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PixelJunk

PixelJunk Inc. photo
Not necessarily in that order
In case you aren't aware, PixelJunk Inc. looks to be the raddest game ever. Imagine Castlevania, Metal Slug, Pikmin, and a tower defense all rolled into one. Also, soup everywhere. Naturally, when I got the opportunity to ta...

PixelJunk photo
PixelJunk

The PixelJunk series is half price right now


You should own at least one of these
Mar 27
// Jordan Devore
Did hearing about PixelJunk Inc. put you in the mood for some of Q-Games' other titles? From now until April 9 in North America (and April 10 in Europe), the entire line-up of PixelJunk games is half price. On Steam, it's the...
PixelJunk 1-6 photo
PixelJunk 1-6

You've got my full attention, PixelJunk Inc.


A better look at the game formerly known as PixelJunk 1-6
Mar 25
// Jordan Devore
For a while now, Q-Games has been releasing bits and pieces of information on PixelJunk 1-6 with regular development updates on its blog. Today, we've got a trailer and screenshots for this project, which is now being called...
Pixeljunk FAQ photo
Pixeljunk FAQ

The meaning of Q-Games' company name is revealed


PixelJunk creator lays it all out in an official FAQ
Feb 07
// Chris Carter
One could assume the biggest question Q-Games (creator of the PixelJunk series) gets is "where the hell is PixelJunk Monsters 2?!" I guess they got sick of having to repeat themselves, as Q-Games tackles that and more in a br...
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Q-Games explains why PixelJunk 1-6 is coming to PC


Developer isn't leaving PSN behind
Nov 07
// Jordan Devore
It's still unclear what exactly PixelJunk 1-6 is, but it sure looks pretty. The game was announced for PC, which didn't sit well with some fans of Q-Games' prior work. "Given our history with Sony I think people are being rat...
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Finally! New PixelJunk game in development for PC


Codenamed PixelJunk 1-6
Nov 02
// Dale North
Q-Games is teasing us with the very first details on the next PixelJunk game, codenamed PixelJunk 1-6. They say it's different from anything else in their catalog as it's being developed specifically for the PC. It is slated ...
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Indie Royale bundle has PixelJunk Eden, Escape Goat, more


Jun 14
// Jordan Devore
I respect what the folks behind the Indie Royale have been doing, but for me personally, many of the bundles haven't stood out as must-buys. This new one, however -- hell yes! It's got my full support. For less than $5, you c...
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Are you staying up until PixelJunk 4am tonight?


May 15
// Kyle MacGregor
Q-Games has certainly crafted some interesting experiences with their critically-acclaimed PixelJunk series. From shooters to racers, tower-defense to puzzle platformers, Q's PlayStation downloadables seem to know no bounds....
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All the PixelJunk games on sale on PSN starting tomorrow


May 07
// Brett Zeidler
Have you yet to complete your PixelJunk collection, but have been waiting for a sale? Well, tomorrow is a good day as any because Q-Games is celebrating PixelJunK's 5th Anniversary by dropping the prices of Racers, Monsters,...

Review: PixelJunk Eden (PC)

Feb 09 // Jordan Devore
PixelJunk Eden (PlayStation Network, Steam [reviewed])Developer: Q-GamesPublisher: Q-GamesReleased: February 2, 2012 MSRP: $9.99Rig: Intel i7-2600k @3.40 GHz, with 8GB of RAM, GeForce GTX 580 GPU (SLI) The core of PixelJunk Eden remains the same for Steam, so rather than completely reiterate what was covered in our original review years ago, I'll summarize the basics. Thankfully, this is a rather minimalistic game, so there's not much to set up. As a little creature called a "Grimp," you feel compelled to use your acrobatic prowess to launch into floating enemies. This recklessness results in an explosion of much-need pollen that gets absorbed by nearby plants. Once fully pollinated, these plants will sprout the next time you bump into them. In terms of objectives, that's practically it. By helping plants grow, you're able to reach new heights and collect pick-ups called Spectra. There are five in each garden to find and collecting them is necessary for unlocking additional gardens. Levels are spacious and non-linear, so it can be more challenging to reach the Spectra than one might initially think. The biggest change for returning players is the control scheme: it's been redesigned for mouse and keyboard. I tend to prefer the comfort of a gamepad outside of, say, real-time strategy, but Q-Games has done such an excellent job with the controls here that I have a hard time imagining playing Eden any other way. Which is good, because there currently is no gamepad support in this version. Given the amount of precision you need to reach certain areas, the new controls don't immediately feel quite right and take some practice -- but the end result is undeniably good. The pacing is such that you're given plenty of time to become acquainted with the controls as you're eased into Eden with fairly straightforward level design. Zen gaming is the category I'd toss Eden in, but that doesn't mean it's boring. The soundtrack by Baiyon had me eager to fetch my headphones every single time and enter a state of bliss. Ending a session of Eden -- breaking the spell -- feels like stepping back into reality. As you become more skilled, you can't help but try zipping through gardens as quickly and stylishly as possible. This is reinforced by a much-needed addition: quick warps. Narrowly missing a jump and plummeting to the bottom of the stage is frustrating, or rather, it would be. At the press of a button, some energy is shaved off and you're teleported back to your last position. Another welcome change to Eden is that now, you don't have to find all five of a garden's Spectra in one go. Instead, you collect one, get sent back to the level-select screen, and can then jump back in. After getting all five, you're able to freely play through the garden, recollecting every Spectra in a single session if you so choose. This may seem like a minor thing, but it greatly helps to alleviate much of the frustration from levels with wind, gravity flipping, and other annoyances. Finally, the five gardens from the PlayStation Network version's "Encore" expansion are included at no additional cost. If you're anything like me, you won't want Eden to end, so this gesture is greatly appreciated. These levels are as solid as the rest of the game. It's a shame to see a few features -- particularly multiplayer -- get cut from this version of PixelJunk Eden, but the warp ability, new controls, and restructured pacing more than make up for the loss. This Steam edition is a must-download for new and returning players alike.
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At this point, I think there's at least one game in the ongoing PixelJunk series for everyone. For the longest time, PixelJunk Monsters was the obvious go-to choice for me, but I've since flirted with the idea of giving Pixel...

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PixelJunk debuts on Steam with Eden


Jan 27
// Jordan Devore
I was starting to think the PixelJunk series would never end up on Steam. Not so! Q-Games has announced a new version of PixelJunk Eden, due out on February 2. This release includes the five levels from the "Encore" DLC and "...

Preview: PixelJunk 4am

Dec 15 // Samit Sarkar
PixelJunk 4am (PlayStation Move) Developer: Q-Games Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment Release: Spring 2012 PixelJunk 4am is Q-Games’ second collaboration with the Japanese artist Baiyon, who also did the art and music for PixelJunk Eden. The relaxing electronic music in that game, which rose and fell with your actions, suited that experience perfectly. 4am ups the ante somewhat, although the atmosphere is still more “lounge” than “rave.” [Update: Per Q-Games, Baiyon himself calls it “deep.”] While Baiyon’s tracks determine the mood, the PlayStation Move gives you an incredible degree of control over the specific sounds coming into your ears. The foundation consists of four different lines: kick, bass, rhythm, and synth. They’re controlled by the X, square, circle, and triangle buttons, respectively, and the ball on the Move wand changes color to match the track. These “long-play elements” are complemented by four one-off gestures: flicking the Move controller up, down, left, or right plays a particular sound. The result is nothing short of astounding. Holding the Move wand in your hand and waving it around to transform the groove, you feel like a digital shaman taming the spirits of song with a plastic whip. The PlayStation Eye camera and the Move controller combine to give you a three-dimensional performance space. To lay down the base tracks, you hold down the trigger and reach out until you feel the controller vibrate and bring it back into the center before releasing the trigger, unleashing the musical line. You also have effects modulation at your disposal: hold the Move button and move the wand to play with an element, perhaps distorting the sound with a phaser. 4am furthers the DJ experience by letting you mute a particular track -- cut out the bass for a bit -- by double-tapping the face button for that track, or mute everything but a particular track -- just the drums right here -- by holding its face button. The software offers three different visualizers, each with its own ambience and set of sounds. You can switch between them, and because doing so doesn’t stop the music, you can cull your favorite elements from each setting and blend them as you desire. Music is meant to be enjoyed by an audience, and 4am lets you broadcast your DJing live over the PlayStation Network through the app. Q-Games will be putting out a free “viewer,” so you don’t need to buy the software in order to be able to enjoy performances. Just turn on your PS3 and tune in to your favorite DJ to get the party started.
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The music/rhythm genre is full of experiences that a reductive person might call “performance simulators.” In essence, games like Rock Band lay out a track of notes to hit -- whether with your voice or a controlle...

Review: PixelJunk SideScroller

Oct 29 // Allistair Pinsof
[embed]214774:41509[/embed] PixelJunk SideScroller (PlayStation Network)Developer: Q-GamesPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: October 25, 2011 MSRP: $9.99 If you beat PixelJunk Shooter 2 and played the unlockable sidescrolling shmup stage, like a tru3 hxcorez dude, then you know SideScroller is a labor of love for Q-Games. SideScroller is more than just an expansion on that idea. It’s the developer’s best game yet. From beginning to end, SideScroller is an immaculately polished, trippy adventure back into the heart of what made a good shooter in the ‘90s. Don’t worry, there are also unlockable difficulty modes and online leaderboards for fans of modern shmups.Like Salamander and Harmful Park, SideScroller gives the player access to a versatile arsenal at all times. The machine gun is self-explanatory. It’s a bit weak, which makes it only useful for the beginning of levels. Then there is the laser and wall gun. The laser is essential for dealing damage fast and the wall guns will help you deal with turrets and other enemies clinging to the walls, above and below. You can level each weapon up to five times (a la Harmful Park), extending their range and power. Finally, there is the charge attack which, as far as I can tell, is completely useless. You hold down the L1 trigger to power-up a charge that sends you spiralling in the direction of your choice. It feels like a half-baked idea that Q-Games never fully developed. We’ll see if high score YouTube videos prove me wrong.The weapon system constantly puts you to the test, as enemies and environments force you to adjust your strategy. Despite the cliché weapon-types, the way Q-Games implemented the system is completely unique and exciting. The challenge grows immensely after the opening stage. (Confusingly, the game has three “stages” that contain four sectors each.) If you don’t know what weapons are good for which environments, you’ll soon find yourself accepting the game’s invitation to play on Casual Mode. Hey, you don’t want that. DO YOU? You want to go to school and have all the kids call you pissy-sissy pants and have sex with your mom? Because that’s what happens when you play on Casual, strangers come to your house and have sex all over your mom. ALL OVER! ON TOP, ON THE SIDE, FROM THE CURTAINS ... I SHOULD KNOW! I'VE BEEN THERE, MAN! I'VE SEEN IT HAPPEN! ALL A SUDDEN YOUR COOL FRIEND BOOZY WITH THE ATV AND KICK-ASS MULLET ISN'T SO COOL ANYMORE. THEN IT'S YOUR SHY FRIEND GABRIEL, THEN IT'S THE ENTIRE FOOTBALL TEAM AND, BEFORE YOU KNOW IT, THE SCHOOL FACULTY! IT'S LIKE A -- As I was saying, Q-Games have done an immaculate job of making every level feel unique through its layouts, mini-bosses, hectic finales, and environmental obstacles. Your ship will weather the elements, although to a lesser extent than the Shooter games. There are no puzzles to be solved here, but lava, gas clouds, and other colorful substances (that I can’t quite identify) make for an ingenious way to restrict the player’s movement. At one point, I cleared a wave of enemies and suddenly found myself searching for safety as a tidal wave of red, boiling death came flowing my way. This game is pretty intense, so feel no shame in punching your pillow, biting your tongue, and letting out a breath of relief as you approach a checkpoint. We all do it. Especially on Hard mode. Along with Casual Mode (...) and Normal Mode, you’ll unlock Hard and Burtal after that. Each difficulty level feels like it was examined in detail, as enemies and environmental hazards are tailored toward each play-level. Even better, Hard mode has an awesome graphics filter that makes the game look like what we thought future Game Boys would look like in 1992. Along with having a less exciting greyscale filter, Brutal mode gives enemies suicide bullets and bullet patterns that flirt with Danmaku.Unlike most shmups, SideScroller doesn’t connect levels together. Each level is played for its own score, so a 1cc isn’t really possible with this game. On the other hand, the combo system and hidden bonuses should keep the dedicated genre-fans returning. Everything in the game, including the bullet patterns, is pretty simple but the game never feels dumbed-down. The weapon system and fluid hazards even out the challenge. However, the checkpoint system may kill it. You basically have infinite continues and you respawn at your last checkpoint. It may be a bit too Call of Duty for shmup-purists, but you’ll be thankful for this in later stages. The visuals in SideScroller are the next best thing to dropping acid at a Daft Punk concert. The scanlines and warped corners of the screen, that replicate a CRT TV, are a loving ode to the '90s, but the actual graphics are jaw-dropping. I thought past Q-Games titles looked like boring Illustrator images made by an ad company, but this game is something entirely different. The way the neon-glow and color palate mix is incredible. I had so much fun getting to the next level just to see how it looked and I was never disappointed. I only wish the game were in 3D, since the game’s scrolling parallax layers naturally pop-out at you due to the colors. The entirety of the final sector, which can only be unlocked via Normal Mode, is one of the most memorable moments of gaming this year. Much like Rez, SideScroller saves the best for last with this epic, mind-bending stage. I’ve never seen graphical glitches so creatively used for tension and visual effect like this before. It’s a brilliant moment when the game’s aesthetic and gameplay come together to make something incredible. I just wish the entire game could have been on this level. Touhou and Cave fans may find issue with SideScroller’s slower-pace and constant checkpoints -- not to mention the levels have individual scores -- but this is a rare shooter that will have appeal to a wide audience. Stoners, hi-score chasers, and shmup veterans will all find something to love in Q-Games' latest. Along with Deathsmiles and Gradius V, SideScroller is one of the few side-scrolling gems of the past decade. So long and thanks for all the bullets, Q-Games.
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No, PixelJunk SideScroller is not old-school. Nor is it retro -- OK, maybe a little. But, more than that, it’s a completely contemporary game full of visuals and ideas that feel fresh and original within videogame&rsq...

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October 25 is PixelJunk SideScroller day in the US


Oct 17
// Jordan Devore
No, it's not PixelJunk Monsters 2, but that doesn't mean PixelJunk SideScroller isn't worth obsessing over. On the Q-Games Twitter feed, we're told this latest PJ title is set for a North American PlayStation Network release ...

Preview: PixelJunk SideScroller

Sep 29 // Allistair Pinsof
[embed]212612:41076[/embed] PixelJunk SideScroller (PlayStation Network)Developer: Q-GamesPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentTo be released: TBA 2011 Konami’s late-80s shmup-sidecrollers (Salamander, Gradius) are the most pronounced influences on Q-Games’ latest, but if you dig deeper you may be surprised by what else you’ll find. The first comparison my mind made was one to Harmful Park. I’ve gushed about that game elsewhere on the site, so I won’t go into too much detail on its history. Like the weapon system in Harmful Park, SideScroller gives you unlimited access to four primary weapons which you level-up individually. This is one of my favorite touches in Harmful Park since it opens the doors to strategic play. It also keeps you from feeling the frustration of accidentally touching the laser power-up and losing your current powered weapon -- Man, do I hate that! In SideScroller, you have lasers, a rapid-fire peashooter and bombs that shoot up and down. Just like Harmful Park, you switch between them with the triggers so you always have immediate access to them. Finally there is the charge attack: By holding down the back left-trigger for a couple seconds, you can send your ship spiraling toward enemies, destroying them, at hyperspeed (not sure if this can be powered-up). When SideScroller was shown at E3 earlier this year, the art direction looked surprisingly lazy for the graphical masterminds at PixelJunk. The game was clearly an early-prototype, reusing Shooter 2’s assets. As you can see in these screens, the current build of SideScroller has much more of a Tron/neon-colored vector-graphics look which suits the game really well. Not only do the visuals pop, but the new look help keeps the bullets distinguished from the backdrops. When you are racing to drop some lava on the ground or are making your way through a narrow tunnel amidst gunfire, you’ll appreciate this new change.The same chemical elements of Shooter are at play in SideScroller but it hardly feels like a puzzle. Though, the game finds ways to keep the player thinking and fighting strategically. You’ll frequently come across environmental hazards that can only be destroyed with certain weapons. The same is true of some enemies and bosses, so you’ll have to spread your power-ups across your arsenal if you want to get very far. Once you have played the game through and have the levels memorized, it probably won’t provide much of a challenge. But, it makes for some tense encounters on the first playthrough, especially during bosses when you scramble to find the right weapon. Although I walked away from SideScroller feeling mostly glee, I have a couple reservations that I hope will be addressed before its release. For a PixelJunk game, the music seemed a bit buried in the mix; it wasn’t up front and thumping like it should have been, especially for this type of game. Also, the constant checkpoints diminished some of the challenge that the game is trying to capture. Gradius and Gradius II are insanely difficult so I wouldn’t expect something like that -- supposedly SideScroller was this hard during its early stages -- but constant checkpoints in a shmup just rub me the wrong way. I rather have lives that let me respawn, even if that isn’t how Gradius did it.Along with Sine More and Jamestown, SideScroller is helping bring shmups back to the masses while giving it a new paintjob. As a fan of the genre, I see nothing wrong with that.
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The title of PixelJunk Shooter was a bit misleading. It was much more of an exploration and puzzle game than an actual shooter. It was a great game (along with its sequel), but not exactly what genre fans wanted. Sidecroll...

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Gorgeous PixelJunk SideScroller screenshots from gamescom


Aug 18
// Jordan Devore
[Update: The original screenshots we ran were, in fact, old. Someone let the Ghoulies run wild in the Sony Computer Entertainment Europe offices again. Q-Games sent over the latest batch of images, so check 'em out.] Having c...
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Q-Games unveils new web-based PixelJunk Monsters


Jul 21
// Jordan Devore
Q-Games' Casual Connect teaser was indeed related to PixelJunk Monsters as many of you had guessed. For the first time, the fantastic series will be available outside of PlayStation Network. This free-to-play, browser-based v...

E3: First look at PixelJunk Lifelike

Jun 07 // Conrad Zimmerman
"We've created an audio canvas with the Move controller," Cuthbert explains. Four sets of sounds can be accessed with the four face buttons on the Move wand, with gestures to add sounds into the track and twists to tweak the currently selected sound. Players will be able to play live and have other users watch and listen to their performances over PlayStation Network. Additionally, two wands can be used to expand the experience, offering cooperative possibilities as well as simply broadening the range of control for a single person. While what we were shown was mostly drum and bass work, there will be a wide variety of instruments supplied with the game along with a range of visualizations. No plans to allow users to upload their own samples, though such a feature may be implemented in future. Also no confirmation yet on whether players will be able to save their tracks to the PS3 for later enjoyment but that is currently under consideration by Q-Games. Remixes of other player's tracks, are out of the question, as Cuthbert says, "I believe everybody's creation is their own." And to round out the list of things we don't know about it, pricing and release schedule are still being discussed with Sony. The demonstration was interesting, but I'm not sure what to take away from it. After a few minutes, the audio at points just devolved into this utter cacophony with sounds indistinguishable from one another while the controller flailed about. Still, in a time when creative uses of the Move controller seem few and far between, PixelJunk Lifelike certainly stands apart.
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Sitting in a darkened theater room, Q-Games Dylan Cuthbert introduced the latest installment in the PixelJunk series with a curious statement: "It's been a long experimental path," he said. "It's not really a game." We quick...

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E3: PixelJunk SideScroller revealed


Jun 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
Curiously absent from Sony's press conference earlier today was the announcement of a new title in Q Games' PixelJunk series. Such a thing does exist and expands the franchise into yet another classic genre of video...
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Q-Games is bringing three titles to E3 2011


May 31
// Jordan Devore
Finally! E3 will be when we figure out just what the heck PixelJunk Lifelike is all about. The teaser sure was weird and all, but that dates back to September. Guess Q-Games founder Dylan Cuthbert wasn't lying when he said we...
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ThinkGeek has a couple of PixelJunk Shooter 2 t-shirts


Mar 03
// Jordan Devore
ThinkGeek has jumped in bed with Q-Games to offer some swanky products based on the studio's games. And really, who can blame them? Chad has certainly flirted with the concept before. To go alongside the release of PixelJunk ...

Review: PixelJunk Shooter 2

Mar 01 // Chad Concelmo
PixelJunk Shooter 2 (PSN)Developer: Q-GamesReleased: March 1, 2011MSRP: $9.99 PixelJunk Shooter 2 starts exactly where the original PixelJunk Shooter left off. After being swallowed by a giant creature at the end of the first game, your little spelunking ship falls into the belly of this enormous beast and must find a way to escape and find a way back home. Yeah, the concept is simple, but the PixelJunk games are not about their stories (or lack thereof) -- they are about the simple, yet surprisingly deep gameplay, gorgeous animation, and lovely, retro-inspired high-def visuals. For anyone not familiar with the first game, PixelJunk Shooter 2 is a 2D side-scrolling shooter, in its most basic terms. The game finds your player (or players, as this sequel once again brings back the refreshing two-player local co-op of the first game!) controlling their subterranean ship through a series of vast, beautifully-designed cave levels, solving puzzles and fighting enemies using a small, but effective, assortment of moves. Control is simple. The left analog stick moves your ship around the screen, while the right analog stick rotates your aim. The right trigger fires missiles (which can be charged up and turned into homing shots by holding the trigger down) and the left trigger releases a grappling hook, used to rescue helpless survivors, collect level-unlocking diamonds, and activate environmental items (switches, levers, etc.). Each level is divided into a series of sections, some larger than others. To proceed forward to the next section, players must rescue (or accidentally kill) all the survivors. By doing this, the door to the next area is opened, and players continue one step closer to the game’s end. Kill too many survivors, though, and your game is over. Admittedly, PixelJunk Shooter 2 could have been too simple for its own good. The game plays like a combination between Asteroids and Defender, and, while I am a massive fan of these retro arcade classics, gameplay that dated could get really old really fast. But PixelJunk Shooter 2 is so much more than just flying around and shooting things. While that aspect is great, the game is mostly about solving brilliant environmental puzzles and navigating your way through ever-increasingly challenging stages. PixelJunk Shooter 2 is separated into three worlds, each with five massive levels. While the first PixelJunk Shooter introduced new play mechanics throughout the game’s entirety, all the stages felt a little similar. This is not at all the case in PixelJunk Shooter 2. Each world in the game is completely different than the one before it. The first stage, as mentioned above, finds your subterranean ship in the belly of a giant beast. The second world takes place in the underground labyrinths of an ice cave and nearby volcano. And the third world is set in a metallic factory, full of moving machines and clever traps. In addition to the obvious difference in aesthetics, each world also possesses completely new puzzles and gameplay to solve and conquer. The first world, for example, has a purple bile liquid that swishes around the beast’s belly. Touching it poisons your ship, starting a countdown that forces you to find a pool of water to cleanse yourself in before the timer runs out. In the second world, the combination of instant-kill lava and refreshing ice water is put to genius use -- players are asked to use these various liquids to solve complicated, yet very satisfying environmental puzzles. (And can I please mention the liquid physics throughout the entire game are amazing?!) I don’t want to spoil the last world, but let’s just say it hosts the game’s most fiendish and absolutely breathtaking levels, using light and darkness in creative, jaw-dropping ways. I truly was blown away by the level design in PixelJunk Shooter 2. Each level just got cooler and more impressive as the game went on. Based on the exquisite level deign alone, I would recommend this game. But even with all this, two specific things impressed me even more. The first are the boss battles. While there are only three main bosses in the game (one at the end of each world), they are some of the most well-designed, clever bosses I have encountered in a very long time. As you battle each boss, all the various skills you learned throughout each world come into play. This gives the game a very “Zelda” feel. You won’t be mindlessly holding down the “fire” trigger to defeat these end-of-world bosses like in most shooters. The game is all about using the environment (and the skills you have picked up along the way) to emerge victorious. The bosses really are magnificent. But even more impressive than the controls, the level design, and the bosses ... well ... I am not sure how to go about this without spoiling some of the game’s biggest (and best) surprises ... Let’s just say there are some wonderfully welcome references to classic retro games that will pop up in unexpected places and put an enormous smile on your face (even for the non-retro fans out there). There are several points in the game when you can obtain special “suits” -- power-ups that equip your ship with extra special powers. One “suit” turns your ship into a vehicle that digs through the ground exactly like the old Dig-Dug games. And this is not a coincidence. These sections feature the exact same four-direction control scheme and falling rock gameplay of the arcade classic, proving the clever reference is obviously intentional. Even better, during the second boss fight, the game organically, almost seamlessly, shifts to a Galaga-clone, complete with attacking “bug” ships that follow the same pattern as the enemies in the old retro classic. There are many more moments like this scattered throughout PixelJunk Shooter 2, each one more brilliant than the one before it. And it’s important to note these events don’t ever feel forced or random. They are integrated into the level so well that you won’t even notice they are happening -- one thing you know you are playing the game like normal and the next you are taking part in these genius tributes. There really isn’t one negative thing I can say about PixelJunk Shooter 2. The game is even better than I thought it was going to be. And after loving the original, I had high expectations! Like Pixar is to film, Q-Games is on quite the hot streak in the world of videogames, furthering their perfect track record with quite possibly my favorite PixelJunk game yet. PixelJunk Shooter 2 is awesome -- a true master class in solid game design. So, yeah: It’s official. I want to put a baby in Q-Games. I am in this relationship for the long haul.
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My relationship with Q-Games and their wonderful PixelJunk series of downloadable games has followed a very similar path to that of courting a real-life future companion. After their first PixelJunk game, Racers, I felt somet...

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March 1 is officially PixelJunk Shooter 2 day


Feb 10
// Jordan Devore
Q-Games president Dylan Cuthbert has taken it to the PlayStation Blog to share exciting news on the PixelJunk front: PixelJunk Shooter 2 has been confirmed for Tuesday, March 1 on PlayStation Network. This looks to be a parti...
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TGS: Teaser for PixelJunk Lifelike is well… it's this


Sep 17
// Nick Chester
So here we have a teaser for Q-Games upcoming PixelJunk Lifelike. You go ahead and watch that. Okay, so you're asking: "What the hell is that?" Embarrassingly, I'm not entirely sure. From the video we know that it will featu...
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Pixeljunk 'lifelike' PS3 visualizer promo coming to TGS


Aug 20
// Dale North
Sometimes you just find gaming news. I was taking a break from the morning news writing just now. I did what I usually do: look at photography sites for news and pictures. You should know that I'm a huge photo nerd. Today I w...
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PS Plus members get PixelJunk Racers 2nd Lap early


Aug 09
// Jordan Devore
PixelJunk Racers 2nd Lap, the not-sequel to the popular not-racing PlayStation Network game, will be ready for download on August 24. If you own the original PixelJunk Racers, it's a free download; otherwise, there's a $6.99 ...
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E3 10: Hands-on with PixelJunk Shooter 2


Jun 17
// Chad Concelmo
All this week I am going to be giving ridiculously quick hands-on impressions of all the games I see on the E3 show floor. Since I think everything is a little amazing, they will be rated, from least to...
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There will be no PixelJunk Shooter soundtrack release


May 21
// Conrad Zimmerman
High Frequency Bandwidth, the guys who created the critically acclaimed soundtrack to PixelJunk Shooter, have announced that there will not be an official soundtrack release. Sucks, right? Not quite. Turns out that all of the...
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Our first kind of conceptual look at PixelJunk Shooter 2


May 18
// Jordan Devore
Many of you were likely aware that PixelJunk Shooter 2 was in the pipeline over at Q-Games. Well, now they're finally ready to talk about it -- and they brought pretty pictures too! Beyond two concept images, there's what loo...
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PixelJunk Monsters Deluxe will soon be $9.99 and on UMD


Apr 21
// Jordan Devore
PixelJunk Monsters Deluxe was so worth getting at the full $19.99 launch price, it pretty much goes without saying that when it releases on UMD later this month -- April 27, to be exact -- for $9.99, you'll be getting a lot o...

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