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Review: Roving Rogue

Jul 03 // Chris Carter
Roving Rogue (Wii U)Developer: Padaone GamesPublisher: Padaone GamesMSRP: $9.99Released: July 2, 2015 The basic gist is pretty genius. Players will take control of Kurt the Righteous, who has just slain the final boss of the game. But what happens when said big bad dies? You can't just jump out of a window at the top of his massive fortress, right -- you have to walk back through where you came from. That's what you'll be doing throughout the course of Roving Rogue. Kurt only has one mechanic to master, so you won't get too flustered as you're busting your way out. Using a two-button system, one button jumps, and the other teleports. By quickly tapping the latter button you can warp a short distance, and holding it will stop your progress and allow you to aim a cursor in whatever direction you desire; it's a lot like Daud's blinking power in the Dishonored DLC. It's an easy concept to pick up, and it works very well. Players can opt to make a lot of jumps manually for safety, or go for a riskier teleport jump at nearly every turn. It makes every platforming portion a choice, but you can only teleport through specially marked "golden" walls to prevent you from breaking the game too hard. While the controls are on point, the levels on which you perform these antics are a mixed bag. Once you've played the first 10 stages or so you've basically seen it all, a feeling that's augmented by the fact that there are only six enemy types in total, all of which essentially operate in the same patrolling manner. There are some new ideas presented on occasion like darkness, and a switch between horizontal and vertical layouts, but it never really iterates beyond that. Four player co-op is definitely a big draw if you happen to have three other people on hand. [embed]295212:59321:0[/embed] Like the level design, the way the developers have chosen to approach the lore is also both brilliant and flawed. Although the premise is based on Kurt's tired old memory loss trope, you're basically rediscovering the fluff of the game's universe as you play it. Picking up collectibles will in turn decrypt diary entries explaining the initial journey throughout the castle, and why you're actually doing it. It even lends itself to multiple endings if you find enough. On the flipside, there's also a less stylish storytelling element -- Twitter feeds. I can't stand these, as they're basically a collective of memes and hashtags that are seemingly chosen at random, presented between levels. They're easy to skip, but feel wholly unnecessary. As for the visual style itself it's a bit plain when it comes to most of the game's animations and structures, but I actually dig the Loderunner feel to it, and as I stated previously, it does play well. Roving Rogue failed to really capture my interest throughout the entire adventure, but from a raw gameplay perspective I had some fun with the platforming bits. You'll enjoy it even more with friends. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Roving Rogue photo
Beam me up, ninja
When I heard of a game concept that starts you off at the last boss and takes you back through his castle as the story progresses, I was intrigued. Sadly, the mere premise of Roving Rogue is probably its strongest quality.

Bloggers Wanted photo
Bloggers Wanted

Bloggers Wanted: April Fools


Believe nothing you hear
Apr 09
// StriderHoang
April Fools' Day has passed and we've managed to survive. So Miles Morales isn't replacing Peter Parker wholesale but we do still believe in that Nintendo Direct a week into their charade.
Twin Souls photo
Twin Souls

Twin Souls looks like it can give me my stealth fix


This is the successor to a student project and looks great
May 12
// Alasdair Duncan
[Update: one of the co-authors of the game Path of Shadows has provided a comment for Destructoid for clarification. "Twin Souls from Lynce Studios is a commercial project for profit while Path of Shadows is an academic...

Very Quick Tips: Strider

Feb 18 // Chris Carter
General tips: Veteran action fans will want to start on Hard right away. Trust me. Note that you can't start over with a New Game+ unfortunately, so don't accept the final prompt unless you're sure you've explored everything. Take advantage of the rapid slice ability on bosses. Although it's tempting to slowly move in and hit bosses intermittently, it's smarter to hack away as fast as you can press the button and take some damage. Remember that you can directional slash, especially in the air. Odds are you can always hit something no matter where you are. This is useful for jumping and slicing upwards for out of reach enemies. Always queue up a charged slash when running around -- you never know when you're going to need it. You can go directly from crawling on a wall to a ceiling, and vice-versa. As long as you don't press LT or get hit you won't fall. If you reach a dead end, try slide kicking the wall or climbing the ceiling. You might find a hidden area that's obscured from view. Enemy guns will often telegraph when they're about to let off a shot with a light. Use this to your advantage, because some weaponry can inflict massive amounts of damage. You can use the slide move to "phase" through many enemies. Use it if you're stuck against a wall with nowhere to go. Since the game moves so fast, it's best to just pick up all the health containers you come across. Sometimes you won't even know when your health meter dips. When you obtain the catapult move (R1, RB), it will stall you in the air temporarily, like you're floating -- use this to dodge attacks like ground explosions and other projectiles.
Strider photo
Go ninja, go
Strider isn't a particularly tough game on Normal mode, but it can get a bit dicey on some of the more involved boss encounters. It also has a number of advanced techniques that can be employed to slice up even more dudes than you're used to, so use the following tips to become a true master ninja.   


Dtoid TV photo
Dtoid TV

Live show: Chivalry: Deadliest Warrior


A community killtacular
Nov 18
// Rick KingFoom Olson
[Mash Tactics airs Monday through Friday at 4p.m. Pacific on Dtoid.TV. Watch Rick 'King Foom' Olson play a variety of games, each day with its own theme. With a heavy focus on community and viewer interaction, you c...

Review: Atomic Ninjas

Oct 17 // Ian Bonds
Atomic Ninjas (PlayStation 3, PS Vita [reviewed])Developer: Grip GamesPublisher: Grip GamesReleased: October 8, 2013MSRP: $9.99 Cooking metaphors aside, the story of Atomic Ninjas breaks down like this: a security guard at a nuclear plant falls asleep on the big red button and the planet goes boom. Ninjas, using their natural survival instincts, are altered, and...um...must fight each other. For reasons. And that's it. I hope you weren't looking for more plot or depth than that, because you just ain't getting it, Johnny. In fact beyond that intro, the only interaction you have with "characters" is the sensei in the tutorial. There are no alternate characters to select to play as, either -- you're just a ninja, fighting other ninjas. There are costumes to chose from, but only once you increase your rank through battles. The main game plays out like Super Smash Bros.; you and three other players are let loose in an arena and must beat the living snot out of each other until they succumb to being flung into a pit and die. There are three weapons to chose from (punch, shuriken, and force grab -- used to chuck boxes at foes) and three gadgets (grappling hook, wall claw, and rocket) that allow you to travel around the arena and basically push your opponents to their doom. [embed]263693:50962:0[/embed] The game is built for multiplayer -- and not much else. You choose an arena, a game mode including the standard deathmatch, team deathmatch, king of the hill, and capture the flag, and try to connect to a room to duke it out with other folk. However the matchmaking is a bit lacking, as often times I would choose a room to play only for it to wind up already being full, or not really there. While fighting your opponents is the whole point of Atomic Ninjas, its execution is hampered by a poor camera and minimalist attacks. The camera is zoomed in on you, and never zooms out, so you never know if you're leaping (or swinging, or rocket-blasting) towards a foe, or a large pit in the floor. Thankfully in the games where there is a goal such as capture the flag, a small arrow points to where you need to go. Once you find a foe, you spam the attack button until they're pushed away. The shurikens are pretty effective, but using the right analog stick to aim while pressing the right trigger for your attack is a bit cumbersome, especially when trying to leap around, or hit a target that is also leaping around. The punches are usually the most effective and when timed right can knock shurikens away from hitting you. At least the game looks nice. The character models are cute and colorful, and the arenas are varied, even if there's not many to choose from. The layout can be confusing the first time you play through due to the camera, but once you learn where the hazards are, you can travel through them well enough. I will say that each stage seems a bit small at times, and the cramped camera angle doesn't help that. There is a single-player mode, but it's basically just a practice arena (strangely labeled "quick match") where you fight against bots rather than live players. It's effective if you're taking the game on the go or just can't connect in multiplayer, but the AI is a little high on the difficulty at times. There's at least cross-buy and cross-play included, so you can feel lonely when the room doesn't connect on either system of choice. The main problem with Atomic Ninjas is that there's just not enough to do. Each battle has Ninja Trials: different objectives to be completed during matches, such as killing three foes with shurikens, or stealing opponents weapons after defeat. While those help vary how you play each level, the limited number of weapons, gadgets, and especially arenas make the quick play even quicker, as I found myself getting bored doing essentially the same thing over and over. Still, there were minimal rewards as I leveled up, as different costumes and abilities were unlocked, but not enough to keep me playing for long periods of time. Atomic Ninjas isn't really a bad game, nor is it a good one. It just sort of exists. What the title does it does competently, but there's not enough options or variety to warrant many matches, unless you're absolutely dying for some multiplayer brawling on the cheap. It's inoffensive and fun, but like the radiation, only in small doses.
Atomic Ninjas photo
Pint-sized punches
Ninjas and explosions: two great tastes that you would think taste great together, right? Throw them in a pot, mix with weapons, gadgets, and frenetic multiplayer action, and you have a recipe for an awesome adventure. Sadly, I don't think this one cooked long enough.

Ninja Gaiden vs. Strider photo
Ninja Gaiden vs. Strider

Shinobi clash! Ryu Hayabusa vs. Strider Hiryu


The least stealthy ninjas of all time cross blades
Aug 16
// Tony Ponce
Videogame ninjas are seriously the worst ninjas of all time. It's kind of hard to keep hidden in the shadows when there is a trail of blood and limbs running right up to your present location. Still pretty badass, though. Tw...
Senran Kagura Burst photo
Senran Kagura Burst

Senran Kagura Burst will hit retail AND digital in Europe


Huge tracts of land
Aug 10
// Tony Ponce
Gentlemen, get your oils and scented candles ready, because Senran Kagura Burst will be arriving in Europe some time in Q1 2014. Americans received a localization confirmation from XSEED earlier this week, seemingly leaving o...
Senran Kagura Burst photo
Senran Kagura Burst

XSEED to release Senran Kagura Burst in North America


It's official!
Aug 06
// Kyle MacGregor
Senran Kagura Burst is coming to the Nintendo 3DS in North America, XSEED Games has announced. The Tamsoft-developed side-scrolling brawler will launch exclusively via the Nintendo eShop this fall.  A two for one followi...
TMNT: Out of the Shadows photo
TMNT: Out of the Shadows

Leo slices and dices into TMNT: Out of the Shadows


All hail our fearless leader
Jun 25
// Tony Ponce
Michelangelo, Raphael, and Donatello have all done their thing; now it's time for Leonardo to step up and show 'em why he is the strongest Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle. Leo has always been the blandest of the four. Everyone e...
Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z photo
Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z

Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z is your new horror action comedy


Cheap thrills and bloody kills
Jun 16
// Jonathan Holmes
Under Itagaki's watch, the Ninja Gaiden series was about big production values, precise action, and serious-face gameplay. Those days are over. With Inafune at the helm of this new Ninja Gaiden spin-off, the tone has gone th...
Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z photo
Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z

Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z trailer takes a page from MadWorld


"Honor and death go together like hot sauce and my balls!"
Jun 07
// Tony Ponce
GameTrailers has the exclusive debut trailer of Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z, the zombie-infested Ninja Gaiden spin-off being handled by the trinity of Team Ninja, Spark Unlimited, and Keiji Inafune's new studio Comcept. Damn, does...
TMNT: Out of the Shadows photo
TMNT: Out of the Shadows

Donatello does machines in TMNT: Out of the Shadows


That's a fact, Jack
Jun 05
// Tony Ponce
After giving Mikey and Raph a moment in the spotlight, Donnie comes out to strut his stuff in the latest Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows trailer. A character trait that usually gets glossed over in Ninja Tur...
Bravoman photo
Bravoman

Episode 2 of Bravoman is about crazy ninja love


Mentally unstable love interest? Check!
May 28
// Tony Ponce
The adventures of Bravoman, Super-Unequaled Hero of Excellence, continues with the second episode of his new web cartoon. As before, voice actor legend Rob Paulsen is the number one reason to tune in, lending his talents to ...
TMNT: Out of the Shadows photo
TMNT: Out of the Shadows

Raphael SMASH in this TMNT: Out of the Shadows trailer


Come back here! I'm not finished with you! DAAAAAAMN!
May 14
// Tony Ponce
The bad boy of the Turtles makes his proper debut in a new trailer for Activision and Red Fly's Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows. Compared to Mikey, Raph is a lot more aggressive and brutal -- watch him Izuna...
TMNT: Out of the Shadows photo
TMNT: Out of the Shadows

Mikey flips out in new TMNT: Out of the Shadows trailer


It doesn't look like poop
Apr 23
// Tony Ponce
When Activision pulled the lid off Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows, we admired the combat but sneered at the Turtles' grim-dark makeovers. Then Steven Hansen checked out a preview build, and we all became ju...
Scent of a woman photo
Scent of a woman

Senran Kagura cell phone charms smell like breasts


Because of course
Apr 23
// Tony Ponce
The marketing of booby ninja school girl brawler series Senran Kagura is simply outrageous. Branded tissue boxes? Facepalm worthy. Themed desserts? Fairly creative. Cell phone charms? Well, that doesn't sound so bad... ... oh...

Review: Super House of Dead Ninjas

Mar 12 // Fraser Brown
Super House of Dead Ninjas (PC)Developer: MegadevPublisher: Adult Swim GamesRelease: February 18, 2013MSRP: $6.99 Nintai Ryoko, the super-charged ninja and title's protagonist, is a woman on a mission. Her goal: to travel to the bottom of a hellish tower, one apparently filled with treasures and the promise of glory. She doesn't want any of that, however; instead, she intends to discover what happened to the one ninja who succeeded before her, the one-armed ninja.  Getting to the bottom is easier said than done, what with it containing a myriad of horrors, from undead warriors, evil spirits, dragon guardians, and crazy monkeys, to traps ranging from floor and ceiling spikes to laser cannons. It's no easy task, but Nintai has a plethora of violent tools at her disposal. She starts of with a basic katana, some shuriken, bombs, and one magic spell, but a vast array of unlockable weapons and tools can be earned for completing all sorts of challenges. Unlocks and upgrades can be picked up at a shop run by a sour old woman. She's dismissive and doesn't think you'll get very far. I didn't like her, and instead of seeking the fate of the one-armed ninja, I really just wanted to show that hag who the boss was. Her and the omnipresent voice that crops up from time to time judging my actions and mocking my many, many failures. At the shop, you can see what needs to be done to unlock any of these items or upgrades, but most of them can really just be earned by playing the game without sparing them a thought. Finding out that I could use grenades or had a new pair of nunchucks that I could snatch after yet another death really softened the blow. Who doesn't like presents? All the cool toys in the world won't make a difference without skill, however, and that's the area where I found myself rather lacking. Dead Ninjas is an insanely fast game, with Nintai being, more often than not, nothing but a blue (or whatever color her ninja robes are, there are several to unlock) streak, speeding across the screen. This speed is a necessity, too, as the game is on a timer, counting down to failure. Pick-ups can be discovered which add more time to the counter, but there's always the feeling that you're running low. Haste inspires recklessness, unfortunately, and that lack of caution spells death. Nintai can sprint past some enemies, slicing and dicing as she goes along, but others have shields, require more than one hit, are covered in spikes, fling projectiles, teleport, or are exceptionally fast, and they require a split-second analysis before tackling -- there's no time for more. So speed becomes dangerous, despite being key.  At first, this led to an agonizing amount of frustration, as Nintai continually got turned into a red smear on the floor of this unwelcoming tower, but I was getting irritated by my own failings, not the design of the game. I got carried away by the delightful 16-bit violence and extreme pace, and would just run into confrontations without a second thought. Practice and experience made me a slightly better ninja. Make no mistake, however, I'm still terrible.  It's all about getting into a rhythm, and when you start to recognize enemies, it takes less than a second to recall the best way to slay them. Continually slaughtering the tower's residents in quick succession builds up Nintai's quickly diminishing rage meter, and when it's activated she becomes an unstoppable force of destruction. Those moments are the game's best, sprinting down the tower as an invincible, deadly whirlwind. And the more enemies you kill while in rage mode, the longer it lasts.  The floor layouts, enemy placements, and item locations are all randomly generated, making each new game after a death a fresh experience. Sure, it means that you won't be memorizing the levels, but it also means you won't have to play through the same section over and over again, which would certainly happen in a game this tricky. Filling out the roster of ghastly enemies are a bunch of rather unfriendly bosses, and a very traditional bunch they are, too. They all come with special abilities, patterns that must be memorized (usually simple ones), and weaknesses that can be exploited. While challenging, most of them have a fairly small amount of health and can be dispatched quite quickly once you figure out how to deal with them. I'm not the most patient of fellows, so I appreciated the fact that these villains didn't outstay their welcome. Die while fighting them, though, and you'll be sent back to the beginning of the section, a hundred floors above them.  Appropriately for a challenging game such as this, Super House of Dead Ninjas sends you into the fray with only minimal instruction. There is, however, a rather novel tutorial in the form of a comic, accessible from the main menu. Contained within are little tips and tricks that the main game doesn't really share with you, and one one occasion it even offered me the key to defeating a boss I'd been struggling with. It's well worth reading, and even rewards players with a new costume. Super House of Dead Ninjas can be played for free on the Adult Swim website, but getting it on Steam nets you an upgraded version. The map editor and player-created dungeons offer up tools for you creative types and a bounty of new levels for those that can't get enough of the main game and its extra, transdimensional tower. It also comes with added items and unlockables, as well as an upgraded soundtrack. The latter is cracking, as well, containing some wonderful oriental-themed chiptunes.  This is one game that I know I'll be playing long after this review is finished with. The instant challenge and frantic pace makes it perfect to just pick up and play for 15 minutes, while the tight controls and potentially limitless number of floors makes it easy to pour hours into. If you're not convinced, then check out the free version and see if it floats your boat. I do have one caveat, however. Whatever you do, don't play this with a keyboard. It's possible, but you'll just be giving yourself another unnecessary and fairly unpleasant challenge. Thankfully, Super House of Dead Ninjas comes with native controller support, and after a few initial hiccups, it seems to work perfectly now.
Dead Ninjas review photo
The tower of a thousand deaths
After climbing down 350 floors of traps, monsters, and ninja ghosts, not to mention the extra levels seemingly without end, I've come to one conclusion: I should never become a ninja. Sure, I should have known that before I e...

Review: Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus

Mar 01 // Chris Carter
Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus (PlayStation Vita)Developer: Team NinjaPublisher: Tecmo KoeiReleased: February 26, 2013MSRP: $39.99 I'll be blunt -- this version of Sigma 2 is locked at a maximum of 30 frames per second, and at times (especially in the game's AI partner based Tag Mode), it doesn't even reach that. Somehow, Team Ninja managed to regress from the beautiful port of Ninja Gaiden Sigma Plus like it has never developed for the Vita before, and I can't explain it. The first Sigma Plus did run at 30 FPS, which sacrificed the integrity of the original a bit, but it ran consistently at 30 FPS -- Sigma 2 ... not so much.During the single-player campaign it mainly happens when there's lots of action on-screen, but in Tag Mode with an AI companion, it's extremely noticeable and borderline unplayable. In a fairly absurd move, I turned off the game's gore, turned up the camera speed, and the framerate improved a little bit, but treating a Vita port of an old release like it's a PC game on a low-end rig is a bit ridiculous. To add insult to injury, the franchise staple option of Japanese audio is mysteriously missing from the game, as is multiplayer in any form. Unlike the PS3 version of Sigma 2, there's no option to play online, or even local co-op for Tag Mode. This feature was quietly removed for no real reason, so be aware of it if you're looking to grab this game to play with friends on the go. I wouldn't go so far as to say co-op is essential to the Ninja Gaiden franchise, but it was a fun ancillary addition in Sigma 2, and it makes no sense to remove it from a supposedly enhanced Vita port. Team Ninja needs to get working on a patch very, very soon to fix the framerate, dual audio, and lack of co-op options, as they're absolutely essential to the experience and cripple this port. Outside of those major problems, however, the game is pretty much the exact same as Sigma 2. It has all of the content, all of the same enemy layouts, and it's still very much a Ninja Gaiden game. Just like Sigma 2, the initial difficulties have been toned down a bit. This is fine by me, considering the barriers to entry for new fans have been lowered, and the higher difficulties still possess a decent challenge. Sigma games are a different experience from the originals, and they've served their purpose just fine. Locales are varied and beautiful looking, and enemy types and boss fights are extremely fun to engage and figure out. Like the original Ninja Gaiden, NG2 offers some of the most iconic and challenging boss fights in an action game to date. All of the controls on the Vita work exactly as intended, with an easy on-screen tap for readying ranged weapons. I had no problem at all getting Ryu to do what I needed to do outside of fighting the framerate. When the game actually ran at its maximum framerate, combat was fast, fluid, and enjoyable just like it's always been. The camera is improved from the first game, but then again I never really had an issue with it in general. In terms of actual new content, there is Ninja Race mode, but it's not very fun. The main issue is that during the "race," you'll have to constantly stop and battle enemies in preset arenas before progressing. Essentially, Ninja Race just functions as a slightly modified Time Attack mode. What Team Ninja could have offered instead is a literal race through arranged portions of the game with few if any holdups, and original content. Instead, it feels like numerous parts of the game were just lazily copied and pasted with a timer thrown in.On top of the technical issues, there's barely anything new that's been added here to justify another purchase. It's a shame, because I really enjoyed the original Ninja Gaiden 2 and Sigma 2. Team Ninja really missed the opportunity to add a killer feature like the ability to replay Time Attack missions with extra characters or enhance Ninja Race, which would have justified a double/triple-dip. With the removal of content like Japanese audio and online co-op, this game doesn't offer enough to truly justify the "Plus" in its name. Team Ninja really needs to get its act together going forward, or the Ninja Gaiden series will be beyond repair.
Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Vita photo
Sigma 2 Minus
After the extremely sour-tasting Ninja Gaiden III that was, in my mind, a disaster in nearly every way possible, it's a bit hard to trust Team Ninja without Tomonobu Itagaki at the helm. Nonetheless, Team Ninja is still extre...

Ninja Gaiden smartglass photo
Ninja Gaiden smartglass

Ninja Gaiden 3 on 360 will feature Smartglass integration


Syncronize YouTube videos
Mar 01
// Chris Carter
Tecmo Koei has confirmed that in addition to the new content that was added to the Wii U version of Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge, the Xbox 360 version of the game will be getting Smartglass support. Basically, this version of...
Mark of Ninja Steam sale photo
Mark of Ninja Steam sale

Mark of the Ninja is $4.99 on Steam right now


That's a steal for this underrated game
Mar 01
// Chris Carter
Mark of the Ninja, one of the best games released last year, is now on sale for $4.99 on Steam. If you haven't gotten a chance to play this gem yet, now is the time, as you can spend your entire weekend slinking around and sl...
Dead Ninjas photo
Dead Ninjas

Action-platformer Super House of Dead Ninjas hits Steam


New rooms, weapons, bosses, and custom levels
Feb 18
// Jordan Devore
I can see myself spending a long, long time playing Super House of Dead Ninjas. Originally released as a Flash game playable on [adult swim] games, this 2D action-platformer has since made its way onto Steam with exclusive ne...
Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus photo
Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus

Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus on Vita: New screens, details


Don't be a Hero
Feb 12
// Dale North
The sequel to Vita the Ninja Gaiden franchise launch title is coming later this month. Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus drops February 26, complete witha new cast, new features, boss battles and more. Tecmo Koei dumped a bunch of ne...
Razor's Edge on PS3 / 360 photo
Razor's Edge on PS3 / 360

Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge outed for PS3 / 360


Well, that was fast
Feb 05
// Tony Ponce
Not even three months since Ninja Gaiden 3: Razor's Edge landed, we already have evidence that PS3 and 360 ports of the enhanced Wii U port are on the way. Japanese retailer Rakuten has let slip that Razor's Edge will drop fo...
Ninja Gaiden photo
Ninja Gaiden

Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus gets a fancy gameplay trailer


I'm still on the fence
Jan 18
// Chris Carter
Ninja Gaiden Sigma 2 Plus is on the way, and to celebrate, Tecmo Koei has a new gameplay trailer ready for eye consumption. Of course, that stupid armadillo boss is back, and I can hear the sounds of my controller hitting th...
Ninja Gaiden Z photo
Ninja Gaiden Z

Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z development consoles detailed


Set for 360 and PS3
Dec 25
// Chris Carter
Remember Ninja Gaiden Z? That weird spinoff game where the chief goal is to kill the franchise hero Ryu Hayabusa? Although details on planned platforms have been scarce, leading some to believe it was a next-gen project, it s...
 photo

Info dump for Senran Kagura: Shinovi Versus on PS Vita


Spin-off of the Senran Kagura series on 3DS
Oct 28
// Tony Ponce
In my my post last week about new Bandai figurines, I very casually mentioned that booby ninja schoolgirl series Senran Kagura was receiving a new installment on PS Vita. It immediately occurred to me that Dtoid never formal...
 photo

An hour of Mark of the Ninja with Nels Anderson


Sep 12
// Rick KingFoom Olson
Last night on Mash Tactics, we had the pleasure of sitting down and chatting with Nels Anderson, Lead Designer of the amazing stealth platformer, Mark of the Ninja. If you just so happened to miss it live, check out the abov...
 photo

I think Gyoretsu Nageloop has FMV lesbian grenade ninja


Aug 19
// Jonathan Holmes
Gyroetsu Nageloop is a videogame published by Nintendo in Japan for the 3DS eShop. It plays like easily comprehended puzzle game (specifically, like Magnetica) but it's storyline is... well, I'm not really sure what it is. T...
 photo

Senran Kagura-themed desserts... why am I not surprised?


Aug 15
// Tony Ponce
Senran Kagura Burst, the sequel to last year's 3DS ninja booby high school brawler, is scheduled for release in Japan on August 30. Time for one last marketing push, right? Until August 19, you can visit Cafe Euro in Akihabar...

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