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9:00 PM on 08.07.2013

Nintendo files suit against Florida flashcart distributor

Piracy on the DS was kind of a big deal, which is why Nintendo has been taking measures to ensure that the same filth doesn't infect the 3DS ecosystem. The 3D handheld has remained more or less untainted thus far, but the onl...

Tony Ponce

10:00 PM on 07.24.2013

Boom! EA loses $11 million Madden lawsuit

In 2011, we reported that Electronic Arts was being sued by Robin Antonick, designer of the original John Madden Football, who was claiming unpaid royalties for derivatives of his work after realizing subsequent early Madden ...

Steven Hansen

4:30 PM on 07.17.2013

Viacom loses $300-million lawsuit against Harmonix

Ending years of litigation, the Delaware Supreme Court has ordered Viacom to pay Harmonix Music's former owners $300 million in owed bonuses, money from when Viacom still owned the studio. You may remember that Harmonix was b...

Abel Girmay

3:15 PM on 07.17.2013

THQ's liquidation plans get court approval

At a hearing held in Wilmington, Delaware, THQ was granted final approval for its liquidation approval plan, effectively marking the end of the publisher's bankruptcy case. Most of you will remember that the defunct publisher...

Abel Girmay

11:30 AM on 07.02.2013

Nintendo loses legal claim to WiiU.com domain name

After filing a formal complaint with the WIPO Arbitration and Mediation Center to gain ownership of the domain name WiiU.com, an official ruling has been handed down in favor of Andy Tran, the current owner of the domain name...

Abel Girmay

9:30 AM on 06.06.2013

Man chooses month of prison over month of Xbox games

A New Zealand young offender has chosen to spend the final month of his house arrest term in a real prison, rather than spend another four weeks trapped in his home with his emotionally crippling Xbox system. He was so sick o...

Jim Sterling







Nintendo is claiming ownership of Let's Play videos photo
Nintendo is claiming ownership of Let's Play videos
by Tony Ponce

The last time we heard about a major game publisher slapping the wrists of innocent YouTube channel operators, it was SEGA forcing the removal of videos that so much as breathed word of the Shining Force series. Whatever reason a company has for punishing fans who merely want to share love for their favorites games, I'm not buying it.

Now it's Nintendo with a shifty look in its eyes. Let's Player Zack Scott has taken to reddit, revealing that Nintendo is in the process of taking ownership of his gameplay videos, starting with LPs of Super Mario 3D Land. It's not a complete takedown as was the case with SEGA, rather an action taken via YouTube's Content ID system to redirect ad revenue to Nintendo's pockets instead of the video creator's. It's not an isolated event, either -- several other YouTubers have also confirmed claims against their own Mario-related game footage.

You could make the argument that content creators shouldn't expect to earn revenue from footage of a game they can't personally claim legal ownership of. But as Scott expressed in a follow-up post on Facebook, LPs offer a blend of entertaining commentary and helpful guidance that could even inspire interest where previously there was none. The success of these videos relies on the talent and likeability of the authors almost as much as on the game itself, sometimes more so.

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8:00 AM on 05.14.2013

Biden: No legal reason why 'violent' games can't be taxed

Vice President Joe Biden recently had a meeting with religious leaders to discuss gun control, and violent media was discussed. God forbid we don't obfuscate the gun discussion with more demented strawmen.  Reverend Fran...

Jim Sterling

3:00 PM on 05.06.2013

Jimquisition: Lawsuits, Memes, and Tasty Medicine

Warner Bros. and 5th Cell are facing a lawsuit over the inclusion of Keyboard Cat and Nyan Cat in Scribblenauts. Preposterous, you say? Greedy, are the meme makers? I say well done them! It's absolutely about time Warne...

Jim Sterling

8:00 AM on 05.03.2013

Aliens: Gearbox defends its right to mislead customers

Both Gearbox and SEGA have responded to a class action suit that alleges customers were lied to during the development of Aliens: Colonial Marines. Both companies are happy to defend themselves and seem unswayed by the threat...

Jim Sterling

9:30 AM on 05.02.2013

Warner Bros. sued over memes in Scribblenauts? Okay!

Warner Bros. and 5th Cell are being slapped with a lawsuit (story via NeoGAF) over the inclusion of a pair of Internet memes in Scribblenauts Unlimited. Both the infamous Keyboard Cat and Nyan Cat can be summoned into th...

Jim Sterling

8:00 AM on 05.01.2013

Aliens: Colonial Marines gets class action suit for lies

SEGA and Gearbox have been slapped with a class action suit for Aliens: Colonial Marines, accused of lying about the game to get it sold. It was only a matter of time.  Edelson LLC has taken the case, which alleges that ...

Jim Sterling

4:45 PM on 04.22.2013

Tim Langdell's EDGE trademark claim finally quashed

It's taken a few years but Tim Langdell's spurious copyright claims on the word "Edge" have finally ended. Eurogamer reports that a judge in California has passed a Consolidated Cancellation put forward by EA that will c...

Alasdair Duncan

2:45 PM on 04.08.2013

No one knows who owns No One Lives Forever

Part of the problem facing older franchises is that after the dissolution of a developer or publisher, the rights to the IP are inevitably a tangled mess. Such is the case with the humorous spy adventure N...

Alasdair Duncan



Ex-Nintendo chairman Howard Lincoln had big brass balls photo
Ex-Nintendo chairman Howard Lincoln had big brass balls
by Tony Ponce

The Nintendo of today is known for being quiet and humble, making conservative decisions, and doing its best not to intentionally piss potential third-party partners off. Most of the complaints directed at Nintendo's current state can partially be attributed to this behavior -- which isn't to say that it didn't work for the Wii and DS. This wasn't always the case, though. There was a time when Nintendo of America was the biggest, baddest shark of them all, and software developers and retailers were genuinely afraid of the House of Mario.

One of the key figures in establishing Nintendo as a Western powerhouse was Howard Lincoln, the lawyer turned Nintendo executive who was recently the focus of a lovely feature by Not Enough Shaders' Emily Rogers. He defended Nintendo against Universal's "Donkey Kong" lawsuit, became senior vice president of NoA in 1983, then served as chairman from 1994 until his departure in 2000. In his nearly two-decade tenure, he was responsible for some of the most influential decisions in Nintendo's third-party relationship history.

From bringing on both Rareware and Retro Studios as second parties to defending Nintendo during the videogame violence Senate hearings in the early 90s, Lincoln wasn't afraid to take risks. He also wasn't afraid to speak his mind -- some of his words regarding the competition were so brutal that you can still feel the scorch marks years later. Could his actions be part of the reason many third parties became wary of working with Nintendo later on? Possibly, but you can't deny that the man got results.

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6:00 AM on 03.05.2013

Schilling looking to dismiss lawsuit over 38 Studios loan

Curt Schilling has requested a judge throw out the lawsuit against his now-defunct development house. Following the dissolution of 38 Studios, the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation accused Schilling and his busine...

Kyle MacGregor