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Parodies

brentalfloss photo
brentalfloss

Snag brentalfloss' unreleased YouTube jams for $0.59 each


Or the whole album for $7.99
Apr 25
// Tony Ponce
[Video uploaded by bedsidecargo] Internet songman brentalfloss has uploaded many funny and creative music videos to his YouTube page over the years. Among those, he cherry-picked a few choice tunes, re-rerecorded them with im...
Insane Ian photo
Insane Ian

Go cop Insane Ian's new VG / pop music parody medley


Mess up the mix, mix up the mess!
Apr 23
// Tony Ponce
In case you've forgotten that Destructoid is staffed by beautiful, talented people, let me remind you that we've got artists, singer-songwriters, scientists, and former reality show stars amongst our ranks. We are some gifted...
Mario Busters 2 photo
Mario Busters 2

The Mario Busters answer the call once again


Death is but a warp pipe, time is but a magic painting
Apr 17
// Tony Ponce
I appreciate Flash animators with quick turnaround between projects. Just a couple months ago, James Farr was able to deliver Super Mario Busters, a kick-ass mashup of Super Mario and Ghostbusters, and already he's hammered ...
AVGN Adventures photo
AVGN Adventures

Check out Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures in action


The parodic platformer has passed through Greenlight and will release on Steam
Apr 17
// Tony Ponce
The Angry Video Game Nerd's assault on all things sh*tty and retro will soon break from the confines of live-action footage and into the digital world. Following last week's teaser trailer, here comes pre-alpha gameplay of A...
Dark Souls Evangelion photo
Dark Souls Evangelion

Prepare to watch this Dark Souls and Evangelion mash-up


Shinji is up for some jolly co-operation
Apr 10
// Chris Carter
A new video has taken the world of Dark Souls and put it up against the entire intro of Neon Genesis Evangelion. The mash-up is faithfully recreated, from the half second cuts all the way to the scrolling sketches. Dark Soul...
Pokémon photo
Pokémon

Stay gold, Pokemon... stay gold


What is going on in this Pokémon rap video?
Apr 06
// Tony Ponce
Ummmm... wut? This Pokémon rap, a parody of Trinidad James' "All Gold Everything," is so ridiculous that I have to wonder how anyone in the video could keep a straight face. Thugged-out Pokémon trainers wearing...
Dr. Seuss photo
Dr. Seuss

These Dr. Seuss game-to-book parodies are delightful


Would you kindly in a box? Would you kindly with a fox?
Apr 06
// Tony Ponce
Watch out, Ashley Davis! You are not the only one capable of turning violent videogames into adorable children's entertainment! Aussie artist DrFaustusAU has a talent for emulating the distinctive style of Dr. Seuss book cove...
BioShock photo
BioShock

What if BioShock was a Disney musical?


College Humor has the answer
Apr 02
// Allistair Pinsof
BioShock Infinite may be all the rage lately, but I've had the original BioShock on my mind and so has College Humor. One part BioShock Cliffs Notes, one part Little Mermaid cover, College Humor's latest original is a joyful...

Review: The Organ Trail: Director's Cut

Apr 02 // Jim Sterling
The Organ Trail: Director's Cut (PC)Developer: The Men Who Wear Many HatsPublisher: The Men Who Wear Many HatsReleased: March 19, 2013MSRP: $4.99Rig: Intel i7-2600k @3.40 GHz, with 8GB of RAM, GeForce GTX 580 GPU (SLI) The Organ Trail sounds like a one-note joke, and newcomers would be forgiven for assuming such a joke wears thin long before the closing credits. However, the game is remarkable in just how much staying power it has. Yes, it's basically just Oregon Trail with zombies, but the Director's Cut adds smart twists and constantly keeps the pressure on players to the point where it easily stands out on its own, more than a simple parody. Players assume the leader of a band of survivors, and must travel from one coast of the United States to the other in a beat up station wagon. Structured very much like its namesake, gameplay consists of driving from landmark to landmark, dealing with supply shortages and random setbacks along the way. Maintaining health, acquiring stores of food, repairing the car and ensuring there's enough fuel to reach the next stopping point are all crucial factors to consider, and things can happen along the way to further jeopardize the journey.  Travel between locations is automatic, and random events can occur along the way. A character may get sick, something in the car might break, or a bump in the road could cause fuel cans to fly off the roof and get lost. More hands-on hindrances involve hordes of zombies, which you can choose to sneak or fight through, or encounters with fellow survivors, offering dialog choices that could lead you into trouble or reward your decision making. More often than not, however, trouble will be the result.  A general rule of Organ Trail, once again like its namesake, is that if anything can go wrong, it will. The game is almost demoralizing in just how willing it is to assault your survivors with problems. When ammunition is low, expect one of your survivors to accidentally drop some out of the window. If you have no spare tires, a bandit is more than willing to shoot one of yours out, stranding the party between destinations and forcing the player to wait for passing traders with the right gear. Food can go rotten, mufflers can fall apart, and party members can get bitten by the undead.  Should a character get bitten, they can generally survive without turning into a zombie. If their health gets too low, however, the risk of turning becomes more likely, and players will have to decide whether or not to kill them. Putting down a party member requires pulling the trigger yourself, and losing any survivor means having one less chance to make it through the game's finale alive.  At landmarks and rest stops, players can shop or trade with fellow survivors, use scrap metal to repair the vehicle, and purchase upgrades for both the car and player character. Here, the party may also rest to regain health (at the cost of food), or use medkits for the treatment of more serious injuries. Jobs can also be taken on, as can scavenging missions to gain supplies and cash. These options require the successful completion of a range of action-based shooter modes.  Shooting sections retain the retro feel of the rest of the game, and the rudimentary controls make for a distinctly nerve-wracking experience. In scavenge mode, zombies swarm in from the edges of the screen while the player picks up randomly spawning supplies. There are also defense challenges, which fixes the player behind a wall and requires all encroaching zombies be killed, and shootouts with bandits, a somewhat frustrating mode in which players must keep cover and shoot at human opponents -- who are also shooting and covering in an excessively annoying game of cat-and-mouse.  The player moves slowly using the WASD keys, and has to shoot by first holding down the left mouse button, pulling back to aim, and letting go. It's a deliberately awkward system that results in regular misses and forces the player to stop and aim carefully. Such design runs the risk of becoming infuriating, but Trail's focus on survival, ammo conservation, and general fear of failure means it works excellently in compounding one's terror. Despite the game's prehistoric graphics, it's remarkable just how much of a survival horror atmosphere is maintained.  It's a good idea to pay attention to the zombie activity before heading out to scavenge. Ranging from low to deadly, activity determines how hard it'll be to avoid zombie contact. To successfully scavenge, you just have to collect items until the time runs out, but if a zombie touches you once, you'll fail, lose some of what you collected, and take a hit to the health bar -- which player characters can only replenish with expensive medkits. Even in areas with low zombie activity, there's enough competition to keep one challenged -- and that activity can change between missions, so one always needs to keep an eye on it. To make things even harsher, the Director's Cut version adds random boss zombies, such as mutant bears and dogs, which take a ton of damage to put down and are generally hard to avoid.  On the road, some other action-based challenges may occur. Bike gangs can assault the station wagon, or a herd of zombie deer may give chase. In these events, the car is moved up and down a section of road with the W and S keys, and must be used to either smash bikes off the road or avoid undead animals, respectively.  Though the main mode is short, the constant fear of failure and sense of urgency provides more than enough anxiety for one sitting. There's also an endless mode with a set of extra challenges that unlock skulls. Skulls, in turn, unlock new endless scenarios and gameplay conditions, providing potentially tons and tons of gameplay on top of the campaign.  Though one could potentially spend hours with the game, the gameplay is simplistic enough to not quite provide that kind of compulsion. Once the campaign's beaten, endless mode is, essentially, more of the same, even with extra conditions. You're still trundling from place to place, trading gear, scavenging items, and shooting white squares and bright green zombies. It's fun while it lasts, but the amusement factor and the jokes only have so much mileage.  One thing that Organ Trail deserves immense amounts of praise for is its brilliant soundtrack. Merging DOS-style bleeps and bloops with deeper percussion, the game's infectious music imbues nostalgic sounds with the kind of dread-inspiring sound made famous in such films as 28 Days Later. It's a fantastic score, and one of the most game-appropriate I've encountered in a while.  Organ Trail: Director's Cut has a few things going against it. It's a parody game, which is always a risk, and it involves zombies; an increasingly tiresome creative crutch. But through wit, ingenuity, and good old fashioned sadism, it manages to succeed against the odds and provide a truly rewarding spin on a number of classic ideas. For the price, you really couldn't ask for more.
Organ Trail review photo
Dysentremendous
If there's one thing that's more overplayed than zombies, it's reviews for zombie videogames talking about how overplayed zombies are. Truly, nobody can win anymore. We're worn out on the zombie thing, and worn out by our own...

Game Over, the poster photo
Game Over, the poster

Game heroes died so that you can have this poster


Hang brentalfloss' "The Game Over Tinies" up on your wall
Feb 26
// Tony Ponce
Did you guys get a chance to check out "The Game Over Tinies" in brentalfloss the comic? Once again, co-writers brentalfloss and Dan Roth and artist Andrew Dobson created an abecedarian comic of videogame character deaths -- ...
The Game Over Tinies photo
The Game Over Tinies

Even more 'Game Overs' in storybook rhyme


The remaining letters in brentalfloss the comic's "The Game Over Tinies"
Feb 22
// Tony Ponce
A couple weeks back, brentalfloss the comic began an arc parodying the dark comedy children's book The Gashlycrumb Tinies -- that book's author, Edward Gorey, is the subject of today's Google Doodle, by the by. Anyway, "The G...
Street Fighter photo
Street Fighter

Street Fighter III's Q is a sexual Kermit the Frog


brentalfloss sings "The Total Destruction"
Feb 18
// Tony Ponce
The enigmatic Q from Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike is a freak. That we know. His Total Destruction technique certainly doesn't leave much room for ambiguity. You do have to wonder what must be going on through his / hers / ...
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Reddit uncovers the PS4 controller's true functionality


The shocking truth
Feb 14
// Niero Desu
Priceless. [Artwork by Farrow on NeoGaf. Thanks, Cybii]
Comedy Gold photo
Comedy Gold

Dig Dug parody video takes Ke$ha to the arcade


Courtesy of our own Ian Bonds!
Feb 09
// Conrad Zimmerman
Destructoid contributor Ian Bonds was seemingly too humble to post this video. Either that, or he doesn't really love us as much as I thought, because this music video created to accompany his parody of Ke$ha's "TiK ToK" is the kind of thing you really ought to be showing the people you claim to care about. 
The Game Over Tinies photo
The Game Over Tinies

The alphabet of 'Game Overs' in comic strip form


Currently running in brentalfloss the comic
Feb 07
// Tony Ponce
Superfans of brentalfloss might be aware that he has his own self-titled webcomic. He doesn't draw it -- doodles are provided by one Andrew Dobson -- but he co-writes along with series creator Dan Roth. And whenever there's a...
Super Mario Busters photo
Super Mario Busters

Ghostbusters and Super Mario Bros. cross the streams


Who you gonna call? Mario Busters!
Feb 06
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Alright, so I thought this was going to be extremely cheesy but this Super Mario meets Ghostbusters crossover is actually kind of cute. A ton of references, nice animations, and that Kirby battle at the end made for an enjoyable video spoof. 
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Mega64: What do we do when the future is flooded by crap?


A cautionary tale
Nov 17
// Tony Ponce
I hesitated sharing this Mega64 parody of the film Looper because I didn't want to risk spoiling the actual movie for anybody. However, I myself have yet to see Looper, so I'm probably f*cked. And if I'm f*cked, you're all f...

Review: Retro City Rampage

Oct 31 // Tony Ponce
Retro City Rampage (PC [reviewed], PlayStation Network, PlayStation Vita, WiiWare, Xbox Live Arcade)Developer: Vblank EntertainmentPublisher: Vblank EntertainmentRelease: October 9, 2012 (PC, PSN, Vita) / Q4 2012 (WiiWare, XBLA)MSRP: $14.99 (PC, PSN, Vita) / TBA (WiiWare, XBLA) Retro City Rampage has had quite the colorful history. Originally conceived as the NES homebrew project Grand Theftendo, Brian decided to shift development to PC in order to escape the NES' limitations. From then on, the game started to gain an identity of its own. RCR may be an open-world sandbox, but a GTA clone it is not. It is a melting pot of ideas and inspiration, a conglomerate of cameos and pop culture references that are woven into the fabric so seamlessly that it feels like they truly belong together. It's Brian's own Who Framed Roger Rabbit, and the in-game world of Theftropolis is his Toontown. So rich is the city with heartfelt nods to cherished icons of yesteryear that you can't even go 30 seconds without being slammed by a parade of nostalgia. As you cruise the streets, you may notice the Ninja Turtles' Party Wagon or the A-Team's van driving by. Environments and objects straight out of Super Mario Bros., The Legend of Zelda, Sonic the Hedgehog, and more dot the landscape. There's even a boxing gym operated by a man who is totally a dead ringer for Doc Louis from Punch-Out!! [embed]237235:45596[/embed] A lot of these references are window dressing, so it might be easy to pass RCR off as lacking substance. That couldn't be further from the truth. The biggest references of all are built into the missions themselves, straddling the line between parody and homage but always with love and attention to detail. In one mission, you break into the home of the very Batman-esque Biffman, don his costume, and patrol the streets in search of Biffman's nemesis the Jester. In another mission, you bust onto the set of a Saved by the Bell knockoff during a live taping, beat up the high school boys, then take the girl back to your place for some "iced tea." In yet another mission, you have to dive into the reservoir to deactivate bombs in a recreation of the infamous dam level from Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles on the NES. These are the kinds of adventures you'll embark upon during the main missions, but you might want to kill some time driving around the street, jacking cars, and mowing down pedestrians instead. The more carnage you create, the more your notoriety grows, attracting the attention of ever more aggressive cops and eventually the military. As with GTA, there's something morbidly cathartic about spreading wanton chaos and destruction -- even more so when the world is populated by pixelated, toy-like caricatures of beach bums, gymnasts, and mariachis. Like I metioned, there is an overarching story. You are a hired thug known only as "Player," who is hurtled through time after stealing Bill and Ted's phone booth in front of a convenience store. Stranded in the future, you are fortunate enough to bump into Doc Choc, who's willing to let you use his DeLorean time machine if you can help repair it. Thus, you must track down the missing pieces of the machine, following leads and taking odd jobs along the way. During your quest, you frequently cross paths with your former employer, A.T. Corp., which holds a monopoly on nearly every industry in Theftropolis, from the media to software development. The biggest thorn in your side is the company's lead scientist, Dr. Von Buttnik, who rides around in a wrecking ball-swinging pod like a certain blue speedster's nemesis. In a stroke of hilarious cleverness, Player's conflict with A.T. Corp. sidesteps all player agency concerns. Player claims to be disgusted by A.T. Corp.'s nefarious business practices, which would seem at odds with his penchant for city-wide mayhem. When asked about this contradiction directly, Player flatly states that the two behaviors are not mutually exclusive. By embracing such a contradiction, Retro City Rampage allows you to have your cake and eat it too! Beyond the core levels, you unlock sub-missions that task you with using a specific weapon or tool to destroy a number of pedestrians or cars or to earn a certain amount of points within a time limit. You are then rated on your performance with a bronze, silver, or gold medal, and your score is posted onto the leaderboards. While scoring is typically very straightforward -- link kills together for a streak bonus -- I had serious issues in sub-missions involving handheld explosives like grenades or dynamite. Destroying people or vehicles with these items yields very few points, so the trick is to cause a chain reaction by using the explosion of one vehicle to destroy nearby ones. For some odd reason, this doesn't always result in a substantial amount of points. Maybe I've yet to discover exactly what triggers scoring chains when it comes to explosives, but I find them to be very random, making these some of the most difficult portions of the entire game. Then there are the guest mini-games, starring Commander Video from the BIT.TRIP series, Meat Boy, and even Harley Morenstein and Muscles Glasses from Epic Meal Time. Commander Video's game is an abridged version of BIT.TRIP RUNNER, Meat Boy's takes its cues from Rad Racer (use 3D glasses for stereoscopic mode!), and the EMT crew's closely resembles "Test Your Might" from Mortal Kombat. Clearing these games unlocks the characters' likenesses in either Free Roaming Mode or in the plastic surgery office alongside the Dtoid crew's mugs. The EMT game is not all that hard, but the BIT.TRIP and Meat Boy ones may make you want to smack your head against a wall. They start easily enough, but the challenge quickly ramps up. Particularly in BIT.TRIP, I was having extreme difficulty bouncing off alligator heads using the Xbox 360 controller. When I switched to the keyboard instead, jumping became far more responsive. That may have simply been a mechanical problem with my controller, but as I didn't have any similar issues elsewhere, I'm left to wonder. Customization is another major feature of RCR. You can change the border around the game screen to look like various monitors or arcade cabinets, add CRT scanlines, or apply color filters to simulate the look of old console, handheld, or computer software. If you want to pretend you are playing on an old VGA monitor, you can! If you want to recreate the feeling of squinting at the Game Boy's tiny spinach-colored square, that's possible too! Whatever tickles your nostalgia bone, there's an option available to satisfy your desires. Options extend to play style as well. By pressing and holding the fire button, you will lock onto the nearest target in your line of sight, but you can also use the right stick on a controller to enable twin-stick shooting, Smash TV style. You can dispatch enemies either by shooting them, bashing them, or running over them. n addition, you can pull a Mario and jump on their heads, a quick means to escape a tight squeeze when you are besieged on all sides. There's even a basic cover system for fans of Gears of War because... hell... why not? I haven't even touched upon the amazing chiptune soundtrack, composed by notable game composers Leonard "Freaky DNA" Paul (Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit 2, NBA Jam 2010) and Jake "virt" Kaufman (Shantae, Double Dragon Neon) as well as game music arranger extraordinaire Matt "Norrin_Radd" Creamer. Their tunes can be heard on the various radio stations while cruising through Theftropolis, the pulse-pounding bass and melodies giving voice to RCR's marriage of anarchy and candy-coated nostalgia. Unfortunately, the on-screen action at any time can be so overwhelming that it drowns out the music. At its worst, the soundtrack sounds like chaotic noise, hardly the catchy rhythms we associate with 8-bit gaming. That isn't so much the soundtrack's fault as it is the sheer concentration of activity that fills every second of play time, but it's nonetheless disappointing. It's this chaos that serves as both RCR's greatest triumph and biggest failing. To go anywhere and do anything, to never go a minute without being bombarded by visual and aural stimulation -- that all sounds good on paper; in practice, it often comes off as distracting. It's a jumble of events that fly past so quickly that your sense of focus will fall apart if you aren't completely devoted. But that was always going to be a problem, considering the ambitious decade-long journey Brian embarked upon. He wanted this to be his magnum opus, a love letter to everything that ever influenced him or made him smile. At the very least, the game never feels bloated or drawn out -- if you only attempt the main story missions, you'll be done in a matter of hours. However, if you want to lose yourself in the city or embark upon an Easter egg quest, the size and scope make for the perfect playground. Will there be people who don't like Retro City Rampage? Of course. In many ways, it bites off more than it can chew, especially when it comes to some of the one-time gimmick missions. Regardless, it is an ambitious achievement that celebrates everything that gaming has been and ever will be. It's clever, funny, outrageous, and even a bit frustrating, but there is a genuine respect for both the players and the sources of all the referenced material. I've barely scratched the surface of what secrets and activities are in store, but I'll leave the rest to you to discover on your own.
Retro City Rampage photo
Grand Theftendo
[Full Disclosure: Not only do current and former Destructoid staff appear as unlockable character skins in the game, there's also a main story mission during which you go inside a giant Mr. Destructoid robot. For these reaso...

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brentalfloss and Dj CUTMAN's ode to Slender Man


Willy Wonka will never be the same
Oct 27
// Tony Ponce
brentalfloss and Dj CUTMAN have each been playing the collaboration game recently, and now their journey has brought them into each other's arms. With Brent on lyrical duties and CUTMAN on sound production, the duo are here ...
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Virtue's Last Reward has me caught up in the game


By the way, the game is out RIGHT NOW
Oct 23
// Tony Ponce
No, I am not LeVar Burton, but I've been told by several people (read: no one) that I greatly resemble him. This is your notice that Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward is available right now on 3DS and PS Vita. I'm plugging my way through right now and can't think about much else. I've got Bracelet Points and sh*t on the brain.
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brentalfloss teams up for 'Super Mario Land With Lyrics'


Mario's got some big superballs
Oct 11
// Tony Ponce
Did you know that Mario doesn't throw fireballs in Super Mario Land? They're superballs -- you know, like the kind you'll find inside capsule machines at the front of the supermarket. Surprised? Fresh from his interview with...

Spotlight: What if a brentalfloss interview had lyrics?

Oct 10 // Tony Ponce
When and why did you decide to go bald? Ha! The same day I decided to be 5' 9'' and have a huge wang. One of these things is not like the others. True. But to answer what might have been your question, I started shaving my head in 2005 and haven't stopped since. Just felt it was time? Well, I mean... after a few years of trying to hide my baldness, I was like, "Look, I have a nice-shaped head. I don't look so bad with the buzzed look, and it makes me seem less creepy." I came back from my junior year summer with a tan and a shaved head and suddenly got laid like... what's 50 times more than zero? I might need to grab the calculator for that one! I only ask 'cause I like hearing people's hair stories. I feel a sense of camaraderie with other bald and balding gentlemen. I no longer feel alone. Gotcha. I started losing mine at 15... I found out around 16 (friends of mine knew but didn't tell me). So five years later, I had pretty much accepted it. [embed]236257:45377:0[/embed]The one that started it all! Also check out the extended remix. You've been in the "With Lyrics" sphere for a while. Your first one was "Mega Man 3 With Lyrics," wasn't it? Yes. When did you realize that "With Lyrics" started to take a life of its own and decide to run with it? Umm... I think within 48 hours of releasing "Mega Man 3 With Lyrics." Before I knew it, it was on CollegeHumor, GorillaMask.net, and other websites. I got more views on it in the first 48 hours than all my other videos combined. And so it didn't take long before I put two and two together. And when you told the people you went to college with what you were doing, they said...? Oh man. To this day, they're like, "So I hear you're like... on the Internet or something?" Very few people outside the Internet videogame content culture really understand it. But once I got to the point where I could say I did it full-time and didn't need any other job to pay the rent, I got more confident about it and I stopped caring whether my college friends understood or respected it. It's baby steps. I mean, I'm still trying to explain to my parents what Internet bloggers and journalists do. So I know the feel, bro. It's like my relatives would have a way easier time grasping what I do if I just said, "I'm a drug dealer by day and a gigolo by night!" Your stuff is great, but I've heard you explain before that you still have your sights on bigger things. I don't know about "bigger," but "other," absolutely. Between the ages of 16 and 24, I had a ton of different life plans: teacher, actor, composer, playwright, songwriter, musical theatre writer, etc., etc., etc. I went to New York in 2006 to write musicals, but there came this point where I realized brentalfloss was moving a lot faster than my musical theatre career. And it satisfies a lot of the same desires, like wanting to write lyrics, tell stories, etc. But it's good that you were able to channel your education and passion into a career that you enjoy. Not many people can claim to be doing that. You are involved in teaching, though, right? Don't you run a music workshop for kids? I was a drama teacher at a children's camp in NYC in 2007, and then I added that experience with my master's degree in songwriting to make a curriculum for a summer program that I've done almost every year since 2008. So yes. Although incidentally, the fate of the program is somewhat unclear. Oh no! What's up? Budget cuts, scheduling issues, and a death in the family that actually hired me to do the teaching. Jeeze. But you were able to make something of it, at least. How would you describe the experience? It was awesome. During a time when I was becoming known as a foul-mouthed Internet clown, I was actually honing my skills as a mature, professorial teacher-type. Huge contrast there. It was scary at first, but after a while, you just realize that kids are programmed to be afraid of you if you're a confident adult. My program was opt-in, so there were no kids who got stuck there by their parents. I became more comfortable being a single teacher with a room full of students, and in the end, I think it actually helped me become more comfortable speaking in front of audiences as brentalfloss. What was the age range of these kids? 8-16. In the same room, I mean, as opposed to sequestered groups. So then when you go on stage for a performance, it feels like addressing a classroom. Well, I'll put it this way: My classroom works more like a live improv show than most. So it's kind of chicken vs. egg. [embed]236257:45378:0[/embed]The first installment of Brent's musical instruction series, "Lyrics 101" I bet you and Mega Ran could do a wild lecture / musical set together. Oh, I'd love that. I actually want to get him to guest on my "Lyrics 101" video series, which itself is an outgrowth of my teaching career. It's nice to see what goes into the production of one of your musical numbers. The way certain commenters act, you'd think songs just pop out of thin air. That's the Internet for you. We start life as babies who have no idea how or why we're getting fed, but we get it without having to pay for it, and we don't question it. Some people never get past that age, I guess. Yeah! It takes skill to rhyme "taint"! Ha ha, yeah! Everyone knows you for your Nintendo-themed compositions, but little by little you've been adding some non-Nintendo material to the mix. You've covered Civilization V, Team Fortress 2, Thief, and recently BioShock. What was the impetus to branch out? I was never married to Nintendo's library exclusively. It's just that I started with a Nintendo game, and that's what people liked, so it took me a while to take the risk of leaving the Nintendo library. It wasn't really a calculated move. It's more that, in my opinion, about 80% of the really good videogame tunes in existence originated on Nintendo consoles. "Team Fortress 2" and "BioShock" are a whole different thing, since they're original tunes, But again, I'm not always quick to stray from the main stuff people know me for. If you go straight from toothpaste to orange juice, it doesn't matter if you have great orange juice. [embed]236257:45379:0[/embed]Brent's BioShock-inspired original composition, "The BioShock Song" "The BioShock Song" got a super positive reception. I don't think I've heard one bad thing about it. Yeah, people really seemed to like it. And unlike the occasional fan service video I do, it was 100% for me. There's a lesson in there somewhere. Something something be yourself. Yep. And moreover, the works that you do because you want to have a different quality than things you do because you feel you "should." Where would "Metroid: A Fight for Love" fall? Talk about a wild departure. You don't even sing in that song! It's like if you took the style of "The 2-2 Blues," except made it rock opera. It just happened to require a girl. You've said in the past that there's a music video for that in the works. How far along is it? It's a CGI video, so that's a tricky number to produce. There's a storyboard, and most of the main characters / creatures have been designed. Most of the settings have not, so in the grand scheme, it's maybe... 40% done? [embed]236257:45380:0[/embed]brentalfloss and The Cartridge Family perform "Metroid: A Fight for Love" at Video Games ROCK! 2 You have Amanda Lepre from Descendants of Erdrick singing it. How did that partnership happen, and how did you decide you wanted a backup band? That's actually a misconception. Amanda sings the lives version, but we got a singer with a slightly different style for the video, slightly more of a Disney voice. Her name is Alysha Umphress, and she's been in a few Broadway shows. Amanda's thrilling on stage in person, but when you take the Amanda away, the voice that remains doesn't quite communicate everything my animator and I were hoping for. As for Descendants of Erdrick, they're also your backup band The Cartridge Family. When did that happen? Two members of DOE approached me at MAGFest 9 and asked if I'd be interested in having them as my backup band. I said yes. Pretty simple origin story, really. Dudes just walk up and say, "Be our leader!" And you're all like, "Sure!" Yeah, that's the TV version, sure. From brentalfloss the comic episode 26, "So the Story Goes," art by Andrew Dobson Similar thing happened with brentalfloss the comic too, right? Yep. [Creator and co-writer Dan Roth] approached me and said, "Hey, let's do a brentalfloss comic!" Now, I didn't say yes quite as immediately, but the first step was essentially the same. It's been just over a year since the comic began. How happy are you with it thus far? Considering the fact that I had no expectations going into it, I'm really happy with it! I wish it generated a little bit more revenue (currently, I'm still losing money on a monthly basis to pay the team), but just like with my videos, I know that sometimes you have to build a large library of content before it turns a profit. Who picks the episode titles? Because those are groan-inducing... in an oddly appealing way. 95% of the time, I do. Sometimes I override Dan's title idea with something corny. I can't help myself. Maybe I watched too much Rocky & Bullwinkle as a kid. Then you should have two titles for every episode. Like... "Sink or Swim OR I'm Drowning and I Can't Get Up!" "The Bald Soprano," yes. I just realized I don't like Rocky & Bullwinkle. Ha ha! Was there supposed to be some kind of continuity? I never once saw those shows in any semblance of an order. I think they exist in that cartoon purgatory where characters die and then come back to life, get blown up, and then suddenly have no soot on them after three minutes. Then they make a Dudley Do-Right movie with Brendan Fraser! God, whose idea was that!? Probably the same asshole who thought George of the Jungle and Leave It to Beaver would make great films. From brentalfloss the comic episode 84, "Wii Hate U" I wanted to ask your further opinions of that Wii U event you attended on behalf of ScrewAttack. Taking away a proper journalist's jobs just because you are an oh-so-famous celebrity! Shame on you! Ha ha! I actually couldn't believe how professionally I was treated. The videogame journalism world is one where you can wear ANYTHING, and as long as you have the right admission bracelet, you're in. I was schlubbing around in a T-shirt and jeans, getting to sit 10 feet from Reggie and talk to a corporate PR guy... it was nuts. That said, the PR guy I interviewed seemed like he was refusing to have any fun in the interview or make it any more interesting than bare minimum. I don't know how we convinced these companies that we are so important. Well, at some point, they have to respect our platforms. I have a potential reach of about half a million if I have a juicy news nugget or a juicy, controversial opinion. That gives them pause, and even if certain journalists are more small-time, they still often have a fan base who will side with them. You are still on the fence with the Wii U, though you will definitely be buying it, correct? Oh, I pre-ordered it the day I went to that event. Partially a fanboy thing, partially a business thing. I knew it'd be hard to get one if I didn't hurry up and order. And also, the whole webcomic thing is tricky if it's all retro, because it's impossible to know whether some other webcomic (there are so many) has made the same joke before. So if you're actually on the cutting edge and making a joke about a brand new game, it's less likely that someone will have made that joke. Also, I want to believe that the Nintendo from my childhood still exists somewhere. I sense some doubt. Oh, I have plenty of doubt. I actually turned down an offer for a free Wii U because it would involve me entering a video contest, where I'd have to make a video showing how much fun it was to play and the winner gets to attend Sundance on Nintendo's dime. But I don't bullshit on the big stuff. It's one thing to be nice to a fan even if I'd rather be somewhere else... it's another to shill for a company and compromise my integrity. Good on you for that. I mean, why not launch with a NEW Mario? Like a follow-up to Galaxy? And not the same freaking Mario sidescroller game I've played since 1991! From brentalfloss the comic episode 108, "And Now for Something Completely the Same..." I understand "why." The 2D Mario games easily sell three times as much as the 3D ones, and the 3D ones sell A LOT. Galaxy is around 11 million, I believe. It's a different style of game, so it's not difficult to see why one would be more appealing. That said, I agree that Nintendo isn't trying hard enough. I mean, my [Wa-Peach] strip from today was about this. It's playing safe with the formula. Exactly. Rather than doing something new, they're leaning back on an old formula: "Tack on another Wa-character!" "Make a new kind of fucking Yoshi!" Think about 1985-1990. They were ballsy. I think they had nothing to lose, really. By the same token, though, we can't be nostalgic forever. The "Golden Age" was about 25 years ago, so we have to accept that times have changed. There you are being a grump old fart again! brentalfloss: OYE Tony Ponce: Booyah. brentalfloss: What's shakin? Tony Ponce: Bacon. Tony Ponce: Not really. All the bacon is gone. brentalfloss: Yeah, I don't eat much bacon these days Tony Ponce: I'd put bacon on everything if they'd let me. brentalfloss: I'd put bacon on everything if I didn't have my parents' obese genes trying to turn me into Val Kilmer :) brentalfloss: Anywho, I forget, are we doing text or audio? Tony Ponce: Text. brentalfloss: Swoot brentalfloss: Fire when ready Tony Ponce: I kinda hate working with audio. I sound like a tool. Tony Ponce: Most important question first: Tony Ponce: When and why did you decide to go bald? brentalfloss: Ha brentalfloss: The same day I decided to be 5'9'' and have a huge wang. Tony Ponce: One of these things is not like the others. brentalfloss: True brentalfloss: But to answer what might have been your question, I started shaving my head in 2005 and haven't stopped since Tony Ponce: Just felt it was time? brentalfloss: Well I mean... after a few years of trying to hide my baldness, I was like "Look, I have a nice-shaped head. I don't look so bad with the buzzed look. And it makes me seem less creepy." brentalfloss: I came back from my junior year summer with a tan and a shaved head and suddenly got laid like... what's 50X more than zero? Tony Ponce: I might need to grab the calculator. Tony Ponce: I only ask 'cause I like hearing people's hair stories (That sounds creepy typed out). I feel a sense of camaraderie with other bald and balding gentlemen. Tony Ponce: Doesn't make me feel alone. brentalfloss: Gotcha brentalfloss: I started losing mine at 15... I found out around 16 (friends of mine knew but didn't tell me) brentalfloss: So 5 years later, I had pretty much accepted it Tony Ponce: Seen those commercials for Miracle Hair? Seems like voodoo to me. brentalfloss: Bosley hair restoration still calls me from time to time Tony Ponce: Ha ha ha ha! brentalfloss: And I give them crap for making people feel insecure Tony Ponce: Tell 'em, "Fuck you! Look at all the money I'm saving on shampoo!" brentalfloss: COMMON MISCONCEPTION brentalfloss: Shampoo is still important Tony Ponce: You just don't need a lot. brentalfloss: without it, you just have a greasy fleshball Tony Ponce: Anyway, you distracted me with this talk of hair. What. Tony Ponce: brentalfloss! brentalfloss: ! Tony Ponce: You've obviously been asked this a billion times, but you've been in the "games with lyrics" sphere for a while. It just sort of snowballed. You first one was... "Mega Man 3 with Lyrics," wasn't it? brentalfloss: yes Tony Ponce: When did you realize that "games with lyrics" started to take a life of its own and decided to run with it? brentalfloss: Umm... I think within 48 hours of releasing Mega Man 3 With Lyrics. brentalfloss: Before I knew it, it was on CollegeHumor, GorillaMask.net and other websites brentalfloss: I got more views on it in the first 48 hours than all my other videos combined brentalfloss: And so it didn't take long before I put two and two together Tony Ponce: And when you told the people you went to college with what you were doing, they said...? brentalfloss: Oh man brentalfloss: to this day, they're like "So I hear you're like... on the internet or something?" brentalfloss: Very few people outside the internet video game content culture really understand it brentalfloss: But once I got to the point where I could say I did it full-time and didn't need any other job to pay the rent, I got more confident about it and I stopped caring whether my college friends understood or respected it Tony Ponce: It's baby steps. I mean, I'm still trying to explain to my parents what Internet bloggers and journalists do. So I know the feel, bro. brentalfloss: It's like my relatives would have a way easier time grasping what I do if I just said "I'm a drug dealer by day and a gigolo by night" Tony Ponce: Your stuff is great so far, but I've heard you explain before that you still have your sights on bigger things. brentalfloss: Well, I don't know about "bigger." brentalfloss: But "other," absolutely. brentalfloss: Between the ages of 16 and 24, I had a ton of different life plans brentalfloss: Teacher brentalfloss: Actor brentalfloss: Composer brentalfloss: Playwright brentalfloss: Songwriter brentalfloss: Musical theatre writer brentalfloss: etc etc etc brentalfloss: I went to New York in 2006 to write musicals brentalfloss: but there came this point where I realized brentalfloss was moving a lot faster than my musical theatre career brentalfloss: And it satisfies a lot of the same desires, like wanting to write lyrics, tell stories, etc... Tony Ponce: But it's good that you were able to channel your education and passion into a career that you enjoy. Not many people can claim to be doing that. Tony Ponce: But you are involved in teaching a bit, right? Don't you run a music workshop for kids? brentalfloss: I was a drama teacher at a children's camp in NYC in 2007, and then I added that experience with my master's degree in songwriting to make a curriculum for a summer program that I've done almost every year since 2008 brentalfloss: so yes brentalfloss: although, incidentally, the fate of the program is somewhat unclear Tony Ponce: Oh no. What' up? brentalfloss: Budget cuts brentalfloss: Scheduling issues brentalfloss: And a death in the family that actually hired me to do the teaching Tony Ponce: Jeeze. But you were able to make something of it, at least. How would you describe the experience? brentalfloss: Well brentalfloss: It was awesome brentalfloss: During a time when I was becoming known as a foul-mouthed internet clown, I was actually honing my skills as a mature, professorial teacher-type brentalfloss: Huge contrast there brentalfloss: It was scary at first brentalfloss: But after a while, you just realize that kids are programmed to be afraid of you if you're a confident adult brentalfloss: My program was opt-in, so there were no kids who got stuck there by their parents brentalfloss: I became more comfortable being a single teacher with a room full of students brentalfloss: And in the end, I think it actually helped me become more comfortable speaking in front of audiences as brentalfloss Tony Ponce: What was the age range of these kids? brentalfloss: 8-16 brentalfloss: In the same room, I mean. brentalfloss: As opposed to sequestered groups Tony Ponce: So then when you go on stage for a performance, it feels like addressing a classroom. brentalfloss: Well, I'll put it this way: My classroom works more like a live improv show than most. brentalfloss: So it's kind of chicken vs egg Tony Ponce: I bet you and Mega Ran could do a wild lecture / musical set together. Tony Ponce: Or at least swap classrom tips and tales. brentalfloss: Oh I'd love that brentalfloss: I actually want to get him to guest on my "Lyrics 101" video series brentalfloss: Which itself is an outgrowth of my teaching career Tony Ponce: It's nice to see what goes into the production of one of your musical numbers. The way CERTAIN commenters act, you'd think songs just pop out of thin air. brentalfloss: Well, that's the internet for you brentalfloss: We start life as babies who have no idea how or why we're getting fed, but we get it without having to pay for it, and we don't question it. brentalfloss: Some people never get past that age I guess :) Tony Ponce: Yeah! It takes skill to rhyme "taint"! Tony Ponce: All in good humor, of course. brentalfloss: Haha, yeah Tony Ponce: Everyone knows you for your Nintendo-themed compositions, but little by little you've been adding some non-Nintendo material to the mix. You have Civilization V, Team Fortress 2, Thief, and lately BioShock. What was the impetus to branch out? brentalfloss: I was never married to Nintendo's library exclusively, it's just that I started with a Nintendo game, and that's what people liked, so it took me a while to take the risk of leaving the Nintendo library brentalfloss: it wasn't really a calculated move brentalfloss: It's more that, in my opinion, about 80% of the really good video game tunes in existence originated on Nintendo consoles brentalfloss: Team Fortress 2 and Bioshock are a whole different thing brentalfloss: Since they're original tunes brentalfloss: But again, I'm not always quick to stray from the main stuff people know me for brentalfloss: If you go straight from toothpaste to orange juice, it doesn't matter if you have great orange juice Tony Ponce: Excactly. Tony Ponce: On BioShock, that got a super positive reception. I don't think I've heard one bad thing about it. brentalfloss: Yeah, people really seemed to like it. brentalfloss: And unlike the occasional fanservice video I do, it was 100% for me brentalfloss: There's a lesson in there somewhere Tony Ponce: Something something be yourself. brentalfloss: Yep brentalfloss: And moreover, the works that you do because you want to have a different quality than things you do because you feel you "should" Tony Ponce: Where would "Metroid: A Fight for Love" fall? Tony Ponce: Talk about a wild departure. You don't even sing in that song! brentalfloss: Well brentalfloss: It's like if you took the style of the 2-2 Blues, except made it rock opera brentalfloss: it just happened to require a girl Tony Ponce: You've said in the past that there's a music video for that in the works. How far along is it? brentalfloss: It's a CGI video, so that's a tricky number to produce brentalfloss: There's a storyboard brentalfloss: And most of the main characters/creatures have been designed brentalfloss: Most of the settings have not brentalfloss: so, in the grand scheme, it's maybe... 40% done? Tony Ponce: You have Amanda Lepre from Descendents of Erdrick singing it. How did that partnership happen, and how did you decide you wanted a backup band? brentalfloss: Well, that's actually a misconception brentalfloss: Amanda sings the lives version brentalfloss: But we got a singer with a slightly different style for the video brentalfloss: Slightly more of a Disney voice brentalfloss: Her name is Alysha Umphress, and she's been in a few Broadway shows, etc Tony Ponce: This gal? http://www.alyshaumphress.com/music.html brentalfloss: Yessir Tony Ponce: Boom. Noted! brentalfloss: Amanda's thrilling onstage in person, but when you take the Amanda away, the voice that remains doesn't quite communicate everything my animator and I were hoping for Tony Ponce: As for Descendents of Erdrick, The Cartridge Family, man! When did that start? I could have sworn you or someone else told me before. brentalfloss: Well brentalfloss: Two members of DOE approached me at MAGFest 9 and asked if I'd be interested in having them as my backup and brentalfloss: *band brentalfloss: I said yes brentalfloss: Pretty simple origin story, really :) Tony Ponce: Dude just walk up and say, "Be my leader!" And you're all like, "Sure!" brentalfloss: Yeah, that's the TV version, sure. Tony Ponce: Similar thing happened with the brentalfloss comic too, right? brentalfloss: Yep brentalfloss: Dan approached me and said "Hey, let's do a brentalfloss comic" brentalfloss: Now, I didn't say yes quite as immediately brentalfloss: But the first step was essentially the same Tony Ponce: It's been just over a year since the comic began. How happy are you with it thus far? brentalfloss: Well brentalfloss: Considering the fact that I had no expectations going into it, I'm really happy with it! brentalfloss: I wish it generated a little bit more revenue (currently I'm still losing money on a monthly basis to pay the team), but just like with my videos, I know that sometimes you have to build a large library of content before it turns a profit Tony Ponce: Who picks the episode titles? Because those groan-inducing in an oddly appealing way. Tony Ponce: *those are brentalfloss: 95% of the time I do brentalfloss: Sometimes I override Dan's title idea with something corny brentalfloss: I can't help myself brentalfloss: Maybe I watched too much Rocky & Bullwinkle as a kid Tony Ponce: Then you should have TWO titles for every episode. Tony Ponce: Like... Tony Ponce: Sink or Swim OR I'm drowning and I can't get up! brentalfloss: "The Bald Soprano" brentalfloss: yes Tony Ponce: I just realized I don't really like Rocky & Bullwinkle. brentalfloss: Haha Tony Ponce: Was there supposed to be some kind of continuity? Tony Ponce: I never ONCE saw those shows in any semblance of order. brentalfloss: I think they exist in that cartoon purgatory brentalfloss: where characters die and then come back to life brentalfloss: get blown up, and then suddenly have no soot on them after 3 minutes Tony Ponce: And then Dudley Dooright rides backwards. Tony Ponce: THEN THEY MAKE A MOVIE WITH BRENDAN FRASER! Tony Ponce: God, whose idea was that!? brentalfloss: Probably the same asshole who thought George of the Jungle and Leave it to Beaver would make great films. Tony Ponce: I actually found George of the Jungle to be quite funny. That's... surprising. brentalfloss: I refused to see it Tony Ponce: Probably for the best. Tony Ponce: The moment has passed. You would have had to go for it right when it was still new. brentalfloss: Yeah brentalfloss: And I was 11 Tony Ponce: At that awkward stage where you want to see PG-13 movies because they look so grown-up. brentalfloss: Haha, yeah brentalfloss: Like how Batman Forever seemed SOOOO sophisticated when I was 10 Tony Ponce: HA HA HA HA HA! Tony Ponce: I still own the glass mugs McDonald's was selling. Tony Ponce: I've got the whole set. Bats, Robin, Two-Face, and Riddler. brentalfloss: Oh yeah! brentalfloss: Wow. brentalfloss: I can't tell if they're highly collectible or highly junk. Tony Ponce: They are solid. I mean, it's etched glass, so if you squint, you kind think Batman is still Michael Keaton. Tony Ponce: *kind of think brentalfloss: I need to bug in the next 20-30 min, so let's steer it back if you have any more substantive questions, haha :) Tony Ponce: Sure thing. I've only got one more nugget. Tony Ponce: I wanted to ask your further opinions of that Wii U event you attended through ScrewAttack. brentalfloss: Well Tony Ponce: Taking away journalist's jobs just because you are an oh-so famous celebrity! Shame on you! brentalfloss: Haha brentalfloss: I actually couldn't believe how professionally I was treated brentalfloss: The video game journalism world is one where you can wear ANYTHING and as long as you have the right admission bracelet, you're in brentalfloss: I was schlubbing around in a t-shirt and jeans getting to sit 10 feet from Reggie and talk to a corporate PR guy... it was nuts Tony Ponce: I don't know how we convinced these companies that we are so important. brentalfloss: That said, the PR guy I interviewed seemed like he was refusing to have any fun in the interview or make it any more interesting than bare minimum brentalfloss: Well, at some point, they have to respect our platforms brentalfloss: I have a potential reach of about half a million if I have a juicy news nugget brentalfloss: Or a juicy, controversial opinion brentalfloss: That gives them pause brentalfloss: and even if certain journalists are more smalltime, they still often have a fanbase who will side with them Tony Ponce: It'll always feel foreign to me no matter how many events I attend. Tony Ponce: But anyway, you are still on the fence with the Wii U, though you will definitely be buying it, correct? brentalfloss: Oh, I pre-ordered it the day I went to that event brentalfloss: Partially a fanboy thing, partially a business thing brentalfloss: I knew it'd be hard to get one if I didn't hurry up and order Tony Ponce: I should have done that, probably. brentalfloss: And also, the whole webcomic thing is tricky if it's all retro because it's impossible to know whether some other webcomic has made the same joke before (there are so many) brentalfloss: so if you're actually on the cutting edge and making a joke about a brand new game, it's less likely that someone will have made that joke brentalfloss: also, I want to believe that the Nintendo from my childhood still exists somewhere Tony Ponce: I sense some doubt. brentalfloss: Oh I have plenty of doubt brentalfloss: I actually turned down an offer for a free Wii U because it would involve me entering a video contest brentalfloss: where I'd have to make a video showing how much fun it was to play brentalfloss: and the winner gets to attend Sundance on Nintendo's dime brentalfloss: But I don't bullshit on the big stuff brentalfloss: It's one thing to be nice to a fan even if I'd rather be somewhere else.... it's another to shill for a company and compromise my integrity Tony Ponce: Good on you for that. Tony Ponce: From what I've played, I personally really enjoy it. I'm not necessarily looking for some grand new paradigm. I just want to see some fascinating games. Tony Ponce: Like The Wonderful 101. Was that at the event? brentalfloss: It was mentioned, but not playable Tony Ponce: Damn. I played it at E3. You would have enjoyed it. Command dozens of superheroes to form shapes like swords and guns and take out aliens. Tony Ponce: Like Pikmin crossed with Viewtiful Joe. brentalfloss: Interesting Tony Ponce: It's what sold me on the Wii U, actually. Tony Ponce: I mean, I've seen Mario. Fine. The Nintendo Land games seem like fun in bursts. Okay. brentalfloss: I mean, why not launch with a NEW Mario? brentalfloss: Like a follow-up to Galaxy? Tony Ponce: But seeing something like 101 gives me some hope that "yes, there's gonna be some good shit in the future." brentalfloss: And not the same freaking Mario sidescroller game I've played since 1991 Tony Ponce: I understand WHY. Tony Ponce: The 2D Mario games easily sell three times as much as the 3D ones. Tony Ponce: And the 3D ones sell A LOT. Galaxy 1 is around 11 million, I believe. Tony Ponce: It's a different style of game, and it's not difficult to see why one would be more appealing. Tony Ponce: That said, I agree that Nintendo isn't trying hard enough. brentalfloss: Well I mean brentalfloss: My strip from today was about this Tony Ponce: It's playing safe with the formula. brentalfloss: Exactly Tony Ponce: Wa-Peach. brentalfloss: Rather than doing something new, they're leaning back on an old formula brentalfloss: "Tack on another Wa-character!" brentalfloss: "Make a new kind of fucking Yoshi" Tony Ponce: I actually wrote a whole article about this very topic. I'll email you a link, and if you have time over the next few days, you could give it a read. No biggie if you don't. Tony Ponce: But yeah, I would rather Nintendo embark on some grand new IP with the same passion it used to establish all these other brands. brentalfloss: Think about 1985-1990 brentalfloss: They were ballsy Tony Ponce: I think they had nothing to lose, really. brentalfloss: By the same token though, we can't be nostalgic forever brentalfloss: The "golden age" was about 25 years ago brentalfloss: So we have to accept that times have changed Tony Ponce: There you are being a grump old fart again! Tony Ponce: I'll let you go now. Thanks for doing this! brentalfloss: Hey, no prob man. My pleasure! Tony Ponce: You're gonna be at MAGFest, right? brentalfloss: Yessir brentalfloss: Running around like a cat in a room full of rocking chairs, probably Tony Ponce: Ha ha ha! Tony Ponce: I'll see you there! brentalfloss: Sounds good man! brentalfloss: Have a good one! Tony Ponce: I'll also let you know when the post goes up. Tony Ponce: Peace! brentalfloss: Ladle!
Spotlight photo
Key change, mofo!
[Every now and then, Dtoid shines its Spotlight on a games-related artist, event, or place we'd like to share with you guys. Basically, we think this is awesome. Do you think it's awesome?] When Brent Black earned ...

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Proof that Sleeping Dogs is actually the new Shenmue


Aug 25
// Tony Ponce
Thanks to YouTuber DSimphony, we've uncovered the secret that Sega and Square Enix tried to slip past us. But gamers are an intelligent and resourceful bunch! Nothing escapes our gaze! So here you go: undeniable proof that Sleeping Dogs is actually the long-awaited Shenmue 3. Sleeping Dogs - Shenmue Parody (Parodia de Shenmue) [YouTube] (via NeoGAF)
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Fake Tetris movie is easily better than Battleship


May 27
// Tony Ponce
Not that it's really all that difficult to make anything that's better than Battleship. This fake live-action Tetris trailer comes courtesy of Warialasky, the real-life GoldenEye bros. It perfectly encapsulates the essence o...
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Commander Shepard is king of sexy space song and dance


Mar 10
// Tony Ponce
When it comes to fans and all the recent Mass Effect 3 hoopla, I have to quote Lumpy Space Princess: "Oh my glob, you guys! Drama bomb!" Let's everybody just chiiiiiiiiill, k? Chew on this for a while, please. Creative duo S...
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Commander Shepard could be a Disney villain


Mar 05
// Tony Ponce
Random Encounters has just concocted a lovely ditty that celebrates the life and times of Commander Shepard. It's actually a spoof of one the greatest Disney villain songs of all time. Which one? Oh, you ought to be able to ...
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Dtoid contributor Ian Bonds likes making musical parodies


Jan 22
// Tony Ponce
Ian Bonds is a name you might have seen pop up a few times here on Dtoid. He's been a contributor for a while now, submitting reviews for games that might have slipped through the cracks. What you may not be aware of, howeve...
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Cash-strapped Link pawns off the Triforce of Courage


Jan 11
// Tony Ponce
Pawn Stars is a reality show here in the States about a family-owned pawn shop and all the characters who come in to sell their precious heirlooms for chump change. TheGameStation, creators of The Street Fighter drama series...
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Offbeat Hall of Fame: Video Game Director's Cuts


Dec 03
// Tony Ponce
[Offbeat Hall of Fame is a showcase of the cool, often bizarre products and media from years past that celebrate videogames and gamer culture.] The Internet was a wildly different place at the turn of the century. Social medi...
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Punch-out!! parody is a knockout


Jul 13
// Wesley Ruscher
  I love Punch-out!! It doesn't matter if it's on the NES, SNES or Wii, the Punch-out!! series is by far the best boxing franchise ever created. When the iconic game made its triumphant return to the squared video game c...

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