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Motion Controller

Resident Evil Revelations photo
Resident Evil Revelations

Resident Evil: Revelations lacks Wiimote pointer controls


Only the GamePad is being focused on at this time
Feb 12
// Tony Ponce
I hate to be the one to crush the hopes and dreams of the affable Jonathan Holmes, but it looks like the Wii U version of Resident Evil: Revelations will not offer a Wii Remote + Nunchuk option. Oh yes, we'll get lovely off-T...

Trends of this Generation: Waggling with motion controls

Feb 11 // Daniel Starkey
I started thinking about all of this a few weeks ago, wondering what trends and innovations would be influential for gaming. What will forever change the face of this industry as we know it? After some discussions with the rest of the staff here, we’ve got it down to a list of a few things whose impact will probably be with us for some time to come.   Motion Controls The Wii, Kinect and Move. If there’s one development that could really sum-up this generation, motion controls might be it. It started back in ’06 with the release of Nintendo’s Wii. Instead of trying to keep up with the graphical race between Microsoft and Sony, Nintendo chose to use an innovative control mechanism, banking on the idea that developers would use it to create games that were compelling enough to draw in casual gamers and the core crowd alike. It worked, more or less. At just under 100 million units, the Wii is still *technically* the most successful console from this generation. I say technically, because Wii sales have been largely stagnant for a couple of years, giving both the PS3 and 360 quite some time to catch up. Early on, however, no one knew how the whole thing would play out. Initially, the Wii was selling so fast that it looked like it was a real contender to surpass the PlayStation 2. The other two companies, realizing the mass appeal of motion controls, Microsoft and Sony moved to produce peripherals that would give their respective consoles functionality that rivaled that of the Wii. At E3 2009, Kinect and Move were shown for the first time. While each unit was met with different levels of success, they were indicative of something more -- a desire to simplify, to cut back on the growing complexity of traditional console controls. For all of its imperfections, motion controls allowed easy translation of subtle, nuanced movement between player and the screen. Games like Wii Sports and Dance Central rode the wave of popularity and saw pretty substantial success. Kinect showed, for the first time, that a peripheral not initially bundled with a console could not only be financially viable, but see incredible mainstream acceptance, selling over 8 million units in the first 60 days and setting a world record for the fastest selling consumer electronics device ever released. While it’s not certain whether the "Nextbox" or the PS4 will keep up with the motion control standard, but the Wii U, the first console of the 8th generation, has already taken the legacy of its predecessor and built upon it. Microsoft has also been unusually dedicated to Kinect, and I honestly don’t see them dropping that support anytime soon. This is perhaps one of the most pernicious and frustrating new bits of tech I’ve seen in some time. I’ve written before about the need for games that are open and accessible to people who may be differently abled, and that sentiment hasn’t changed. Motion controls, indeed, can be very helpful for some individuals, but it seems that more often than not it is a restriction. Playing the Wii for example can be tiring, even if it just means holding your arm in one specific place for extended periods of time. Motion controls, more often than not place an additional barrier between the player and the game.  Standard console controls have been fine-tuned for years and it’s pretty rare to see even the worst games completely screw them up. Anytime a new Kinect or Move game comes out, however, the first and most important discussion that’s had is whether or not the controls are even competently implemented. The simple act of not screwing something up is now seen as an exceptional accomplishment because just being okay is the new bar. Maybe I’m wrong, but within the past few years I haven’t seen anything pull off new control schemes quite as well as games like Wii Sports or Dance Central, and they are meant for very general audiences and are very liberal with what kinds of movements they will accept as being correct. This tech isn't really ready for prime time and probably won’t be for a while- not to the degree required to justify the cost. When I was young, my mom told me that eventually all games would be controlled with the whole body. Even back then, I knew that was a bad idea. I’m not necessarily against change in the abstract, but at no point have I seen anything that justifies two expensive add-ons and an entire console that’s a generation behind. Creativity on the part of the developers brings innovation. Messing with the most fundamental aspect of a machine (its interface) undoes everything people have learned since gaming has… been. People can say what they like, but this is one shift that gives me a lot more stress, physical pain, and hours of frustration than it should have. At the end of the day, ask yourself- do you want Red Steel or do you want Portal? [image courtesy of SlamDunk! Studios , I'm a Gamer Too, and Kotaku Australia]
Motion Controls photo
Many embarassing Facebook images later
If current estimations are to be believed, the current console generation will be the longest we’ve seen in the history of gaming. As of right now, just a little less than one-third of my life fits between November 16, ...

Kinect 2 dev kits? photo
Kinect 2 dev kits?

Rumor: Motion control kits for next Xbox 'in circulation'


I hope they come up with a better name than Kinect 2
Jan 17
// Jordan Devore
For all of Microsoft's commercial success with Kinect, the device still seems to draw a lot of criticism for its lack of compelling supported games, and rightfully so. Perhaps things will be different with the successor to th...
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CES: MAG II gun controller needs no sensor bar


Works with any display
Jan 09
// Dale North
I sprayed virtual bullets all over the CES game section today trying out the MAG II gyroscopic gun controller. This "wireless magneton induction" controller uses a gyroscope and on-the-fly calibration to let you aim in first-...
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J.S. Joust designer on art, failures, and motion control


"Game design is like black magic"
Dec 06
// Jonathan Holmes
Last week's Sup Holmes (now on iTunes) was a real instant friendship time. Douglas Wilson is probably the most down-to-earth, PhD-educated videogame developer I've met all year. There was no subject he wasn't willing to roll...
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The DTOID Show: Sony's New Controller, God of War & THQ


Also: The Wii U is awesome now.
Nov 30
// Max Scoville
We were live earlier today for The Destructoid Show, and if you missed it... Shame on you. But here's a recording anyway. Sony patented a new controller that's kinda cool, but also stupid-looking. THQ's in the latest Humble ...
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Sony patents DualShock/Move hybrid that breaks in two


Something about how it looks like testicles
Nov 30
// Jim Sterling
A new patent from Sony has revealed a unique little idea that potentially hints at future PlayStation plans -- a hybridized controller that blends both the DualShock and PlayStation Move into one gestalt beast.  The quir...
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CVG looks back on the origins of the Wii


Fascinating send-off for Nintendo's most successful home console
Nov 17
// Tony Ponce
On the eve of the Wii U's launch, it's time to pay our final respects to the console its replacing, because unlike the PS2, no company is going to be supporting the Wii from here on out. The Wii was a treasure trove of potent...
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Jimquisition: Touch Waggle Touch Waggle Swipe


Jimquisition happens every Monday!
Nov 12
// Jim Sterling
Over half a decade of frustration is about to be unleashed with glorious fury. It's been six years, the tech has been demonstrated, yet still the tech demos come. So few games have found a way to implement new interfaces gra...
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Describing Johann Sebastian Joust is arguably one of the most difficult things I've had to do since I saw the game back at E3. The best I've managed to come up with is: "It's kind of like tag... But it's also got some elemen...

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Skid to victory in this Wii U Sports Connection trailer


Sep 13
// Brett Zeidler
No, I didn't come up with that hilariously horrid pun in the title. That one was courtesy of Nintendo themselves in this new trailer for Ubisoft's Sports Connection on Wii U. Oh, you think they'd stop there, but no,&nbs...
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The DTOID Show: Tony Hawk, Sleeping Dogs & Metro's Spider


Jul 18
// Max Scoville
The big news today is the newly announced voice cast for Sleeping Dogs, which includes Lucy Liu, Tim Wilkinson, Robin Shou, and oddly enough, Emma Stone. A video walkthrough of the E3 demo of Metro: Last Light is now online,...
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DTOID Extra: LEAP's motion-control makes Kinect look dumb


Jul 18
// Max Scoville
The LEAP is essentially a precision Kinect that senses various types of gestures in a 3D space, and can be used for a whole ton of stuff besides Fruit Ninja and dance games. The video on the LEAP's website makes it look...

I am officially done with the Kinect

Jun 20 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
First, I need to address my earlier hyperbolic statements. When I went hands-on with Steel Battalion just prior to GDC a few months back, the setup of the room was the most ideal environment one could have to play any Kinect game. Brightly lit, lots of room, and optimal spacing between the Kinect and player. When I played it there, Heavy Armor was functioning just fine for me. So you can hopefully understand where I was coming from when I made what is now an obviously outlandish statement. I downloaded the Steel Battalion demo last night to see how the game would do in my living room. It was barely five minutes into the demo before I rage-quit after getting stuck in a loop where I was entering and exiting the cockpit view. I was sitting as instructed, with my hands and controller in my lap, yet the Kinect was just unable to process that I wasn't moving my arms at all. It was then a realization dawned over me. I've been making excuses with every Kinect game up until this point. Every time a motion or voice command failed with any game, I would shrug it off until I got whatever I was trying to make happen. Why have I been so forgiving all this time? We would cry bloody murder if we had to press a button on our controller or keyboard multiple times to get an action working. Imagine trying to shoot a weapon in something like Call of Duty, where your gun would only fire on every third or fourth pull of the trigger. That would be unacceptable, and yet nearly two years since the launch of the device "Kinect forgiveness" is applied to every Kinect game released. I'm done making excuses, as it's become grossly obvious to me that the device doesn't work, and I doubt it will ever be fixed in its current form. We've all just been test subjects, feeding the device data that will shape the next iteration of the Kinect. The rumors regarding the next Xbox console have been increasing since the start of the year, and this supposed leaked document detailing Microsoft's future vision proposes the Kinect 2 with higher accuracy, improved voice recognition, four-player support, and a dedicated hardware processor. Wait, some of that sounds familiar, doesn't it? [embed]229792:44134[/embed] Oh yeah. All this and more was promised when the Kinect was known as Project Natal. Instead, what we got was a shadow of what was shown. As for the voice recognition, the whole feature is about as useful to me as it is to say "Xbox, open disc tray." I think the main problem with Kinect is that seemingly no one in the industry is pushing the hardware at all when developing for it, with most attempts feeling like half-assed cash-ins. It's rather telling when a first party published title doesn't even try, as was the case with Kinect Joy Ride. I say most. Like I said earlier, the Dance Central series is done rather well, and titles such as Twisted Pixel's The Gunstringer and Grasshopper's Diabolical Pitch have been fun, but they seem to be fun in spite of the Kinect features rather than because of them. The best Kinect-enabled games that really take advantage of the device seem to only be the ones directed at children, with Double Fine's Sesame Street: Once Upon a Monster, and Kinectimals being some shining examples. If anything, kids are the perfect target for the Kinect, as they're hyper little monsters that won't be fazed from having to repeatedly wave their arms or scream at their TV trying to make something happen. The Kinect was designed for gaming, but the areas where it actually excels have nothing to do with games. Hacks of all sorts have been designed for the Kinect, from acting as a virtual dressing room, making autonomous flying robots, helping doctors in the operating room, to so much more. There's a serious problem when the hacks and mods do so much more with the Kinect than the games do. I'm mad because Microsoft has been shoving the Kinect in everyone's faces since 2010 as if we need it, like Xbox 360 owners can't live without it. It is not an enjoyable experience at all having to repeat the swipe of your hand or voice command to do something as simple as navigate the poor layout of the Xbox 360 Dashboard, especially when it's far easier to do anything with the controller itself. None of the motion controller experiences are flawless, but between the big three, the Kinect is the worst offender of them all. I can't help but feel all this is moot at this point. Microsoft has laughed all the way to the bank, selling 18 million Kinects worldwide as of January 2012. Perhaps my grievances with the Kinect are too little, too late. Still, there's this odd sense of peace knowing that I'm done with the Kinect this generation.
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I owe everyone an apology. This past March, I stated that "Steel Battalion: Heavy Armor validates owning a Kinect." As it turns out, I was so, so wrong. We went as far as having the Steel Battalion: Heavy Armor review pass th...

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Rumor: Wii U controller trades its nubs for sticks


May 19
// Jonathan Holmes
E3 is just a few weeks away. Everything that is going to be at the show already exists somewhere, right at this very moment. It's just a matter of time before wee see it all.  It looks like one surprise of the show may h...
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DNA sync completed with Assassin's Creed: Kinect


Apr 01
// Ian Bonds
It was bound to happen. We're finally seeing the full capabilities of the Kinect motion sensor, and it looks like they've announced the ultimate in immersive gaming. Assassin's Creed: Kinect puts gamers back in the shoes of Ezio in what looks to be a motion-controlled remake of Revelations. Check out the trailer. Obviously, another joke trailer. But wow, well done!
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Freddie W reveals an 'inconvenient truth' to himself


Mar 25
// Ian Bonds
Freddie Wong has once again captured the current video game culture and applied it to one of his regular videos on YouTube. This time, Freddie is a time traveler who jumps back in time to let his younger self know about how awesome gaming could have been. Oh, and Cheetos.
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Study: Wii doesn't make fat kids not fat


Feb 27
// Liam Fisher
Nintendo's Wii and the motion control trend that followed gave seemed like the game industry's answer to inactive youth. As games have grown in popularity, kids have spent less and less time outside and, logically, "active" g...
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Get your tilt on in Need for Speed/DiRT 3 on PC


Feb 15
// Liam Fisher
This one took me a little bit to wrap my head around. Flypad, available on iTunes, allows you to control PC racing games like Need For Speed: The Run and DiRT 3 with touchscreen and tilt controls by downloading the iOS ...
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Five games we could really Kinect with


Jan 16
// Conrad Zimmerman
Kinect, as it stands right now, is a "pretty cool" thing. As a supplement to the general operation of an Xbox 360, it's hard for me to imagine living without it now that it's in my home. As an accessory designed for the purpo...
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Office Chat: Faith in Valve, Zelda's motion-based future


Dec 14
// Conrad Zimmerman
We have another delightful edition of Office Chat for you today. Join Jim Sterling, Jordan Devore and I as we consider a world where all Zelda is motion-controlled. We also contemplate what Valve fans might do for confirmation of Half-Life 3 and what starts as an innocent question about Jim's sunglasses takes a turn for the sordid.
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Skyward Sword controls: The future of the Zelda franchise


Dec 12
// Fraser Brown
There was a time when The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword might have been a button only affair, with nary a motion control in sight. But Legend of Zelda producer, Eiji Aonuma, explained to Official Nintendo Magazine that he co...
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PS Move ships 9 million, only 1 million in half a year


Nov 25
// Jim Sterling
Sony's boasted that the PlayStation Move shipped six million units since launch, although once again it declined to give any actual sales figures. Considering only a million units were shipped in the past six months, however,...

Skyward Sword should've given us control of its controls

Nov 21 // Jonathan Holmes
First off, it's not a double standard to criticize Skyward Sword for having mandatory motion controls but leave games like Super Mario Galaxy 2 and Donkey Kong Country Returns out of that argument. Those two games utilize motion controls as minor parts of the experience, employed to perform actions that are not at the heart of their designs. In Skyward Sword, just about everything besides character movement and sub-screen activation are done with motion controls. They are a constant part of the Skyward Sword experience. That said, I wouldn't say that Skyward Sword is game that is about motion controls. It's not like Dance Dance Revolution, Wii Fit, or Wii Sports Resort. All three of those games work like a high-tech mirror -- the player does not take on the role of another character. They play as themselves, and the game reflects back how effective (or ineffective) their physical actions are at achieving the game's particular goals. These are games about focusing on your body, not about leaving your body and being transported somewhere else. The Zelda series (Skyward Sword included) is about doing the opposite thing. It's about leaving your room, leaving your body behind, and entering the world of Hyrule through Link as your avatar. For some, motion controls are definitely going to get in the way of that process. Some find that motion controls make them constantly aware of their bodies in a way that button controls do not. Button and stick controls have become second nature for most "diehard" gamers. For them, button and stick controls work as the most direct and non-intrusive connection between our world and the game world. Just as they don't have to think about moving each muscle in their body when going for a walk, they don't even have to think about what button to press on the controller when playing a game. For these players, the standard controller truly is an extension of themselves. That's why they hate motion controls so much. Where standard button controls are something their muscle memory has fully embraced, motion controls are still a relatively new and awkward thing to adjust to. Even though many of the motions in Skyward Sword only require a flick of the wrist (or the elbow at the very most), the game's controls are still likely to distract and annoy them. For "casual" gamers, the roles are reversed. Button controls are typically strange and disorienting to them. Twelve buttons, two analog sticks, and a D-pad are just as intimidating to them as being presented with the controls for a 747 and asked to "just fly it a round a bit." Constantly looking down at the controller to figure out which button to press takes them right out of the game, and the frustration of not being able to just "get the game to do what they want" can be enough to turn them off  to gaming for good. Motion controls have been such a revelation to these gamers, allowing them to play games by using actions and motions that are already second nature to them in real life and destroying the barriers that once existed between them and the game world.  [embed]216198:41829[/embed] This brings us to Skyward Sword, a game that seems to try to have it both ways but isn't quite willing to go the extra mile to get there. According to certain reviews, the game's motions controls have clearly taken at least one person out of the game. Now, as the video from TheBitBlock above clearly demonstrates, to fault the game's controls for your inability to play it properly is an inaccurate assessment. That would be like giving a bad review to a perfectly good basketball because, every time you try to get it in the hoop, it bounces off the backboard. Good reviewers would know when it's their fault, not the game's, for their inability to enjoy it. That's often not true of reviews of motion-controlled games. A lot of reviewers fail to understand that if a motion-controlled game works some of the time, then that means that it would work all the time if they were playing it properly. I could go on about that topic, but I'll save it for another time. In addition to being able to differentiate between personal flaws and a game's flaws, it's also their job to speak from their heart as well as their head. Though I felt like Skyward Sword was a perfect 10, I thought that the game was too potentially alienating to be considered flawless from a design perspective. To get a 10/10, the game has to give all players everything they could possible want or expect out of a title. The forced motion controls are just enough to keep Skyward Sword from getting there. It would be one thing if it were impossible to adapt the game for standard controls, but that's definitely not the case. Anyone who has played the Ape Escape series will tell you how the second analog stick can work to control swords, remote-controlled vehicles, and other Zelda-like items. It would be different, though not unheard of, for a game to have both classic and motion controls; the practice is becoming more and more common as gaming moves forward. Resident Evil 4: Wii Edition, Monster Hunter Tri, No More Heroes 2, Conduit 2, Punch-Out!!, Mario Kart Wii, GoldenEye 007, and many others on the Wii give us that option. The same can be said of No More Heroes: Heroes' Paradise and Dead Space: Extraction on the PS3. Even Twilight Princess gave you the option to play with standard or motion controls. Nintendo may have required players to buy a separate game for that option, but it was still possible. Players who aren't interested in the prospect of a motion-controlled Zelda have every right to feel disappointed that Skyward Sword doesn't allow us to play it the way they want. It seems even stranger that Nintendo would make this call when you consider that the Wii U is potentially less than a year from launch. The upcoming console's main input device is basically a Wii classic controller with a touch screen. Wouldn't it have been great to have the option to play Skyward Sword on that controller, on your own private screen without the shackles of motion controls, while the rest of the family uses the TV for other purposes? Maybe Nintendo built in the option to play the game that way, or maybe the company will release a Wii U edition later on. Either way, it's strange that the company is moving towards making dual-analog controls and motion controls part of the core experience with the Wii U on that end, while completely abandoning the idea with Skyward Sword on the Wii. The fact that the Wii U exists says that Nintendo understands how much players appreciate being provided with control of how they experience their games. The same goes for the 3DS and its ability to turn off the 3D effect. If Nintendo ever makes a 3DS game that forces you to play with the 3D on, you can be sure that it will alienate some people. So far, that hasn't been an issue. As excited as Nintendo may be about 3D, it still seems to understand that, if 3D is as great as it hopes, it won't need to force us to accept it. We will gravitate to it naturally if it truly enhances the experience. I bet the same thing would have happened if Skyward Sword's motion controls had been optional. If that's the route Nintendo had taken, I think it's likely that many players who were initially turned off by the idea of playing a fully motion controlled Zelda would have picked up the game. Maybe they would have started off with the Classic Controller then tried out the motion controls over time. Over even more time, they may have come to find that the motion controls are so responsive and exhilarating that they do even more to make them feel connected to Link and the game world than button and stick controls could. Maybe Nintendo was right. Maybe motion controls really are better than button controls for the Zelda experience.  One thing's for sure: there are a lot of people who will never be convinced if they feel like the idea of motion controls is being forced on them. If you want to get someone to willingly try something new, the last thing you should ever do is make that person feel forced. I find that's especially true with gamers. By nature, we're the ones who want to be in control. When developers and publishers try to take that control away from us, it usually leads to bad things. Let's hope Nintendo keeps that in mind with their next Zelda title and that Skyward Sword doesn't miss finding its full audience in the meantime.
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The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword was released today, and the game is already buzzing with controversy. Specifically, some reviewers and players are insisting that the game's motion controls are fantastic while others a...

PlayStation Move, why aren't you moving?

Nov 16 // Jim Sterling
With the PlayStation Move's being out for over a year, the grace period where Sony could get away with shallow waggle-based minigames and glorified tech demos ought to have expired. However, this week I was sent a tote bag of PS Move review copies by Sony, and looking inside I found ... waggle-based minigames and glorified tech demos. Medieval Moves: Deadmund's Quest is one such game. It's an on-rails shooter/slasher that could have been legitimately brilliant had the developers not played it so damn safe. While its sword combat is decent and the bow-and-arrow controls surprisingly good, these ideas are barely developed from the launch title Sports Champions. What could have been a third-person action-adventure, one along the lines of, say, The Legend of Zelda, is just another on-rails demonstration of ideas in an industry that's become swollen with such things. The lack of bravery exhibited in the game is so obvious that it punches you in the face.  Carnival Island was also in the bag, and I think the game's name says it all. It's yet another collection of vague funfair minigames, the kind that have been on the Wii since at least 2007. You can throw balls! You can steer things! You can throw other kinds of balls! How innovative, how amazing, how exactly like so many other fucking games we've seen on rival systems! Rounding out the package was EyePet & Friends, a sequel to a PlayStation Eye game that was interminably vapid, and LittleBigPlanet 2: Special Edition, a re-release of a game that arrived earlier this year and includes a bunch of Move-focused DLC. That is Sony's big holiday lineup this year -- another tech demo, a collection of carnival minigames, a sequel to a game nobody loved, and a repackaged special edition. Forgive me if I'm being hard to please, but it's hardly a handjob from Debra Messing. Over the course of the year, the PlayStation Move's primary use was as an optional control method in games not designed with it predominantly in mind. Killzone 3, Resistance 3, and inFAMOUS 2 all had options for the Move, but they tended to change the way each game was played. In the case of first-person shooters, the garish new targeting reticule made aiming ridiculously easy and had a detrimental effect on the multiplayer, especially for those who didn't find the Move comfortable in an FPS and instead found themselves slaughtered by those who were having their hands held by a giant yellow circle that glowed bright red on the tiniest of targets. Without these optional control schemes, however, players would have had ZERO use for the Navigation Controller, the analog-stick secondary peripheral that Sony had the nerve to sell separately for $39.99 and then did nothing with. The Navigation Controller could have made for some genuinely exciting "real" games that used motion as an enhancement, but I'm willing to bet that its status as a separately purchased add-on is what has stopped games like Deadmund's Quest from being anything other than an on-rails affair. I doubt developers want to further shrink their potential audience by requiring another controller that gamers aren't guaranteed to have. Unfortunately, this becomes a vicious circle. No games want to use the Navigation Controller because so few gamers own one, but so few gamers own one because no games want to use the Navigation Controller. As with so many PlayStation-flavored problems, it's Sony's job to lead the way and work hard on producing enthralling games that exploit this forgotten peripheral. However, as with so many PlayStation-flavored problems, Sony won't fucking bother.  The only PlayStation Move game that's ever looked worth a shit is Sorcery, and unsurprisingly, it's a game that we've seen bugger-all from since the Move first launched. In December, Sony is due to finally unveil a hands-on version of the game, and I am expecting good things. Even if it is good, however, it's a year too late and it's just one game. Right now, the Move is putting out games that exist only to make Move owners feel like they weren't ripped off in 2010, and that's not a good position for any consumer product to be in. A year removed from launch, the Move should be producing awesome new experiences, not desperately struggling to still validate its existence. More importantly, a product more technologically advanced than the Wii, on a superior console, should not be pathetically retreading Nintendo's footsteps and regurgitating the kind of experiences that we've already been playing for years. The PlayStation Move could be a leader, but it's straggling as a follower. Sure, its controls may be a little more precise than those on the Wii, but that means jack shit when you're just reproducing the same kind of content. We don't need that. We don't need tech demos anymore, and we don't need proofs-of-concept. If you've been unable to prove your concept in over a year, then what the fuck were you doing for the past twelve months? The time when cute little demonstrations of ideas were acceptable has long since passed. It's high time that the Move got the kind of experiences that it is capable of. Otherwise, all you have is a shitty little Wii knock-off that's destined to be forgotten. Apparently, Sony's okay with that.
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The PlayStation Move came to North America on September 17, 2010. In that time, I think I've used the peripheral maybe six times. This is said as a person whose job it is to own and use one of these things. When the controlle...

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Mega64: Rise of Nightmares is all you ever need


Sep 07
// Tony Ponce
Yesterday, we showed you a new ad for Sega's Kinect horror game Rise of Nightmares. That video... was for plebeians. Here's the one you want to watch, complete with a Look Who's Talking Too twist ending. Mega64: RISE OF NIGHTMARES Commercial [YouTube]
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New Rise of Nightmares trailer looks more familiar


Sep 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
SEGA has had an interesting run of ads for its Kinect-based horror title, Rise of Nightmares. But this latest trailer for the game should be easily recognizable to everyone as the typical, "people are having fun playing...
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Freddie Wong's PS3 really DOES do everything!


Sep 04
// Tony Ponce
Freddie Wong, special effects guru and maestro of magic and sunshine, has modified his PS3 to enable real 3D gaming. Equipped with a PlayStation Move inserted in a Sharp Shooter controller shell, Freddie takes to the streets...
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New Destructoid Episode: Jimmy Fallon Steals All Our News


Jun 17
// Max Scoville
Move it, football-head. It's Friday, so today's episode of The Destructoid Show was carefree and whimsical. Here's the rundown: Jimmy Fallon, that guy who was in Taxi with Queen Latifah, sometimes covers video game news on h...
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Razer Hydra motion controller shipping in June for $140


Apr 21
// Jordan Devore
I hope you didn't forget about the Razer Hydra. It's a motion-control device for PC, which might seem a little unusual at first, but the market is certainly there for this type of controller. Razer and Sixense have announced ...

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