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King Arthur

Princess Arthur photo
Princess Arthur

Meet Princess Arthur's hunky Knights of the Round Table


Isn't Galahad just dreamy?
Jan 20
// Kyle MacGregor
In case you missed it before, Princess Arthur is an otome game based on Arthurian legend. The game follows a young woman named Alu who retrieves a sacred sword encased in stone before falling in with a group of sexy young kn...
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Date the Knights of the Round Table in Princess Arthur


What is this I don't even
Jan 04
// Kyle MacGregor
The PSP isn't dead. Not if companies like Aksys, XSEED, and Atlus have anything to say about it anyway. Every month or two the system seems to add a new title to its library and lately they usually seem of the niche Japanese ...
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King Arthur II: The once and future king returns today


Jan 30
// Fraser Brown
  I got rather caught up in the Arthurian legend when I was a mite, enough so that when I played King Arthur - The Roleplaying Wargame I was rather charmed by it. The real time battles were fun, the choose your own adven...

Preview: King Arthur II: The Role-Playing Wargame

Nov 25 // Wesley Ruscher
King Arthur II: The Role-Playing Wargame (PC)Developer: Neocore GamesPublisher: Paradox InteractiveRelease: January 10, 2012 "When the greatest tale of chivalry ends, the nightmare begins..." These are the words used by Paradox Interactive to sum up the theme behind King Arthur II. The first title in this series revolved its narrative heavily around the basics of Arthurian legend, albeit with a few more twists. Excalibur was unsheathed (releasing a great evil), the Knights of the Round were formed, and eventually peace and prosperity where brought to Camelot. Everything was going great, until the witch queen Morgawse sent an assassin to kill the mighty king. Arthur survives, but becomes cursed with a wound that will not heal. With his life mystically intertwined to Britannia, darkness begins to settle -- perfect for the long-banished Fomorians to resurface and ravage the lands. As this new threat serves as the driving factor behind the main campaign in King Arthur II, it is not the only playable story. To accompany the threat of the Fomorians, a new Roman Empire has risen to vie for the lands of Britannia. A prologue campaign is available, letting players take this Roman threat to arms to gather a better understanding of just how they fit into the mix of the main story arc. From the time I spent watching part of the game's campaign unfold, there's a lot of twists, treachery, and blood to be shed with this added faction. Regardless of which campaign one is playing, King Arthur II's story is shaped by the decisions that are made, similar to a Choose your own Adventure book; players are given the option to lay the path before them thanks to branching dialog paths. Early choices can and will grant different choices in the future which guarantees a unique experience from start to finish. Whether it’s from deciding the path of a skill tree, altering your influence and self perception in the morality chart, or striking alliances with some shrewd diplomacy, there’s always a decision to make around the corner. Outside of the battles in King Arthur II -- which are all performed in real-time -- every other phase of the game is handled in a more role-playing-esque, turn-based procedure. Each turn consists of a season, with the appropriate seasonal effects, and allows for the management of troops, upgrading of establishments (including strongholds now) and the completion of quests amongst the myriad of other things one can do. To say that this game is deep would be an understatement, but to say it is complicated would be doing it a disservice. I admit to struggling when it comes to fully understanding the many layers of strategy that befall most games in the real-time field, but King Arthur II feels different. Perhaps it’s the fact that only the battles are performed on the fly that makes this game a little easier to swallow. When the call to arms finally arises, King Arthur II's improved engine lends itself to creating some truly impressive visual flairs. Rich textures, dynamic lighting, and atmospheric effects help create a believable fantasy world where men fight monsters. Battles typically unfold similarly to what one expects from a large-scale war game. The proper management of units to counterattack enemy transgression and the map manipulation -- to unearth strategic ambushes -- are the basics to combat. Maps also contain certain points of interest that, when captured, imbue beneficial enhancements to the captor's army. To broaden the scope of each, battle flying units have also been introduced to combat. This adds a second level of combat to each battle and helps create a more strategic environment. Units like archers become even more important, as they are typically the only units that can take on the enemies flying units free of harm’s way. These flying units, along with the rest of the Fomorian race, are a sight to behold thanks to some fantastically dark fantasy art design. The mix between medieval knights and demons doesn’t get any more epic than in King Arthur II’s huge full-scale wars. What sets King Arthur II apart from its competitors is its reliance on magic as a viable combat mechanic. Along with the game's other enhancements, magic has seen a drastic improvement in its implementation. The biggest change is in the ability to defend oneself against powerful enemy attacks. With magic attacks having casting and cool-down periods, the heroes that use these spells can be interrupted when in the process of summoning. It opens up a powerful risk-reward system that can help turn a battle quickly in either direction. The first King Arthur was released to fairly positive critical response and King Arthur II looks to continue that lineage. While I’ve always admired Arthurian lore, I hadn’t heard of this series before my time with it -- as I’m not the biggest PC gamer out there -- but its tactical depth, rich dark-fantasy vibe, and role-playing roots should pique the interest of any mythology buff and diehard strategy fan when this game arrives early next year.
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If there is one piece of Western mythology that has stood the test of time, it would be that of the legend of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round. Whether it is Disney’s Sword in the Stone, Sean Connery in First Kn...

Review: King Arthur: Fallen Champions

Oct 03 // Joshua Derocher
 King Arthur: Fallen Champions (PC) Developer: Neocore Games Publisher: Paradox Interactive Released: Sep 16, 2011MSRP: $9.99 King Arthur: The Roleplaying Wargame is a good game. The premise is a turnbased strategy game, very much like a Total War game, where you have units and armies that you can move around. You can improve your territories and manage your economy, and you can raise armies to crush your foes. While you're playing about on the map, quests will pop up that you can move your hero units too. The quests are text based, and are very similar to the old "Choose Your Own Adventure" books. You have a small section of story to read, and then you can make a choice based on what you want to do. Your actions can lead to very different outcomes, and the outcome effects what units you have in the upcoming battle. While the idea of reading text might seem off putting, it's all very well written.If your a fan of Arthurian legend it's filled with great and it captures the emotions and setting of Arthur's Britain almost perfectly. This section of the game is King Arthur's strongest point. It's unique, and it's very engaging.The series weakest point has always been it's combat. While it plays much like a Total War game, it lacks that franchise's deep AI and realistic physics. Units don't group together very well, and they don't feel like they are actually on the battlefield. The pathfinding is horrible, and units will often move in the opposite direction of where you want them to go.In "Fallen Champions" you get to play as three different heroes, Sir Lionel (a Knight trying to save a damsel in distress), Lady Corrigan (a supernatural being looking for her home in Tir na nÓg), and Drest (a shaman trying whose following a vision. Each of these heroes represents one of the factions from King Arhthur: The Britons, the Picts, and the Sidhe. The story here bridges the gap between the original King Arthur and the upcoming King Arthur 2. Each hero has a short quest line that includes three missions. Each of the mission phases is made up of a quest and a battle.  After you have played all of the heroes missions you play one final mission that involves all three characters. This is a decent amount of content for the $9.99 price tag, and it's a standalone expansion  so it's an even better bargain. There is a tutorial included in here too, so even if you have never played King Arthur before you'll still be able to learn how to play the game.All of the managing aspects of the game have been removed, it's just battles and quests. There are no cites to develop, you can't pick which territory to move to, and you can only go to the next mission spot. You can't build armies, and there is really no need of the tactical map. It's essentially only two-thirds of the game, and they left in the third that sucks.The fact that over half of the game's content relies on the awful combat really ruins this expansion. In the original game, you could just auto-resolve the battles and keep playing the fun questing part of the game. You can't do that here.In one mission, you have an army of ghosts at your disposal. There is a day and night cycle during the mission, and your ghost army will burn if they are exposed to daylight. You have to protect them by moving them into a magical circle, which should be fairly easy. Nope, it's not. Your units don't move to the spot where you tell them to go, and they'll walk right past it. They'll happily move outside the circle randomly and burn to death. In another level, there are fire that you can light to kill and split up the enemy army, but you'll probably kill your own units too when they randomly walk into the flaming inferno.While I really enjoyed the original game, and I think it's one of PC gaming's lovely little gems, I can't recommend this expansion to anyone. If you haven't played King Arthur, then you won't really enjoy this a whole lot, and if you have played it you'll just think of how much better it is than this weird expansion. I recommend that you check out the original game if you haven't played it, and if you have played it you should just wait for King Arthur 2 to come out. King Arthur: The Roleplaying Wargame was a really fun and interesting hybrid rts/tbs/rpg. It pulled a lot of good elements from these genres and it was a game that felt unique and it really stood out. It had some flaws. The AI was awful, and moving units around felt loose and sluggish. Sadly, this expansion is made up almost solely of mechanics that showcase the games weakest points.  King Arthur the Roleplaying Wargame is a good game. The premise is a turnbased strategy game, very much like Total War, where you have units and armies that you can move around. You can improve your territories and manage your economy, and you can raise armies to crush your foes. While you're playing about on the map, quests will pop up that you can move your hero units too.  The quests are text based, and are very similar to the old "Choose Your Own Adventure" books. You have a small section of story to read, and then you can make a choice based on what you want to do. Your actions can lead to very different outcomes, and the outcome effects what units you have in the upcoming battle. While the idea of reading text might seem off putting, it's all very well written.If your a fan of Arthurian legend it's filled with great and it captures the emotions and setting of Arthur's Britain almost perfectly. This section of the game is King Arthur: The Roleplaying Wargame's strongest point. It's unique, and it's very engaging. The series weakest point has always been it's combat. It's very much like Total War, but it lacks the deep AI and realistic physics. Units don't group together very well, and they don't feel like they are actually on the battlefield. The pathfinding is horrible, and units will often move in the opposite direction of where you want them to go. In "Fallen Champions" you get to play as three different heroes, Sir Lionel (a Knight trying to save a damsel in distress), Lady Corrigan (a supernatural being looking for her home in Tir na nÓg), and Drest (a shaman trying whose following a vision. Each of these heroes represents one of the factions from King Arhthur: The Britons, the Picts, and the Sidhe. The story here bridges the gap between the original King Arthur and the upcoming King Arthur 2. Each hero has a short quest line that includes three missions. Each of the mission phases is made up of a quest and a battle.  After you have played all of the heroes missions you play one final mission that involves all three characters. This is a decent amount of content for the $9.99 price tag, and it's a standalone expansion  so it's an even better bargain. There is a tutorial included in here too, so even if you have never played King Arthur before you'll still be able to learn how to play the game. All of the managing aspects of the game have been removed, it's just battles and quests. There are no cites to develop, you can't pick which territory to move to, and you can only go to the next mission spot. You can't build armies, and there is really no need of the tactical map. It's essentially only two-thirds of the game, and they left in the third that sucks. The fact that over half of the game's content relies on the awful combat really ruins this expansion. In the original game, you could just auto-resolve the battles and keep playing the fun questing part of the game. You can't do that here. In one mission, you have an army of ghosts at your disposal. There is a day and night cycle during the mission, and your ghost army will burn if they are exposed to daylight. You have to protect them by moving them into a magical circle, which should be fairly easy. Nope, it's not. Your units don't move to the spot where you tell them to go, and they'll walk right past it. They'll happily move outside the circle randomly and burn to death. In another level, there are fire that you can light to kill and split up the enemy army, but you'll probably kill your own units too when they randomly walk into the flaming inferno. While I really enjoyed the original game, and I think it is one of PC gamings lovely little gems, I can't recommend this expansion to anyone. If you haven't played King Arthur, then you won't really enjoy this a whole lot, and if you have played it you'll just think of how much better it is than this weird expansion. I recommend that you check out the original game if you haven't played it, and if you have played it you should just wait for King Arthur 2 to come out.
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King Arthur: The Roleplaying Wargame was a really fun and interesting hybrid real-time strategy/turn-based strategy/role-playing game. It pulled a lot of good elements from these genres and it felt unique and it really stoo...


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