hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

LittleBigPlanet

Order x LBP photo
Order x LBP

This LittleBigPlanet-style Order: 1886 statue needs to be killed with fire


Or, you can pay $200 for it
Jun 04
// Brett Makedonski
You know how teleportations sometimes go wrong and the result is a mangled mess of horror that just needs to be killed as quickly as possible? You know how in Alien: Resurrection, Ripley finds a room of failed clones of herse...
Don't Starve photo
Don't Starve

Four indies, including Don't Starve, are invading LittleBigPlanet


Also, Octodad, Velocity, and Thomas
May 15
// Chris Carter
Sony is still coasting along, supporting LittleBigPlanet 3 with plenty of costumes and level-packs. The last content drop was based around Adventure Time, but the next one will give some indie games some love -- specific...
LittleBigPlanet photo
LittleBigPlanet

Adventure Time content coming to LittleBigPlanet 3


The fun will never end with Sackboy and Friends
Apr 29
// Laura Kate Dale
Hey adventure lovers, are you looking for more content to shove into your copy of LittleBigPlanet 3? Fancy dressing Sackboy up as Finn, Jake, Fionna or the Ice King? Well, Sony is probably able to help you out there. There's...

LBP photo
LBP

LittleBigPlanet 3 celebrates the PlayStation Anniversary


Cute
Dec 08
// Chris Carter
LittleBigPlanet is a pretty special franchise to me, and I'm glad Sony has allowed it to stay around for so long. Compliments of LittleBigPlanet 3's new engine, you can get a quick look at some other Sony franchise...
FFVII in LittleBigPlanet photo
FFVII in LittleBigPlanet

Two years worth of work went into this Final Fantasy VII recreation in LittleBigPlanet


You can hear the cry of the LittleBigPlanet
Nov 18
// Darren Nakamura
I love Final Fantasy VII as much as the next guy, unless the next guy is Jamie Colliver. More than two years ago we featured his work in LittleBigPlanet 2 as he had remade Final Fantasy VII up through the Temple of the Ancie...

Review: LittleBigPlanet 3

Nov 18 // Chris Carter
LittleBigPlanet 3 (PS3, PS4 [reviewed])Developer: Sumo DigitalPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased:  November 18, 2014MSRP: $59.99 This time in Sackland, Sackboy is put up against an evil Hugh Laurie (a light bulb person named Newton), and is tasked with saving the world of Bunkum as he teams up with his new friends, Toggle, Swoop, and Oddsock. That's the story in a nutshell, for better or worse, as you're not going to get much more than that. In my mind it edges out on the side of better, as it resembles one giant Wallace & Gromit episode, complete with wacky antics and a fairly talented voice cast. Visually on the PS4 the game looks very smooth, but it definitely feels like the PS3 was the lead platform here, give or take a few lighting effects. The narrative is secondary to the actual story experience, which is basically a teaching tool for all of the new character mechanics and the gadgetry and platforming you'll inevitably use while playing online. It's the aforementioned new characters that bring welcome changes into the world of LittleBigPlanet, even if they aren't exactly groundbreaking. Toggle has the power to change his shape with the press of a button, allowing him to morph from a lumbering hulk to a teeny sack that can run on water and go through tight spaces. Oddsock is a frog-dog thing that can hop at a greater height than other characters, as well as hop off walls. And Swoop...man my boy Swoop, he can fly. He's sort of broken that way, but the Swoop-specific levels are designed around his abilities. It's also really fun to carry people (except Big Toggle) as Swoop. [embed]283720:56354:0[/embed] The problem is finding things to actually do with the whole gang. While the story allows for each of them to briefly shine in their own way, you're only going to get a taste of the new characters every so often, and it isn't until the game's conclusion that all of them are available at once. Also, playing online can present problems with the new characters as many levels have locks on them that force you to only play as Sackboy. If you have the patience you can already find levels online that accommodate, but Sumo Digital should have added more in the base package. As it stands it is adequate, but I expected a bit more. Since you're going to be seeing a lot of Sackboy, gadgets are back, including a vacuum that has a dual blow and suck function, as well as a jetpack and other power-ups. You'll have to flip between one gadget at a time as you go, but earning a new upgrade truly feels like you're getting somewhere, even if the need to play as the other characters will no doubt eclipse your love of gadgetry. Yes, the physics are still "floaty," but the new characters (when you can play as them) will help alleviate any concerns you have, especially if you spring for Swoop or Oddsock. If you're feeling less action-oriented and more puzzle-savvy, you can also spring for the "Popit Puzzle" mode, which stars Larry Davinci from LittleBigPlanet 2. In short this is an extra mini-campaign that lets you don a hard hat and move platforms around to get through smaller stages, just like Sackboy's Prehistoric Moves minus the PlayStation Move device. It's a nice diversion but it didn't catch my attention like the other characters or even the aforementioned Prehistoric Moves. The import process to bring in your content from LittleBigPlanet 1 and 2 is painless, and only takes roughly 45 seconds to bring in hundreds of outfits and objects. But the real key here is the commitment to building one giant world dating all the way back to 2008. Upon booting up LittleBigPlanet 3 and going to the creation planet, I found my old levels that I created six years ago still intact. My Mega Man 2 Crash Man stage, my Oceans 11 heist remake, they were all there and ready to play. All of my hearted (favorited) levels are also still there, which is incredible. Creating levels is still a fairly niche activity as the entire process could be described over multiple guidebooks, but Sumo Digital does a decent job of acclimating new players to the basics. New layers, buttons, AI, and top-down camera options are the highlight of this year's edition, but if you've already played the best and brightest stages from the first two games over the course of the past six years, you're going to have to wait for the good stuff. There aren't a whole lot of "new" stages out in the wild as the game has just launched, so as always, you're at the mercy of the community to help keep you playing past the initial launch week. Nothing is guaranteed, and I only found a handful of stages so far that I'd recommend to people. Unlike the previous iterations to some extent, the story mode isn't strong enough to assuage that wait. With all of the innovations LittleBigPlanet 3 brings with Toggle, Oddsock, and Swoop, it's a shame they aren't allowed to show off their stuff on a regular basis, because they are the best thing to happen to the series in years. It would be nice to see them return in a big way in a potential sequel, but for now hardcore LBP fans should have enough creation options to last them until that point. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
LittleBigPlanet 3 review photo
Sackboy rides again
Back in 2008, LittleBigPlanet was a staple in the Carter household for a good year. It was tough to put down as we earned a full 100% completion rate, and creating levels for each other was a joy. Floaty physics hate be ...

Little Big Planet photo
Little Big Planet

LittleBigPlanet 3 pre-order plushies look worse than the 'real' thing


Videogames are officially better than reality
Nov 16
// Jonathan Holmes
Sackboy was one of the best things to come out of the PS3 era. Most marquee PS3 games pushed for "realistic graphics," but when it came to replicating the human form, they landed in the uncanny vally more often than not. One ...
LBP 3 fan creations photo
LBP 3 fan creations

Fan recreates Symphony of the Night in LittleBigPlanet 3


Now I'm remembering all those horrible Mario recreations in the first game
Nov 04
// Steven Hansen
We're just two weeks away from LittleBigPlanet 3's November 18 release, but it doesn't feel that way. I think it's become its own thing, propped up by a community that has created millions of levels, all of which are grandfa...
LittleBigPlanet photo
LittleBigPlanet

LittleBigPlanet 3's Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeroes costumes are adorbs


That Miller costume is fabulous
Sep 22
// Jordan Devore
I'm still freaking out over this weekend's big Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeroes news -- that you can capture and raise a wolf pup and it'll grow up to one day wear an eye patch. The best. This LittleBigPlanet news isn't on tha...
Run SackBoy! photo
Run SackBoy!

Run SackBoy! Run! is coming to the Vita, Android, and iOS platforms


Just like Fat Princess: Piece of Cake
Sep 05
// Chris Carter
Just like how Sony brought over Fat Princess: Piece of Cake to mobile platforms in addition to the Vita, so to is the upcoming Run Sackboy! Run coming to iOS and Android. It's a runner, and of course, it's free-to-p...
LittleBigPlanet 3 photo
LittleBigPlanet 3

You might have a LittleBigPlanet 3 private beta email in your inbox


Go check!
Aug 20
// Chris Carter
Over the past few days or so numerous PSN users have been reporting that they have been granted access to a special private beta for LittleBigPlanet 3. The invites seem to be rolling out for "creative" people who have previou...
LittleBigPlanet 3 photo
LittleBigPlanet 3

See some new screenshots for LittleBigPlanet 3


Sackboy and friends take things to a new level with enchanced user content
Aug 13
// Alessandro Fillari
After the runaway success of the first two LittleBigPlanet titles on PS3, fans had been clamoring for a follow-up on Sony's new hardware. With the announcement of LittleBigPlanet 3 at E3 coming to both PS4 and PS3, the LBP co...
Little Big Planet photo
Little Big Planet

LittleBigPlanet 3 gets a new gamescom trailer


Sackboy's back
Aug 12
// Alasdair Duncan
LittleBigPlanet is coming back to a Sony console, with LittleBigPlanet 3 coming to PS4 on November 18. Sackboy is back and he's brought some new friends with him -- Oddsock, Swoop, and Toggle -- which will hopefully mean we'll see unique characters used in co-op games, instead of lots of Sackboys (cute as they are). Check out the new trailer above.
LittleBigPlanet photo
LittleBigPlanet

LittleBigPlanet 3 out on PS3, PS4 this November


Lots of pre-order options
Jul 29
// Jordan Devore
Sumo Digital has announced a November 18, 2014 release date for LittleBigPlanet 3 on both PlayStation 3 and PS4. Levels created in the prior games will be compatible (and look better on PS4) and there are new characters to pl...
LittleBigPlanet photo
LittleBigPlanet

LittleBigPlanet will have a free July 4th costume


Sacktue of Liberty
Jul 01
// Chris Carter
Since 2008, MediaMolecule has been running promotions for free LittleBigPlanet costumes -- usually on holidays -- which is pretty impressive. On July 3rd of this year, anyone who owns the original two games or LittleBigP...
LittleBigPlanet 3 photo
LittleBigPlanet 3

'Sackworm' missed the cut for LittleBigPlanet 3


More on the new characters
Jun 20
// Steven Hansen
I'm team Oddsock forever. It's just a super cute dog sack. I love it. I could take or leave the rest. Particularly a bird that makes platforming irrelevant. I guess LittleBigPlanet has always been creativity and co-op fi...
LittleBigPlanet 3 photo
LittleBigPlanet 3

LittleBigPlanet 3 will also be coming to the PS3


In addition to the previously announced PS4
Jun 16
// Chris Carter
LittleBigPlanet 3 looks amazingly adorable with Sackboy's three additional friends, and I enjoyed the fact that the E3 demonstration was a real demo and not staged. As far as we knew based on E3, LBP3 would support old l...
LittleBigPlanet 3 PS4 photo
Over 8.7 levels made, all will be playable
Sony has some LittleBigPlanet 3 (PS4) footage and the biggest change in the series is the introduction of new character types alongside Sackyboy. Oddsock runs on all fours and quickly. It can wall jump and burst through cert...

Hunger photo
Hunger

Tarsier Studios presents Hunger, a surreal action adventure


You said 'surreal," so now you have my attention
May 21
// Brittany Vincent
Tarsier Studios did an excellent job on LittleBigPlanet Vita, and I thoroughly enjoyed my time with it. Their new project Hunger looks like a decidedly different affair, a much more mythical story with somber tones and stealt...
Watch this, fo' real photo
Indie Game The French Movie
This is confusing, but cool. Pixel Heart is going to be a documentary that visits a bunch of talented, global folks in videogames -- Tetsuya Mizuguchi (Rez), Robin Hunicke (Sims, Journey), Edmundo Bordeu (Zeno Clash), Mark H...

LittleBigPlanet photo
LittleBigPlanet

LittleBigPlanet gets DC Comics level pack trailer


There's a cape that lets you glide!
Jan 09
// Chris Carter
LittleBigPlanet is still chugging, and Media Molecule still has some add-ons to sell you. Coming soon is part two of the DC Comics Premium level pack, which you can get a taste of in the trailer above. In addition to ne...
LittleBigPlanet Hub photo
LittleBigPlanet Hub

Sony announces free-to-play LittleBigPlanet Hub for PS3


Makes sense!
Aug 20
// Steven Hansen
LittleBigPlanet Hub is a free-to-play version of MediaMolecule's creative PS3 platformer. The video at Sony's gamescom conference talked about multiplayer, outfits, and the whole creative suite people have some to expect out...
PSN Chart photo
PSN Chart

Unfinished Swan, EDF 2017 soar to new heights on PSN


Giant Sparrow and Sandlot run away with PSN in January
Feb 06
// Kyle MacGregor
The Unfinished Swan and Earth Defense Force 2017 Portable are your top-selling PlayStation Network games of January. The PlayStation Blog reports that this domineering pair have unseated Journey and LittleBigPl...
LittleBigPlanet 2 Extras photo
LittleBigPlanet 2 Extras

LittleBigPlanet 2: Extras Edition announced, with Muppets


As well as Cross-Controller DLC for PS Vita
Jan 11
// Jason Cabral
Last year, Sony was hard at work pushing out value packs for many of its exclusive franchises. It has been a little over a year now since LittleBigPlanet 2: Special Edition was released, but it looks like Sony and M...
 photo

PS Store update: Stranger's Wrath, Karateka, and way more


Plus Rockstar Classics, Angry Birds DLC, Knytt Underground
Dec 18
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Lots of nice updates for PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Vita owners today! First up, Oddworld: Stranger's Wrath HD is now available for the Vita. A small team spent 10 months on porting the game, and shares the same featu...
 photo

LittleBigPlanet Karting launch trailer (yes, it's out!)


LittleBigPlanet Shafting
Nov 06
// Jim Sterling
[Update: It appears the servers were running all day during launch, and some issue with my PS3 actually prevented me from accessing the online mode. Once I'd just gone ahead and reset my connection on the system, it got in. ...

Review: LittleBigPlanet Karting

Nov 01 // Jim Sterling
LittleBigPlanet Karting (PlayStation 3)Developer: United Front Games, Media MoleculePublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentRelease: November 6, 2012MSRP: $59.99 LittleBigPlanet Karting does for the kart racing genre what LittleBigPlanet did for the platforming genre, and by that I mean it does what ModNation Racers was already doing for the kart racing genre. I promise I won't keep going on about that, but it truly boggles the mind how completely useless Sony has made either one of these two titles. It doesn't help that LBP Karting is, more or less, exactly like the aforementioned "rival" title (likely due to United Front working on both games).  The general idea is that, like with LittleBigPlanet, players can create their own levels to share and play online. Using all manner of terrain deformation tools, pre-set objects, and customizable materials, players can craft some truly impressive tracks using the exact kind of user-friendly interface seen in mainstay LittleBigPlanet titles. This time around, instead of creating 2D platform levels, players lay out tracks built from all kinds of material by "driving" a paint roller across the ground. The roller can be raised or lowered to create tracks of varying heights, and branching routes can be added for shortcuts and hidden paths.  Most of the tools found in LittleBigPlanet transfer over quite well to the karting spin-off. Almost anything can be tweaked, from the color of the sky to the behavior of CPU-controlled racers. Speech bubbles, animated obstacles, dangerous terrain, and prizes can all be added, to the point where the only real appreciable difference between LBP and Karting is the 3D perspective. This leads for an incredibly intuitive crafting experience that, once players get to grips with the way track-building works, will have them bolting together all manner of quirky race levels in no time at all. [embed]238102:45678[/embed] Unlike ModNation, there is not a huge amount of scope when it comes to making karts and racers themselves. Your Sackboy is still a pre-made doll upon which to hang costume pieces, while the karts lack the minute level of customizable details found in Sony's earlier karting property, and fail to appear quite so personalized due to LBP's "improvised" aesthetic. Nevertheless, the designs are still rather charming, and unlocking new body parts for the vehicles remains a compelling little incentive.  The building aspect of LittleBigPlanet is as entertaining as usual, but the racing itself doesn't match such levels of satisfaction. It holds its own as a fairly decent karting experience, but it chooses to stop at merely being decent, refusing to do anything new or exciting on its own and instead relying on the customization aspect as a sole draw. In a way, this is a problem shared by the regular LittleBigPlanet games -- just as LittleBigPlanet is an exceptional way of crafting unremarkable platformers, so too is Karting an exceptional way of crafting unremarkable racers.  All the obligatory features are in place -- karts can drift for speed boosts, perform spinning tricks in mid-air, and collect weapons to blast the competition. As with ModNation Racers, Karting goes overboard with the luck-based power-ups, using projectiles that are completely unavoidable unless you waste your own weapon to diffuse incoming attacks, and a multitude of powers that can shunt you from first to last place without skill ever being a factor. This makes it useful as a casual party game, but renders the solo story chapters more aggravating than amusing.  As well as straightforward races, there are Mario Kart-style battle arenas where players have to kill each other as much as possible, solo checkpoint races, and capture-and-hold objectives where players need to hold onto a specific item for as long as possible. The story mode also provides a smattering of mini-games and even boss fights, where mines or guns are used to take out weak points on huge, monstrous creations.  One thing I appreciate is how traditional elements from the series have been incorporated stylistically into the gameplay. For instance, weapon power-ups are appropriated Weaponators, and when you die, a familiar spawn point opens up on the track to get your racer back into play. The grappling hook is used to swing across wide chasms, prize bubbles can be collected to unlock new items, and many weapons are taken directly from the various obstacles found across the LBP series. Karting succeeds impressively at creating a title that feels right at home in the LittleBigPlanet universe.  Nevertheless, there's no escaping the fact that, like so many kart racers released over the last few years, LittleBigPlanet Karting is unadventurous, traditional to a fault, and too damn slow. Yet again, it's shameful to note that a budget title, Jimmie Johnson's Anything with an Engine, has still done more to energize the genre than any of the more prominent titles. Make no mistake, Johnson was sorely lacking in the quality department, but at least it tried. LBP Karting is yet another racer that simply hasn't put any effort into making kart racers exciting again. It's solid, it's functional, but it's not exhilarating in any way.  The lack of thrill is compounded by the fact that LBP's famously floaty physics are preserved unapologetically and used throughout the racing experience. Cars feel unwieldy and lacking in traction, and jumping is an oddly slow affair. It's not enough to be a massive problem, but the physics are just loose enough to give the whole game a strange, waxy feeling. Online play makes things a bit more interesting, though only marginally so. The multiplayer aspect runs smoothly, and a cool voting system offers up three stages pulled up at random for players to choose. The randomized aspect makes the next race a consistent surprise, but it can offer up poorly designed courses just as often as good ones, and can even change the controls without warning the players.  Still, the game is already filling up with user-created courses, running the gamut between insipid and inventive. Time will tell if there are enough players to keep the game ticking, but right now there seems to be a healthy batch of offerings to choose from, and folks are quickly finding ways to put a unique spin on things. One user has managed to craft a water course, complete with boats. The water physics don't react to the boats, making the whole level look odd, but it's a promising start. For those that do manage to find the gameplay aspect compelling, there's a solid amount of content to check out.  LittleBigPlanet Karting may be worth checking out for fans of the series, but experienced kart lovers can happily skip it. While the creation mode is a potentially engrossing concept, it's not really anything that hasn't already been done, and the racing itself is almost antediluvian in nature. It's not a bad game by any stretch of the imagination, and can even manage to be quite fun in the right environment, but it's altogether a fairly meaningless release that seems to exist just to ensure Sony has something out in time for the holiday season that isn't All-Stars.  I felt sorry for ModNation Racers when LBP Karting was released, but now I just kind of feel bad for both of them. 
LittleBigPlanet Karting photo
Not quite up to speed
When LittleBigPlanet Karting was announced, the first thing I felt was pity. Pity for ModNation Racers, the build-everything karting title that Sony presented under the same "Play Create Share" banner as Media Molecule's crit...

 photo

Ex-Sony PR: Sony's sending titles out to die


Laid-off worker cuts loose on former master
Sep 24
// Jim Sterling
Recently laid-off Sony PR man Will Powers has taken to Twitter to share some views on his former bosses, questioning the company's recent business decisions and suggesting that its big titles are being thrown to the wolves. I...
 photo

LittleBigPlanet Vita breaks street date


Sep 17
// Chris Carter
LittleBigPlanet Vita was all set for a September 25th release date, but guess what? That crummy old street date has been broken, which means the release date is "whenever the hell you feel like buying it."But hold on peo...

Review: LittleBigPlanet PS Vita

Sep 12 // Jim Sterling
LittleBigPlanet PS Vita (PS Vita)Developer: Double Eleven, Tarsier Studios, XDevPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: September 25, 2012MSRP: $39.99 Fans of LittleBigPlanet will know the score right from the outset. Ostensibly a do-it-yourself platform game, the PS Vita version is exactly like its console brethren in allowing players to construct their own vast levels out of a huge selection of materials, gadgets, tools, and stickers. Very little has been left out, with LBP2's extra gimmicks and power-ups all in attendance, alongside a few all-new features. Everything you need to enjoy LittleBigPlanet has been maintained -- no small feat for a humble handheld title.  The full set of community features have been transported without flaw to Sony's little system. As always, players can search for, play, review, rate and favorite all the user-created levels uploaded by others. At the time of writing, only a few test levels from fellow reviewers are uploaded, but I can confirm that getting into them is fairly quick and simple. There can be some lengthy loading at times, but nothing too egregious, save for one or two instances where a level seems to be stuck in a perpetual load. My one big complaint is that the menus could use some cleaning up, as trying to find my user reviews feels more convoluted than it needs to be, and the icons aren't exactly helpful in telling you which selection does what. [embed]234613:44997[/embed] The game's campaign tells a predictably trite story about an evil puppeteer attacking a magic carnival planet. The cutscenes and voice acting grate, and the levels are little more than glorified -- but nicely designed -- tutorials, telling you how the game's new toys work. In that latter purpose, the campaign is a success, as there are quite a few fresh playthings that manage to be surprisingly fun.  Among of the biggest new items are the touch-activated materials. Fingerprint scanners and blocks that can be manually moved by dragging across the touchscreen add some new interactions to a level, and I'm surprised by how well they work. Unlike other PS Vita games, the touch controls don't feel overly saturated and work to make the gameplay more interesting, rather than less convenient for the sake of showing off. There are some cleverly designed levels using blocks that can be pushed in and out using the front and rear touch interfaces, and I'm excited to see what more talented gamers can create using them.  New power-ups make similar use of the PS Vita's control range, from gliders that can be dragged with touch to vehicular wheels propelled by physically tilting the system. These items vary in terms of quality and entertainment. Dragging an unwieldy vehicle around with one's finger is just uncomfortable and bothersome, but I've always got time for a good tilt mechanic, and LittleBigPlanet uses this functionality elegantly.  The game wisely ensures that it doesn't always force you to use touch controls. The Popit menu, as well as level building, can be interacted with using either touch or buttons, and I've actually found that using a combination of both options makes building levels more fluid and enjoyable than ever before. LittleBigPlanet Vita thus serves as a fantastic example of Vita controls done right -- a working compromise between two well-executed control methods, as opposed to a forced either/or situation that promotes technology over user enjoyment.  One thing I really love about the Vita is that the microphone and camera are built in, allowing you to instantly add your own images and sounds to the levels you create without the need for peripherals. The quality is predictably spotty, but the accessibility is appreciated. Being able to scream at my handheld and having such eldritch sounds transported instantly to whatever vile beast I've built out of ivory and jam is a source of infinite amusement.  It's not just the controls, though -- the entire handheld format delivers an overall better crafting experience. The more casual nature of a portable device makes dipping in and out to tweak and build feel more relaxed and enjoyable, the ability to bring my work anywhere encouraging me to take more time on it. Sitting in front of an HDTV with speakers blaring just to spend an hour shaping a block of wood feels silly. On the PS Vita, it feels soothing. It's the kind of activity one should be doing on the train, or in a queue at the bank. Having LittleBigPlanet on the PS Vita works so well in the game's favor that I wish it had always been on the portable format.  The bite-sized nature of the playable levels also work better on the PS Vita than the PS3. The game's physics are still a bit too floaty for my liking, but overall, the Vita's controls just seem like a much better fit. That said, I'd have preferred at least a few improvements and tighter mechanics overall. As with other games in the series, LBP Vita does nothing of its own to improve the series in any way, choosing instead to just toss more toys at the player while sticking rigidly to formula. It may be in a better package this time around, but the contents remain mostly the same. That's mostly fine, but there are gameplay mechanics that could definitely be better, and haven't been touched since the series' inception. I've also found a rather annoying bug with create mode. After a while of building any moderately sized level, the game seems unable to cope with it and will crash out, returning the player back to the Vita's home screen. I noticed this mostly happening when transitioning from building a level to playtesting it. Getting back into the game is quick, and if one saves before the transition (which is always prompted), nothing of value is lost. It is, however, a frequent annoying occurrence and one that'll need patching swiftly.  There's a range of extra content on offer. While there's naturally online co-op for everything, there are also a whole bunch of minigames littered throughout the campaign, ranging from block-building to whack-a-mole to racing games. There's also an entire arcade section filled with puzzles and simple skill tests. Most of these games feel like iPhone game clones, making heavy use of touch input and mobile-style level select systems. Whether you're into iOS gaming or not, these arcade add-ons are adequate extras that are worth checking out at least once. It's nice to see mobile-style games being packaged as extras rather than sold on the PSN for $10, at any rate.  The presentation is as solid as ever. Stephen Fry returns to narrate and teach in his usual dapper fashion, while the selection of music is eclectic and suitably quirky. Graphically, the game looks a little washed out in comparison to its technically superior PS3 predecessors, but it's still a fine-looking Vita game -- not as pretty as, say, Gravity Rush, but certainly not unpleasant to look at by any stretch of the imagination. Objects obviously look a bit less detailed and animations aren't quite so lively, but Double Eleven and Tarsier did a fine job of preserving as much of the aesthetic spirit of the series as possible.  LittleBigPlanet PS Vita is the definitive LittleBigPlanet. The new interface options work splendidly, the extra toys are fun to play with, and the portable format simply works best for such a creative and laid-back venture. It's not as visually attractive as its bigger brothers, and it does little to move the series forward in any meaningful way, but it's by far the most earnest fun I've had with a LittleBigPlanet game to date, and something I feel belongs in the library of any PS Vita owner. I certainly hope it finds its way to many players, as the community will need a lot of support to keep it going.  LittleBigPlanet has come home, and the PS Vita has found a game truly worthy of its potential. 
 photo
LittleBigPlanet gets bigger and littler
The original LittleBigPlanet earned a lot of its praise through sheer charm alone. The cute presentation and unique creativity afforded to the player won it a lot of acclaim, despite the fact that, to be fair, the actual game...


  Around the web (login to improve these)




Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter!
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -