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Beat Bros photo
Beat Bros

What is even happening in this Beat Bros video?


Like Bomberman with Doritos shrapnel
Mar 23
// Darren Nakamura
I have watched the video above a couple of times now, but I still do not think I could describe Beat Bros accurately. It looks like developer Ultimate Walrus (of #Snake2 infamy) started making a rhythm-based Bomberman c...
Meltdown photo
Meltdown

Meltdown has a lightning gun and a dubstep trailer


(Heat of) fusion of arcade shooting and tactics
Mar 14
// Darren Nakamura
Sometimes, players want to take in a thought-provoking narrative, with realistic character development and emotional events. Other times, players just want to shoot robots and blow things up. Meltdown is definitely meant for...
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DTOID News salutes ursine iconoclasm
Everyone’s off playing Titan Souls or Darkfall or whathaveyou, so news this week is a lot of non-news. The Witcher 3: The Wild Hunt has been delayed, which sucks, but apparently won’t derail Cyberpunk 2077. Sony ...

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Thralled: An Ouya-exclusive art game about slavery


Coming Fall 2014
Mar 13
// Dale North
Thralled tells the story of a runaway slave in 18th century Brazil. This art-driven experience was originally created as a student project by Miguel Oliveira, and now it's an OUYA exclusive, set to release this fall. Thralle...
Ouya photo
Ouya

Mad Catz officially announces partnership with Ouya


Uh, what?
Mar 06
// Chris Carter
Remember when we told you that you soon wouldn't need an Ouya to play Ouya games? Well it appears as if the first stop is Mad Catz, since they have just announced a partnership that allows Ouya titles to appear on their more ...
Ouya photo
Ouya

Soon you won't need an Ouya to play Ouya games


Tiny box maker opening up its ecosystem to other devices
Mar 03
// Steven Hansen
Ouya maintains its doing just fine and unveiled a new part of its strategy today. In an interview with [a]list daily,  Ouya CEO Julie Uhrman said Ouya sales are right within the company's projections. "Of our 675 games, ...
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DTOID News is wearing a dumb scarf
Hey everybody, I’m back from Japan! And here’s your quasi-timely news update for the first two thirds of this week. Irrational Games closed, pre-ordering Wolfenstein: The New Order gets you a beta for the new and...

The best and worst games of the week - A Bravely January

Feb 02 // Wesley Ruscher
The Banner Saga (Windows PC [reviewed], Mac, Linux)Developer: StoicPublisher: StoicRelease: January 14, 2014MSRP: $24.99 This game feels like a project created by artists. It's uncompromising to a fault. Tiptoeing its way around trite conventions and hackneyed design choices, I have no doubt that the team at Stoic created the game they wanted to make. By the end of the journey, I cared for my banner like a shepherd tending to his flock. I commiserated with their hardships, as the thread of despondency wove its way throughout virtually every aspect of the experience. Read the full The Banner Saga review  Nidhogg (PC)Developer: MesshofPublisher: MesshofMSRP: $14.99Release Date: January 13, 2014 Nidhogg is a perfect game wrapped in a not-so-perfect package. When playing locally against another human, it is the epitome of competition. Playing online is a mixed bag of lag, disconnects, and a weird chat system. Hopefully some of the bugs get ironed out over time, especially whatever stopped the tutorial from functioning, to make everything more functional as a whole. Read the full Nidhogg review  Muramasa Rebirth: Fishy Tales of the Nekomata (PlayStation Vita)Developer: MarvelousAQLPublisher: Aksys GamesReleased: January 14, 2014 (US) / January 22, 2014 (EU)MSRP: $4.99 I heartily enjoyed my time as a cat in Muramasa Rebirth, and I can't wait to see what the other DLC stories can do. Vanillaware ingeniously was able to tie the heart of the game into its first Genroku Legends side story, while giving it a fine heart of its own. It's so well done in fact, that I could easily see a full game starring Okoi one day. Read the full Fishy Tales of the Nekomata review  Two Brothers (PC)Developer: Ackk StudiosPublisher: Ackk StudiosReleased: December 3, 2013MSRP: $14.99 It's very much the type of game you play for the story, which has flashes of brilliance that can only be effectively realized in an interactive medium such as this. Unfortunately, it's tied to lackluster mechanics, technical problems, and a disappointing lack of polish. Two Brothers may not be an overall success, but its best moments are worth experiencing first-hand. Read the full Two Brothers review  Continue?9876543210 (Linux, Mac, PC[reviewed])Developer: Jason OdaPublisher: Jason OdaMSRP: $9.99Release Date: January 3, 2014  Continue?9876543210 truly does feel like a personal and emotional experience: someone else’spersonal and emotional experience. It did not connect to me the way it was seemingly intended to. Good “experience” games either have super simple controls so that the player never has to think about them, or the controls and mechanics tie directly into the game’s central themes. Continue?9876543210 does neither. Read the full Continue?9876543210 review  OlliOlli (PS Vita)Developer: Roll7Publisher: Roll7Release Date: January 27, 2014MSRP: $12.99 There's a lot to love about OlliOlli. The game is in the sweetspot of "simple to control" and "just difficult enough" to keep you playing without tearing your hair out. The Daily Grind and Spots challenges will keep the score-centric crowd happy, and Career mode will have you blistering your thumbs as you try to perfect each level. A masterpiece. Read the full OlliOlli review  Broken Age: Act 1 (PC)Developer: Double Fine ProductionsPublisher: Double Fine ProductionsRelease Date: January 14, 2014 (for backers) / January 28, 2014MSRP: $24.99 (with free update for Act 2) I haven’t felt this surge of nostalgia and excitement about a game in a long time, and I truly thinkBroken Age will be looked back fondly as one of the greats. That being said, the first Act is only a few short hours and ended on a nail-biting cliffhanger with no word on how long we’ll be waiting for the rest of the game. In some ways I feel cheated, but in the end it’s the heart of the game that matters - and that certainly isn't broken. Read the full Broken Age: Act 1 review  Dead Rising 3: Operation Broken Eagle (Xbox One)Developer: Capcom VancouverPublisher: Microsoft StudiosRelease Date: January 21, 2014MSRP: $9.99 As it stands, there is literally no reason to get Broken Eagle. It's criminally short, you can't enjoy it with a friend, there are no real benefits if your character is maxed out from already playing the core game, and it doesn't add to the overarching lore in any meaningful way. Hopefully the other Season Pass offerings will be an improvement, since we still have three to go. Read the full Operation Broken Eagle review  Soul Fjord (Ouya)Developer: Airtight GamesPublisher: Airtight GamesRelease: January 28, 2014MSRP: Free, with microtransactions Soul Fjord started with a good idea, and even has a few redeeming qualities, but in the end, it is just too dull to be enjoyable for longer than a few minutes. The free-to-play aspects don't ruin the experience, but they don't particularly help it either. If nothing else, Ouya owners should probably give this a try since it costs nothing upfront, but this is not the system savior that we have been hoping for. Read the full Soul Fjord review Bravely Default (3DS)Developer: Silicon StudioPublisher: Square EnixRelease: February 7, 2014MSRP: $39.99 Bravely Default gave me an experience that seemed to put me right back in my bedroom in the middle 1990s, where I'd sit in front of a small Hitachi television set and play the day away with a Super Nintendo controller in hand, so engrossed that I'd forget to eat. It harkens back to a time where we were all in love 16-bit Japanese role-playing games, and couldn't get enough of them. Read the full Bravely Default review Call of Duty: Ghosts: Onslaught DLC (PC, PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Infinity WardPublisher: ActivisionReleased: January 28, 2014 (Xbox 360, Xbox One) / TBA (PC, PS3, PS4)MSRP: $14.99 ($50 Season Pass for four packs) I was pleasantly surprised by Onslaught, especially considering the fact that Ghosts was so underwhelming. Although it won't do too much to change your mind if you're an adamant Call of Duty hater, the new Extinction episode is promising, and there are three solid maps here for the taking. Read the full Onslaught review  Octodad: Dadliest Catch (Linux, Mac, PC [reviewed], PlayStation 4)Developer: Young Horses, Inc.Publisher: Young Horses, Inc.Release: January 30, 2014 (Linux, Mac, PC), March 2014 (PlayStation 4)MSRP: $14.99 ($11.99 until February 6)Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit n the end, I would not be surprised to hear that the Octodad community is thriving years down the road. It exudes a certain weirdness and charm that makes it stand out from a lot of other titles out there, and there are tools in place for it to live on past the point when the credits start to roll. Though it has some issues with framerate drops and its approach to control is definitely not for everybody, Dadliest Catch kept a smile on my face for most of its duration. Read the full Octodad: Dadliest Catch review Dungeon Keeper (Android, iPad, iPhone [reviewed on an iPhone 5])Developer: Electronic Arts, Mythic EntertainmentPublisher: Electronic ArtsReleased: January 31, 2014MSRP: Free It's a huge shame, because Dungeon Keeper is such a great franchise. I vividly remember getting hooked on the original for the very first time, and hooking in non-strategy fans with its unique perspective and visual style. But you're getting none of that here, as you're instead presented with a hollow freemium shell of what once was. Do yourself a favor and go to GOG.com and grab the original. Read the full Dungeon Keeper review Polk N1 Gaming SurroundBar
Reviews!!! photo
Week ending 2/1
January has come and gone, but that doesn't mean there weren't some great games to play. Just look at all the amazing "indie" games that hit the PC this month. We had the fruition of two KickStarter campaigns finally see the ...

Ouya photo
Ouya

The new 16GB OUYA is available right now


$129.99
Jan 31
// Dale North
The new and improved 16GB OUYA console is available right now on Amazon and OUYA.tv for $129.99. This is a North American release only. With this new one they've doubled  up on the memory, boosted the WiFi signal, and dr...

Review: Soul Fjord

Jan 28 // Darren Nakamura
Soul Fjord (Ouya)Developer: Airtight GamesPublisher: Airtight GamesRelease: January 28, 2014MSRP: Free, with microtransactions To start on a positive note, the strange hybrid setting is fantastic. It seems like a completely random combination, but mixing '70s soul with Norse mythology is just silly enough to work. It helps that it is supported by some genuinely funny writing, where equippable items have Scandinavian-sounding names and descriptions, but are often just rudimentary bludgeoning tools like stop signs or keg hammers. Heck, there was a loading screen or two that made me laugh, just imagining this Shaft-like figure giving advice for surviving the trip up Yggdrasil. For the most part, the presentation is pretty decent as well. Character art is sharp, animations are smooth, and the funk soundtrack that changes from level to level is sufficiently funky. There are effects that reproduce the visual artifacts found in 1970s films, and while they fit the theme well enough, they do start to wear thin after a few sessions. [embed]269579:52358:0[/embed] In theory, Soul Fjord could be fun to play. Jones has two basic attacks and a block, and when he hits enemies, numbers pop out of them until they die. The unique element of combat here is that players can deal (or block) significantly more damage when attacking (or defending) to the beat of the music than if they were to mash buttons. One problem that arises is in the choice of the funk soundtrack. Regardless of what the music is doing, attacks are augmented when performed on the downbeats. By the nature of the genre, the music is very often syncopated; it specifically emphasizes notes in between the beats during certain sections. What results in these cases is rhythm gameplay that relies more heavily on the visual cues than the audio cues. Thankfully, this is not the case for every song in the game, but it is a huge design misstep with those songs that produce this effect. The other big issue with the combat, even when the music has a heavy beat to follow, is that it is often slow and dull. Enemies will only attack on the beat, and early in the game their attacks are so infrequent that it is better to ignore blocking entirely and always go for the kill. Each weapon has two unique combos, so carrying around one weapon for a while means pressing the same sequences of buttons, over and over. Getting to the combat is also a pretty trite affair. Enter a room. Kill all of the enemies. Go to the next room. Repeat. There are a few points of interest that can be found randomly, like rooms filled with spike traps or altars to the gods, but the procedural generation of levels is often squandered on areas with slightly different shapes that all play identically to one another. Soul Fjord is a free-to-play game, and it comes with all of the trappings of that model, for better or for worse. As a game with roguelike elements, players do not keep items from one play to the next, unless those items are "Soul Bound." Items that are randomly dropped or purchased with in-game gold can be manually Soul Bound by spending platinum records, Soul Fjord's premium currency. Treasure chests can also be opened for a few records, and any items found in this manner are automatically Soul Bound. Some modicum of persistence in games that otherwise adhere to the roguelike tenet of permanent death is fine, and has even been done quite well in games like Risk of Rain or Desktop Dungeons. It just feels a little strange in Soul Fjord that the persistence is optional and tied to spending real money to maintain it. It feels especially strange in a hack-and-slash game to find a rare weapon or piece of armor but only be able to use it once without paying extra. However, the impression one gets of the Soul Bound system is heavily dependent on perspective. Rather than thinking of Soul Fjord as a Diablo-style loot fest that is hindered by mandatory microtransactions, if it is viewed instead as a roguelike that is enhanced with persistence through optional microtransactions, then it stings a bit less. Indeed, the game can be played and theoretically completed without spending a penny on it. That said, it would still require most players several playthroughs to gain the skill necessary to make it through to the end without starting with the most awesome weapons, and the gameplay is just not entertaining enough to support more than one or two runs. Though there are only nine levels, and each lasts between five and fifteen minutes, Soul Fjord was already repetitive and boring by the end of the second attempt. Soul Fjord started with a good idea, and even has a few redeeming qualities, but in the end, it is just too dull to be enjoyable for longer than a few minutes. The free-to-play aspects don't ruin the experience, but they don't particularly help it either. If nothing else, Ouya owners should probably give this a try since it costs nothing upfront, but this is not the system savior that we have been hoping for.
Soul Fjord review photo
Fjorgettable
Ouya users have not had a lot to be excited about for a while now. Excepting a few titles like Towerfall, there is not much worth owning on the microconsole, and especially few games that are not available elsewhere. As one o...

Ouya co-founder leaves photo
Ouya co-founder leaves

Ouya co-founder leaves company


'Would a coward do this... BYE!'
Jan 15
// Steven Hansen
Ouya co-founder Muffi Ghadiali has left the company, according to TechCrunch. Ghadiali, who previously worked as Amazon's product manager for Kindle, was a big part of Ouya development, leading teams responsible for the conso...
Soul Fjord photo
Soul Fjord

Kim Swift's Soul Fjord out this month, still Ouya only


Unfjortunately, I don't think I can affjord an Ouya for one cool game
Jan 14
// Steven Hansen
The new game Airtight Games and Kim Swift (Portal, Quantum Conundrum) joint, Soul Fjord, will be released on January 28 exclusively for the Ouya. A year ago, the exclusive inspired faith in the platform. After subsequent Ouy...
Double Fine photo
Double Fine

First act of Broken Age hits Steam on January 28


Kickstarter backers can play as of today
Jan 14
// Jordan Devore
It's been a longer-than-expected wait for Double Fine's Broken Age, but it's nearly ready. Well, part of it. The first act of the Kickstarter-funded adventure title releases on January 28, 2014 for Windows, Mac, and Linux, w...

TowerFall Ascension is shaping up to be one kickass port

Jan 09 // Chris Carter
TowerFall Ascension (PC [previewed], PS4)Developer: Matt Makes GamesPublisher: MiniBossReleased: TBA 2014 You may have played the Ouya version so I won't spend too much time on Versus, the core game mode. At its heart TowerFall is a brawler similar to the Super Smash Bros. series, pitting four players against each other in funhouse-like arenas with power-ups and hazards galore. At the start of each match, every player only has three arrows. It's a simple premise, but the mechanics go much farther from that launching point. In addition to the ability to wall jump, players can dash at will, which not only allows them to gain ground, but also grab arrows out of the air. At first I thought it was a fairly cool concept, but then I discovered the air dash, and from there it became really cool. Matches become extremely hectic with people who know what they're doing, as arrows are bound by the laws of physics and have an arc -- so you can't aim them like a speeding bullet or any other videogame projectile. Arrows can also be retrieved from walls or corpses, and picked up by jumping on people's heads. It adds a strategic element to the proceedings, and mixed with the vertical elements of many stages, matches can turn from one-sided affairs to close calls nearly every time. It's very similar in nature to Samurai Gunn, but unlike that game there are no melee attacks, and everything is a lot crazier due to its arcade-like nature. To use a Smash Bros. analogy, if Samurai Gunn is "no items, Final Destination only," TowerFall is "all items set at a very high frequency on Pokemon Stadium." [embed]268660:52149:0[/embed] But Ascension is more than just a straight port to the PC and PS4 platforms. It's a new version of the game with extra content, including updated weapons, maps, characters, a "trial" gametype and the addition of the two player co-op Quest Mode. Before I talk a bit about the new campaign I'd like to take a second to praise the "trial" mode in particular, which I didn't expect. Think of it like a "break the targets" mode from the Nintendo 64 iteration of Smash Bros. -- it just has creepy straw dummies instead of actual targets. At first I thought it was a simple challenge mode, but each stage is actually built around teaching you a new concept, usually by way of a weapon or item. It's a genius design, because it's not only a score attack gametype for hardcore players, but a tutorial as well. It's also playable solo, which makes Ascension much more enticing for those of you who don't have local friends (Ascension will not support online play).  Quest Mode is the main draw however, which can be played by one or two players and mixes things up with a Bubble Bobble-style campaign. Each set of stages consists of multiple "waves" with different AI opponents, who range from formidable blade-wielding grim reapers to simple cave bats. Although it sounds simplistic in nature it's a ton of fun with another partner, because you'll need to work together to best some of the harder waves. It's also fairly rewarding to grab a teammate's errant arrow while in the thick of combat, and having two players dash around trying to avoid and destroy every enemy on the screen is thrilling, to say the least. TowerFall Ascension sports an enormous amount of extra content in comparison to its original incarnation, even including a few old-school-style secrets and collectibles in tow. Out of all of the arena type games I've played in recent years, I'd put this near the top of the pile, considering how much there is to do in terms of solo content. It's only a matter of time until the real deal releases, and we can see how brightly the definitive version of TowerFall shines.
TowerFall Ascension photo
The new additions for PC are excellent
In 2013, the highly anticipated TowerFall hit the Ouya platform -- and so began the thousands of voices clamoring for a port to any other platform. As of late last year creator Matt Thorson reported that he had only sold...

VVVVVV photo
VVVVVV

VVVVVV coming to Vita, iOS, and Android this year


Creator provides updates on his other games
Jan 07
// Jordan Devore
Terry Cavanagh's wonderful platformer VVVVVV will become even more widespread this year. In a blog post detailing his existing game projects, which all seem to be in various states of completion, the designer said to expect t...
ULTIONUS photo
ULTIONUS

ULTIONUS is out now, features music by Jake Kaufman


Rad music, eyeroll-inducing character design
Dec 12
// Darren Nakamura
Not long ago, Andrew "DarkFalzX" Bado ran a Kickstarter campaign for the pixel art Metroidvania Legend of Iya, which just barely reached its funding goal in the final hours of its run. Though he has been putting his time int...
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OUYA now accepts Bitcoins as a payment method


Niche product, meet niche currency
Dec 05
// Conrad Zimmerman
If you have a whole pile of Bitcoins lying around, you'll be able to spend some of them to buy hardware and content from OUYA. Tweeting to this effect earlier today, the Android console-maker's marketplace now features an opt...
Dino Run 2 photo
Dino Run 2

Dino Run 2 launches free game in last push for funding


All dinos revealed, live stream in effect
Dec 03
// Jonathan Holmes
Dino Run 2 seemed like a sure thing when it first hit Kickstarter. It's the sequel to a well loved and well played title. It's got top notch animation, music, and art direction. It's coming from established developers with a ...
Kickstarter photo
Kickstarter

GaymerX organizers reveal Read Only Memories


Their cyberpunk adventure game is 25% funded on Kickstarter
Nov 19
// Alasdair Duncan
You say the term "adventure game" and you'll get my attention. Say the word "cyberpunk" and you'll really have my attention. Say "cyberpunk adventure game" and I'll be begging for more info. Read Only Memories is a new game ...
Special Ouya photo
Special Ouya

Limited holiday edition Ouya comes in white


Appropriate for something you'll never touch
Nov 18
// Conrad Zimmerman
Ouya is trying its damnedest to appeal to those looking to put a little gaming under their tree this holiday. Today, a special, exclusive holiday edition of the console has been announced which comes in bright, white case and...
Ouya's UI photo
Ouya's UI

Here is what the Ouya's new interface will look like


It's a lot better
Nov 14
// Joshua Derocher
The Ouya will be getting a very nice looking new interface, as spotted on Engadget. Ouya hired on a designer to try and make the user interface look better, and I think they pulled it off. This new screen looks better, a...
OUYA photo
OUYA

Major publishers coming to Ouya is inevitable, says CEO


Uhrman says publishers are just slow to embrace new business models
Oct 31
// Kyle MacGregor
Ouya boss Julie Uhrman believes its just a matter of time before major publishers get on board with her revolution. “The publishers are always late to the newest business models,” Uhrman asserted during  Game...
Ouya photo
Ouya

Ouya rolling out nationwide in Target stores this holiday


Demo kiosks expected early next year
Oct 25
// Conrad Zimmerman
The Ouya has had no small amount of supporters, but for "the little open-source console that could," real success might be seen at the brick-and-mortar level. After having been available in select Target stores for the last f...
TowerFall photo
TowerFall

TowerFall targets January 2014 launch on PC


Ouya's hottest exclusive to feature many new features on new platform
Oct 13
// Kyle MacGregor
TowerFall is aiming for a January 2014 launch for Windows PC, creator Matt Thorson recently divulged to Shacknews. The multiplayer archery combat game released on Ouya earlier this year and quickly made a name for itself...
Gridiron Thunder photo
Gridiron Thunder

Gridiron Thunder undergoing delays after Ouya controversy


I wonder how many copies this will sell?
Oct 03
// Chris Carter
If you haven't heard of Gridiron Thunder yet, I can't blame you, since it's Ouya related. As the biggest project to come ahead in the Free the Games fund, the folks over at Ouya were all set to hand them hundreds of thousands...
Neverending Nightmares photo
Neverending Nightmares

Neverending Nightmares meets funding due to typo


Fans swarm to support developer and other backers
Sep 30
// Jonathan Holmes
Neverending Nightmares got a lot of press on Dtoid this week. It's also gotten a lot of support from other developers. Everything appeared to be coming together to help bring the game in close to its funding goals, ...
Potatoman photo
Potatoman

Potatoman Seeks the Troof hits Ouya on Oct. 2nd


A thing to play on that thing you bought
Sep 29
// Jonathan Holmes
Most of the press about Ouya has been pretty negative lately, to the point where the developers of That Dragon, Cancer felt the need to come out to the console's defense with a very well written article on their relationship...
Neverending Nightmares photo
Neverending Nightmares

Neverending Nightmares draws horror from real suffering


Like Mystery but with exposed bloody bones
Sep 24
// Jonathan Holmes
First, a quick announcement -- Lone Survivor: The Director's Cut is out now on PSN and it is incredible. We should have a review for you soon.  Like Lone Survivor, Neverending Nightmares is a 2D horror game. More i...

Ouya's Free The Games Fund is a bloody mess

Sep 18 // Chris Carter
While the Free the Games Fund could have gone about its business rather quietly, two major red flags came about that drew attention to it: Gridiron Thunder, and Elementary, My Dear Holmes. Specifically, both of them roused suspicions after raising quite a bit of cash with a relatively low amount of backers. While Elementary had a number of fictional backers and was stopped by Kickstarter before any potential Ouya involvement could arise (although the developers have stated that they will continue on with the project), Gridiron was fully funded -- and then some. While I would never outright accuse the project of fraud, look at the facts and see if you raise an eyebrow or two. At closing, the project earned a total of $171,000 -- with 183 pledges. That's roughly a little less than $1,000 per pledge. So not only is Ouya matching the funds raised, but Gridiron Thunder also gets the Kickstarter money and a $100,000 bonus from Ouya for being the "top earner" in the Free the Games fund. This is the game that has raised half a million dollars of funding. [embed]262056:50531:0[/embed] But despite how you feel about Gridiron's quality, even if nothing shady is going on with these projects, the total lack of transparency isn't helping. While exclusivity requirements are up for debate, it's obvious that the $50,000 requirement itself is causing a ton of problems. So after a rather lengthy wait and some self-back patting, Ouya fired back an official response saying that nothing was changing, and that the fund would continue. But it was not a sufficient enough for a number of Ouya owners and developers like Sophie Houlden, who claimed she was going to pull all her games from the platform. Thomas Was Alone developer Mike Bithell commented on Ouya's post directly, noting that it makes him "sad for a lot of reasons." He said that the post wasn't an acceptance of criticism, but rather a "press release from a console company locked into a foolish policy and using aspirational language to shift the blame, weirdly, onto its critics." Rock, Paper, Shotgun's John Walker had a bit to say about the subject as well, noting that the $50,000 requirement is a major problem in and of itself. As he points out, limiting your potential pool of games to more affluent indie developers is contrary to the independent spirit as a whole. Walker also points out that the top-selling Ouya title so far is Towerfall -- a game that sold 2,000 copies since it was last reported, and is coming to PC later this year. Hardly an audience to justify a $400,000+ payout for Gridiron Thunder. Houlden has since talked to Ouya Founder Julie Uhrman and smoothed things over, but the damage has already been done to the Ouya organization. More controversy has recently arisen, with Ouya pulling out of a Free the Games Fund match with Dungeons The Eye of Draconus, claiming that the campaign was illegitimate -- with no mention of the equally suspicious Gridiron Thunder. Developer William McDonald is not happy, stating, "It appears we were thrown under the Free the Games bus. Ouya gets their fall guy and Gridiron Thunder keeps their money." So what do you do at this point? Well, you pick up the pieces and move on. The Free The Games Fund was a bad idea in execution, and as an astute commenter points out in Ouya's response blog, they are under no obligation to continue with the project, and can scrap this current incarnation at any time. Bithell has the right of it -- creating a giant "indie fund" pot like Sony did is a great idea. Giving out Wii U dev kits or relaxing stances like Nintendo and Microsoft have recently done are also great ideas to entice indies. But when you force independent developers to raise $50,000 and arbitrarily judge who is deserving of it even if they reach that high goal, it's going to cause problems. I was a backer of the Ouya because I thought it had promise initially to do things a bit differently. But it turns out they're just throwing ideas to a wall to see what sticks, and that won't get them anywhere. To those of you who are running the show at Ouya, stop putting walls up and preventing more great games from reaching your already limited platform. Instead, find ways to bring those walls down.
Ouya photo
They need to admit defeat and move on
[Update: so it seems Ouya has taken note of articles like this one, and has just updated the Free The Games terms. Now instead of a $50k minimum there will be a $10k minimum. There also needs to be a minimum number of backers...

The Only Escape photo
The Only Escape

Imagination Is The Only Escape returns on Indiegogo


Game sees new life through crowdfunding
Sep 04
// Jonathan Holmes
Many years ago, indie developer Luc Bernard conceived of a game centered on a child working to survive the holocaust by retreating into his imagination. It was once planned for Nintendo DS, but for a variety of reasons,...

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