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Infinity Ward

Call of Duty photo
Call of Duty

The rest of us can play as the Predator in Call of Duty: Ghosts this May

Release dates for Devastation on PS3, PS4, and PC
Apr 11
// Jordan Devore
I'll hand it to Infinity Ward for spicing things up by included the Predator in Call of Duty: Ghosts with its Devastation DLC pack. More moves like that and the studio might just win over some of the fans who have moved on to...

Review: Call of Duty: Ghosts: Devastation

Apr 04 // Chris Carter
Call of Duty: Ghosts: Devastation DLC (PC, PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Infinity WardPublisher: ActivisionReleased: April 3, 2014 (Xbox 360, Xbox One) / TBA (PC, PS3, PS4)MSRP: $14.99 ($50 Season Pass for four packs) Out of the four standard maps that are a part of the Devastation DLC, the most standout addition is easily Ruins. This is the temple map that Call of Duty: Ghosts never knew it needed, and the layers upon layers of stairs help make this one of the more interesting arenas in the game. You can also see a noticeable improvement upon past entries in terms of detail, as every piece of foliage is meticulously crafted, on top of the wonderful mist effects that help add to the theme of the level. The maze-like layout also makes objective-based modes a bit more exciting, but it's more than sufficient for team deathmatch as well. Of course, the major gimmick here is the ability to become the Predator -- and not just any "predator" -- the creature from the successful string of Hollywood films. Although it's not a fully decked-out alien hunter it's still extremely formidable, as you can track down enemies with thermal vision, cloak yourself, slash enemies with your claw, and even shoot a shoulder-mounted gun. The pièce de résistance is easily the self-destruct mode that triggers upon death, complete with the Predator's signature evil laugh. While I wouldn't recommend that people buy this DLC just for this element alone, it undeniably adds to the allure of the overall package, as even fighting the Predator is fun. Devastation has another solid map in the form of Collision, which takes place on a tanker that's crashed into a giant bridge. Like Ruins it's insanely detailed, as the ship itself is creaking, sprouting leaks, and some areas are even on fire. It's a great theme that's a step up from many of the "wrecked" levels in past games, and the running water effects look great on current-gen consoles. It helps that it sports a great layout with lots of twists, turns, and elevated vantage points. [embed]272838:53254:0[/embed] The next two maps however aren't as memorable. Behemoth takes place on a giant platform with multiple buzzsaws looming in the distance. It's extremely standard fare with no real standout points outside of the well done backdrop, which is inconsequential in the grand scheme of things. There's lots of tunnels, but overall it feels cramped and limited. I usually hope that Behemoth gets voted out while I'm waiting in the lobby. Unearthed is another level that feels like a wasted slot, as it's a remake of Dome from Modern Warfare 3. While Dome was a decent arena it never really resonated with me, offering up standard underground passages and one major point of elevation. Unearthed is basically that exact same layout, just re-skinned to look like an excavation site. Infinity Ward could have done so much more with the theme, or picked a more iconic map in general. There's one more piece of the puzzle though that raises the other two weak maps up a bit -- a new Extinction level called "Mayday." Although one could easily say that the less cryptic nature of Extinction makes it less alluring than zombies, it's much easier to follow and pick up, and has a vastly detailed upgrade system that's made even better with the new DLC. In addition to picking and building your own class you can also earn "teeth" by completing levels and certain objectives, which basically function as currency for even more upgrades. Now it's easier than ever to customize your look and craft your own personal character based on your style, which adds to the mode's replay value considerably. Mayday itself is also a welcome addition to the Extinction family, taking place on a giant Tanker that's under siege by an even bigger Kraken. More doors are open from the start (which have to be drilled through just like nests) that lead to secret weapons and items, but the stakes are also much higher since the Kraken's tentacles can burst through walls. There are also a few new enemies including a Tank-like alien that can take tons of pain, and the addition of ceilings ensures that you'll have more vertical threats than ever before. It's a very difficult mission, one that'll take teamwork to complete. At one point I was stuck in a room with two downed allies, two giant tank aliens, three enemies throwing down fire from the ceiling, and a teleporting mini-boss, and was completely overwhelmed -- but I was having a ton of fun in the process. I can't wait to see what Infinity Ward does with Extinction in the next two add-ons, as they're really coming into their own here -- I hope they keep this as their "signature" in their next iteration. I'm really glad that Infinity Ward decided to model their DLC packs after Treyarch, and include an additional story-related component on top of the standard maps. $14.99 seems like a high price to non-fans, but I've played enough of Extinction mode to fit in the length of a few major releases -- the other maps are basically a bonus. I just hope they step it up next time and have every map match that level of quality.
CoD DLC review photo
I got time to bleed
Infinity Ward's DLC capabilities may not be up to snuff compared to Treyarch's, but the fact that they're trying is good enough for me. Call of Duty: Ghost's Onslaught DLC was a major step up in quality when compared to their...

Call of Duty photo
Call of Duty

New Call of Duty: Ghosts DLC seems like a real waste

But hey, the free Steam weekend is okay
Feb 20
// Jordan Devore
This weekend, Call of Duty: Ghosts' multiplayer will be free to play on Steam and the game is half price ($29.99) to own. There's also double XP being offered, from February 21 at 10:00am to Feb. 24 at 10:00am. These are all...

Sledgehammer leading development of next Call of Duty

Call of Duty series going into three-year development cycle now
Feb 06
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Activision has just reported on their financials for the last quarter, and among the news they've announced that Sledgehammer Games will be leading the development of the next Call of Duty coming out this year. In the past, C...

Call of Duty's Onslaught DLC dated for PS3, PS4, and PC

Releases on February 27
Feb 05
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Call of Duty: Ghosts Onslaught DLC was released last month for the Xbox One and Xbox 360. And like clockwork, the PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, and PC versions of the game will see the new content a month later. Specifically ...

Review: Call of Duty: Ghosts: Onslaught

Jan 29 // Chris Carter
Call of Duty: Ghosts: Onslaught DLC (PC, PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Infinity WardPublisher: ActivisionReleased: January 28, 2014 (Xbox 360, Xbox One) / TBA (PC, PS3, PS4)MSRP: $14.99 ($50 Season Pass for four packs) First things first, Onslaught comes with a new weapon -- the Maverick. It has the unique ability to be used as either an assault rifle or a sniper, but sadly, not at the same time (all my hopes of a Transformers style gun have been dashed). I was excited to try it out, but after using it in a series of games, there isn't much to say about it. It's more fun as a sniper than an assault rifle, because there are so many of the latter to choose from anyway, but that's about it. The good news then is that it's not overpowered and won't alienate players who don't buy the DLC. In terms of maps, there are four new ones -- Bayview, Containment, Ignition, and Fog. The standout here is Fog, featuring a creepy swamp area and a series of shacks that are straight out of a horror movie. There's a ton of detail here, including cult shrines littered about the brambled swamp, and a large house that features a deranged basement, leading into a runoff of blood and organs. The interiors have a lot of work put into them, with dead animal trophies, flayed hides, and other horror themed knick-knacks in tow. There's even a wrecked bridge leading into the level, complete with a broken down car on the other side. But the real kicker is the ability to transform into Halloween's Michael Myers by picking up and completing a specific field order. This usually happens once per match, and when it does, the iconic Halloween theme plays for everyone, and one player gets to run around the map with extra health and an axe, wrecking havoc while everyone else panics. It's basically a modified version of the Maniac killstreak, but it's well done and fun, nonetheless. This is one of the first times any Call of Duty has featured such an extensive Easter egg in the core multiplayer, and it really adds a lot of character to the DLC in general. Bayview is the best new addition though, taking place on the oceanfront under the guise of a boardwalk style town. It has a distinctively different feel from most of Ghost's bleak maps, as it feels more Treyarch in nature with its bright hues and sunny backdrop. There are tons of buildings to explore, including a giant crab shack, an information center, and a miniature aquarium. There's a lot of variety aesthetically and in terms of its layout, with a good mixture of indoor and outdoor environments to have firefights in, complete with a moving trolley along the map's perimeter. All in all, it's a pleasant surprise, and probably my favorite Ghost map in general. Containment is a bit more boring, but not a bad map by any means. It takes place in a war torn city, almost like a World at War level. The setup is interesting, as there are two distinct sides separated by a bridge and a ravine, with a truck housing a nuke in the middle. If you approach the truck your radar is screwed up, which leads players into sticking to their sides, engaging into lots of ranged fights. Other than a giant church on one side however, there isn't a whole lot of personality to it, and although you won't loathe playing on it, you won't get very excited either. Unfortunately, the last part of the four piece map puzzle (which is a remake of Modern Warfare 2's Scrapyard) feels like a complete waste. Ignition features a generic layout and style that's been done many times before -- whether it's the shuttle launching in the background or the industrial warehouse theme. The only cool part is the non-functional mobile fortress is one area (similar to the Jawa's Sandcrawler in Star Wars), but even then that's pushing it. This map is just so boring that I actively found myself voting against it -- it's not nearly as memorable as Scrapyard was when it debuted. Thankfully, all four maps have a really cool meta-game involving the hunt for "alien eggs," as one is hidden on each Onslaught stage. The main event for Onslaught however is the new Extinction storyline, starting with "Episode 1: Nightfall." For those who aren't aware, Extinction is Infinity Ward's answer to Treyarch's "Zombies" mode, but instead, it's a bit more linear in nature, and features more mobile aliens. At launch, Ghosts came with a rather generic offering of Extinction that I only bothered to play a handful of times until I was bored to tears. But with Nightfall, I see some hope on the horizon. Firstly, there's now a real cohesive story involving the outbreak and a few people who know the truth behind it. It's not a great story, but it's something, and runs parallel to Treyarch's attempts to link together their Zombies mode with its own lore. The other kicker is that it adds new aliens, including a boss fight with the giant Breeder, and a new miniboss -- the Phantom. The Phantom is a standout in particular, as he has the ability to teleport around, Nightcrawler style. His teleporting is seemingly non-scripted, as he can feign an attack, then ghost about at will just to trick you as you're attacked by other aliens from behind. The new map is also much brighter and more open ended, allowing you to drill various alien nests at your own pace with up to four players. All of the same progression oriented gameplay is here, including the ability to choose between an assault, tank, mechanical, or healing class, to augment your party's abilities or buff your own. Although it's not nearly as robust as Zombies and doesn't feature half as many tricks and secrets, I feel like Extinction has really proved its concept in Nightfall, and I'm legitimately looking forward to seeing what the next three episodes can offer.I was pleasantly surprised by Onslaught, especially considering the fact that Ghosts was so underwhelming. Although it won't do too much to change your mind if you're an adamant Call of Duty hater, the new Extinction episode is promising, and there are three solid maps here for the taking.
COD DLC review photo
I get by with a little help from Michael Myers
Call of Duty: Ghosts is one of the most disappointing games in the series' history. Although I didn't dislike it as much as Jim did, there's certainly something missing that made past games in the franchise appealing, an...


Nightfall descends on Call of Duty: Ghosts Extinction

A teaser for the first new episode
Jan 23
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Episode 1: Nightfall is coming with the Onslaught downloadable content for Call of Duty: Ghosts, and here's a deeper look at what to expect. It takes place in the Alaskan wilderness, where the Nightfall Program has been rese...

Real life in the way? Then sign up for CODnapping

As in Call of Duty, not like, a cod fish
Jan 21
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Call of Duty's real life ad campaign continues with this year's Call of Duty: Ghosts. The ad starts off almost as an homage to the intro from The Dark Knight with the whole Joker bank robbery scene. Then we see it's that one...
Call of Duty photo
Call of Duty

CoD: Ghosts Xbox 360 update stabilizes Broadcaster mode

Further competitive rules restrictions added
Jan 18
// Harry Monogenis
Infinity Ward has pushed out Call of Duty: Ghosts' first update of the year on the Xbox 360, addressing complaints from users regarding its Broadcaster mode and how it would sometimes cause the game to crash. The update also ...

Become Michael Myers in the new Call of Duty: Ghosts DLC

First of four downloadable content packs
Jan 13
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
GameStop leaked the first look, and now Activision has given us an extensive overview of what to expect from the upcoming Onslaught downloadable content for Call of Duty: Ghosts. Onslaught includes four new small to medium s...
Onslaught DLC photo
Onslaught DLC

Call of Duty: Ghosts Onslaught DLC info leaks

GameStop poster reveals content for 1st DLC pack
Jan 11
// Wesley Ruscher
First information for the upcoming DLC pack for Call of Duty: Ghosts has hit the web thanks to the keen eyes of one Twitter user making their way through a local GameStop. The pack, coming first to Xbox Live, will contain fou...

Call of Duty: Ghosts update adds Heavy Duty mode

Plus a bunches of fixes
Dec 23
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Call of Duty: Ghosts received an update today across the PC, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PlayStation 4, and PlayStation 3. A new Heavy Duty mode was added to multiplayer, plus there are new loadouts added to the Infected mode. Five s...
Console transition photo
Console transition

Activision blames new consoles for lower sales of Ghosts

Of course it's not Activision's fault
Dec 05
// Joshua Derocher
Activision knows why Call of Duty: Ghosts didn't sell as many copies as they had hoped, and it has nothing to do with them regurgitating the same game every year. Eric Hirshberg, Activision's CEO, told GameInformer that the s...
Call of Duty photo
Call of Duty

CoD: Ghosts PC patch reduces required RAM amount

Further support for MLG also implemented
Nov 19
// Harry Monogenis
A new update for Call of Duty: Ghosts has been rolled out by Infinity Ward on PC, which intends to fix numerous stability issues and provide improved performance for Nvidia and AMD users. Ghosts' third update on PC has a...
Call of Duty photo
Call of Duty

Data files hint at Call of Duty: Ghosts weapon DLC

Guns, guns, guns
Nov 14
// Abel Girmay
Charlie Intel, courtesy of user @syncohboyy, recently got its hands on what look to be data files for weapon DLC in Call of Duty: Ghosts. The files plainly state "dlcweapon" with a number designation following each, as well a...
Call of Duty photo
Call of Duty

CoD: Ghosts PS4 needs a day-one patch for full 1080p

Single-player is restricted to a native 720p without it
Nov 13
// Jordan Devore
There was quite the fuss made about the Xbox One version of Call of Duty: Ghosts outputting at 720p while the PlayStation 4 version was confirmed by Infinity Ward to output at a native 1080p, as one would expect from a "next-...
Infinity Ward photo
Infinity Ward

Infinity Ward: Call of Duty formula not for everyone

Annual release schedule is not always the best way
Nov 10
// Wesley Ruscher
It's no understatement that Activision is the king of the annual game release. Call of Duty; Skylanders; and the -- may it rest in peace -- Tony Hawk and Guitar Hero franchises have been milked to death in more...

Get Double XP in Call of Duty: Ghosts multiplayer

Starting today at 10AM PST
Nov 08
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Call of Duty: Ghosts is the biggest title launch of this week, and to celebrate Activision is running a Double XP weekend. It starts today at 10AM PST, and will go on until November 11 at 10AM PST. This is good for all the pl...
Call of Duty photo
Call of Duty

This Call of Duty: Ghosts scene is straight out of MW2

Getting the most out of that animation
Nov 06
// Jordan Devore
Building on your past work or even repurposing it as a cost-cutting measure isn't unheard of. I'd argue that it's not inherently that big of a deal, really -- unless people catch on. Then it's just becomes funny, or sad, or ...

Opinion: Stop annualizing Call of Duty

Nov 06 // Chris Carter
Call of Duty 4 set the world on fire at release. It not only redefined what a console shooter could do with a campaign, but it also popularized the "perks" system -- a mechanic now prevalent in pretty much every shooter in the modern era. It certainly wasn't the first game to use this system, but it was the first to make it standard issue; and since so many games followed suit in such a massive way, it's safe to call Call of Duty 4 a trend-setter in its own right. Contrary to popular belief, Call of Duty was not always stale. In fact, the original working title for the first game was "The Medal of Honor Killer" -- a moniker predicated on rising above the competition, and in this case, EA. Said game was made by Infinity Ward -- the flagship developer for the franchise that was founded in 2002 as a subsidiary of Activision. But in 2005, along came a modest developer named Treyarch, who handled the console version of Call of Duty 2. This development crew had been around the block, creating smaller games and ports as far back as 1996, until it was acquired by Activision in 2001. It was Treyarch, not Infinity Ward, that would continue to innovate the franchise. Just as Call of Duty was getting stale, they introduced a "Zombies" mode in World at War, which lit the gaming world on fire once again. The first Black Ops even had a top-down shooter (that could have easily been sold piecemeal for $10 as a downloadable), and real life cheat codes that you (gasp) didn't have to pay for. Their most recent contribution to the series, Black Ops II, innovated in new ways, with a "choose your own adventure" style campaign that felt distinctly different from the pack. It was still very much a Call of Duty joint for sure, and more of it wouldn't change any staunch hater's mind -- but for fans, it was an improvement. So what went wrong with Ghosts? Complacency. The campaign is, in every sense of the word, predictable. Not only is the "American Invasion" tale rehashed, but the characters feel generic and forgettable, especially compared to Treyarch's particularly over-the-top style. Hell, there's even accusations of Infinity Ward copying their own ending. Multiplayer is still fun at times, but it's literally nothing new, instead opting to hold the "Squads" gametype on a pedestal -- when it's actually just a pared down version of the same thing we've played many times over. Infinity Ward even blew it with Extinction, a mode that attempted to ape Treyarch's masterful Zombie mode. To put things into perspective, there's a huge community strictly centered around Zombies, and some fans even buy Treyarch's games just to play it. There's an entire story behind the mode, filled to the brim with easter eggs and goofy weapons like toy monkey grenades. But the Alien injected Extinction in Ghosts by proxy feels like a soulless rendition of Treyarch's work -- almost like it was a check box to say "we can do it too." The crux of the problem is Infinity Ward's lack of innovation, among other issues. If the Call of Duty franchise weren't annual and were fine tuned every other year, it would not only have a better reputation, but a longer overall life span. Despite what executives may think, grinding blood out of a stone for a few years is not effective. With lower pre-orders for Ghosts (partially due to generational fragmentation) and lower review scores, is Call of Duty down for the count? Well, it's far too early to tell. I think this is a great opportunity for Activision to sit down with both of their studios, and remember what made the series so successful in the first place. Do what should have been done long ago: give Treyarch the reigns, encourage growth and innovation, and stop making it an annual series with a $50 Season Pass. Or, keep milking it until the well runs dry. Your move, Activision.
Why is COD stale? photo
It's time to mix things up, consolidate, and stop annual releases
There is room for Call of Duty in the gaming world -- I assure you. I don't know about milking it every damn year, but there is plenty of room for those of us who enjoy mindless first-person fun with our friends, oc...

Review: Call of Duty: Ghosts

Nov 05 // Jim Sterling
Call of Duty: Ghosts (PC, PS3, PS4, Wii U, Xbox 360 [reviewed], Xbox One)Developer: Infinity WardPublisher: ActivisionReleased: November 5, 2013MSRP: $59.99 While most fans consider their Call of Duty campaigns to be little more than additional fluff, tacked onto the multiplayer, I've always found them a compelling draw. The stories aren't the most engrossing, nor are they particularly deep, but they are at least energetic, explosive, and highly effective at drawing a reaction from the player, even if a few cheap tricks are employed the get it. Ghosts, by contrast, offers a startlingly lethargic solo experience, with a story lacking in character -- or indeed, characters -- and going through the expected motions with little evidenced enthusiasm.  The campaign isn't exactly bad, but it is a banal shooting gallery without the remarkable setpieces or memorable moments to carry it. Very much a COD-by-numbers affair, players quickly blitz through the usual tasks with dutiful obligation. Indeed, "obligation" is a fitting word to use when talking about Ghosts' solo missions -- the obligatory bit where a temporary player character dies, the obligatory aircraft sequence, the obligatory escape while shooting things from the back of a vehicle, the obligatory sniping part, the obligatory chapter where you're walking quietly in grass. More than any other Call of Duty, there is an overwhelming sense of having been there many times, and having done that more than you can count.  The combat is solid, but its solidarity is matched only by its tepidness. You move from small wall to small wall, shooting the enemies ducking behind their own walls, and avoiding their endless grenades. After the mission variety and unique optional objectives found in Black Ops II, it's difficult to go back to "normal" Call of Duty, which feels comparatively dry and plodding. Without an interesting story (the American invasion plot feels like a rehash of Modern Warfare 2), and without the usual explosive pace I've come to expect, there's really very little worth experiencing here.  Ghosts' one big attempt to stand out is the inclusion of Riley, a dog. It's a dog. That's what it is. In missions where Riley accompanies you, you can press a button to make the dog attack an enemy. Every now and then, you might get to control the dog and let it sneak around in grass to attack people. That's about it. There's something about the game industry that compels it to market dogs as massive, game changing inclusions in games. They never have been, and if Ghosts is a continuation of a trend, they probably never will.  Without a campaign of note, Call of Duty hinges on multiplayer more than ever and ... it's okay. As always, various tweaks and refinements have been added, but Ghosts' online efforts suffer in the same way its campaign has -- the previous installment added too much, and did too many things better, for this to be considered a worthy successor. While there are some new toys to play with, and you can even customize the look of your character (as well as play as a woman, finally), the core experience feels like business as usual, moreso since we've lost the near-future gadgets found in 2012's installment.  A new mode, Squads, allows you to command your own team of characters in a multiplayer scenario, cooperating with friends and challenging others with AI-controlled teammates. I'll be honest, I don't really get the point. You're not commanding anybody, or doing much more than experiencing an official simulation of a multiplayer match with half a lobby full. Its presence isn't offensive, and it may be of use to total newcomers who aren't ready to jump into full competition, but it failed to really excite me.  If one is to be diplomatic, one can say Ghosts is still better than a lot of cornball military shooter knock-offs, but formula and familiarity have won the day, as Infinity Ward finds itself too afraid to shake anything up in too dramatic a fashion. As with the campaign, a checklist of obligatory elements appears to have been steadily worked through, as the usual format of ranking, unlocking, and customization trundles along with methodical reliability. And don't get me wrong, it's as reliable as it's always been -- if all you've ever really wanted is the same Call of Duty every single year, then you're going to love this, because it's as Call of Duty as Call of Duty gets. A few cute modes help break up the usual stable of gametypes, such as Infected (one player slowly turns the others into zombie-like creatures) and Cranked (chaining kills makes you tougher, faster, and able to score more points). These modes can make things less monotonous, but they riff on ideas seen in many other shooters, and really aren't worth the buying the whole game for.  Except players can also have dogs now. Dogs make everything good.  I've made no secret of my love for Call of Duty, and I've been avidly into the series up until last year, but this time around, I barely struggled to keep my eyes open for more than a handful of matches. I feel I've officially done this too many times to care anymore, and for as much as I've supported the series, this is the one that's turned me off -- at least as far as the Infinity Ward installments go. While Treyarch has steadily gotten better and braver with each new game, Ghosts sees Infinity Ward step into the role of pretender, of flagging inferior, one that doesn't seem to care much about improving its status, not when it could churn out any old guff at this point and come out on top of the sales charts.  To that end, Infinity Ward takes a page directly of Treyarch's book with Extinction, a wave-based cooperative mode that performs functionally similar to the ever popular Zombies mode. However, while Zombies always had a unique sense of humor and an amusing arcade quality, Extermination is a fairly bland slice of chaos, in which fairly uninteresting aliens are mowed through across blasted cities littered with quivering pustules.  As aliens are killed, one earns cash, which can be spent on new weapons, while skill points unlock temporary items that support the team. As with everything else in Ghosts, it performs its job adequately, and is not a terrible experience. It's just not very exciting either, and yet again plays catch up to things done far better in previous installments.  At the risk of sounding like a stuck record at this point, everything I've said can be said about the visuals as well -- they're not the worst, they're far from the best, and yet again they feel highly lacking off the back of Black Ops II, which at least had cool futuristic designs to play around with. Ghosts' vision of a not-quite-post-apocalyptic America is bourgeois at best, an unremarkable representation that could have been eerie and unsettling, if it were presented with anything more than sociopathic carelessness. Audio is the same way -- uninspired music, and the usual shooting noises, alongside bored voice actors.  A few buggy elements rear their heads too, such the audio frequently cutting out during campaign loading screens, and guns failing to switch properly when they run out of ammo. I also had to restart a checkpoint due to an event not triggering as it should. Nothing game breaking, but at this point, one doesn't expect to see such silly little glitches in a game that's not done a whole lot to reinvent itself.  Call of Duty may have picked up a reputation as one of the laziest, most callously developed cash cows in the business, but I've always believed that reputation was undeserved. Call of Duty: Ghosts, however, with its slapdash campaign and unambitious multiplayer, contains enough factory-standard cynicism to earn itself plenty of scorn. Nothing Ghosts does is especially bad, but nothing Ghosts does is worth paying any attention to. It exists to exist, a stopgap bit of filler spat out as the industry transitions from one generation of consoles to another.  Contrary to the old saying, you can teach an old dog new tricks. Black Ops II demonstrated that with style. Ghosts, however, is a dog that simply doesn't want to change. It knows what it is, and sticks with it. It would be a respectable endeavor, if it didn't lead to such an underwhelming and predictable little product. What a sleepy, sleepy dog.  Goodbye. 
COD: Ghosts reviewed! photo
Old dog, old tricks
While Call of Duty is often regarded as the epitome of the annualized, cynically produced, lazily constructed videogame franchise, I've always maintained that both Infinity Ward and Treyarch expended much more effort than the...

Call of Duty photo
Call of Duty

Infinity Ward talks 720p for CoD: Ghosts on Xbox One

Does resolution even matter to you, really?
Nov 04
// Jordan Devore
It was good of Infinity Ward to finally come out and confirm that, yes, Call of Duty: Ghosts runs at 720p natively on Xbox One and is upscaled to 1080p. Resolution matters to certain people -- some much more than others -- an...
Call of Duty infographic photo
Call of Duty infographic

Want absurd numbers? Here's a Call of Duty infographic

Billions and billions of SCARs
Nov 04
// Darren Nakamura
Call of Duty is a cultural phenomenon; we all know that by now. Still, the numbers that the franchise puts up are staggering. Not only does the series make truckloads of money, but it also consumes countless man-hours of time...
Call of Duty: Ghosts photo
Call of Duty: Ghosts

Call of Duty: Ghosts is upscaled at 720p on the Xbox One

PS4 running at 1080p, Xbox One upscaled from 720p
Oct 31
// Chris Carter
A lot of rumors have been flying around in regards to the PS4 and Xbox One versions of Call of Duty: Ghosts, and Infinity Ward's Mark Rubin has addressed them once and for all. For starters, Ghosts runs at 1080p on the PlaySt...
Call of Duty aliens photo
Now you've got my attention
[Update: Official trailer added. Extinction is described as a "1-4 player cooperative game mode featuring a unique blend of fast-paced survival action, FPS base defense, scavenging and class leveling." Get to the chopper.] ...

Call of Duty photo
Call of Duty

These are the final Call of Duty: Ghosts system specs

A few changes to the minimum PC requirements
Oct 25
// Jordan Devore
Sometimes, I feel like I'm writing the same story twice since history does tend to repeat itself. In this case, I literally am! Those minimum system specs for Call of Duty: Ghosts have been finalized by Infinity Ward and ther...
Ghosts photo

It's more Call of Duty: The launch trailer for Ghosts

Hope you like single-player
Oct 21
// Jordan Devore
It dawned on me this morning how close we're getting to November. A few more nights spent watching horror movies and, before I know it, Call of Duty: Ghosts will be out. Heck, the launch trailer is already here, featuring fa...

Call of Duty: Ghosts clan features detailed

Deeper integration through the mobile app
Oct 10
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Clans are of course back in Call of Duty: Ghosts. A new feature this year is that clans are now cross-platform. So you can be part of the same clan as your friends regardless of the platform. The free Call of Duty app also h...
CoD system specs photo
CoD system specs

You'll need 6 GB of RAM for Call of Duty: Ghosts

PC system requirements
Oct 07
// Jordan Devore
The system specs for Call of Duty: Ghosts have appeared on GeForce and they're worth a look for a couple reasons. Namely, there's the higher-than-expected minimum RAM requirement. And although it's something I'll need to get ...
Call of Duty photo
Call of Duty

CoD: Ghosts' dedicated servers aren't Xbox One exclusive

Hybrid system will attempt to find the best matches
Oct 07
// Jordan Devore
Up until this point, there's been little if any talk about dedicated servers for Call of Duty: Ghosts outside of such support being confirmed for Xbox One. The game's coming to platforms other than Xbox One, as you surely kno...

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