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Game of Thrones

Game of Thrones Season 2 photo
Game of Thrones Season 2

Telltale's Game of Thrones is getting a second season

Surprise, surprise
Nov 20
// Darren Nakamura
After finishing the season finale for Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series, I had my suspicions that it was all setting up for an inevitable second season. Speaking with The Hollywood Reporter, Telltale CEO Kevin Bruner co...

Review: Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series: The Ice Dragon

Nov 17 // Darren Nakamura
Game of Thrones - A Telltale Game Series: The Ice Dragon (Android, iOS, Mac, PC [reviewed], PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: Telltale GamesPublisher: Telltale GamesReleased: November 17, 2015MSRP: $4.99 (episode), $29.99 (season)Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit The reason I'm being so cavalier with discussing in general terms how my story ended -- spoilers be damned -- is that other players might see things play out quite differently. It took the whole season to make good on the promises that we may shape the future of House Forrester, but The Ice Dragon finally introduces significant divergence. Important characters may live or die, depending on not only the choices presented in this episode, but also on those made earlier. With Asher joining Rodrik and the convergence of those two paths at the end of A Nest of Vipers, more time can be spent on each individual thread. Up north, Gared and company finally make it to the North Grove. Down south, Mira learns who had been conspiring against her. Nestled in the middle of it all is the drama in Ironrath, with the Whitehills mounting up for war against the Forresters. Gared's path is probably the most disappointing of the three. After five episodes wondering what the significance of the North Grove is, I was hoping for a revelation when he finally made it. The main concrete takeaway is that it's important and must be protected, but precisely why is up for debate. [embed]321059:61115:0[/embed] What makes Gared's journey to the North Grove sting so much as a part of the story of the Forresters is that it feels like he made no measurable impact on any other section. The final recap does hint that he might have been a bigger player in the grand scheme if I had made different choices, but my personal Gared could have been cut from the story entirely and it would have made no difference. In contrast, Mira's scheming in King's Landing is at least mentioned by the characters on the home front. She may not have had any concrete effects on the conflict at Ironrath, but her path still feels important in the overall narrative. In Sons of Winter, I was so pleased with myself for winning a war of words as Mira. I was shrewd and calculating, manipulating the situation to get exactly what I wanted. Somewhere along the line I lost that slyness and turned into a softie, and Mira paid for it. I can't say I'm happy with how Mira turns out at the end of this episode, but I don't think I'd be particularly pleased with the possible alternatives either. Of course, the main action is at Ironrath, where the Whitehills have mounted up for war against the Forresters. There were hints in this episode at a possible diplomatic solution, but as Asher and his band of gladiators, battle seemed like the most appropriate option. The climactic scene is probably the most brutal in any Telltale game to date. There was figurative backstabbing followed by literal backstabbing. There was frontstabbing. There was sidestabbing. There was ramming a greatsword into someone's mouth and out the back of his head. Good lord, there was a lot of stabbing. It fits the universe perfectly, in that in one fell swoop a dozen named characters meet their ends, and the whole time I'm watching in horror, muttering obscenities to myself and wishing thing weren't the way they are. Valar morghulis: all men must die; fans of the source are well-versed in that concept, but it hurts more when it's my men dying. There may still be a glimmer of hope for the Forresters, despite being broken, beaten, battered, and beheaded. The finale leaves a few loose ends open (possibly for a second season), but the family as we have known it is done. In a way, I'm almost pleased the story finishes the way it does. In Iron From Ice, I noted the similarities between the Forrester clan and the more famous Starks. I realize now that I modeled my Forresters' behavior after them as well. I fought with honor and I did the right thing, though it eventually spelled my own doom. I can take solace in the moral victory. The Ice Dragon caps off a year of fretting and worrying. Telltale's take on Game of Thrones has been spot-on in that regard. Now that it's over it's almost a relief, even with a bleak end. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Game of Thrones review photo
A chilling finale
In my review for The Lost Lords, the second episode of Game of Thrones, I lamented that I was making all the wrong decisions and that my version of House Forrester was doomed. With The Ice Dragon wrapping up the series, my pr...

Game of Thrones trailer photo
Game of Thrones trailer

The Game of Thrones finale trailer hopes you have been following along

Spoilers abound
Nov 16
// Darren Nakamura
Don't watch the trailer below if you aren't caught up with the first five episodes of Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series. It highlights a lot of the major choices from the previous episodes, including the one right at th...
Game of Thrones photo
Game of Thrones

Telltale's Game of Thrones is coming to retail next week

To coincide with the last episode
Nov 12
// Chris Carter
We knew that the last episode of Telltale's Game of Thrones was set to arrive on November 17, but now the developer has revealed that a full retail edition will be coming on the same day. The disc will be printed on PS3, PS4,...

Game of Thrones screens photo
Game of Thrones screens

First screens for Game of Thrones finale are non-canon (for me)

Gared fights a claymation bear
Nov 11
// Darren Nakamura
The long-awaited season finale for Telltale's Game of Thrones series following House Forrester is almost here. It releases next week, but today we have a few tastes of what to expect. Mira looks like she's in trouble with the...
The Walking Dead photo
The Walking Dead

Telltale details assorted Walking Dead news

Plus a lil' Game of Thrones
Nov 10
// Mike Cosimano
Job Stauffer, Telltale Games' director of creative communications, recently dropped some news regarding some of its upcoming products, including The Walking Dead: Michonne.  Stauffer kicked off these mini-revea...
Game of Thrones photo
Game of Thrones

Game of Thrones Episode 6 dated, Episode 1 available free now

Winter is coming in Winter. Or something
Oct 21
// Vikki Blake
The final episode of Telltales' Game of Thrones series, The Ice Dragon, will release on November 17, 2015.  To celebrate, Episode 1 - Iron from Ice - is available for free on... well, everything (PlayStation 4, Play...
Game of Thrones screens photo
Game of Thrones screens

Game of Thrones: A Nest of Vipers screenshots, we have some

Jul 21
// Darren Nakamura
Another episode of Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series, another batch of screens I took while playing through for review. This batch seems especially small, for two reasons. For one, I was less diligent about taking scree...

Review: Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series: A Nest of Vipers

Jul 21 // Darren Nakamura
Game of Thrones - A Telltale Game Series: A Nest of Vipers (Android, iOS, Mac, PC [reviewed], PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: Telltale GamesPublisher: Telltale GamesReleased: July 21, 2015MSRP: $4.99 (episode), $29.99 (season)Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit [Editor's note: there will be no major spoilers present for the episode reviewed here, but events in previous episodes may be discussed.] Throughout the series, Asher and Mira have been the more interesting characters to follow, the former for his action and wit and the latter for her suspense and guile. Ethan and Rodrik at Ironrath have been fine as central characters, but haven't stood out. Gared's exploits at The Wall and beyond have easily been the least exciting thus far. A Nest of Vipers shakes up that split, if only a little. Asher still stands at the top with scenes dense with action and dialogue choices that feel important. He and his partner Beskha find themselves in a fighting pit in Meereen, seeking combatants to follow them back to Westeros. During this sequence, the stakes are high and it genuinely seems like failure is possible, forcing Asher to return home without any extra aid. One other point for Asher is Telltale's injection of humor into his lines. Though Game of Thrones takes an entirely different tack than Tales from the Borderlands, the little pockets of comedy help to break up the oppressively somber tone of the episode. One line in particular had me audibly chuckling, which I think is a first for this series. [embed]296123:59553:0[/embed] Mira's sections, on the other hand, lacked a lot of the punch they have had in past episodes. Where the coronation ceremony scene in Sons of Winter left me feeling smart for having successfully navigated and manipulated King's Landing politics, both of Mira's major scenes here just had me along for the ride. The first scene is one with Cersei and the second features Tyrion in his cell, locked up and awaiting trial for the incident at Joffrey's wedding. Perhaps because she was playing opposite two of the strongest personalities in Westeros, Mira didn't seem to do anything important or have much of an impact. This episode does set up for one final showdown with Cersei, in what sounds like it might be a life-or-death situation. Gared's journey toward the nebulous North Grove continues, and how it can possibly help House Forrester so many miles south is still a mystery. That said, it's finally getting to the point where Gared feels important again. The first four episodes were spent putting him in place, first getting him to The Wall, then getting him north of it. Now he actually gets to do something. Of all the intertwined stories, Gared's feels the most hopeful at this point. He's in a pretty sticky situation, but it's difficult to imagine a scenario where he doesn't make it out to at least play his part in the grand scheme during the finale. Everybody else in House Forrester might die and the clan might be wiped from the map, but he's going to get to the dang North Grove. Next time. The crux of the story still lies in Ironrath, with Rodrik dealing with the fallout from the last episode. It's a little disappointing; all of the clever politicking from Episode Four is essentially nullified by the traitor. Where it previously seemed like a peaceful resolution could be possible, it's now clear that this story can only end with bloodshed. That isn't to say Rodrik's sections were bad; there were still plenty of interesting decisions to make along the way. They may not all have a major effect on where things end up, but a few appeared to have serious immediate consequences and a few others appeared to affect how the final episode will shake out. This episode culminates with a particularly emotionally impactful finale, the kind Telltale has steeled us for with series like The Walking Dead. It's difficult to discuss without going too far into spoiler territory, but I can say that I was thinking about the last scene hours after I played through it the first time. It could go down as the most memorable section for the entire series. It's strange. Detailing all of A Nest of Vipers' parts makes it sound about average, if not even a little disappointing compared to the previous episode. But this one ends up working well as a cohesive unit, even if some pieces fall flat. This episode has its highs and its lows, but it still leaves an unforgettable impression. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Game of Thrones review photo
Now we're getting somewhere
Anyone following my exploits as House Forrester in Telltale's slice of A Song of Ice and Fire will know that the first four episodes have been a lot of setup for the main event. While only one episode felt like filler (The Lo...

Game of Thrones trailer photo
Game of Thrones trailer

Telltale's Game of Thrones Episode Five: A Nest of Vipers trailer ramps up

The calm before the storm (of swords)
Jul 16
// Darren Nakamura
From that trailer, A Nest of Vipers seems like a perfect title for this episode. The question is: which character is in the nest? Asher finds himself in a pit fight (presumably to the death), Gared is north of The Wall in Wi...
Game of Thrones photo
Game of Thrones

Episode 5 of Game of Thrones will drop later this month

Here, look at some pretty pictures
Jul 16
// Vikki Blake
The fifth installment of Telltale's Game of Thrones series, A Nest of Vipers, will be released later this month. Good news if you've been growing impatient, particularly as we're already halfway through July. Yay. The confirm...
Game of Thrones screens photo
Game of Thrones screens

Game of Thrones: Sons of Winter screenshots, we have some

Painted with blood
May 26
// Darren Nakamura
Another episode of Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series, another batch of screenshots I took while playing through for review. There weren't any huge twists this episode, so I'm not afraid of spoiling too much, but as alwa...

Review: Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series: Sons of Winter

May 26 // Darren Nakamura
Game of Thrones - A Telltale Game Series: Sons of Winter (Android, iOS, Mac, PC [reviewed], PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: Telltale GamesPublisher: Telltale GamesReleased: May 26, 2015MSRP: $4.99 (episode), $29.99 (season)Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit [Editor's note: there will be no major spoilers present for the episode reviewed here, but events in previous episodes may be discussed.] Those following along with the series shouldn't expect any major changes in how events play out. There is lots of dialogue, lots of split-second decisions, a handful of quick-time events, a little bit of exploration, and not much else. The split between the four living playable characters stays about the same as well: Mira's sections are almost entirely dialogue-based and Asher's are generally more action-focused. Despite being the Forrester known better for stabbing first and asking questions later, Asher's story in Meereen comes with some of the more interesting this-or-that decisions this episode. Where Rodrik has to choose between murder and mercy, Asher has the more nuanced quandary of loyalty to the family that exiled him and loyalty to his sellsword partner Beskha. Parts of Beskha's past come to light in Sons of Winter that give the situation more gravity. Of all the decisions in this episode, Asher's handling of the mission in Meereen is "the big one" for me, and I'm most anxious about the potential fallout from my choice, which won't show up until next episode at least. [embed]292557:58611:0[/embed] Mira's tribulations in King's Landing continue to be a high point for the series. Though this episode lacks the big names -- neither Cersei, Tyrion, nor Margaery makes a significant appearance -- the way Telltale handles Mira shows genuine understanding of what makes the source material so great. Any game could have quick-time swordfights, but a Game of Thrones game ought to be more than that. Her best scene is at Tommen's coronation feast. It comes closest to being like a classic adventure game. She must navigate the celebration cautiously, eavesdrop on conversations to gain information, and use that information at the right time. Even if it turns out not to be the case in the end (as Telltale games often do), the feast scene felt like it could have ended with a much different outcome. As it stood for me, I came out of it laughing, pleased with how clever I felt to have achieved what I wanted and particularly smug about the last line I had Mira say to close out the scene. It reinforced the idea that in King's Landing, shrewd manipulation of information is just as powerful as a sword, if not more so. Rodrik has his own share of politicking to deal with on the home front. A new opportunity lands in his lap that could help return control of Ironrath to House Forrester, and he has his own decisions to make, though they seemed a bit more obvious. Satisfy a desire for petty revenge near the beginning and he loses some leverage for later on in the episode. I'm curious to know how things shake out with other choices; in contrast to the first few episodes I feel like I made the best decisions for Rodrik this time around. There is a tense scene as Rodrik at Highpoint, the Whitehill stronghold. Not only are the stakes high, but it also rewards an attention to detail. Prior to the meeting with Lord Whitehill, some light exploration can help to reveal information that can be used in the encounter. It's another instance where proper intel beats physical force that feels right in place in the A Song of Ice and Fire universe. Gared's scenes were the least interesting this time around. Where prior episodes set him up to be part of the party that goes to Craster's Keep, he ends up with a blander story. It still has room to get better once the importance of the North Grove is revealed, but in this episode it felt a bit like he was stagnating. The oil paint aesthetic that turns people off remains, though it does feel like Telltale has tuned down the baffling polygon edge blur effect that plagued the first two episodes. It's still present, but not nearly as distracting as it used to be. There aren't any heart-stopping moments or dramatic twists like there were in the early episodes, but Sons of Winter sets a good pace and keeps it up throughout the episode. It's great to see the continued focus on shrewdness over brute strength for most of the characters, especially considering House Forrester's situation in Westeros. What the family lacks in soldiers, it must make up for in cleverness. Being party to the events makes me feel clever, whether I truly have much of an effect or not. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Game of Thrones review photo
Son of a...
At the end of Episode 3: The Sword in the Darkness, Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series was in an interesting place. Nearly all of the playable characters were in tough spots, but all of them ended the episode with some h...

Telltale Game of Thrones photo
Telltale Game of Thrones

Telltale's Game of Thrones Episode Four: Sons of Winter trailer gave me chills

Winter is coming, after all
May 21
// Darren Nakamura
Although winter is coming, things are really starting to heat up for House Forrester. While the first couple episodes took a lot of time to set things up, the last one really started putting things into motion. With Episode ...
A Telltale game series photo
A Telltale game series

Episode 4 of Telltale's Game of Thrones is coming, here are some screens

More like LAME of thrones
May 18
// Steven Hansen
Ah, Game of Thrones. I forget it's still a huge thing sometimes, like when I recently learned Mad Men is still on. This time it's the fourth episode, "Sons of Winter," of Telltale's adventure game take on the J.R.R. Tolkien property to remind me it's still around. Here are some pictures. Darren Nakamura liked the last episode and will be doing up a review of this'n when it comes.
Deals photo

First episode of Telltale's Game of Thrones free on Android

Apr 13
// Jordan Devore
$4.99 is the usual asking price for episodes of Telltale's Game of Thrones series, but not today, valued Android user. The debut episode, Iron From Ice, is free if you download through Amazon. In his review, Darren said the g...
Game of Hyrule photo
Game of Hyrule

Watch Hyrule spring from the ground Ó la the Game of Thrones intro

A Link to Game of Thrones
Apr 07
// Brett Makedonski
Millions of fans know the overworld of Game of Thrones due to the map depicted in the intro of each episode. However, to many, this video's overworld will be instantly recognizable upon first viewing because of decades ...
Game of Thrones trailer photo
Game of Thrones trailer

Trailer for Telltale's Game of Thrones Episode 3 unfolds some earlier plot points

Spoilers for Episode 2 in the video
Mar 23
// Darren Nakamura
Well, this one snuck up on me. I thought I had been following most of Telltale's releases pretty closely, but it turns out that Game of Thrones Episode 3: The Sword in the Darkness is coming out tomorrow. Who knew? In the tr...
Amazon Fire TV photo
Amazon Fire TV

Amazon Fire TV gets Sling TV today, also Telltale's Game of Thrones

And Luftrausers
Feb 12
// Chris Carter
This is an "Amazon Download" update of sorts, as the publisher has just sent word that Sling TV has launched for the Fire TV and Fire Stick. New apps have also been added, including Telltale's Game of Thrones series, which is...

Review: Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series: The Lost Lords

Feb 03 // Darren Nakamura
Game of Thrones - A Telltale Game Series: The Lost Lords (Android, iOS, Mac, PC [reviewed], PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: Telltale GamesPublisher: Telltale GamesReleased: February 3, 2015MSRP: $4.99 (episode), $29.99 (season)Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit [Editor's note: there will be no major spoilers present for the episode reviewed here, but events in previous episodes may be discussed.] That is to say, one of my versions of House Forrester is doomed. For Iron From Ice and now The Lost Lords, I have run through with two separate save files. I do not recommend doing this for a couple of reasons. For one, playing through more than once lifts up the curtain on which choices actually make any sort of difference in the story and which ones lead to the same place regardless. Most choices do not have any immediate impact; only a select few shape the narrative into something unique to an individual player. This is standard Telltale modus operandi at this point, so it should not surprise most who have been following the developer for the past few years. For two, it shows how utterly inept I would be in the A Song of Ice and Fire universe. For my initial playthrough, I live in the moment and make the decisions that feel right. Sometimes I mouth off, sometimes I am defiant, but often I keep cool and try to maintain allies. My second save is labeled "Jerks" and in it I play House Forrester as a group of inconsiderate, self-serving assholes. For my first save, I find myself sparing lives when I should kill, making promises I should never keep, and helping others before helping myself. For my second save, I do the opposite. By most measures, the Jerk Forresters are in much better shape than the True Forresters. [embed]286540:56983:0[/embed] Where Iron From Ice set the stage for the series, The Lost Lords begins to put everything into motion. The Stark-esque scattering of the members of House Forrester is deliberate, planned to coincide with major events from the novels. Mira continues to serve Lady Margaery in King's Landing just prior to King Joffrey's wedding. Gared has completed his journey to The Wall to begin training before Mance Rayder launches his assault. Newcomer Asher is traveling between Yunkai and Meereen just as Daenerys is campaigning to liberate the slaves in Essos. Of course, plenty of focus is given to Ironrath, the seat of House Forrester, in the aftermath of Episode One. In a way, it works against The Lost Lords to be set precisely when it is. The build-up will likely be worth it once everything is in place and it all starts to hit the fan, but in the moment it feels like a lot of waiting. Consequences for some of the major choices from the last episode show up here. If Mira asked Margaery for help last episode, then Margaery will be unwilling to provide any assistance now. Ethan's choice of Sentinel in Iron From Ice affects how the Whitehill soldiers are treated in The Lost Lords. The former consequence seems like a major one; an entire avenue of intrigue involving the Queen of Thorns may be locked away in the future. The latter does not appear as important; Lord Whitehill is ornery and spiteful regardless. Thus far, Mira had only been exposed to the diplomacy, secrecy, and espionage of King's Landing. In The Lost Lords, she gets her first taste of the more overt awfulness of Westeros. Her story is still the most subdued of the playable characters. Her audience with Queen Cersei in the first episode was chilling and tense, but there are no comparable scenes in this episode. Gared still holds the cryptic information given to him by Gregor in the beginning of Iron From Ice, and he hopes to become a ranger in the Night's Watch in order to investigate that further. It only comes up optionally, but it seems like he will be the center of that subplot in addition to being present during the huge battle at The Wall. Asher was teased in the first episode as the hothead exile brother, and his scenes show as the most action-oriented. He is apt to fight his way out of trouble, but he does have a sharp wit when he needs it. His story about returning to Westeros from Essos to help save his house has potential to be interesting, but it is only starting out. The oil paint aesthetic remains constant, with both its pleasing 2D backgrounds and distractingly fuzzy 3D objects. I did experience a few typical Telltale glitches, like teleporting character models, but nothing gamebreaking. Overall, The Lost Lords is a fine episode for Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series, but it does not stand out. It is not exactly filler, but it does feel like it exists almost entirely as exposition, putting the pieces into place for all of the really exciting stuff to happen in a future episode. It does begin to demonstrate the far-reaching consequences of each character's choices, but it lacks the truly memorable scenes found in the first episode. If Iron From Ice felt like a punch to the gut, The Lost Lords is the throbbing pain afterward. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Game of Thrones review photo
Feeling the Ironrath
I would not last a day in Westeros. My best hope would be to spend some time in Oldtown to train as a maester, and even though it would help to protect me from personally going to war, I would probably be too close to the pol...

Game of Thrones trailer photo
Game of Thrones trailer

Elissa Forrester laments in the Game of Thrones Episode Two launch trailer

'It's happening all over again'
Feb 02
// Darren Nakamura
Game of Thrones - A Telltale Game Series: The Lost Lords is out tomorrow for Mac, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, and Windows, with versions for other platforms hitting later this week. To commemorate, Telltale has released a ...
Game of Thrones Episode 2 photo
Game of Thrones Episode 2

Trailer for Telltale's Game of Thrones Episode 2 threatens open war

The Lost Lords
Jan 22
// Darren Nakamura
Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series kicked off in December with Episode One: Iron from Ice. In preparation for the release of Episode Two: The Lost Lords, Telltale released the preview trailer seen above. The first half ...
Game of Thrones photo
Through heartache, assumed betrayal, and borderline acceptable fight scenes, Mike and Will have made it to the end of Game of Thrones' first episode. And boy howdy, is it a doozy! People actually die in this one! Keep your eyes glued to Destructoid, because I've got a feeling Game of Thrones is only just getting started. And we're going to stick with it up to the very end.

Game of Thrones photo
Game of Thrones

We choose who's gonna screw us over in Game of Thrones

How passive-aggressive can two men get?
Jan 09
// Mike Cosimano
Like so many racist family members planning their strategy for Thanksgiving dinner, Will and I charted a course for passive aggression...after spending like a solid 15 minutes wandering around, trying to deduce the lesser of...
Game of Thrones photo
Game of Thrones

Mike and Will spar with the stars in Game of Thrones

In which Miles Finch puts us on blast
Jan 08
// Mike Cosimano
Will and I continue our journey through Westeros, but not before stopping by the throne room to have a little spat with Ma-Ma from Dredd 3D. Did you guys ever notice that 'Dredd' has three 'D's in it? That makes the title ex...
Game of Thrones photo
Game of Thrones

We continue to fail at diplomacy in Game of Thrones

You salting my game, man?
Jan 07
// Mike Cosimano
There's nothing more difficult than diplomacy, as we found out in today's Game of Thrones installment. When a fat jerk wanders into your hall, demanding blood and some kind of weird-ass tree, you've got no other choice but t...
Game of Thrones photo
Game of Thrones

Mike and Will deliver some medieval haircuts in Game of Thrones

Just a little off the DEATH
Jan 06
// Mike Cosimano
As Ol' Westwater and I continued our dangerous journey through Westeros, we came across a Barbershop Emergency™ in progress. Now, we couldn't just pass by and leave that poor man with that haircut, so we thought it'd b...
Game of Thrones photo
Game of Thrones

We stab dudes and get stabbed in Telltale's Game of Thrones

What do you think, sirs?
Jan 05
// Mike Cosimano
Oh hey, Destructoid! What's up? You're looking great, as usual. My name is Mike Cosimano and I've actually been around these parts before! But now that Max is fleeing to a non-extradition country to escape punishment for his...
Game of Thrones screens photo
Game of Thrones screens

Here are nearly 80 Game of Thrones: Iron From Ice screenshots

Fuzzy memories
Dec 02
// Darren Nakamura
Another Telltale game, another set of screenshots. I'm still ambivalent about the oil paint aesthetic used in Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series. Some shots look fantastic, and others are blurry messes with weird kaleido...

Review: Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series: Iron From Ice

Dec 02 // Darren Nakamura
Game of Thrones - A Telltale Game Series: Iron From Ice (iOS, Mac, PC [reviewed], PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: Telltale GamesPublisher: Telltale GamesReleased: December 2, 2014 (Mac, PC)MSRP: $4.99 (episode), $29.99 (season)Rig: AMD Phenom II X2 555 @ 3.2 GHz, with 4GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5700, Windows 7 64-bit Over the six planned episodes, Game of Thrones is set to be experienced from the point of view of various members of House Forrester, both noble and lowborn. Most fans of the series would not know the Forresters yet, as the family has only seen a brief mention in the novels and has not appeared in the television series. Still, the family feels familiar, as it closely mirrors the better-known Stark clan. Lord Gregor is the battle-hardened head of the house whose life is taken through treachery. Lady Elissa is his wife, a calculating matriarch from the South. Ethan is their teenage son, thrust into power before he is prepared. Mira is the firstborn daughter, discovering guile within herself while living the life of a proper lady in King's Landing. Ryon is the youngest son, too fearful and naive for the harsh time he was born into. Asher is a short-fused warrior who was exiled to Essos. Only Ethan's twin sister Talia does not have a close parallel in the Stark family. In this episode, players control Ethan, Mira, and a lowborn squire to Gregor named Gared Tuttle. Asher is hinted as the fourth playable character for future episodes, but the final member of House Forrester to be controlled is still unknown. True to the source material, there are many characters to keep track of, but there is an in-game codex to aid in that endeavor (and the notification for its existence pops up exactly when it is needed). [embed]284409:56490:0[/embed] Any who have played the most recent Telltale series know what to expect in the gameplay department. Players divide time between exploration, dialogue, and action. Exploration sections involve walking around, inspecting the environment, and initiating conversation. Dialogue sections present a series of choices for the player to steer the story, in both major and minor ways. Action sections involve quick-time events and serve to inject some excitement into what is otherwise a largely passive experience. All of that is present in Iron From Ice, but Telltale's trend toward a greater focus on writing and a lesser focus on classic adventure gameplay is apparent. After the opening at Edmure Tully's wedding at the Twins and the subsequent chapter following Gared, there are no more action sequences. As quick-time events are never particularly great in Telltale's games, this is not a huge loss, though it does set the slower, more somber tone for the episode. Less easily excusable in the shift away from classic adventure gaming is the total lack of puzzles or other logic exercises. The characters do keep inventories, but none of the items gained in this episode are put to use in any inventive ways. Most are not used at all, but instead saved for later. The only thing remotely resembling a puzzle is having to remember a dying man's words to act upon later, and to liken that to a puzzle is a stretch. The emphasis on story largely pays off, as it captures the essence of A Song of Ice and Fire. Diplomacy is paramount in Westeros at this time, and certain sections like the audience with Queen Regent Cersei or the encounter with Ramsay Snow are particularly nervewracking as a result. Attempting to balance honor, fealty, nobility, and justice is an impossible task, and no matter which dialogue option is chosen, it rarely feels like the right one. By the end, I was filled with a sense of dread for what is to come. The Forresters are good people, but it definitely seems like their situation will get worse before it has any chance of getting better. To exacerbate the feeling, having (perceived) agency in the story elevates it from "bad things are happening to good people" to "bad things are happening to good people and it's all my fault." To the effect of creating a foreboding narrative, Telltale emulates the source material well. Still, it takes a particular mood to enjoy such a dire tale. One of the failings of the story is common for Telltale: it turns out that the choices the player makes are not as far-reaching as they initially appear to be. Driven by guilt over some wretched outcomes from my decisions and curiosity over whether they could have turned out better, I played through Iron From Ice twice, each run taking about two hours. Despite the claims that the actions of each playable character would ripple out and affect others in House Forrester, the main plot events are largely predetermined. If the choices made here have important effects, those effects will not be clear until a future episode. Overall, the writing is on par with what we expect from Telltale. It is smart and it captures the feel of A Song of Ice and Fire well. Dialogue for existing characters Cersei Lannister and Ramsay Snow is spot on. Tyrion lacks any standout lines that will be classic quotes, which is disappointing. Graphically, Game of Thrones is kind of a mess. Though it was not apparent from the quick cuts in the teaser trailer, the art is done in the style of an oil painting. The two-dimensional landscape backgrounds can be beautiful, but up close the textures are muddled. Usually, the edges of character and environment models are sharp, but at times they take on a strange blur. It is distracting at worst, but it highlights the age of Telltale's engine. Another side effect of the inclusion of less cartoony character models is the step toward the uncanny valley. Most of the previously unseen characters look stylized enough to fly under the radar, but some of the known characters are unsettling. Specifically, Margaery Tyrell resembles a strange alien porcelain doll hybrid. Again, it distracts from the serious drama of the narrative. Still, that narrative is the focus, and it is strong. If Zer0 Sum left me looking forward to future episodes of Tales from the Borderlands because things are going to get awesome, Iron From Ice does the polar opposite for Game of Thrones. The bad situation that House Forrester is in is only going to get worse. It feels like a punch to the gut, and it sets the stage for an intensely emotionally draining experience. In spite of its blemishes, so far it looks like Game of Thrones: A Telltale Game Series deserves its place in the A Song of Ice and Fire lore.
Game of Thrones Episode 1 photo
Valar morghulis
The War of the Five Kings might be one of the bleakest collections of events in A Song of Ice and Fire, the series on which HBO's and Telltale's Game of Thrones is based. The entire continent of Westeros is at war, heroe...

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