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Rock Band 4 photo
Rock Band 4

The Rock Band 4 disc will cost $20 extra on Xbox One


All due to wireless protocol
Aug 24
// Brett Makedonski
Those who plan to play Rock Band 4 on Xbox One with their instruments from Xbox 360 will have to pay a bit for the privilege. As it turns out, the standalone Rock Band 4 disc will cost $80 instead of $60. That price...
Rock Band 4 photo
Rock Band 4

Rock Band 4's latest big addition is Van Halen


PANAMA! PAN-A-MAH-HUH!
Aug 17
// Brett Makedonski
Not recognizing a majority of music in games has been a running theme this year. Guitar Hero Live largely falls victim to this. Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 5 definitely does. Fortunately, Rock Band 4 does not. Harm...
Rock Band 4 photo
Rock Band 4

Rock Band 4 pre-orders are up, and the bundle will cost a pretty penny


And 24,998 more pretty pennies
Jun 15
// Brett Makedonski
Harmonix's Rock Band was a significant investment last generation. The barrier to entry for a proper full band experience meant buying a drum set, two guitars (if you didn't have any from Guitar Hero) a microphone, and t...

Rock Band 4 is doing a new fun thing you wouldn't expect

Jun 15 // Brett Makedonski
Between those dueling stages was an innocuous, decidedly less interesting room. But, what it lacked in flair, it made up for in substance. Some posted up nearby talking Filipino politics, but those who ventured inside found the biggest change to Rock Band in years. Guitar solos aren't what they used to be. Trepidation was abound. Shredding in Rock Band is such a staple. Now it's different. Accuracy has been replaced with creativity. I couldn't help but think that's a musician's move right there. I also couldn't help but be a little dejected that there's less skill involved with the instrument that I spent the most time trying to perfect. Down the hall, Pearl Jam's "Alive" started playing, and Eric Pope couldn't hide his disdain. I thought about firing it up to figure out how these new solos worked. I refrained and chose "Cult of Personality." In everyone else's hands, this is a plastic guitar; in my hands, it's a pipebomb. Things didn't pan out quite as I wanted. Rather than rhythmically dissecting the song until the solo hit, I was met with five minutes of solo. That's a dev mode thing -- perks of the preview event. I guess that's adequate time to figure out the ins and outs of the new format. I was mostly right, but not entirely. [embed]293727:59016:0[/embed] A small group had formed after a few minutes. Someone made a comment about the five buttons on a Rock Band guitar. The timing couldn't have been more perfect. A Harmonix representative sprung into action to correct the misstatement and pitch the Freestyle Solos -- a system that reminded everyone there are ten buttons on these axes. Intricate notes have been left by the wayside for colorful patterns. Blue means to play in first position (normal notes); orange indicates you need to slide up the neck and play on those five forgotten-about buttons. An algorithm decides exactly what gets played, whether it be sustains, eighth notes, sixteenth notes, or just wildly tapping without any strumming. One of the patterns mandates you just play anything. Make noise, anything works. While it sounds somewhat insane, it mostly works. The solos come together in a way that's satisfying -- as if you were actually playing the solo. However, substituting that for nailing a classic solo isn't a trade-off that I necessarily appreciated. It just feels like maybe it's a bit too easy now. That's not the only concern. Harmonix has made a point of framing Rock Band 4 as a party game that anyone can pick up and play. But, I saw many of my peers struggling to integrate the solos into the gameplay they already knew. When I asked the devs how long they expected it'd take for casual players to grasp Freestyle Solos, they thought it'd go pretty quick. I estimate it'll take slightly longer than very casual players want to commit. In that event, the mode can be turned off, which seems like a less than optimal solution. For those who have the patience to learn it but aren't dedicated enough to excel at the old solos, Freestyle may be a fine compromise. Wailing on those solos makes you feel really good even when you're performing a relatively simple task. It makes for a nice little illusion for anyone who doesn't want to look past it. 
Rock Band preview photo
'Play Freestyle!'
Everywhere I looked, my peers seemed to be having fun. Mere minutes before, everyone couldn't stop talking about how cold that Santa Monica rooftop was. It was the opposite of fun. Now, that had melted away, a distant memory ...


Rock Band 4 details photo
Rock Band 4 details

Rock Band 4 wants players to 'color outside the lines'


Improvisational vocals and more
May 05
// Darren Nakamura
IGN has the hot scoop on Rock Band 4 these days, having taken a trip to the Harmonix office to cover the upcoming music game. While it has exclusive gameplay footage going up later this week, the site posted some details yest...
Mad Catz photo
Mad Catz

The next round of Mad Catz FightPads are coming with Street Fighter V


Wait until then
May 04
// Chris Carter
While arcade sticks are generally the preferred way to go for a lot of fighting game fans, there are a lot of people out there who like to play on pads. Mad Catz has done well by those enthusiasts for some time now, with its ...
Rock Band 4 photo
Rock Band 4

Tell Harmonix to put the entirety of '...Like Clockwork' in Rock Band 4


Really, just urge them to include the QOTSA discography
Mar 06
// Brittany Vincent
Looking forward to Rock Band 4 just as much as I am? You're probably wondering how the upcoming roster is going to look. Me too. In fact, I'm pretty concerned. I dropped a pretty penny on hundreds of songs, with 70% of them i...

Rock Band 4 is coming, and it's bringing the party back

Mar 05 // Brett Makedonski
While it's important to look forward, fans also can't help but look back. After all, there are some pretty hefty investments there -- both with regard to instrument peripherals and downloadable tracks. Harmonix acknowledges this and is doing its best to make sure that there's continuity across the Rock Band brand, even if it has jumped to new consoles. With regard to instruments, Sussman says that the team's doing its best to ensure that legacy peripherals will be compatible with Rock Band 4. He couldn't definitively say that it'd happen, but Harmonix is working with Sony and Microsoft to try to work something out. Sussman said that he was confident in the chances those conversations would yield positive results. The other big concern, previously purchased downloadable songs, has an even better outlook. Harmonix is tackling the engineering issue, something that Sony and Microsoft are fully supporting. The only problem is that it'll require a lot of man-hours to essentially recreate every song in the library. It's going to eventually happen, but Harmonix can't say how long it'll take to get there. But, players definitely aren't going to be required to buy tracks a second time or anything in that vein. Of course, alongside Rock Band 4's release will be a set of brand new instruments manufactured by Mad Catz. However, that's not the extent of its involvement. Mad Catz is cooperatively publishing the game with Harmonix. This'll likely mark the largest software publishing deal in Mad Catz's history. [embed]288538:57603:0[/embed] Despite Mad Catz's involvement, Rock Band 4 won't release with a flurry of optional equipment like Rock Band 3 did. Because Harmonix is putting focus on the social aspect, it's mostly doing away with Pro mode. Drums will still be supported because the base instrument is all that's needed. Gone are Pro Guitar and Pro Bass. Also nixed are all forms of keyboard. Sussman said that through data collection, Harmonix saw that keys were played a very small percentage of the time relative to other instruments. Although this is the first time in a half-decade that Rock Band's making a return, there's also the well-founded rumor that Guitar Hero will throw its hat back into the ring this year. When asked if the studio was at all disappointed that it'd face immediate competition, Sussman seemed upbeat about Rock Band 4's chances against Activision's property. "We're focused on things we can control. However, I think our pedigree speaks for itself," he said. He's right; Harmonix has a history that's rooted in quality. However, maybe none of that really matters if the general audience just isn't ready to go back to Rock Band. When we pressed Sussman about the idea that most people from his audience seven years ago are likely in very different places in life now, he was unflinching. "While I realize that people move on, a love for music is all that's needed for Rock Band to be appealing to you. That's something that no one grows out of," he commented. Again, Sussman's right. Even if Harmonix stayed mum on a lot about Rock Band 4, it tipped its hand on what might be the most important facet: the game's tone. Rock Band 4 is all about the unique social experience that comes from playing music together. It wants to be a party, a constant source of good times. Basically, Harmonix is doing everything it can to make sure you want to get the band back together.
Rock Band 4 photo
Releasing in 2015, coming to PS4 and Xbox One
Five years after the latest installment in the seminal music/rhythm franchise, Harmonix is going on a proverbial reunion tour. Rock Band 4 is in development for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, and it's currently scheduled fo...

Mad Catz photo
Mad Catz

Mad Catz' new controller looks like a Michael Bay Decepticon


And it's as expensive as one too
Jan 06
// Jordan Devore
I can't look away from Mad Catz' new controller for Android devices and PC. I just can't. The L.Y.N.X. 9 is meant to "offer a premium [see: $299.99; yes, really] gaming experience in almost any situation," though it's primari...
Farming Sim controller photo
Farming Sim controller

So, Mad Catz is making a controller for Farming Simulator


Might as well quit your job as a farmer and do this instead
Dec 16
// Jordan Devore
Peripheral maker Mad Catz and Farming Simulator developer Giants Software are working on a range of Saitek-branded hardware for the PC simulation game we can't seem to stop talking about. The controller, which is planned for ...
Mad Catz photo
Mad Catz

Mad Catz reveals three new Xbox One headsets


Options are great
Jun 09
// Chris Carter
Mad Catz has announced three new headsets as part of the Tritton audio brand, and all of them are Xbox One joints. First off is the Tritton Kunai headset, which is designed for comfort as a middle of the line option. Next up ...
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Mad Catz new Ultra Street Fighter IV stick has a PS3/PS4 toggle


PlayStation 4 release coming?
Jun 05
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Ultra Street Fighter IV is now out, which means a brand new fight stick was also released by Mad Catz. Well in Japan at least. Interestingly, the PlayStation 3 version has a PlayStation 4 toggle, so you can use the stick on S...
Ouya photo
Ouya

Mad Catz officially announces partnership with Ouya


Uh, what?
Mar 06
// Chris Carter
Remember when we told you that you soon wouldn't need an Ouya to play Ouya games? Well it appears as if the first stop is Mad Catz, since they have just announced a partnership that allows Ouya titles to appear on their more ...
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Mad Catz' Killer Instinct TE 2 fightstick is $200


Pre-orders now open
Oct 11
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The Mad Catz Killer Instinct TE 2 fightstick pre-orders are now open. It's going to run you $199.99, and will be available on the Xbox One's launch day, November 22, 2013.  The fight stick features Japanese-style Sanwa j...
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Mad Catz's Mojo Android console launches Dec 10, for $249


Android console preorders up now
Oct 08
// Dale North
Mojo, Mad Catz's little Android console for your living room, is set to hit shelves on December 10. They announced today that it will be priced at a yikes-faced $249.99 in USA, and for 249.99 Euro in Europe.  Mad Catz an...

Review: Damage Inc.: Pacific Squadron WWII

Aug 29 // Ian Bonds
[embed]233645:44865[/embed] Damage Inc.: Pacific Squadron WWII (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: Trickster GamesPublisher: Mad Catz InteractiveReleased: August 28, 2012 MSRP: $49.99 The game starts out innocently enough: choose Arcade or Simulation mode, and jump in. But almost immediately, it falls apart. If you choose Arcade mode, your view is behind the plane, and that's the only option given. Simulation allows for external, nose, and in-cockpit views, but you must select which version you want when you begin the game. There is no in-game button to toggle through camera views; if it turns out the one you've selected isn't to your liking, you must pause the game and change it in the options menu. A minor quibble to be sure, but one that begins a slew of issues with this title. Obviously Simulation and Arcade controls vary, but beyond that, there's not much difference between the two modes, other than a few buttons changed around and how the planes pitch and yaw, as well as the aforementioned camera handicap. Just be careful when changing cameras in the options menu -- if you're playing Simulation with external camera view, be careful not to select Arcade with external camera view, as that has totally different controls. After the necessary tutorial, the game drops you directly into a combat mission with Japan's first attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, and missions proceed historically through 1945 along the Pacific coast. It is here that the game's real issues become apparent. Firstly, and I can't say this in a nice enough way, the game is just ugly. While a certain amount of love and detail has been given to the 32 unique planes, everything else is sloppy and uninspiring. Frame-rate issues pop up frequently, and everything becomes jaggy and muddied, while the graphics become choppy trying to catch up to your hot dodging maneuvers. Speaking of your maneuvers, for a simulation game, you certainly do a lot of barrel rolls. As you attack enemy aircraft, you'll tuck, roll, skim the water, buzz towers ... all in the name of taking out your foes. Both your enemies and friendly airplanes show up on your mini map with appropriately colored icons, and you'll target baddies with relative ease -- until you realize you're supposed to aim for the red dot in front of the enemy ship rather than the ship itself. This is to lead the plane, anticipating its flight path into your line of fire, but when the plane is directly in front of you flying straight, aiming for a red reticule above the plane seems a bit stupid, and serves as the reason why you're flying like you're in a damn air show rather than fighting during D-Day. Hitting the reticules can be a chore, until you realize that the game equips you with a bullet time of sorts. Warspeed allows you to slow everything down so you can carefully aim your shot, which makes taking out foes a bit too easy. This, as well as a speed booster, are always available and replenish instantly, despite having two essentially unnecessary meters showing how much of each you have in your HUD. There are waypoint markers that show up occasionally on your map as well, signifying where you should go to activate the next part of the mission, fly over to take recon, or things like that. However, when you really need the markers, such as when the game tasks you with protecting certain buildings or planes from enemy attackers, they're nowhere to be seen. The only thing that pops up on your map are all the planes, and your targeting icons always snap to the immediate threat closest to you. It's frustrating to lose missions over and over again because you're supposed to be defending some position you can't even find. There's a multiplayer portion here too, but the less said about that the better. It's passable, but the choppy graphics and terrible targeting are only amplified by playing against human opponents. If you enjoy frustration, feel free to dive right in. It's clear that Mad Catz only made this game to go along with its new Saitek AV8R flight stick, which comes bundled with the Collector's Edition of the game. Sadly, my time with that was even worse, as the stick itself is so touchy that even the slightest movement had the targeting sights flying all over the screen and maintaining an accurate shot was nigh-impossible. I switched back to the standard controller after failing the same mission over and over for trying to aim while avoiding hitting the ground. Word is the flight stick works very well with other games of the genre, but if it can't even work well in the game it's bundled with, I don't have high hopes. Damage Inc. is a hot mess. Choppy frame rate, ugly graphics, shoddy presentation, forgettable multiplayer, and an overall worthless feeling when playing doesn't amount to much. There's at least a good variety of things to do with the number of missions and planes involved, but you may be too frustrated with the gameplay itself to even care. Play the demo and save your money.
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Almost immediately, it falls apart
In theory, flight simulation games offer fans of the genre accurate flight controls with a diverse array of those amazing aircrafts they love so much, with powerful dogfights and skill helping push along a narrative worthy of...

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Damage Inc. now has a demo on Xbox Live


Aug 10
// Harry Monogenis
Mad Catz' upcoming World War II flight-shooter, Damage Inc. Pacific Squadron WWII, is set to take off (I know, I know) on August 28 and -as far as I can tell- seems to be a pretty interesting game with apparently 23 "his...
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See how the MLG Pro Circuit Controller can swap sticks


Jan 27
// Dale North
The Mad Catz MLG Pro Circuit Controller is a really impressive accessory. I've been putting it to the test in many different types of games and it comes away looking like a champ every time. You can definitely tell that Mad ...
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CES: Mad Catz Major League Gaming controller impresses


Jan 11
// Dale North
We had a chance to check out the Major League Gaming Pro-Circuit Controller from Mad Catz today at CES. This is a pro controller available for PS3 and Xbox 360, and it lets you freely switch out analog sticks, ...
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Street Fighter X Tekken Arcade FightStick Pro coming soon


Aug 25
// Jordan Devore
It wouldn't be a fighting game if there wasn't a corresponding arcade stick plastered with relevant imagery. Mad Catz has entered a multi-year agreement with Capcom to put out Street Fighter X Tekken controllers and accessori...
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Mad Catz to re-release Rock Band 3 this holiday


Aug 10
// Dale North
[corgi head tilt] Accessories company Mad Catz has entered into an agreement with Harmonix to re-release Rock Band 3 this holiday season. Last year's hit music game will come back this holiday as a bundle, published by the co...
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Mad Catz officially signs on to make Xbox 360 games


Jul 08
// Dale North
Not controllers. Games.  Mad Catz, the guys behind all many of third-party controllers and accessories out there, announces today that they've entered into a Publisher License Agreement with Microsoft. This agreement all...
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First off, let me apologise for the length of this video; it is an epic twenty minutes long and at no point during recording did I want to cut it short. Anyone who has seen my videos with Alex from MadCatz will kno...

This Thing That I Do: Alex Verrey, Mad Catz PR

Feb 17 // Hollie Bennett
Alex, lets start by keeping it simple, tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got into gaming "Alrighty, I’m 33 years old, a true hardcore gamer at heart, and a guy genuinely passionate about our industry.  As well as video games, my other passion in life is performing and I started my career as a TV presenter where I presented a series of popular video game shows in the UK under the name ‘Big Boy Barry’ which those with very long memories may just remember.  There’s loads of footage of me knocking about YouTube for those with way too much time on their hands…" [embed]194238:36328[/embed] When you and I have done interviews in the past, many people have recognized you from the hugely popular Sky One programme Games World. Was this your first entrance into the games industry and was it intentional, or had you never even considered working in the games industry? "Yeah, that’s right.  In PR the nature of your work means that you operate ‘behind the scenes’ but a surprising amount of gamers and industry folk still recognize me as BBB.  That’s cool though, I’m totally proud of my TV work and actually pinning for a comeback! GamesWorld was technically my second taste of the industry, I first appeared on the second ever episode of the TV show ‘GamesMaster’ playing a challenge on the original Sonic the Hedgehog.  I think I was like 13 at the time.  A few months later, the production team called me and explained they were planning a new show for Sky One called GamesWorld and were looking for resident champions to appear on air.  Once thing obviously led to another and Big Boy Barry was born.  I guess the character kinda’ resonated as they offered me my own spin off show the following year with David Walliams appearing as my sidekick.  That was cool, all before I was 17 and all totally unplanned.  Life can throw up all kinds of surprises when you’re just not looking! So there we go.  I remained in TV full time for years and years but usually appearing in shows related to games.  Realising that TV work is fun but damn unpredictable, I was offered a chance to do a few days freelance PR by an old industry buddy, and, well, that was 7 years ago and those’ few days’ still haven’t come to an end I guess!" Now you currently you work for Mad Catz as their Global Public Relations and Communications Manager. Tell us, what is Public Relations and what is a typical day for you at Mad Catz? "I still smile at my official job title.  It’s gloriously long ain't it?! Public Relations can mean many things, but in short, my job means that I’m the contact or ‘go between’ for the company and the media.  When you read news or a review of a game (or in my case one of our accessories), a journalist will usually have obtained the game, images and information directly from the company PR contact.  We are the guys who promote the games or accessories to the media either in person or via trade shows.  We write press releases (Official names for documents which explain or ‘hype’ the game or product in question) and we then work with the media (be it TV, magazine, Radio, etc) to make sure we get our game or product seen everywhere.  Most of us in video game PR take time to visit gaming journalists and demo the game or product in person; it’s all part of the job and one which can be incredibly varied.  In my case, the word ‘Global’ refers to the fact that even though I’m based in the UK, I’m in charge of promoting Mad Catz and our various brands everywhere in the world, so the first half of my day will have me dealing with media from around Europe and then at around 5pm, I start getting hundreds of emails from the US.  It can be pretty intense but I love it.  I spend a lot of time traveling also as you Hollie can verify!  In June I was at E3, in August I demonstrated our new Rock Band gear for Hollie in Germany for GamesCom and then saw her a few weeks later in Seattle where I showed off our new Call of Duty ProGaming Headsets!" [embed]194238:36329[/embed] Now we all know that being in PR means you get to deal with us lot; the gaming press, bloggers, journos, or whatever you want to call us. What is it like working with such a huge group of people and what kind of relationships do you look to build? "For the most part it’s great.  Our industry can at times be very incestuous; I’ve known many of my fellow PR colleagues and various journalists for literally years.  Most of us work in the industry because we love games and once we are in the business, few of us want to leave again so I can honestly say that I have built up many, many close friends from all sectors of our industry.  Like all walks of life, a few bad apples can spoil things for everyone else.  There are a few notorious industry figures that every PR knows and always has a headache dealing with.  Some people are rude, others unscrupulous, but where possible we all try to get along and respect that we have jobs to do and are all passionate about the very reason we’re here!  I tend to think it’s about being a good judge of character.  Some of the journalists I deal with are friends (I even went to school with one well known editor), so these relationships are based in friendship more than anything else.  Others you can get on very well with but always mindful of the fact that the relationship is based in business and others still may be journo’s you’ve never met before so the relationship changes again to one of a more professional manner.  It’s all about knowing your audience and being able to adapt with ease." A lot of people see PR as the people who give out 'free shit' such as games. Do you get a lot of people 'taking the piss,' as it were, and expecting to be given freebies? How do you react to people like that? "Yeah, I think we touched on that in one of the stories above. I find it personally interesting how quickly our industry changes.  When I first started doing PR, the vast majority of journalists were working for the specialist press (Gaming mags), nowadays, the web is by far the biggest source of coverage. Hundreds of enterprising young gamers email me daily asking for samples (Free sh*t) and promising me ‘substantial coverage’ in return.  Frankly, you can hardly blame them; it works for a lot of these one-kid-bedroom-websites.  Part of my job is working out the genuine media big boys from those after a freebie.  Usually, it’s pretty easy to spot when someone is taking the pi**, as soon as you start asking the tough questions, they usually back off.  Now, journalists are different.  It does grate when you get the same guys turning to you again and again asking for free gear and making lame promises of coverage which never appears.  Most of my contacts are honest and rightly so.  Sometimes they ask for a freebie because they think your product is cool.  I would much rather that than they insult my intelligence and ask for gear under the pretence of coverage which we all know will never materialise.  Those guys usually get a flat “NO” from me…." [embed]194238:36330[/embed] What is one of the best benefits to working in PR? What are some of your favorite things you have seen, done or even do as a PR for Mad Catz? "Are you kidding?!  The job is hard but it’s always varied and usually pretty cool.  I’m still a gamer and love that I get to travel the world, meet great people and get to go to the cool trade shows like E3, PAX and GamesCom.  Not only do I get to see the new games but Mad Catz often work with the publishers to make the official accessories (Like Call of Duty, Rock Band, Street Fighter etc) which means we get  to work with the publishers and with their PR guys also.  Our industry knows how to throw the coolest parties which are always fun (One year you’re in the front row watching ”The Who” perform in LA for the Rock Band 2 launch and the next you have tickets to watch the bizarrely entertaining ‘Cirque Du Soleir’ unveiling for Kinect!  I remember for one E3, I arranged for myself and 20 UK journalists to sit in the front row at Manns Chinese Theatre in Hollywood for the first showing of Star Wars Phantom Menace. The movie was kinda' horrible but that was one pretty cool night.  Next I’m off to Vegas in January for CES so I can only image what shenanigans I’m letting myself in for…" Finally, what kind of skills do you think people need to go into PR and what advice would you give anyone who wants to working PR in the games industry? "I think in all forms of PR it’s vital to be a good communicator and have a natural grasp of the English language. A lot of gaming journalists go into PR as they already possess the ability to articulate what they like or don’t like about gaming.  Next, it goes without saying but it’s important to actually have an interest in what you’re working on.  You’d be surprised at how many PR’s I’ve met who don’t really ‘get’ what they’re working on and it never, ever works. The gaming media and the gaming public are way too smart and always see though a PR representative who doesn’t truly understand their product.  So, be enthusiastic, have a genuine love of games, be chatty, quick witted and good at English and you stand a pretty good choice of getting a break.  Of course, a fair degree of luck doesn’t hurt either!"
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["This Thing That I Do" is a feature on Destructoid where I interview people who work in the gaming industry or people who have achieved something noteworthy to give us some insight into how it all works.] The world of PR has...

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That's Mad, Cat: Mad Catz' net sales up 91 percent


Feb 10
// Dale North
Mad Catz sent out a press release today just to tell us that they made a f*ckton of money this year. I'm happy for them. I remember when used game stores would not accept trade-ins on anything with the Mad Catz name on it. No...
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Marvel vs. Capcom 3 Mad Catz Arcade Fightstick announced


Feb 01
// Dale North
You knew it was coming, but now it's official. Mad Catz has officially announced their Marvel vs. Capcom 3 Arcade FightStick Tournament Edition sticks, just in time for the game's release on February 15th. Marvel and Capcom h...
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Mad Catz bringing you more Gears of War stuff this fall


Jan 26
// Nick Chester
Expect more Xbox 360 accessories with COG logos and smatterings of blood this fall. Mad Catz has announced its entered into a deal with Epic Games to produce Gears of War peripherals to coincide with the release of the third ...
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Mad Catz bringing new 'Brawl' Stick/Pad for WWE All Stars


Jan 19
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Here's something you probably never expected! Yes, Mad Catz and THQ have teamed up to release a special Arcade BrawlStick and BrawlPad for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3. The new WWE All Stars plays a lot more like an arcade ...
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CES: Mad Catz has 3DS accessories, mini Wii controllers


Jan 08
// Dale North
Getting a 3DS and need accessories? Mad Catz is on the case. Or, they're making cases for the 3DS. They're making cases, styluses and screen protectors. I saw their new line-up at CES yesterday, where all of this was on displ...
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CES: Rock Band 3 Midi Pro Adapter hits shelves full force


Jan 08
// Dale North
The Rock Band 3 Midi Pro Adapter technically came out at the end of 2010, but they're still pretty hard to find out in the wild. Best Buy had a few at launch, but that was about it. Those musicians that wanted to try connecti...

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