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Metal Gear Solid

Metal Gear Solid V photo
Metal Gear Solid V

Get a better look at the Metal Gear Solid V special edition bits


Red PS4
Jul 03
// Chris Carter
Konami has provided a pair of videos to help show off what's inside the various special edition kits for Metal Gear Solid V -- an official unboxing, if you will. The above showcases the new red PS4, and the bottom shows us the actual game's special edition. That case is just so sexy! I have enough Metal Gear in my collection so I don't think I'll spring for it, but I do want it.

And Destructoid's E3 Game of the Show is...

Jun 26 // Niero Gonzalez
Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain Konami isn't shy with what it has in Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. With most titles, publishers tend to sit you down and let you play through a well-crafted chunk of game -- maybe 15 minutes before shuffling you off the station. That's the common preview experience. Not this time. Instead, Konami plunked three of our editors -- Jordan, Steven, and Brett -- down in chairs and let them have at The Phantom Pain from the very beginning. Jordan and Brett got a solid two hours in; Steven wound up with a staggering 14 hours. If this is some sort of vertical slice trickery, it's the most elaborate in the history of video games. Much more likely is that we got to see the final product (or very close to it), and Kojima's going out with a bang. The Phantom Pain has an open world that somehow doesn't feel all that open. Just ahead at pretty much all times are guards who are dead set on shouting things at you, throwing bullets with their guns, and just generally blowing the cover off this whole stealth operative you fancy so much. But, it's plenty open world in the sense that nothing seems scripted. You're given the reins (to a horse and the game), and the plan-of-attack is entirely up to you. The encounters often sprawl and there are just so many ways of doing anything and everything. For that to be pulled off with any degree of competency takes some seriously skilled design. That's not to say that our efforts were always executed with a degree of competency. The Phantom Pain has a way about it where you just sense that nothing you did was quite good enough. Sure, it got the job done, but that's not how real Snake would've done it. Botch job and all, it still has a neat "totally meant to do that!" air about it. Man, that kid makes fucking up look cool. Wait. Now, go ahead and jettison a guard away with a weather balloon -- err, your Fulton. That guy works for you now. And that horse you're riding? He poops when you want him to. Big Boss, indeed. All that stuff is indicative of what will surely make The Phantom Pain a great video game. Not only is it incredibly polished and detail dense, but it also has enough silly stuff to remind you that you're playing a game. There's plenty of weirdness to be found, and Kojima's tightly tethered it to the title's core mechanics. As we finished our play sessions, it was tough for us to imagine a game that would be more deserving of Destructoid's Best of E3 award. Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain just plays so damn wonderfully. In hindsight, Konami wasn't going out on a limb by letting us have at it at our own pace; it did exactly what any publisher would do if it had something this special on its hands.
E3 Game of the Show photo
So many good options
We've hemmed. We've hawed. Destructoid's editors and judges have kindly suggested, boldly voted, bickered, scolded, stabbed each other with rapiers, revenge-slept with each other's illegitimate cousins, and finally have come ...

The Phantom Pain photo
The Phantom Pain

Konami's stance on Metal Gear Solid V microtransactions


And, uh, 40 minutes of footage!
Jun 19
// Jordan Devore
I'm back home from E3 2015 thanks to a too-early flight. I can safely watch this 40-minute demonstration of Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain without any guilt trips from Steven. Yes! Straight away, "While it is true that...

MGSV E3 trailer photo
MGSV E3 trailer

Kojima's final MGSV E3 trailer shows off the bloodshed


The Twin Snakes
Jun 15
// Alessandro Fillari
A lot's happened this year with the state of the MGS, and its creator's fate after the launch of MGSV. As Hideo Kojima's final Metal Gear, and this time it's for real, The Phantom Pain will be a very bittersweet title fo...

Sneak king: 14 hours of Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

Jun 09 // Steven Hansen
[embed]293558:58900:0[/embed] There is a reason I am excited about Snake's horse having a poop button and it is not only that I am a dumb idiot. While I never managed to confirm, I am sure that you can do something like strategically place poop so an enemy walks into it and stops, or maybe slips. Because things like that are what elevate Metal Gear Solid V above typical stealth and/or open-world titles. It's the idiosyncrasies, like calling in a supply drop from Mother Base right onto the head of a stationary guard, knocking them out. It's knowing winks like hiding in a PS4 cardboard box, or the ghost from PT being an item, or a spoken, in-universe tutorial where you're told fourth wall breaking things like "press X" while under extreme virtual duress. The opening segment, which has mostly been covered in diced up trailers, stuck with me in hindsight for how long it goes on with you controlling a crawling, limping Snake in the under siege, burning hospital. It's a while before you're given any power back (guns or even the ability to walk properly), which I appreciated. Kojima ratchets up the direness here, too, as loads of hospital patients get brutally murdered all around. The meat of Phantom Pain opens after this mix of spectacle and terror with a trip to dusty Afghanistan to save Miller that ends in a frightening [redacted]. This plays similarly to Ground Zeroes, of course, but with a horse and more scouting and enemy tagging to do. I wormed my way up to where Miller was captive, climbed up a crack in a building, and jumped from one roof to another to neatly sneak in. Carrying a less-limbed Miller out did get me plenty shot up, but a whistle for my buddy D Horse got both of us out of there quickly. Back on Mother Base, the structure becomes clear. There are main missions you must travel to (by helicopter to a nearby landing zone, or on horseback/by ground vehicle) and they are not all story heavy, though you're always treated to beginning and ending credits, as if each mission was a TV episode, just in case you forgot that this was directed by Hideo Kojima. One mission simply tasked me with rolling up on a compound and assassinating three Russian officers. I fulton'd them all -- attached balloons to them to send back to Mother Base -- against Miller's wishes instead, which proved wise as the officers had some high statistical aptitudes. These poached soldiers fill out your private army and get cool names like Blue Mastadon. Eventually you can scan them ahead of time to know which have high stats, or you can sometimes interrogate soldiers into informing you if an en elite operative is nearby (provided you've acquired a translator for your support team, as Snake's language skills are limited). [embed]293558:58893:0[/embed] It's a lot of contract work in addition to the narrative goal of stopping the Hamburglar-masked Skull Face and generally figuring out what the hell is going on with things. I was actually a bit surprised by how infrequently missions came with cutscenes or main story ties. Sometimes they open up three at a time and you can take them on in any order. You can also choose to repeat a mission at any time if you want to aim for a better performance ranking. I did this with a prisoner extraction mission I had previously finished, but barely. Turns out using the Phantom Cigar to speed up until nighttime, coupled with the night vision goggles, made that particular mission a five minute cakewalk. Going at it in the day led me to enough deaths that I was offered the Chicken Hat, which makes things easier and slows down enemy reaction time. Other dynamic weather events -- rain or sandstorms -- can also come into play, sometimes not at opportune moments. The low visibility caused by sandstorms helped me a few times, but also led me to walk right into an enemy soldier, once. There are also useful side missions that pop up for you take at your leisure, often en route to the next mission point. The Afghan desert is huge, but much of the terrain is empty or cordoned off by mountainous areas or steep cliff sides that encourage you to use the main roads. These roads are littered with enemy outposts, however, often with small platoons of three to four and a watch tower. Sneaking through them isn't too tough, because often you can take a longer loop around them, but they often house collectables (you can pinch a huge assortment of music from enemy tape players) and valuable resources that tie into the upgrade system. Oil, alloys, raw diamonds for straight cash, plants to upgrade the sleeping toxin in Snake's tranquilizers or the time-shifting Phantom Cigar -- you'll be scooping up all of it, though other means of acquisition open up when you can start sending squads out on missions. Plus, those posts are full of soldiers to abduct and, after you upgrade your Fulton balloons, things like heavy artillery to nick. [embed]293558:58895:0[/embed] Everything you Fulton, barring bad weather or bad luck with nighttime visibility, ends up back at Mother Base, which is large enough, especially once you get construction going, that you can actually take a helicopter to other parts of it. Or you can take a long, straight drive in a jeep. Going back to visit helps your troops' morale. They're also proud and happy to have you practice your close quarters combat on them at any time. During my lengthy hands-on, I never got to the point where my Mother Base came under attack, though that's supposed to be a big part of it, up to the point where you can consider nuclear capability as a defense. It's worth noting that 14 hours or so with Phantom Pain and I didn't feel close to finished. Back at Mother Base, I was still building an animal sanctuary (necessary to house all the wandering sheep and other creatures I kept bringing back) and trying to get an imprisoned, sun-bathing Quiet as a deployable buddy like D-Horse and Diamond Dog (the adorable wolf pup that grows into a super-scouting badass). She just sat in the cell, face down, top undone (got to watch those tan lines) listening to tunes from an eclectic, amusing soundtrack. Adorably, construction scaffolding on Mother Base is all stamped with a picture of a dog in a hardhat with a pick axe. It's the little things. Like changing my Diamond Dogs logo from a boring, stencil font "DD" to a cool ass octopus emblazoned with the words "VENOM WOMAN." You can even paint Mother Base if that Giants-orange is too much for you. I find a tasteful dark blue goes well with the sea. My favorite Mother Base quirk so far, though, is the giant shower Snake can jump into to come out feeling refreshed. It also washes off all the blood that accumulates on him while out on missions (if you end up getting shot, at least). [embed]293558:58891:0[/embed] While there are reasons to return home, you can manage a lot of Mother Base, like troop allocation and base development, while out in the field through the iDroid. It also acts as Snake's cassette player, useful for Codec-replacing heaps of exposition, which is just about the only place I heard Snake do much talking.  From the iDroid you can also develop new or better versions of weapons and items. There are upgraded critter traps, different abilities for Snake's robot arm, enhancements to the binocular scanner, extra Fulton balloons to heft heavier weight. I mostly played with a stealthy approach so I didn't dabble much with the vast assortment of snipers, machine guns, or rocket launchers you can call in. Nor did I ever run up on a lack of funds that would prevent re-supply drops of my own essential Fulton balloons and tranq darts, but the fact that you have to call in and then get to the supply drops means that the feature rarely made things too simple. Especially because missions often end up in close quarters or indoors where a supply drop would be useless anyways. I was impressed by how naturally set piece sort of areas exist in Metal Gear Solid V's world. There are long tracts of dusty road, vast open desert, but suddenly you stumble upon an enormous, imposing compound. In the case of one early mission, it was an Uncharted-style winding, honeycomb-esque historical labyrinth, which you get to by creeping through an excavation camp. There are mission areas that would feel like obvious "levels" elsewhere, but here they mesh cleanly with the open world. Just starting or ending a mission (the latter, usually by reaching a helicopter and flying out in real time) is seamless and the day/night cycle persists in cutscenes. I did hit one snag with this open-world structure, though. When you start a mission (or side-mission), you're then restricted to a "mission area." Leaving it ends the mission. I only ever noticed after one challenging mission that ended with [redacted] and [redacted] coming up on [redacted] and holy hell [redacted] -- anyway, towards the end I tried to hightail it on my horse, but I ended running clean through the mission area and having to start from way, way back. It wanted me to sneak to a nearby chopper extraction point instead of just racing to safety and calling one in. This is, incidentally, when I noted the cutscene and subsequent segment I originally did at night now took place during the day. [embed]293558:58892:0[/embed] Phantom Pain feels like the freshest, most distinct use of an open world since Far Cry 2 and it does this without sacrificing the cozier feeling of the series' past level design. While I can't say anything about the story, I don't actually know much at this point, either, besides various "holy shit" moments that have only raised questions. It's appropriate, then, that this Sutherland-voiced Snake speaks sparingly. He always seems sad and a little bit confused, retreating into the rote, work-like task of soldier stuff hoisted upon him by Ocelot and Miller, who seem to be a bit at odds with each other as well.  While Ground Zeroes' sadistic storytelling might raise concerns over how this extra grim tale will play out (Snake is basically a devil what with the horns, the intro is pure brutality before giving way to surreal insanity, there's still a whole thing about child soldiers at some point), I've come away nothing but impressed with Phantom Pain. I don't miss codecs, I don't miss Hayter. I've embraced the open world, I love the tangible Mother Base. And I feel like I've only scratched the surface. There's so much more to do. I've barely used the cardboard box -- you can leap out the sides or hang out in delivery zones and actually have enemies unwittingly pick you up and drive you into outposts. I haven't used to inflatable decoy to bop someone off a cliff. In a world of blockbuster clones and genre convention, Metal Gear Solid V manages to feel fresh. I can't wait to get someone to slip on my horse poop.
First hands-on! photo
First hands-on with Metal Gear Solid V
Trailers from as far back as two years ago offer evidence enough, though. Do you all remember the giant, on-fire man supplanted in malevolence seconds later by the even more giant, on-fire whale careening through the sky to ...

Sweet photo
Sweet

Venom Snake red limited PlayStation 4 console coming to Europe


Previously Asia exclusive
Jun 09
// Steven Hansen
If you missed my (spoiler-free) hands-on preview with the first 14 hours of Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, go read that here. If you are in Europe, you may be pleased to know that the previously Asia-exclusive deep red...
Metal Gear Solid V photo
Metal Gear Solid V

The Phantom Pain's official guide sounds slick


The hardcover edition has an art gallery
Jun 08
// Jordan Devore
The folks who created guides for the Metal Gear Solid series and Revengeance are working on the official guide book for Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. It'll cover every mission, secret, and collectible, as well as the ...
PS Plus for June photo
PS Plus for June

PlayStation Plus scores Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes next week


A Hideo Kojima Game
May 27
// Jordan Devore
Fair amount of PS4 love from PlayStation Plus next month including, hell yes, the turn-based strategy title Skulls of the Shogun. But folks who held out on Ground Zeroes are in for the best treat of all. It'll be nice to have...
Mobile Gear Solid photo
Mobile Gear Solid

Konami proves mobile is the future of gaming with Metal Gear Solid V iOS port


Apple Watch version under consideration
May 18
// CJ Andriessen
Last week, Konami announced its intention to focus on mobile gaming going forward, saying the platform is the future of the industry. This morning the company proved that even the most complicated console game can feel righ...
A poem for Kojima photo
A poem for Kojima

Movable Breasts: A poem for Hideo Kojima


I hope he likes it
May 12
// Jed Whitaker
I was inspired to write a poem for the father of Metal Gear Solid, after reading our very own Kyle MacGregor's A Gardevoir for all Seasons poem. I tried to make it about something he likes: movable breasts.  Kojima, senpai, won't you love me too?
Fondle your toys photo
Fondle your toys

Soft, movable boobs are on Metal Gear Solid V's Quiet action figure


Certainly doesn't make me soft
May 11
// Jed Whitaker
Hideo Kojima revealed an action figure for Quiet, a character from the upcoming Metal Gear Solid V, that has soft pushable boobs. The boobs can be squished together...on a toy. This was the man who was going to make Silent Hills. I don't even know anymore. Boobies.
Music photo
Music

Silky smooth Game Music Lullabies Volume II out now


Featuring Final Fantasy, Majora's Mask, and more
Apr 28
// Jordan Devore
[Disclosure: Jayson Napolitano, the producer of Game Music Lullabies Volume II, previously wrote for Destructoid. As always, no relationships, personal or professional, were factored into this news post.] It seems like I was...
Metal Gear Rex photo
Metal Gear Rex

This new Metal Gear Rex statue is like, whoa


$230 is a lot, but I've seen worse
Apr 22
// Chris Carter
World of 3A previously released a giant Metal Gear Rex figure out into the world, but the people have spoken -- they want something a little more bite-sized to put on their desk. Lo and behold, the "Half-Sized Edition" is now...
MGO photo
MGO

Metal Gear Online: 16 players on PC/PS4/Xbox One, 12 players on PS3/360


Player counts detailed
Apr 21
// Steven Hansen
Konami's Japanese Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain website has detailed the player count for The Phantom Pain's online component, Metal Gear Online. The PC, PS4, and Xbox One versions of Metal Gear Online will support up...
Metal Alan Grier photo
Metal Alan Grier

Square Enix comes up with two new Metal Gear Solid V Venom Snake dolls


Metal Alan Grier
Apr 07
// Steven Hansen
Square Enix has two new Play Arts Kai Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes Venom Snake dolls for all you collectors out there, one of which is exclusive to Amazon Japan. The difference in the two is the camo. The "Splitter" mode...
Metal Gear photo
Metal Gear

Metal Gear movie gets new screenwriter


Yes, that's still happening
Mar 31
// Laura Kate Dale
So, do you remember that Metal Gear Solid movie that got announced back in 2012? Well, it's apparently still happening despite the relative silence on the project and all the recent rumblings with Kojima. Sony Pictures have r...
Metal Gear lore photo
Metal Gear lore

Brush up on all of Metal Gear's history before MGSV: The Phantom Pain comes out


It's what Kojima would've wanted
Mar 27
// Brett Makedonski
Whether you're a complete newcomer to Metal Gear or a seasoned vet just shooting to glaze over a few things that you probably already know, it's not a bad idea to take a look at this top-secret document. Okay, it doesn't...
MGS V photo
The Buffalo Bills are the best team in the NFL
Earlier this week, rumors of Hideo Kojima leaving both Konami and the Metal Gear series surfaced, thanks to a report from GameSpot. Not to be undone by excellent reporting from The 2nd Street Jerks (The 2nd Street Jerks is a...

Metal Gear photo
Metal Gear

Konami working on a new, likely Kojima-free Metal Gear


'Even if the Metal Gear franchise continues, to me, this is the last Metal Gear'
Mar 20
// Steven Hansen
Konami's website has the first indications of Metal Gear Solid continuing without series creator Hideo Kojima. This note from Konami confirms Kojima will "remain involved throughout" Metal Gear Solid: The Phantom Pain's Septe...
Konami drama photo
What the hell?
"After we finish [Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain], Mr. Kojima and upper management will leave Konami," a source within Kojima Productions told GameSpot today amidst speculation that some real crazy shit is happening at ...

MGSV data transfer photo
MGSV data transfer

More details on transferring data between MGSV: Ground Zeroes and The Phantom Pain


You're a legend in the eyes of those that live on the battlefield
Mar 16
// Jason Faulkner
Konami has released a bit more info on what will be involved in transferring data from Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes to Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. Unfortunately, you can't use data from any version of Ground Zeroes for any version of The Phantom Pain. However, Konami made a handy chart to help us out.

Holy hindsight! Five series that should have been on Wii

Mar 10 // Tony Ponce
In a 2009 interview with Kotaku's Stephen Totilo, Nintendo of America President Reggie Fils-Aime expressed frustration regarding why the biggest third-party titles were skipping Wii: "I've had this conversation with every publisher who makes content that is not available on my platform. The conversation goes like this: 'We have a 22-million unit installed base. We have a very diverse audience... We have active gamers that hunger for this type of content. And why isn't it available?'" The unfortunate reason was that, prior to Wii's launch, most publishers didn't have faith in Nintendo's unconventional strategy, especially coming off of GameCube's lukewarm performance. By the time they realized that Wii mania was real, they were too entrenched in HD development to easily shift gears. When support did come, it was in the form of minigame collections and low-priority efforts farmed out to C-team studios, most of which seemed to target the stereotypical "casual" gamer while ignoring the rest of the audience. The Wii wasn't conceived as a "casual machine," but rather a low-risk development option that could ideally satisfy everyone -- with a focus on videogame newbies, true, but not an exclusive focus. From the beginning, there was enormous interest among the enthusiast crowd for more substantial software, but as the years slipped away and their needs weren't met, they simply turned their attention elsewhere. There were sporadic attempts to appeal to enthusiasts, though most typically fell into the mid-tier category -- the types of games that, on a well-served platform, would help round out the library. But without headliners to attract an audience in the first place, the MadWorlds and Little King's Storys of the world were stuck playing an empty venue. It's clear that the Wii was no powerhouse and wouldn't have been able to realize many of the eventual HD hits in a satisfactory fashion. However, you can't tell me that publishers weren't sitting on golden preexisting properties that could have easily been adapted to the hardware -- properties that had a near guaranteed chance of finding success, which would in turn have led to a greater influx of auxiliary Wii software and a healthier third-party ecosystem overall. Just to name a few examples... Kingdom Hearts Remember the rumors years ago that Kingdom Hearts III on Wii might be happening? A series whose chief draw is allowing you to visit famous Disney worlds and battle alongside famous Disney heroes seemed like the obvious choice for a Nintendo platform, where family-friendly entertainment is the order of the day. Square Enix thought so too, just not in the manner we had hoped. Following Kingdom Hearts II in 2005, numerous word-building side stories and interquels were released on portables, with the bulk appearing on Nintendo machines. One in particular, Dream Drop Distance for 3DS, was even billed as a lead-in to the eventual Kingdom Hearts III. Meanwhile, the series was completely absent on home consoles. This would have been a perfect opportunity for Square Enix to port KHI and II onto Wii in their "Final Mix" forms. That way, those who followed the series on PS2 would be able to transition smoothly, while others with little exposure to the games would have the perfect entry point. And with all these returning and newly minted fans on Wii, maybe the PSP-exclusive Birth By Sleep would have had another platform on which to score sales, which were otherwise soft in Western territories. Metal Gear When Super Smash Bros. Melee was brought out West, it introduced players to Marth and Roy, two unknown characters from a Japan-exclusive franchise called Fire Emblem. The warm reception these fresh faces received gave Nintendo the incentive to start localizing future installments in the tactical RPG saga. I had hoped that Solid Snake's appearance in Super Smash Bros. Brawl would have led to a similar decision regarding Metal Gear, but no dice. Why was Snake in Brawl to begin with? Definitely not because of his rich history on Nintendo platforms -- Metal Gear did more for PlayStation than it ever did for NES. No, it's because Hideo Kojima practically begged Masahiro Sakurai to put him in. Regardless of how the arrangement came about, Snake was a welcome addition to the Smash roster, quickly rising to the top of many players' lists of favorite fighters. A smart publisher would have tried to capitalize on that kind of exposure. Konami could have tested the waters with a Wii reprint of The Twin Snakes, which had become quite rare in its original GameCube format. Follow that up with with MGS2 and 3 ports, possibly an up-port of Peace Walker as well. MGS4 was never going to come over for obvious reasons, but hey, 360 didn't get it either, and Xbox and Metal Gear are good buddies these days. Instead, the only Metal Gear to appear on a Nintendo platform post-Brawl was Snake Eater 3D, which was made redundant a few months later with the release of HD Collection on Vita. One of the most popular characters in Nintendo's all-star roundup wound up being nothing more than advertisement for competing platforms, even though he didn't have to be. Street Fighter Did you know, if we disregard the combined-SKU Resident Evil 5, that the original Street Fighter II for Super Nintendo is the single best-selling game in Capcom's history at 6.3 million copies? It also happens to be the best-selling third-party game in the SNES library -- and that's before we even factor in the various updates! Among Wii owners were a fair number of lapsed gamers -- people who may have gamed in the arcades or on an NES or SNES back in the day but have since lost interest. I guarantee a significant cross section of that group were former SFII players itching for a proper follow-up. And since the goal of the Street Fighter IV project was to make the series accessible again to the widest possible audience, it would have behooved Capcom to include in its multi-platform plans the console built entirely around the concept of accessibility. You can't tell me that SFIV was dependent on high-end hardware -- it was designed to be a traditional 2D fighter with 3D window dressing. The fact that a spot-on port was later developed for 3DS, with static backgrounds as the sole concession, should be all the proof that a Wii version could have looked and played just fine. If you want to argue that SFIV was ill-suited to Wii because the Wii Remote was an inappropriate fighting game controller, I think you're overestimating the general game-playing public's need for the "perfect gaming controller." Besides, anyone who desired a more traditional pad would have made the effort to buy one -- such as with Tatsunoko vs. Capcom. Speaking of TvC, there's a game that strikes a fine balance between technical skill and accessibility. Although I appreciate the effort it took to localize such a licensing nightmare, that seahorse in the logo was the kiss of death -- only hardcore anime aficionados had the slightest inkling who these strange new characters were. It's odd that Capcom would invest in TvC yet couldn't be bothered to hammer out an adequate SFIV port, which would have had a significantly larger shot at finding a receptive audience on Wii. Persona Atlus has enjoyed a wonderful working relationship with Nintendo since the former's founding in 1986, and that relationship thrives to this day. In fact, over the past generation, the bulk of Atlus' in-house productions have found an exclusive home on Nintendo platforms, including new IPs like Etrian Odyssey, Trauma Center, and Radiant Historia. Of important note is how Atlus has gradually been shifting the entire Megami Tensei franchise back into the Nintendo camp, beginning with Devil Survivor on DS and culminating with Shin Megami Tensei IV on 3DS. One particular MegaTen sub-series, however, has remained with Sony: Persona. It's apparent that Atlus was reluctant to jump into HD development right away. Releasing Persona 3 as a late-gen PlayStation 2 title was one thing, but sticking to PS2 for Persona 4 as well? That earned the company quite a few stares. But if Atlus was insistent on squeezing out every last ounce from legacy hardware, why not prep those Personas for simultaneous release on the low-spec Wii as well? Atlus already had a Wii development pipeline in place, so the financial risk would have been extremely minimal. Wii versions could have only added to those games' success. The series has finally come to Nintendo in the form of Persona Q on 3DS, although the game's main selling point -- the crossover of P3 and P4 characters -- would feel more appropriate had those two titles actually appeared on a Nintendo platform prior. Grand Theft Auto "Nintendo has done all it can to persuade Take-Two Interactive Software to bring the Grand Theft Auto franchise to Nintendo consoles, and it is now up to the third-party publisher to decide whether Rockstar Games' immensely popular series will appear on Wii." Reggie Fils-Aime shared this nugget in December 2006, shortly after the Wii's launch, to let the world know that Nintendo desired the violent crime series on its hardware (those Game Boy Color and Advance titles don't count). Sadly, Take-Two didn't seem to want to play ball and even laughed at the notion just one year later, when then-executive chairman Strauss Zelnick asserted, "[T]here are other titles better suited to the Wii than Grand Theft Auto." Nonetheless, talks continued, and Take-Two and Rockstar Games eventually decided to give Nintendo a shot... with a DS game. That's not what fans were asking for, but baby steps, we figured. Take-Two CEO Ben Feder did state that Grand Theft Auto: Chinatown Wars was an important step in the company's relations with Nintendo and suggested that this new title could pave the way for future developments. The rest is sick, sad history. Chinatown Wars earned rave reviews, becoming the highest-ranked DS title on Metacritic, yet sold just under 90,000 copies in the US in its launch month. Not willing to take any chances, Rockstar quickly announced PSP and mobile ports. Mature games were reaffirmed as poison on DS, and all hopes of another GTA on a Nintendo platform vanished. Let's try to understand why Chinatown Wars failed. First, GTA is not a handheld series. Some brands are simply better suited to home consoles than handhelds or vice versa -- Monster Hunter, for instance. Yeah, both Liberty City Stories and Vice City Stories on PSP were million sellers, but those sales were a drop in the bucket compared to what the console installments regularly pull in. Those were ported to PS2 months later too, so it's not like Rockstar had full confidence in them either. Still, both LCS and VCS sold much better than Chinatown Wars, which brings me to my second point: GTA only became a phenomenon with GTAIII and the leap into the third dimension. Taking the series back to its top-down roots was never going to appeal to all the same people who fell in love with the real-world atmosphere and fully voiced and acted cutscenes, no matter what kind of review scores it earned. Need further proof? Although you can find copious news bites around the web lamenting the poor sales of Chinatown Wars on DS, you'd be hard-pressed to find any mention of sales of the PSP port. It's safe to surmise that it tanked even worse than on DS, because Take-Two would have said something otherwise. The mobile ports likely outsold those two combined, though it's difficult to draw a solid conclusion there when sales were aided by rock-bottom mobile pricing. Grand Theft Auto: Chinatown Wars was the wrong game for the wrong platform. From day one, Rockstar should have been working on a Wii game in the desired 3D style as Nintendo had originally intended. It would have been more expensive to produce, though I doubt anywhere in the range of GTAIV's $100 million price tag. If Rockstar didn't want to take that gamble, it could have assembled a PS2 trilogy collection, or ported the PSP games, or anything! We're talking about the biggest home console of all time, after all! If you still doubt the viability of GTA on Wii, consider Call of Duty: World at War, which sold over a million copies on Wii. Big deal, you figure, since sales of the PS3 and 360 versions vastly outstripped it. But also consider that Activision has repeatedly withheld information regarding the Wii versions of Call of Duty installments up to and sometimes even after release, limiting awareness to those who had prior knowledge or had seen one of the rare TV commercials. Somehow, the game still broke a million -- can you imagine how much better it could have performed had Activision given it exposure comparable to the HD builds? How could Take-Two wholeheartedly say, during a period when Wii was selling faster than any other home console before or since, that the audience wasn't there? Grand Theft Auto is one of the biggest gaming brands of all time! Its most recent entry has shipped 45 million units across all platforms! Its consumer base includes every type of gamer, from kids to adults, from the hardest of the hardcore to those whose only other gaming purchase in a year is the latest Madden! If Take-Two honestly believed that there was little to no chance of success in adapting Grand Theft Auto to Wii, it means that either its marketing department is completely clueless as to what makes GTA so appealing, thereby attributing each record-breaking achievement to blind luck, or everyone in management simply didn't give a shit. As you can see, I'm not suggesting that publishers should have thrown millions at unproven concepts. All it would have taken to get the ball rolling was some low-risk ports based on established, popular brands. Even if some of these franchises wound up not resonating with the Wii audience, most are powerful enough that they would have been accepted without question. Had key third-party tentpoles been established and found success on Wii early on, smaller studios would have felt comfortable in producing Wii content. Instead of the sudden decline as casual players lost interest, Wii could have maintained a steady momentum by serving the enthusiast crowd low-tech yet feature-rich software, in turn extending its life. By the time Nintendo introduced a follow-up console, publishers would have been far more willing to offer support than they wound up being with Wii U. Though we can only speculate precisely how such a movement would have affected Wii and the industry overall, it could only have been a net positive -- for Nintendo as well as third parties that struggled to stay in the black or simply wanted to grow their consumer base. You can blame Nintendo for certain Wii shortcomings, but third parties are at fault for letting painfully obvious opportunities slip through the canyon-sized cracks.
Wii got shafted photo
Third parties missed some major opportunities
By the end of 2014, Xbox 360 had slid past Wii to become the best-selling seventh generation console in the US. While a fantastic achievement for Microsoft, this event also punctuates the drastic shift in Nintendo's market do...

Metal Gear Solid photo
Metal Gear Solid

That Metal Gear Online trailer is still so dang good


Now with commentary
Mar 04
// Jordan Devore
Steven covered this well-edited footage of Metal Gear Online in December, but here it is again with commentary by online community manager Robert Peeler. Yep, that's good enough for me. The balloon-firing trap shown at 1:54 is the stuff of dreams. Same goes for the enchanting plush puppy. (At one point it was going to be a "real" dog, but the designers didn't want us to shoot that.)

Metal Gear Solid V launch details confirmed, Collector's Edition unveiled

Mar 04 // Chris Carter
“Day 1 Edition” Content (Physical Version*) MAP DLC items Adam-ska Special Handgun Personal Ballistic Shield (Silver) Cardboard Box (Wetland) Fatigues (Blue Urban Snake Costume) METAL GEAR ONLINE XP BOOST *Digital Version contents to be announced at a future time **Steam version will include the above DLC content at launch Collector’s Edition Content (Physical Version Only): Half Scale Replica of Snake’s Bionic Arm Collectible SteelBook Behind the Scenes Documentary & Trailers Blu-ray Disc MAP Exclusive Packaging DLC items WEAPON & SHIELD PACK Windurger S333 Combat Special Revolver Adam-ska Special Handgun Maschinen Taktische Pistole 5 Weiss Special Handgun Rasp Short-Barreled Shotgun Gold Personal Ballistic Shield (Olive Drab) Personal Ballistic Shield (Silver) Personal Ballistic Shield (White) Personal Ballistic Shield (Gold) CARDBOARD BOXES Cardboard Box (Rocky Terrain) Cardboard Box (All-Purpose Dryland) Cardboard Box (Wetland) SNAKE COSTUMES Fatigues (Black Ocelot) Fatigues (Gray Urban) Fatigues (Blue Urban) Fatigues (All-Purpose Dryland) Other "VENOM SNAKE" Emblem MGO BOOST METAL GEAR ONLINE XP BOOST MGO Items Metal Gear Rex Helmet AM MRS-4 GOLD Assault Rifle WU S. PISTOL GOLD
MGS V launch details photo
Bonus bionic arm and MGO XP boost
After a leak involving the release date for Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, Konami has confirmed the date this morning -- September 1, 2015 (September 15 for Steam), with a few other details in tow. Metal Gear Onli...

MGS V photo
MGS V

Let's take September off to play Metal Gear Solid V


Releasing worldwide September 1, 2015
Mar 03
// Jordan Devore
Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain will release worldwide on September 1, 2015. The news is attached to an IGN video that was supposed to go up tomorrow, but NeoGAF found a working URL for the it earlier today. NeoGAF sees ...
Butts photo
Butts

Laura's Gaming Butts: Metal Rear Solid


Yep, let's look at Metal Gear's Butts
Feb 10
// Laura Kate Dale
Hello all and welcome to Laura's Gaming Butts, Destructoid's new weekly YouTube show about butts in videogames.  Yep, it's a video podcast where I get guests in to talk about butts. Professional journalism at its finest...
What a thrill photo
What a thrill
I noticed the creepy janitor in Life is Strange slowly climbing up the ladder and thought, "Ah, I see, an organic, in-world time limit." Nick Robinson thought of Metal Gear Solid 3, which is always the better thought.  

Metal Gear Rising 2 photo
Metal Gear Rising 2

Geoff Keighley says Metal Gear Rising 2 rumor 'is not true'


'Slice that rumor'
Feb 01
// Jonathan Holmes
Notorious videogame journalizer and all around nice fella Geoff Keighley just tweeted a tweet that's sure to put a frown on the face of many Metal Gear fans. Keighley has reportedly spoken to Ken Imaizumi of Kojima Production...
Ground Zeroes photo
Ground Zeroes

Already done everything in Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes? Try rolling everywhere


'PRolling'
Jan 28
// Brett Makedonski
Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes is a short game. After you have a good feel for what you're doing, you can run it over and over, experimenting all the way. Eventually, you'll know it like the back of your hand (assumi...
Ground Zeroes FPS mod photo
Ground Zeroes FPS mod

Metal Gear modders put Ground Zeroes in first-person


Not as cool as people birds, but still cool
Jan 12
// Steven Hansen
Almost disappointed I have Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes on PS4, where it was recently like $6, rather than on PC, where people have been modding all sorts of zany crap into it. The above first-person mod is low on ...

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