the land. Plague Knight decides to seek out his own fortune, developing a potion of unlimited power in secret. The levels are, for the most part, the same, but are reworked to cater to Plague's particular set of skills. Most, if not all stages, have completely new paths and areas as well. This remix concept paid off, because while the actual themes of the levels were familiar, it felt like I was playing a new game. Heck, he even gets his own town. Plague Knight sports a double-jump by default, as well as a charge attack that explodes and provides a triple-leap. Because of the nature of the charge, players can employ a lot of fancy maneuvers, delaying your explosion to basically go anywhere you want. Even using his potions mid-air will delay your descent. You'll basically have to relearn the game's mechanics, as Plague Knight feels utterly different. He's a bit more loose than Shovel Knight, sliding to and fro as he runs. Attacking is even more nuanced, as Plague's potions are a delayed explosion (initially), so you can hit stronger enemies with your first barrage, and aim subsequent projectiles as traps of sorts to blow up later. From there you can upgrade your standard attack to use a longer fuse, or even orbit around your character like a shield. Overall I'd say he has more options than Shovel, but is much tougher to master. As far as collectibles go, there are Green Cipher Coins to locate (which open up more shop options) as well as cash to acquire. The Ciphers remind me of the red coins in Yoshi's Island, and they're just as fun to hunt for. The fact that the number of overall coins out there is known (420) makes them more addicting to collect, and this is on top of the musical sheets to find (now scrap sheets). My favorite new element of the game is probably the tonic system, which allows you to drink an item to gain a temporary life point until death. It's a bit more strategic and deliberate system. There is one minor hangup -- don't put too much stock in the challenge mode, which is hosted by a playable Shovel Knight. Of the challenges, most are rematches (boss rushes). A few of the boss-centric challenges are pretty tough, like the one that tasks you with beating The Big Creep in under a minute, with the minimum amount of life available. The first 10 have fairly difficult bits like riding an enemy to the end of a lengthy scrolling arena. Plague of Shadows also has its own achievements (albeit 20 compared to Shovel's 45), but I'm told that he will not take on Kratos or the Battletoads, as those fights are exclusive to the core campaign. Shovel Knight already felt complete at launch, but Plague of Shadows just makes it even more enticing. The fact that it's a free update for existing (and new) owners rather than paid DLC is the cherry on top. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Shovel Knight DLC review photo
Bubonic Chronic
I can't believe it's been over a year since Shovel Knight released -- time flies, right? Over the course of that year, I've beaten it on every conceivable platform outside of the PC edition, playing it over and over...

Review: Leo's Fortune

Sep 16 // Darren Nakamura
Leo's Fortune (Android, iOS, Mac, PC, PlayStation 4 [reviewed], Windows Phone, Xbox One)Developer: 1337 & SenriPublisher: Tilting PointRelease: April 23, 2014 (mobile), September 8, 2015 (Mac, PC, PS4), September 11, 2015 (Xbox One)MSRP: $4.99 (mobile), $6.99 (non-mobile) Originally released on mobile last year, Leo's Fortune is now playable with a controller elsewhere. It's equal parts precision platformer, speed platformer, and puzzle platformer, alternating between the three to keep the experience fresh throughout. Leopold is a slippery guy, which aids in the speed sections. Certain areas have ramps and curves built in, giving Leo a playground to jump, inflate, and dive toward the exit quickly. Of the three styles of platforming present, this is the most exciting. The other two styles slow Leo down considerably. With his inflate ability, he can not only jump and launch off walls, but he can also slow his descent, giving himself greater control in spiky sections. Here, Leopold's slipperiness can get him into trouble; he will sometimes maintain momentum from a speed section straight into a trap. It can be difficult to make the small adjustments necessary for the precision segments, because pressing in one direction for more than a split second will send him careening in that direction. The puzzles are a welcome change of pace, though they never really tax the brain. For the most part, they are the same kinds of physics-based puzzles we've seen elsewhere. They're certainly not bad, but they're never mindblowing either. [embed]310626:60351:0[/embed] All of this is tied together by an after school special-esque story. Though the specifics of the big twist aren't exactly predictable, it's clear throughout that Leopold is barking up the wrong trees and stands to learn a life lesson. It's almost like one of Aesop's fables; it comes with the moral of appreciating people over possessions, which is a great message to teach children, but feels trite to those who have heard it before. In that way, the story mirrors the puzzle sections. It's totally serviceable, but I'm not particularly impressed by it. Where Leo's Fortune excels is in the presentation. Leopold's fuzz and a lot of the environmental effects are fantastically animated. Leo slides as he moves, meaning he doesn't have any walking or rolling animation, but despite that he exudes personality, particularly through facial expressions. I love the look he gives when he inflates. So what we have in all is a beautiful platformer with ups and downs (literally and figuratively), a mundane narrative with a good message, and some real difficulty toward the end. The whole game probably only takes about an hour or two to finish (with full game speedruns clocking in at about 45 minutes. It's not a must-buy, not even for platformer fans, but it's a cute little game that most people can find some fun with. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Leo's Fortune review photo
Favors the bold
Coins. Plenty of games have them scattered around to collect, but few explain why they're there in the first place. If they're so valuable, why did somebody just leave them there? Leo's Fortune gives a reason. The titular mus...

Sonic Boom delay photo
Sonic Boom delay

New Sonic Boom delayed over quality concerns

Slow down, Sonic
Sep 15
// Kyle MacGregor
Sega has hit the brakes on Sonic Boom: Fire & Ice, postponing the Nintendo 3DS exclusive's launch date to give developer Sanzaru Games additional time to polish and improve the experience. The publisher says "it&rsqu...
Banjo-Kazooie photo

Rare had a cool idea for a Banjo-Kazooie remake

Before it settled on Nuts & Bolts
Sep 14
// Jordan Devore
I'm way behind on watching those documentary shorts included in Rare Replay and I might never catch up unless I set aside time to see them on YouTube. Rare uploaded this video today detailing how it arrived at Banjo-Kazooie: ...

Metroid Maker? Zelda Maker? Should Nintendo keep it up?

Sep 14 // Steven Hansen
This is new territory, and a surprising route for domineering Nintendo, but recent moves like opening up its IP to mobile show a company that's adapting. The mad success of all-ages, creative ventures like Minecraft and even Sony's now-flagging LittleBigPlanet are easy answers for the shift. The PS4 has a dedicated Share button, but I saw as many people sharing pictures of their Super Mario Maker codes (with their phones, off their TV screens) as I did Metal Gear videos. Part of that is novelty. But, also, opening up a beloved series to fan-goofing and sharing could give Mario Maker a long tail. Then what? Super Mario Maker support with DLC, or expansion packs bringing in new 2D Mario aesthetics? Or would you like Nintendo to go whole hog on Sony's "Play. Create. Share" and start making tool sets for other popular series? I mean, it's not like Nintendo wants to make a 2D Metroid itself, clearly.
What's next? photo
If Mario Maker is a success, then what?
With the 9/11 Super Mario Maker release, it seems like a lot of people spent the weekend playing and making levels while I spent the weekend playing more Metal Gear, eating too much at an Indian buffet, and watching sports. T...

Mario Maker levels photo
Mario Maker levels

Share your Super Mario Maker creations here!

I made one too
Sep 11
// Chris Carter
So, Super Mario Maker is finally out, and I can only assume people are hard at work creating their own levels. Thankfully the pointless "nine-day" wait function is now gone, so you can access every tool available in a few hou...

Review: Super Mario Maker

Sep 11 // Chris Carter
Super Mario Maker (Wii U)Developer: Nintendo EAD Group No. 4Publisher: NintendoRelease: September 11, 2015MSRP: $59.99 The core theme behind Super Mario Maker is simplicity. Opening up with a rather lovely tutorial section, you'll be introduced to the creation process, which is as simple as touching an object with your stylus, and placing it in the on-screen grid. The entire experience can be played on the GamePad without the use of a TV, and never seeks to overwhelm the player. As the famous fictional Chef Gusteau once said, "anyone can cook!" and now anyone can create a Mario level. While Super Mario Maker doesn't give you everything your heart desires, you'll find plenty of toys to screw around with, from enemies like Kuribo's Shoe (which are actually Yoshi in select themes), to Giant Goombas that split into more Goombas, that can assist you in crafting objectives like P-Switch-centric puzzles, and even shoot 'em up levels with clouds or Koopa Clown Cars. You can create pipes or doors to send players into different areas of a level, tracks to craft moving platforms -- every basic Mario concept you can think of is here. The bread and butter of Maker is themes. You'll start with the original 8-bit Mario theme as well as the New Super Mario Bros. U series, then eventually work your way up to Mario 3, and the always delightful World. Themes (which have their own unique physics and in a few cases, movesets) can be shifted at the press of a button, including the ability to jump into underground, ghost, water, airship, or castle settings in every sub-franchise. It's awesome to create a level and see it switch to an entirely new gimmick within seconds. An "undo" option, eraser (which can be toggled with quick trigger presses), and a nuke-like reset button make everything easier. Costumes, however, are probably my favorite extra in Mario Maker, which provide players with a way to morph into other characters like Sonic, Pac-Man, or Mega Man. They're unlocked by way of amiibo, or another method I'll get to shortly, and have some unique animations and sound effects in tow, like Pac-Man's shift to an 8-bit sprite when he runs. Sadly, all of these costumes are limited to the 8-bit style only. The more you play it, the more you'll realize that limitations are a recurring issue with Super Mario Maker, despite its immense charm. [embed]306729:60161:0[/embed] Not all of these objects will be available immediately, either. Instead, you'll have to wait nine days to obtain everything, including major themes like Mario 3 and World. I can confirm that players will be able to fast-forward the Wii U clock a day ahead at a time to "unlock" the next set of items. But the process is still painfully tedious, as you have to play five minutes to "allow" the unlock, then switch to the main menu, then back to the game to receive the items, then play for another five minutes, and so on. Since this method is available, the entire requirement is rendered pointless. Having said all that, it wasn't really a dealbreaker in any way for me, and didn't have any direct correlation to my assessment here. However, there are a number of shortcomings inherent to Mario Maker's toolset even after unlocking everything. For starters, there are no assets related to Mario 2 outside of a select few re-skins. Not only is the entire theme missing from the game, but unique objects and enemies such as the iconic Phanto are nowhere to be found. Additionally, there is no way to eliminate the countdown timer (the max is 500 seconds), which takes the wind out of exploration-based creation's sails considerably. There's also a severe limitation in terms of how you can build out levels. Right now you can't choose to create a vertical-themed stage -- you have to go with the same horizontal blueprint the game gives you without fail. Maker also limits the amount of enemies you can have in any given level (for instance, only three Bowsers or roughly 100 smaller enemies) even in the 8-bit theme, which is a silly design. Mario Maker does have a few modes beyond the creation realm, thankfully, including a "10 Mario Challenge" mode that tasks you with completing eight levels in 10 lives. This essentially functions as the campaign, and brings players through a variety of different themes composed by Nintendo. The reward is two-fold -- you'll experience a fun pseudo-story mode, and obtain each blueprint for use later in the game's creation mode. They're relatively easy, but some of them provide mechanics very rarely seen in a core Mario game, and are worth spending several hours on alone. The online hub (titled "Course World") is probably where players are going to spend most of their time in the coming months. Having played other creation games with online functionality for years, I have to say that this is one of the better modules. There's support for everything, from bookmarking levels (with hearts), to viewing your "played" history, to queuing up your own creations, and sorting potential levels with qualifiers like popularity and newly shared. It's crazy to see what people have come up with already in the past few weeks, like re-creations of old school Mega Man levels complete with the 8-bit costume, to the classic "music videos" we've seen for years on end in games like LittleBigPlanet. My one gripe with viewing levels online is that they are automatically "spoiled" right before you start them. Basically, by looking at a stage, it will show the entire layout by default -- there's no way to "hide" this currently, and a lot of courses I played lost their luster as a result of this snafu. As a bonus of sorts, the hub has its own version of the 10 Mario Challenge -- a 100 lives version, which basically grabs levels online and mixes them into a custom world. This is probably my favorite element of the game, as it does a good job of curating content and giving it to you in a rapid-fire format. It also rewards players with costumes upon completion, so you don't need to use amiibo to unlock them. Super Mario Maker is a charming little creation tool, and I'm sure fans will come up with some amazing levels for years to come. However, it feels a bit more constrained than it needs to be, and is in dire need of updates or DLC to keep it going long term. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Super Mario Maker review photo
The costumes are the best part
Ever since I was five years old, I've been drawing my own Mario levels on graph paper. It's a pretty common story, because when I look at a series to give me a platforming baseline, it's usually Mario. Nintendo didn't ju...

Mirror's Edge Catalyst photo
Mirror's Edge Catalyst

GAME UK gets that expensive Mirror's Edge Collector's Edition

A whopping 160 quid to purchase
Sep 11
// Laura Kate Dale
Hey, do you like Mirror's Edge? Do you have a mighty £159.99 lying around your house with which to buy some video game tat? Well, it looks like GAME UK has an exclusive box of stuff in addition to the actual game to sel...
N++ photo

N++ is even bigger and more difficult than we thought

For wizards only
Sep 10
// Darren Nakamura
N++ released back in July with a bold claim: "No way anyone 100%s it." Given its enormous level select screen featuring more than a thousand levels and the brutal difficulty the series is known for, it seemed fair enough to m...
Collect ALL the pieces photo
Collect ALL the pieces

Day-one update removes nine-day wait on Super Mario Maker content

Just make some levels, ya dingus!
Sep 10
// Jed Whitaker
A patch for Super Mario Maker went live hours ahead of its official release that removes the requirement to wait nine days -- or set your Wii U system clock ahead -- to acquire all of the level editor parts.  The update ...
Famitsu photo

DLC confirmed for Super Mario Maker, starting with Famitsu mascot

Necky the Fox
Sep 10
// Chris Carter
As expected, Super Mario Maker will seemingly get new DLC post-launch. I mean, the format is ripe for it, both for free and paid content. The first round will include the DLC character of "Necky," (Nekki) Famitsu magazin...
Suge Knight? photo
Suge Knight?

Free Shovel Knight expansion out September 17

To all platforms and regions
Sep 09
// Steven Hansen
Yacht Club Games just announced Shovel Knight: Plague of Shadows is coming to, "all existing platforms and regions on September 17, 2015." The free expansion is a completely remixed story mode starring Plague Knight and featu...
Mario Maker photo
Mario Maker

The Super Mario Maker idea booklet is bizarre

Peruse the digital version
Sep 09
// Jordan Devore
In the lower left of this Nintendo-approved image, it looks like Mario is holding hands with himself. It's far from the only strange sight in the Super Mario Maker idea booklet. Ahead of the game's Friday release, you can loo...
Squid now photo
Squid now

Splatoon has one of the best Super Mario Maker cameos

Extra twist
Sep 09
// Steven Hansen
Super Mario Maker, which comes out on September 11 (9/11) has seen various 8-bit character skins (Sonic, Waluigi, Pit, etc), many of which are unlockable with amiibo dolls (but also unlockable through gameplay). The only dif...

Review: Ascendant

Sep 08 // Chris Carter
Ascendant (PC, PS4 [reviewed])Developer: Hapa GamesPublisher: Hapa GamesRelease Date: May 13, 2014 (PC) / September 8, 2015 (PS4)MSRP: $9.99 While Ascendant is a hack and slash first and foremost, it follows a metroidvania style, with a boxed-base map. It's only an illusion however, as most of the game's rooms are standard challenge rooms, with very little in the way of actual exploration. You'll battle your way through said rooms, acquiring slight statistical bonuses (but never enough to get you pumped) and items, until you die -- then you start all over again. The concept is neat, but it never really follows through, nor does it entice the player to actually keep going with nearly enough carrots to go along with the stick of permadeath. Ascendant sports a cool "seasons" theme, with each portion of the game culminating in a boss fight followed by another art style, but the visual flair begins and ends with that concept. While it may look colorful and vibrant at a glance, the actual in-game visuals are fairly unimpressive. This is exacerbated by the fact that nearly every enemy in the game looks like same. As most of you know by now, I'm a fan of tougher games, but having an experience focus on that fact doesn't excuse a dip in quality. Ascendant is difficult, mostly because all of the upgrades you obtain throughout the course of each run aren't all that great, and you'll have to rely on your raw combat skill to get by. Each character has a dash (which can be done in the air), a block (with a parry), standard combos, a few spells, and a launcher system. [embed]309645:60283:0[/embed] At first I was on board with the combat, but the way launchers work turned me off a bit. To launch foes, you'll have to beat them up a bit first, then you can slam them into a specific direction. It's not really conducive to comboing or juggling -- they kind of just speedily fly away. Combat doesn't have a whole lot of impact, and while the dash system ensures that dodging is paramount, your offensive repertoire feels shallow. The fact that the game is procedurally generated also doesn't help its case. Whereas a lot of other similar titles have a variety of different obstacles to overcome, most of Ascendant's rooms (particularly early on) are simple boxes with very little in the way of platforming. I get that the team was probably going for a more combat-oriented game, gating off exits left and right, but the end result is rather jarring when you're fighting the same boring enemies over and over. Boss fights can be a blast, and highlight the vision of the developer's quite well -- even if there aren't enough of them. In a confined space with pre-determined rule sets and patterns, Ascendant does a decent job of playing with its mechanics, forcing players to master every element of the game to proceed. But then it's right back into the open world, completing the same menial actions, until another big bad crosses your path. Playing a co-op game will severely boost your enjoyment, but you'll encounter all of the same problems over again. It's almost like developer Hapa Games had two really cool ideas and tried to integrate them both into Ascendant, with mixed results. At times it has flashes of brilliance with its focus on raw skill and combat, and others, it feels like you're just aimlessly wandering another barren landscape, in search of a rush.
Ascendant PS4 review photo
We're getting to the point where the roguelike formula doesn't inspire "oohs" and "ahhs" like it used to. Where a game could generally have had the label "tough as nails," and earned instant cred, it's becoming increasingly h...

Super Mario Galaxy photo
Super Mario Galaxy

Miyamoto is 'always looking to challenge Mario Galaxy and do another 3D action title'

The team can only do so many projects
Sep 07
// Jordan Devore
The last time Nintendo designer Shigeru Miyamoto spoke about the possibility of another Super Mario Galaxy, the team was busy with Super Mario 3D World and physically couldn't "make both at the same time." But more Galaxy, he...
Freedom Planet photo
Freedom Planet

Freedom Planet devs found the Wii U holdup, still on the way

It wasn't looking good previously
Sep 04
// Chris Carter
Last we heard, Freedom Planet was delayed indefinitely thanks to a major issue with the Wii U code. Thankfully, developer GalaxyTrail has found the problem, confirming the progress to Nintendo Life. According to the devs...
Super Mario Maker photo
Super Mario Maker

An easy guide to the things NOT included in Super Mario Maker

No frog suit, no buy
Sep 03
// Nic Rowen
Super Mario Maker has been making me think dangerous thoughts about buying a Wii U. It just looks so charming and sweet that I've been secretly generating rationales and excuses to myself to go out and blow a few hundred doll...

Tearaway Unfolded faithfully breaks the DualShock 4th wall

Sep 02 // Steven Hansen
Tearaway used fourth-wall breaking about as much as Metal Gear Solid, which still, with the recently released Phantom Pain, has a character tell you to, "use the stance button to stand up." That you are playing a video game is addressed, here through the physicality of the thing. Your own face in the sky, representations of your fingers popping up in the world. Unfolded's entire opening is new. It plays off the home console's position as a living room box, likely hooked up to a television with some kind of cable network. The two voices that narrate the story switch through a fake cable TV guide, hastily bypassing shows called "Rubbish" and flicking through commercials before coming to the conclusion that there's nothing to watch, that there's no good story. So we'll have to make our own. Actually, it's almost like the beginning of Metal Gear Solid 4. The first new PS4 feature is light. The triggers produced a beam of light in the world that reflects the light emitted by the DualShock 4. It even keeps the same triangle shape and shows up in the world as if you were pointing to the front of the controller like a flashlight. So far it's one of the only useful reasons for that light existing, save for draining battery life and then blinding me every time I tilt the thing up to find the charge port. [embed]308798:60230:0[/embed] The You's -- that's you -- light has different effects, from simply illuminating the new, dim intro to making plants grow to scraping inky newspaper Scraps from the construction paper world to hypnotizing enemies that will follow the beam of light off a cliff. It doesn't have the same punchy feel as poking at them with giant fingers from below, but it does its job of grounding the player in both the game world and real world in a novel way. It's too hell with immersion and that's fine. Due to my lack of the PlayStation camera, I did find myself wanting with regard to my self-portrait showing up in the hole in the sky. Even if on the Vita it was grainy and always the least flattering angle (I never held my arms parallel to the ground when I played), it is missed, here. Same with the ability to, say, reupholster an elk by taking a picture of my cat. Of course, if lower case you have a camera, it's possible to sustain these touches, or if you have a mic at the ready you can record an intimidating yell for your scarecrow. A new gust of wind ability replaces your ability to physically leaf through the environment. Instead of swiping a platform down on the Vita screen, you swipe the DualShock 4 touchpad in the desired direction you want to the wind to blow. Atoi, the messenger you guide through Tearaway, can also throw enemies and items up "through" the TV screen and into your controller, and then you can aim a reticle and swipe forward on the touchpad to shoot the projectile back onto the map, whether to bash an enemy or solve a puzzle. The touchpad is also used for the paper craft segments where you're tasked with making wings for the local butterflies or snow flakes to pepper your mountain climb (I went again with some nice pink cherry blossoms). It works alright, but the lack of real estate makes precision hard. You might consider the companion app, which would give you (or a friend) a larger drawing surface, but, again, I don't want to be fiddling with three extra pieces of technological accessories just to get the same effect the Vita bundled up. Tearaway Unfolded isn't as elegant or holistic an experience as it was on Vita because of additional technical needs, but significant effort has gone to reproducing the same effects in new ways. It's pretty as hell, too, holding its own with anything on the PS4 despite its humble beginnings. New areas have been built from scratch, parts extended, others cut. No more log rolling troubles, which is the only Vita feature that bugged the hell out of me. A lot of care went into Unfolded. It may be another tacit admission that the Vita is dead, but at least this incredible, surprising game did not die with it.
Tearaway PS4 port photo
Challenging PS4 port flashes Metal Gear
Tearaway was the zenith of the PlayStation Vita. While many fine games have hit the platform since, few have been exclusive and original, and none used every inch of the Vita's additional capabilities to as good effect. That ...

Meddle in the affairs of others, control their minds in Randall

Sep 02 // Brett Makedonski
[embed]308786:60224:0[/embed] Randall (releasing on PC, PS4, and Vita) takes place in a world where everyone's been brainwashed by the authoritarian powers that be. A corporation has the citizens under its control, but the populace is completely unaware of the oppression at hand. We The Force wasn't willing to go too far into the story, but hinted at a "bigger things are at play" angle. One person is acutely aware of the oppression, however. That's the titular Randall. In a "taste of your own medicine" type of twist, he's trying to take down this faceless juggernaut through the use of mind control. It's this mechanic that takes Randall from an action-platformer and injects a puzzle element into it too. Rooms will often have a throng of enemies in them that need to be cleared out in a particular order. A rudimentary example was an area with one foe on the ground and two on platforms above who could shoot projectiles. Those platforms were unreachable from the floor, but if you controlled the bottom enemy, you could jump off of him and up to the top. Order of operations is important to figure out. It was obvious in that instance what needed to be done, but later encounters surely won't be as telegraphed. Most of these guys won't just allow themselves to get taken over, though. They require a quick beat-down. This comes in the form of simple button-pressed combos. We were shown an earlier level, but there was a definite sense that tactics would have to be switched up as the game progresses. That's only half the battle. Studio head Cesar Ramirez Molina told us that the developer's aiming for about a 50/50 split on combat and platforming. The platforming aspect isn't as intuitive as it could be, and it took several deaths before I got the hang of it. There's likely a better learning curve and teaching process in the full game than in the quick slice I played. Fortunately, Randall checkpoints graciously and there wasn't too much lost progress. There's promise in Randall, but there's more promise in what Randall represents. We The Force Studios is one of the few video game developers in Mexico. Currently, the scene is dominated by software and web developers. It's a much safer prospect to follow the established market than to risk your family's security pursuing what no one else is. That's why We The Force was doing web development up until it made the bold decision that it wanted a legacy. That's why the team started creating games. Randall is its first project, and Molina lamented what a tough transition it has been. He spoke about how challenging it is to make a decision about gameplay and then have to do all the research to figure out exactly how to implement it. Seasoned developers already know the technical side, but Molina and his crew have learned most of it on-the-fly. Randall is projected for a release sometime in 2016. It's a loose window, but it needs to be considering that the studio's inexperience possibly makes it more subject to delays than others. Regardless of when it launches and how it turns out, it's admirable that We The Force went out on a limb to pursue a dream while sacrificing safety. Just like its protagonist, these developers are going against the grain and chasing what they believe in.
Randall preview photo
Freedom fighter
Clerks has a scene where Randal Graves, an irresponsible and indifferent video store employee, tells a customer that he finds it best to stay out of other people's affairs. The laissez-faire approach isn't a noble a...

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