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PlayStation evolution photo
PlayStation evolution

Latest Sony retrospective video is all about the games

Evolution of PlayStation
Feb 19
// Jordan Devore
The latest and perhaps final video in Sony's Evolution of PlayStation series is specifically about games rather than the hardware they were designed to run on. Hitting on the divide between games being viewed as toys and gam...

New GDC talks on Dishonored, Journey, and...NASA?

Houston, we have news blog
Feb 13
// Dale North
This year's Game Developer's Conference, which takes place in late March in San Francisco, keeps filling up with more interesting talks and sessions. New ones announced this week are all interesting enough that I'm already tr...
Violence photo

David Cage is right: Violence is not essential

Even if it is jolly good fun
Feb 12
// Fraser Brown
Earlier this week, Allistair suggested that violence is integral to immersion, that it could draw us into games that lack it even more. This was in response to a presentation given by serial pompous twit and occasio...
Dtoid Show photo
Dtoid Show

Half-Life & Portal Movies? Rayman Delayed? What MADNESS!

Also: The Destructoid Show is being weird and stupid again
Feb 08
// Max Scoville
What a bunch of wacky news today about the video games! There's the ongoing Rayman Legends debacle, with it being delayed for a multi-platform release, causeing devs and fans to speak out. Meanwhile, J.J. Abrahms a...

Journey: Chen wanted emotional connections from MMOs

WoW player looking for more
Feb 07
// Dale North
Jenova Chen admitted to being "a nerdy guy that likes to stay at home" during his D.I.C.E. Summit 2013 talk on Journey, but he still wanted to connect with others, and hoped he could do so in MMOs like World of Warcraft. But ...

Journey took thatgamecompany into bankruptcy

Feb 07 // Dale North
[SPOILER ALERT] Chen told a story about how one play tester had the game freeze on them at the end, where your character dies. While the game's ending was not testing well at the end of the second year, this particular player was moved as ending it all before ascending the summit made for the perfect tragedy ending. This got Chen and his team thinking about how they could dig down deeper to make the final emotional wave -- from depth to climax -- more moving. They approached Sony to ask for another year to reach the emotional bandwidth they knew they could it, but even with that extension granted, the work went even beyond this third year. Chen said that in the last half year some staffers worked unpaid. They dipped into their own funds to finish, taking them to bankruptcy in the last year.  But the time they spent that last year really made Journey. They did so much work in making sure the player went through every emotion. For example, near the end on the mountain, in the snow, they created new animations for the journey to show a struggle, making the player feel weaker and less capable. They added new areas in the mountain section, and worked in the stone serpent to heighten the experience. The summit, the game's glorious ending section, was originally on rails in earlier versions. They switched it to be free-roaming, added surfing from the beginning, and made sure that players had total freedom to walk toward the light.  Chen said three of the 25 testers of the final version cried at completion.
Struggles of Journey photo
Went one year over budget
Jenova Chen's D.I.C.E. Summit talk on my favorite game of last year, Journey, was moving for many reasons, but I was particularly moved when I heard that his team, thatgamecompany, went bankrupt in the struggle to finish the ...


Try not to cry from reading this Journey fan mail

Feb 07
// Dale North
thatgamecompany's Jenova Chen shared this fan letter during his D.I.C.E. Summit 2013 presentation today on his team's journey making Journey. Your game practically changed my life. It was the most fun I had with him since he...
PSN Chart photo
PSN Chart

Unfinished Swan, EDF 2017 soar to new heights on PSN

Giant Sparrow and Sandlot run away with PSN in January
Feb 06
// Kyle MacGregor
The Unfinished Swan and Earth Defense Force 2017 Portable are your top-selling PlayStation Network games of January. The PlayStation Blog reports that this domineering pair have unseated Journey and LittleBigPl...

Journey, Dishonored top Game Developers Choice Awards

Nominees announced
Jan 24
// Dale North
The nominees for the 2013 Game Developers Choice Awards are in, and it looks like Journey, Dishonored and The Walking Dead are leading. Hey, those were our favorite games too. Journey took six nominations as the top favorite,...

Journey leads D.I.C.E. awards with 11 nominations

Chris Hardwick to host 16th annual awards
Jan 14
// Dale North
The 16th Annual D.I.C.E. Awards take place next month in Las Vegas and the nominations have been announced by The Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences. I'm not at all surprised to see Journey taking the t...

Journey was the best-selling PSN game of December

Jan 10
// Jordan Devore
On the PlayStation Blog, the top-selling PlayStation Network games of December have been compiled for curious minds to look over and commit to memory. Topping the charts is none other than thatgamecompany's Journey, beating o...

2012: Year of the Wingsuit

Dec 31 // Kyle MacGregor
Call of Duty: Black Ops II  Wingsuits are a pretty scary prospect in real life. Jumping off daring heights, gliding off into the wind is enough, but to look ridiculous doing it? It's a bit too much for me. Thankfully, Michael Rooker and his squad did it for me in Black Ops II -- all I had to do was press a few buttons. Although the wingsuits aren't really featured for more than a few minutes of the game, their addition added some excitement to the beginning of the campaign, and really drove home how diverse the gear and weaponry really is in 2025. Mark of the Ninja Like the Tenchu series, Mark of the Ninja has a number of items that may not be very ninja-y (strictly speaking), but provide a ton of fun for anyone who wants to utilize them. One of those items is the wingsuit, which lets you stalk your enemies with great care in the air. While a ninja game is probably the last game I'd expect to see a flying squirrel homage in, Mark of the Ninja is one of the many wingsuit-filled games of 2012. New Super Mario Bros. U While at first I lamented the lack of Cape Mario or the Tanooki Suit, I learned to love the Flying Squirrel Suit in New Super Mario Bros. U. Once you realized the nuanced play of clinging to walls, and bouncing off enemy heads to keep your glide going, things get really technical, and incredibly fun. I didn't truly learn to appreciate the Flying Squirrel Suit until I tackled the game's challenge modes, where I quickly had to acclimate myself to not overdoing it, and utilizing all of the enemies I could to keep my flight combo going. Although it isn't the best new addition to the Mario franchise, I really enjoyed my time with it this year. Far Cry 3 I thought Far Cry 2 was near perfect, but Ubisoft Montreal really strove to take everything up to eleven with the sequel. There are several additions and improvements that make the already winning formula even more enjoyable, but few manage to be more exhilarating than soaring over Far Cry 3's war-torn jungles in a wingsuit.  When Jason Brody's journey into this insane new world calls for him to head to a new island, he acquires this equipment to help him drop unseen behind enemy lines. After that memorable covert landing, the wingsuit can be used freely for a limitless number of exhilarating flights. And whether our intrepid protagonist is using it to sneak up on enemies or just indulging in a joyride, one thing is for sure: using Far Cry 3's wingsuit always makes for a good time. Journey Okay, so this one's not exactly a wingsuit per se, but it's close enough in our book. Journey's magical scarf does just about everything you'd expect a wingsuit to do and the flapping cloak doesn't look too far off the mark, either. Gliding plays an integral role in traversing Journey's glittering desert landscapes and also makes for some of the title's more memorable and cinematic moments. SSX In SSX, there are nine deadly descents that correspond to different environmental hazards that exist around the globe. There's a variety of specialist gear to help conquer these potential threats, but of them all the wingsuit is, far and away, my favorite. On certain slopes, there are large drops and wide gaps that make having a wingsuit an absolute necessity if you're looking to survive the run. However, given the choice I still take a wingsuit with me just about every time. While it might seem unintuitive, despite the webbing reducing speed, the enhanced level of control it offers in the air can help shave off precious seconds in a race. That and, like the rest of these games, it's also just a lot of fun to use in general. 
Wingsuits photo
I want to fly like a squirrel
When just about every major publisher rolled out a game featuring bows at E3 earlier this year, the fad didn't go unnoticed. Many were quick to comment on how in vogue arrow-slinging weaponry has become and for good reason. T...


Journey Collectorís Edition minigames to be PSN downloads

In Europe...
Dec 31
// Dale North
Siliconera spotted listings and ratings for Duke War and Grave Diggers on PEGI's ratings board. These are names some might know from the recently released Journey: Collector's Edition, a title we saw this fall, but Europe mis...

Jimquisition Awards: Journey

Five Days, Five Games, Five Awards
Dec 19
// Jim Sterling
The very first Jimquisition Awards are here! Five days, five games, five awards! Very rarely, a game comes along that strikes a near-perfect balance between interactivity, visuals, and sound design. Journey&nb...

VGAs: Journey wins three awards tonight far
Dec 07
// Dale North
Best Independent Game, Best PS3 Game, Best Original Score. And if you ask me, they should also win Game of the Year. Three awards so far from VGA 2012. Congrats to all the folks behind Journey. You deserve these awards and more.  If you haven't played Journey yet, don't talk to me.  Hey, even Jim liked it.

Journey gets nominated for a Grammy and seven VGAs

Journey takes on Tintin, Hugo and Batman
Dec 06
// Audun Sorlie
Journey composer Austin Wintory is a busy man these days. He recently spoke at SC9.0 in Germany to great success and media attention where he was able to share that Journey had received seven nominations for the ten...

Journey soundtrack gets physical CD release

Better late than never!
Nov 07
// Jayson Napolitano
Looking back at 2012 thus far, Journey stands out as one of the strongest soundtracks of the year. We had the pleasure of hearing from composer Austin Wintory regarding the score as well as offering our own review of the soun...

Soundtrack Cologne bringing the VGM party to Germany

To health and game music, prost!
Oct 28
// Audun Sorlie
You can be sure a lot of beer will be consumed as Soundtrack Cologne 9.0 is preparing to bring some esteemed videogame music legends together for a round of panels and an exclusive concert over the weekend of November 15-18 a...

David Cage: games must innovate or 'die'

Jul 06
// Jim Sterling
Self-proclaimed videogame auteur David Cage has urged the videogame industry to innovate of face certain death. "... This industry will die if it doesn't try more to be innovative and to come up with new ideas and to talk a b...

Over the precipice: An essay on Journey

Jul 03 // Rob Parker
Now, that is a philosophical joke, which means partly that it’s not funny, but also that its profundity is revealed gradually, the deeper you consider it. The point is that, while it is easy for us to see water for what it is -- as outsiders looking in -- for the fish it is always there, and thus very hard to be aware of. This is a message worth keeping in mind when thinking about Journey, the latest release from thatgamecompany, developers of the zen-like Cloud, Flow, and Flower. Journey is a remarkable videogame, a work of art that commentators across the spectrum of gaming have found much to ponder within. For me, Journey is about the only thing that art worth any goddamn can ever be about, which is what it is we’re all doing here. Journey is about truth, about base reality, about this experience of being itself we so often ignore. It is a call to look around us and remember that, as David Foster Wallace puts it: “This is water. This is water.” We humans like to think we’re pretty hot shit. We stand, like the figure in that screenshot up there, overlooking our kingdoms, lords of all we survey. We are intellectual beings, gods on Earth; we have split the atom, put man on the moon, invented squeezable jam. We have mastered chaos. And yet we trudge onwards under a shadow. There is a great shape towering over us, and it is brought closer with every step. We are on a fixed path, ushered forwards, and there can be no escape. We stand upon a precipice, waiting for the moment we will be tipped off. And then ... who knows? For all our nuclear reactors and space shuttles and tubed-jams, we have no clue what will happen when we take the final fall. Our arrogance is really a mask for fear, for the truth of our situation, which is that we are but insignificant flames, blazing once in an endless void, soon to be extinguished forever. There is, certainly, a sense of this evident within Journey. Its tale of an enigmatic robed figure traveling through a vast desert towards a distant mountain can be read as a treatise on death, a declaration of the inconsequentiality of man’s power and knowledge when measured against the vastness of the cosmos. We are tiny specks scuttling across a universe that feels nothing but cold indifference to our plight. We are alone, and we will all die. The thing is, while Journey might present us with these facts, the conclusions it arrives at are far from nihilistic. In the vigor and exuberance engendered through traversing its undulating sands, you feel not despair at your insignificance, but liberation. The treatise on death is transformed into a treatise on life. And not life as opposed to death, but life including death. Because the real truth of our situation is not that we are standing on a precipice, waiting to fall, but that we are falling already, and haven’t yet hit the ground. Rather than peering down into a dark unknown, we are actually in this dark unknown right now. The dark unknown is, at our most fundamental level, us. It hardly matters that we don’t know what will happen when we die, because we don’t even know what will happen when we live. We don’t even know what we mean when we say “know.” “The Tao that can be spoken of is not the eternal Tao.The name that can be named is not the eternal name.” These wry, wise old words come from the first lines of the Tao Te Ching, a screed regarding the Tao, or hidden flow, of the universe. It’s telling that the lines, among the most penetrating -- and most quoted -- in philosophical discourse, comprise a negative statement -- telling us what is not, rather than what is. In much of Taoist (and subsequent Zen) thought, the assumption is that awareness of base reality -- and thus liberation, enlightenment -- is not something that can be intellectually arrived at, but a fundamental truth of existence that we simply have to stop trying to attain, and remember is here, right now, for us all to experience. We don’t often think like this in the West. Our busy, fearful, left-hemisphere dominated minds have a hard time relinquishing control and placing faith in a more natural, less forced intelligence. A Zen master would remind us that a finger pointing to the moon is not the moon, while our great thinkers tie themselves in knots wanting written instructions how to look from the finger to the moon, how eyes switch targets, how light is converted into electro-chemical impulses, and how that happens, and how that happens. We believe it is possible to “know” everything, and we do so erroneously. For what we mean by “knowing” is really just grouping, ordering, filing away. To know a thing is to delineate it, to demarcate its boundaries, its opposites, to cut it away from the rest of the world so it may be observed. In doing so we build complex maps of the relationships between things, yet we say nothing of the things themselves. You cannot demarcate that which has no opposite. To try is to confuse the map with the territory. I still remember this faux intellectual punk I used to know, who once sneered, “Everyone gets so soppy about love, without realizing it’s just a chemical reaction in the brain that means nothing.” The kid thought that because he could classify love, he could explain it away! He didn’t recognize that the whole universe is a chemical reaction -- if viewed through the framework of chemistry. Love, or fear, anxiety, joy, are what chemistry feels like from the inside. We are a chemical reaction experiencing itself! To borrow again from the Tao Te Ching, “Mystery of mysteries, the door to all wonders.” This isn’t, however, to say that the Western mind is worse at perceiving truth than the Eastern mind. For where our intellectual discourse fails, our art provides answers. Art is a way of presenting truth as honestly as possible, a kind of meditation -- both in the creation and the contemplation -- that allows us to see deeply into things as they really are. Whether staring at a lapis lazuli pendant from ancient Mesopotamia, vibrant with preternatural color, or feeling a creeping dread at the hellish rabbit visions conjured onto film by David Lynch, or exploring the simulated realms of a modern videogame, art lets us step back and refocus on what is, reminds us of the incomprehensibility of this teeming mass of reality blossoming each moment around us, and within us. And when we do so we are transformed. We no longer bustle along the forest path, eyes down, heads busy with What Jason Said Yesterday, or Why Sarah is Such a Cow -- but instead look up, and remember that we are, at this very moment, in paradise, and we better appreciate it now, before it is gone for good. This is what Journey does for me. It is, I think, an antidote to the suffering we feel when we misjudge our place on Earth. Sometimes we trudge up dunes, and the going is tough. Sometimes we surf and sail downhill, and we feel borne on the wind. Such is life. There is a mountain towering over us, the engulfing light at its peak drawing closer with each step. But this mountain need not be a specter. It can instead be a warden -- a lighthouse guiding us home, waiting patiently for our return. We soar up its slopes, our hearts glad. We are tiny, we are empty, we know nothing -- and how very beautiful that ultimate truth is. For when we are empty of ourselves we can let everything else in, and it is then when we find our real selves, not apart from the universe, but a part of it, growing out of it, growing back into it. And we are far from alone. Look at all these other travelers around us, pilgrims on the same journey. When we meet others in Journey, we no longer care about measuring them, comparing them, judging them. We don’t wish to manipulate them, nor do we fear being manipulated by them. We see them for who they truly are, empty as well, and we can enjoy simply existing with them, being with them, as we once did as children in that half-forgotten world of dreams we used to inhabit. There we stand, together, on the precipice of all things -- two tiny hearts beating in unison against the drone of an endless cosmos. What is there to do but sing? So we sing. And, somewhere down there, over the precipice of all things, the endless cosmos sings back.

[Rob Parker is a freelance writer based in the North of England, where it rains every day. Except the days when it hails. Rob stays sane (and dry) by plunging himself into the simulated worlds of videogames, and writing st...


Jimquisition: The Definition of Art Games

Jul 02
// Jim Sterling
There's nothing like a debate about art games to ensure that everybody has a fun, enlightening, and not-at-all-aggravating time! Let's discuss the assertion that "art game" as a descriptor doesn't work, that it's a broken te...

The DTOID Show: 2012 in Retrospecticus

Jul 01
// Tara Long
I know what you're thinking. "But Tara, the year's only half over!" Well yes, technically that's true, but it doesn't mean we can't stop and take a moment to gather our thoughts on this year's video game releases, does ...

The DTOID Show: Scrolls, Journey, and Dead or Alive 5!

Jun 25
// Tara Long
While Max is off catching fresh salmon with his bare hands overseas, Anthony Carboni was kind enough (and contractually obligated) to filled in for him on today's Destructoid Show! We talked all about Far Cry 3's unsurprisin...

Journey Collector's Edition detailed for North America

Jun 25
// Jordan Devore
Journey has done extremely well for itself on PlayStation Network, and with the upcoming disc-based collector's edition on the way, I can only see that trend continuing. As announced today by developer thatgamecompany, Journe...

Fan-made Journey figurine is simple and elegant

Jun 20
// Tony Ponce
Journey has such a clean, simple beauty about it that's minimalist yet striking. This custom Journey figurine seems to check all the appropriate boxes, don't you think? thatgamecompany spotted this pretty little thing on Twit...

E3: Journey is the 'best selling PSN game of all time'

Jun 04
// Chad Concelmo
During Sony's press conference, Jack Tretton announced that Journey is officially the best selling PSN game of all time. Quite a feat. Quite a great game. This is exciting news for fans of the game and great news for developer thatgamecompany. If you haven't bought the game yet, go download it! It is wonderful.

Talking to Women about Videogames: Art has no e-penis

May 28 // Jonathan Holmes
It's especially disheartening to see these claims coming from Sony, which has a pretty poor track record when it comes to creative plagiarism. Everyone has their own opinions about what constitutes artistic integrity (more on that later), but most would probably agree that ripping off other people's ideas isn't as "artistic" as expressing your own. Whereas Nintendo consistently does whatever they want and Microsoft seems dedicated to finding new ways to speak to every aspect of the Western market, Sony spends a lot of its resources on directly copying other developers, both in terms of hardware and software. When cartoon mascots were big in the industry, Sony churned out titles like Ape Escape and Crash Bandicoot. After Metal Gear, Resident Evil, and Tomb Raider made the "Hollywood" approach to game development popular, Sony dropped its mascots in favor of titles like Uncharted, God of War, and Heavy Rain. The fact that we have three Uncharted games on the PS3 but not one title from Team Ico on the console shows exactly where Sony's priorities are in terms of plagiarism vs. originality. And don't even get me started on the current state of the PlayStation Move and its library. That said, Sony has published some very original games recently and further in the past: PaRappa the Rapper, Jumping Flash, Twisted Metal, Ico, Shadow of the Colossus, Loco Roco, Patapon, The Last Guy, Flower, and Journey, to name just a few. The company also has the tendency to improve upon whatever idea it's ripping off (Uncharted 2 and God of War 2 are arguably the best "action movie games" ever made). That's why Sony is one of my favorite publishers today. I just wouldn't say that originality is one of their strengths. Something I do think Sony is very skilled at is making its fans feel better about themselves. It does that in a variety of ways, from providing them with powerful hardware to brag about to, in this case, leading them to believe they are more "artistically minded, sophisticated, and grown up" than fans of other developers. Sony has always payed close attention to the surface-level traits of the games on its consoles, working hard to control the "image" of the PlayStation brand. In the early days, it discouraged Capcom and other developers from putting 2D games on the PS1 and PS2, as it didn't want PlayStation to be associated with "old games." Today, the company highlights "realistic"-looking PS3 games at retail, leaving more abstract titles like those developed by ThatGameCompany out of the spotlight, constrained to the smaller scale and profit space of PSN. It's all part of a plan to make the PlayStation name and PlayStation fans feel like suave badasses of the videogame world. The focus on "realism" is just one of the ways that Sony attempts to dress its games in grown-up clothes. Other than LittleBigPlanet, it hasn't put many "cute" games on the PS3 (presumably because it thinks "cute" means automatically "for kids"). It has also avoided putting too many "sexy" games on the console, maybe because it doesn't want to look like it panders to "horny teens." These are all issues of style, not so much of substance. With the software from ThatGameCompany, Sony has touted how much the games "looked" like fine art, saying little about how much artistry is involved with the actually gameplay design. With Heavy Rain, Sony seemed to make an effort to tell everyone how many "un-game" activities the title featured -- stuff like shaving, using an inhaler, and yelling a child's name repeatedly in real time. Then there was the whole "realistic acne" thing. None of these details have any relationship to how "artistic" a game is. Interpretation of art is a personal, subjective thing that can't be measured by how much a game looks like a painting, how many cutscenes it has, or how big its pimples are. For me, a game's level of artistry has a lot to do with how much integrity it has. I'm guessing that's true for a lot of people, though "integrity" is also a pretty subjective term. That's why I get more out of the Animal Crossing series than something like Journey. Both games are about relaxation through simplicity, the appreciation of minutia, and interacting with both the environments and with other players through a minimalist, conflict-free focus. It's just that Animal Crossing does all that via a combination of low-intensity, non-sexual pornography (hunter-gatherer porn and "cute little cartoon animals that look like babies" porn to be specific). In fact, the first thing I thought after playing Journey was that "it's like Animal Crossing for hipsters." I was half joking in that assessment, but I still felt that there is some validity to it. I really felt like it was valid after I heard from Jenova Chen on Twitter that Animal Crossing was a "big inspiration" for Journey. That's not something I think you'd hear Sony talk about. [Artwork by 8WholeBits] Like I said in last week's post, I think that there are basically four types of human communication: art, competition, pornography, and education. I don't think that mixing any of those forms of communication dampens their integrity in any way. Art + pornography = erotica, a worthwhile sub-genre of communication all its own. Education + competition = spelling bees, and spelling bees are totally rad. Combining forms of communication can strengthen all components involved, resulting in something that is greater than the sum of it's parts. There is no loss of integrity there. Sense of integrity is only lost when you lose a feeling of sincerity and honesty. Journey feels more pretentious to me, like its developers were just as concerned about looking like artists as they were about making art. Animal Crossing's artistic merit comes off as a byproduct of its developers' insane desire to make a game about nothing. It almost feels like art by accident. On the other hand, Journey feels like it's trying so hard to look deep that it sometimes forgets to actually say anything. Most of that boils down to design. There are so many little life metaphors in the Animal Crossing experience, from the game's cannibalistic Thanksgiving holiday to the way it rewards the player with bags of money, grand pianos, or even NES games for shaking random trees, and they seem like direct comments from the game's designers on their perception of the world. Journey is more about unobtrusive, linear design. Its emptiness permits the player to project their own thoughts and feelings into the game, taking in very few ideas directly from the developer. It feels a little like a cop out, like the player is tricked into thinking it's "deep" because of the depth they're permitted to project from themselves into the game's world. That's part of why Journey's priorities don't totally fall in line with my own as much as Animal Crossing's do. When something speaks to you, when it seems to reflect your own perspectives and values, it's always going to seem more sincere and legitimate. We're going to be biased towards the things we like and have a tougher time seeing the value in things that we aren't compatible with. It's very easy to call a game that you don't like "pretentious," "less artistic," "a sellout," "sexist/racist/stupid," or some other disrespectful modifier. It's also great for people's egos to apply that kind of disrespectful, sour grapes thinking to the tastes of others. That's why it would a misstep for me to come out and say that the games I like are more "artistic" than the games that other people enjoy. The only thing I'd really be saying in a statement like that is that I think my taste in games makes me a better person than others. I don't see the point in thinking that way (though it is sometimes tempting). It's much better for us to take a close look at why certain games speak to us and why others don't, remaining focused on speaking only for ourselves. We should stay away from labeling some games as more sincere, sophisticated, or artistic on some objective level, because that will only work to close us off from looking at those games for all that they are. When you're truly "sophisticated," "grown-up," "artistic," and "confident" with your various endowments, you won't feel the need to brag about them or belittle others for being different than you.

[Talking to Women about Videogames is a series where Jonathan Holmes talks to different people who are women about the biggest videogame news of the week for some reason.] A little while ago, brilliant game developer Je...


Science: PS3 users more sophisticated than 360/Wii users

May 08
// Jim Sterling
According to thatgamecompany designer Jenova Chen, the reason why games like Flower and Journey are on the PlayStation Network is that PS3 owners are more mature than Xbox 360 or Wii users. Apparently, those who bought the Bl...

Journey and Escape Plan infiltrate LittleBigPlanet 2

Apr 24
// Chris Carter
While you're waiting for LittleBigPlanet Karting, you may as well enjoy LittleBigPlanet 2, right? Well this week thatgamecompany and Fun Bits Interactive are making it a bit easier, with the dawn of Journey and Escape Plan co...

Rapper Random produced a short, sweet Journey remix album

Apr 19
// Tony Ponce
Whether you've already played Journey or have yet to do so, you've no doubt fallen in love with Austin Wintory's beautifully introspective soundtrack. Jayson Napolitano has already given the full album his highest recommendat...

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