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Jurassic Park

LEGO Jurassic World photo
LEGO Jurassic World

LEGO Jurassic World sells over four million copies

I see more Jurassic films in the future
Oct 13
// Chris Carter
Say what you will about the LEGO games, but they sell. Evidently WB has recently revealed that LEGO Jurassic World has sold over four million copies. I'd wager that the massive one billion plus success of the f...

Review: LEGO Jurassic World

Jun 26 // Ben Davis
LEGO Jurassic World (PS4 [reviewed], PS3, PS Vita, Xbox One, Xbox 360, Wii U, 3DS, PC)Developer: Traveller's TalesPublisher: Warner Bros.MSRP: $59.99Released: June 12, 2015 As a huge Jurassic Park fan, LEGO Jurassic World is pretty much exactly what I expected from a dinosaur game themed around children's toys. There is no shortage of humor, plenty of satisfying references to the movies and books, playable dinosaurs, and I get to run around as Ian Malcolm with his shirt torn open. What more could I ask for? LEGO Jurassic World's story is built around the plots of the movies, but while the movies can be tense and thrilling, the game remains silly and lighthearted. Death scenes from the films are played out in a comedic fashion. The LEGO characters are never actually killed; instead, they usually end up sharing a goofy moment with the dinosaur that attacks them. For example, Gennaro can be seen cleaning the T. Rex's teeth with a toilet brush after being pulled from his restroom hiding place, and the raptor tamer who dies in the very first scene of Jurassic Park only loses the precious sausage he was holding onto rather than his legs (there's a weird recurring sausage joke for some reason, which I can't say I really understood). Meanwhile, other parts feature raptors riding motorcycles, wearing fruit hats, and chasing lawn mowers through the long grass, so the dinos are generally more charming than they are terrifying. Of course, for a LEGO game, this was kind of a necessity. [embed]294839:59241:0[/embed] Gameplay is heavily puzzle-based, requiring obstacles to be solved by choosing the specific character required for the task. Most of these obstacles are accompanied by button prompts, and there are numerous quick time events scattered throughout as well. There is also some light combat, whenever the party is attacked by dinosaurs or InGen employees, but it involves little more than punching things until they get dizzy or fall apart. Characters do have health bars, but the only penalty for dying is losing a few studs, so it's not really a big deal. The health bars honestly feel wholly unnecessary, as there aren't any lives and characters already essentially feel invincible. They could have probably scrapped that mechanic entirely. It's possible to play as nearly every character from the Jurassic Park films, even minor characters such as Mr. DNA and that weird boy at the dig site who says raptors look like giant turkeys. Each character has their own unique skills which typically play off of their personalities and roles in the films, all of which will need to be utilized in order to traverse each level. Some characters, like Dr. Grant and Gray Mitchell, are good at building things out of dinosaur bones; characters like Lex Murphy and Kelly Malcolm can scream loud enough to shatter glass; characters like Tim Murphy and Ian Malcolm have items that can illuminate dark areas (night vision goggles and flares, for example); and others like Ellie Sattler and Owen Grady aren't afraid to get dirty and rummage through dino droppings (by diving in head first, no less!). It's necessary to play as many different characters in order to clear all of the puzzles and obstacles in the game. Of course, there's not only human characters, but dinosaurs to control as well. Most dinosaurs are unlocked by collecting amber bricks hidden in every level. They can be summoned via dinosaur creation pads, and sick dinosaurs can be healed in order to join the party as well. The dinosaurs come with their own sets of skills; Triceratops can charge and bash open large objects, Dilophosaurus can melt certain things with its venom, T. Rex can roar loud enough to shatter stuff, and Velociraptors can pull switches and sniff out hidden objects. The craziest option is the enormous Brachiosaurus, which can be used to crush certain platforms with a huge stomp, but it's so gigantic and slow that it's almost hilarious. It's even possible to play as Pteranodons and Mosasaurus, although they're restricted to the aviary and aquarium, respectively. Story mode will take the player through twenty levels centered around many of the most memorable and action-packed scenes from the movies. It's really fun to reenact classic scenes like the very first T. Rex attack, the raptors in the kitchen, the San Diego crisis, and more through the playful lens of the LEGO world. Every level is filled with puzzles to solve, obstacles to overcome, and a set amount of collectibles to find. Many levels implement chase sequences, such as running from the Gallimimus herd, or puzzle-based boss fights, like taking down Indominus Rex. There's nothing too complicated, though, so it should be an easy ride for most players. Upon completing each level in story mode, free play mode will be unlocked, allowing players to choose any character they want and switch to someone else at any time. Many of the collectibles can only be obtained in free play, since the characters in story mode might not have the required abilities, so it's necessary to play each level at least two times in order to find everything. Outside of story mode, players can also freely explore each of the four parks. The parks contain more collectibles to find, sick dinosaurs and workers in peril to help, characters to unlock, photograph locations, races, and more. The parks on Isla Sorna are unfortunately rather small and unexciting, but Isla Nublar's Jurassic Park and Jurassic World are both huge and full of all sorts of attractions and cool areas to discover. Strangely, though, once story mode is completed, free play in the parks takes place entirely during nighttime, which kind of bothered me as some areas just seem much less exciting in the dark. I'd prefer to view these beautiful parks in the bright sunshine. [Edit: Apparently, this can be changed, but only by fast travelling to specially marked areas on the map. Still an odd choice, but at least there are options!] Split-screen co-op is also an option, and players can jump in and out of the game at any time. Co-op can make solving puzzles and overcoming obstacles much easier, as players will not need to switch between characters as often and multiple tasks can be completed at once. For such a light-hearted adventure as LEGO Jurassic World, I can definitely see co-op being a popular option. The best aspect of LEGO Jurassic World for me was all the little nuances and nods to the films which were sprinkled throughout. Idle animations for characters usually highlighted certain aspects of their personalities or referenced specific moments from the movies. For example, Zach Mitchell will put on his headphones and start dancing, Amanda Kirby will test her megaphone (put that thing away!), and Ian Malcolm will run a Chaos Theory experiment by dripping water onto his hand. Many of the trophies also make great references to the movies; I think my favorite is the "Hello John!" trophy which is awarded for having both characters set to John Hammond. I also loved that Mr. DNA was in charge of all the tutorials and loading screen trivia. Aside from borrowing plot, characters, and locations from the movies, LEGO Jurassic World also borrows sound clips. While some new dialogue was recorded specifically for the game (mostly for the Jurassic World section), a lot of the dialogue is taken directly from the films. This can be entertaining at times (hearing Jeff Goldblum's ridiculous laugh on the helicopter never gets old, even when it's coming out of a LEGO character's mouth), but it can also be quite jarring. Since the tone of the movies does not match the tone of the game, the dialogue is often way too tense and emotional for what should be silly, light-hearted scenes. There are also many instances where background noise from the films can be heard in the game's dialogue, which sounds really strange when compared to the newly recorded dialogue. Unfortunately, LEGO Jurassic World is not without its fair share of bugs. During my time with the game, there were several instances where I had to restart a level after a character got stuck between a wall and an object and couldn't move or jump to escape, or after they fell through the ground when I switched away from them. There were also a few instances where, after spawning a dinosaur and taking control of it, I could no longer switch to any other character and was permanently stuck in my dinosaur body. Usually, this meant I lost all progress on that level up to the point where I got stuck, so that was always a bummer. While it may have its flaws, I was still perfectly satisfied with my time in LEGO Jurassic World. Fans of the LEGO games should basically know what to expect, and Jurassic Park fans should be more than happy with the story, cutscenes, characters, and references. It captured all of my favorite Jurassic Park moments and added its own unique sense of humor into the mix, and that's essentially all I really wanted. And if you still need a reason to play this, just remember that is has LEGO Jeff Goldblum. Let's be honest: that's all anyone really needs. [This review is based on a retail build of the game purchased by the reviewer.]
LEGO Jurassic World photo
Hold on to your butts
Another year, another beloved franchise gets the LEGO treatment. This year, blocks and dinosaurs come together in LEGO Jurassic World, a compilation of games spanning the entire Jurassic Park film franchise. Released simultan...

LEGO Dimensions photo
LEGO Dimensions

LEGO Dimensions has Chris Pratt, the Doctor, and the Companion Cube

And a partridge in a pear tree
May 11
// Joe Parlock
LEGO Dimensions is a game we all know is going to be absolutely huge. It's little, way too expensive LEGO with Disney Infinity glued on to it, and if that doesn’t print money I don’t know what will. Despite that, ...
LEGO Jurassic World photo
LEGO Jurassic World

LEGO Jurassic World's trailer features festive raptors, Jeff Goldblum

Mar 16
// Ben Davis
The new trailer for LEGO Jurassic World really knows how to get me super pumped for a Jurassic Park game. It features several scenes from the 1993 movie animated in the LEGO style. Everything from the T. Rex chase scene, to ...

LEGO Jurassic World photo
LEGO Jurassic World

Confirmed! You can play as dinosaurs in LEGO Jurassic World

Feb 04
// Jordan Devore
"Imagine playing as the ominous LEGO T. rex, roaming the grounds of Isla Nublar, smashing LEGO bricks and battling with other dinosaurs -- this game is bound to bring out the kid in all of us," says TT Games managing direc...

Revisit Jurassic Park in this Half-Life 2 mod

We have a T. Rex!
Jan 03
// Chris Carter
My wife and I are huge fans of Jurassic Park, and watch it as much as humanly possible. Sadly, games related to the IP haven't really been all that strong since the 16-bit era, but it doesn't take much to get me to at least ...

Review: Jurassic Park

Jan 24 // Darren Nakamura
Jurassic Park (PC [reviewed], Mac, Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, iPad)Developer: Telltale GamesPublisher: Telltale GamesReleased: November 15, 2011MSRP: $29.99 The story in Jurassic Park: The Game occurs during and immediately after the events of the original film. In the first episode, there are a few small callbacks to events from the movie, such as the mention of a hotshot paleontologist on the island and the devastated visitor's center. The focal point of the story is on the fate of the stolen embryos in Dennis Nedry's fake can of shaving cream. It follows a group of survivors left on the island after having missed the evacuation boat during the storm that knocked out the power in the park. These include the park's veterinarian and his visiting daughter, a jilted geneticist who cares more about dinosaurs than people, the mysterious woman sent to steal dinosaur embryos, and a few mercenaries to rescue the stragglers. While that seems like a decent enough premise on which to build the story in Jurassic Park, it falls flat in practice. Each of the characters has a backstory that the player learns more about as the game progresses, but most of the characters are so unlikable that it's difficult to care. Perhaps it is by design that the characters are mostly irritating, so the player doesn't feel too bad when they are inevitably devoured by a tyrannosaurus rex. Some of the situations the characters find themselves in are too ridiculous, even for a story about an island where we cloned dinosaurs using ancient mosquitoes and frog DNA. If it weren't as cumbersome to say, I would try to coin "velociraptors on a roller coaster" as a new version of "jump the shark." The story is far from the worst element of Jurassic Park. While the gameplay isn't exactly terrible, it is incredibly boring. It is broken up into two types of sections: action sequences and puzzle sequences. The action sequences consist entirely of quick time events. While this would be tolerable in moderation, it feels like 75% of the time spent with Jurassic Park is in these QTEs. Compounding on that is the fact that many of them feel arbitrary until after you see the effect. For instance, an arrow may appear on screen instructing the player to press left, and while it's clear from the action on screen that the character may want to dodge, it's not always clear why he has to dodge to the left specifically. The worst offenders are the double or triple arrow quick time events. The arrows themselves are surrounded by a number of circles letting the player know that there are multiple sequential inputs necessary, but the second command isn't displayed until the first button is pressed. With the limited time allotted to input the commands, the player would either have to be clairvoyant to input the correct command, or he would have to go memorize the order of button presses and return to the sequences to replay them. It's unfairly difficult the first time, but then stupidly easy the second time, and it gives the player no satisfaction. The upside to this abundance is that failing certain segments will get your character killed. Although Telltale marketed these deaths as gruesome and intense, they really don't accomplish that. Most death scenes show a few seconds of the character being bitten or swallowed whole, then immediately cut to the "you are dead" screen. While it could be annoying to have to sit through the same long death sequence multiple times, their brevity gives them no weight, and the lack of graphic detail makes them more comical than I think was intended. Following the lead of the boring action sequences, the puzzle sequences require virtually no thinking. Most are solved by clicking all the investigate icons until something happens. Over the four episodes, there were exactly two puzzles that one could rightfully call puzzles; the remainder of these sequences essentially play themselves. Outside of the story and the gameplay, Jurassic Park has some decent production values. There are a few graphical glitches, but overall, the environments and the dinosaurs look fine. The human characters all have a bit of a stylized look to them, which works fine until they start talking; the low-quality facial animation brings them a bit into the uncanny valley. The music is appropriate, and although the original songs weren't composed by John Williams, the score sounds similar enough to the movie that it doesn't seem out of place here. As a game, Jurassic Park is pretty bad. Both the action and puzzle sequences are uninteresting at best and obnoxious at worst. As a movie that forces you to press buttons arbitrarily and occasionally rewinds thirty seconds because a character died when he shouldn't have, it fares a bit better. Still, considering the grating characters and the ridiculous plot, I can't recommend it to anybody, even hardcore fans of the Jurassic Park fiction.

Telltale Games has an established modus operandi for making games. The developer obtains licenses to beloved old franchises, then expands the universe with its own fiction, along with a dose of puzzle solving and exploration....


Telltale employees caught reviewing Jurassic Park

Nov 18
// Jim Sterling
Some naughty Telltale employees were caught writing user reviews for Jurassic Park on Metacritic, with four 10/10 summaries going up at once. Their cover was blown by GameSpot, who found the reviews suspicious and did some de...

Telltale allegedly f*cks up man's Jurassic Park Jeep

Nov 14
// Jim Sterling
[Update: Telltale's Kevin Bruner has responded on Reddit, saying the company has been in regular contact with the Jeep's owner, but the insurance process has been time consuming. "To expedite this, I'll be writing a personal ...

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