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Xenoblade Chronicles X photo
Xenoblade Chronicles X

Furries, mechs, and an octopus lady in Xenoblade Chronicles X


I WANT TO PET THAT CAT!
Apr 22
// Jed Whitaker
A fresh new trailer for Xenoblade Chronicles X can be seen above that looks more like Gundam and Metal Gear Solid to me than a JRPG. I couldn't quite decipher what is going on in the above trailer, but I'm just happy th...
Shiness photo
Shiness

Great-looking indie RPG Shiness meets its $100K goal


First gameplay video shared with backers
Jun 04
// Brittany Vincent
I told you about the incredible-looking Shiness a few days ago, and since then it's reached and exceeded its Kickstarter goal of $100,000. Ynnis Interactive's ambitious role-playing game now has a gameplay video that showcas...
Freedom Planet photo
Freedom Planet

Get motoring with new demo of Sonic-like Freedom Planet


The graphics have been tightened up on Level 3
Jul 02
// Tony Ponce
Earlier this year, throwback platformer Freedom Planet by GalaxyTrail Games blasted through its Kickstarter campaign and almost all of its stretch goals. If you haven't been following, Freedom Planet draws heavily from the SE...

The Eevee Song photo
The Eevee Song

Eevee can be whatever you want her to be


New Pokémon jazz number by Random Encounters
Mar 20
// Tony Ponce
Last month, Nintendo revealed Eevee's newest evolution for Pokémon X / Y, Sylveon. No doubt the versatile critter has been on many a Poké-maniacs mind since then. What we've all been unknowingly waiting for was...
Sexy Sly Coopy photos  photo
Sexy Sly Coopy photos

Get yourself randy with these Sly Cooper furries


Celebrate Sly Cooper's new release by having a very special release of your own
Feb 05
// Allistair Pinsof
As a long time series fan, I'm excited for Sly Cooper: Thieves in Time's release today. So, I'm celebrating in the only way I know how: by posting random NSFW images of Sly Cooper, of course!
Freedom Planet photo
Freedom Planet

Sonic-esque Freedom Planet is doing the Kickstarter thing


Aiming for a 2014 release
Jan 22
// Tony Ponce
Oh, did I not mention Freedom Planet before? Of course I have, silly! More importantly, have you played the demo yet? 'Cause you should totally do that if you haven't. Freedom Planet fills me with so many good feelings, and ...
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The DTOID Show: "Girlfriend" mode, Dust, & XCOM


Aug 13
// Max Scoville
Today on The Destructoid Show, we bring you the hottest, slimiest journalistic filth to come out of the gaming industry. For starters, Borderlands 2 caused a bit of a ruckus this morning by ruffling the feathers of everyone ...
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Sonic-inspired Freedom Planet tickles my platforming itch


Aug 08
// Tony Ponce
Who doesn't love a good clone? As much flak as people like to give certain games for playing too much like other games, its nice to see a well-established style or formula applied to a new world with original characters from...

PAX: I want to play more of Dust: An Elysian Tail NOW

Apr 09 // Tony Ponce
Why is this game so impressive? The years-old screens above really don't do it justice, and neither do low-res YouTube videos. At the XBLA booth, in full HD, Dust is simply orgasmic. The colors are so rich, and the characters and environments are rendered in such loving, hand-drawn beauty. The combat is like a dance, where even the simplest of combo chains makes you look like a badass. If I hadn't met the creator, Dean Dodrill, face-to-face, I would have never believed that this was a one-man project. Except for the music, Dean is responsible for the art, animation, coding, level design, and every other friggin' thing. He had previously done cutscene work for the Jazz Jackrabbit series, but aside from that, he has had no experience making games whatsoever, yet here we stand today. Seriously, this dude makes Vanillaware look like a school of chumps. Dust isn't a particularly innovative game, just one with a mountain of polish. It basically takes its nods from games like Zelda II and Castlevania II, in that the hero Dust runs through areas, fights monsters, collects new abilities, and visits a few towns along the way. In fact, I jokingly asked if there was a part in which you kneel down before a wall and let a tornado come and whisk you away. I was merely poking fun at Simon's Quest, but Dean admitted that there is such a scene in the game. Surprise! As Dust marches on, he'll face a variety of creatures that can be dispatched in various ways. You can execute a fancy combo by alternating X and Y, carving your opponent up or launching it into the sky. Your familiar Fidget can spew out these white orbs of magic, then you can twirl your sword and generate an intense maelstrom as the orbs zoom every which way, pummeling your foes into putty. Or you can act just before an enemy hits you, parrying its attack and following up with a devastating counter. No matter what you do, the screen will fill with tons of graphical effects to indicate that shit just went down. Keys you collect open treasure chests, in which you'll find pieces of armor and items that can be equipped from the menu. You also earn gemstones that can be used to increase your attributes, like health, defense, and so on. Along with new abilities that you acquire along the way, the possibilities for growth are seemingly endless. The demo for Dust: An Elysian Tail felt quite long as I was standing in line, anxiously awaiting my turn. Once I got up and played, I was shocked at how quickly the time flew by. I am super stoked about this game, and from the positive impressions from everyone ahead of me, it sounds like many others are as well. I envision Dust being the start of really big things in Dean's future, I guarantee it.
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Remember Dust: An Elysian Tail, that crazy action RPG with the animals and the animations and all that? It's been a while, huh? It ought to be ready later this year for XBLA, but I don't think I can wait much longer. Before a...

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Live show: Rocket Knight Adventures on Mash Tactics


Feb 09
// Bill Zoeker
It's time for 'Throwback Thursday' on Mash Tacitcs! The retro romp this time is Rocket Knight Adventures, and its sequel Sparkster: Rocket Knight Adventures 2 for the Genesis console. A series about a possum equipped with a s...

Review: Solatorobo: Red the Hunter

Oct 02 // Allistair Pinsof
[embed]212734:41101[/embed] Solatorobo: Red the Hunter (DS)Developer: CyberConnect2Publisher: Xseed GamesReleased: September 27, 2011MSRP: $34.99 In Solatorobo, you play as cunning dog Red flying around the world with his adopted sister Chocolat and his mech suit DAHAK. It looks similar to the mech suit from Tail Concerto, which Solatorobo is a spiritual successor to. You even get to see some of the characters from that buried PlayStation action-RPG. While Tail Concerto played like Mega Man Legends, Solatorobo feels more like a Zelda title. You know, without all the good stuff. Red is a hunter, which pretty much means he's a badass in a world of useless peasants. As he travels town-to-town in his sweet airship, peasants come up to him and ask him to kill evil, giant cockroaches or whatever. Like a chump, he goes and does it. Red is nice like that. He's the classic spunky adventurer. Likable enough to stick with throughout the game's 15 or so hour story, but not memorable enough to stick with you once the game is over. The combat is pretty binary -- you dodge or attack. To attack, you pummel an enemy until you can pick them up. Once they are in your robotic arms, you can throw them on the ground, then repeat up to three times for a maximum-damage combo. It's like spamming the "open door" button in God of War extended across an entire game, and it gets old pretty fast. It boggles my mind that CyberConnect2 takes more than 10 hours to introduce some new mechanics. Eventually, you gain access to a new suit that grants you some different abilities. With it, you can swing enemies, pound them into the ground for splash damage, or go into Trance mode to shoot projectiles. It doesn't fix the problem of dumb A.I. and boring enemy design, but at least it's something. It's just strange that these features don't come into play earlier. It's as if the game knows how shallow it is and holds onto whatever tricks it has in desperation. "No... please wait! You see'll... uh, you can, like, swing people in about five hours! It's totally worth it, dude! Please, stick around and play me! Plaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay meeeeeeeeee!!!!!"  After getting past the first three chapters, I felt insulted by Solatorobo's difficulty. I was dumbfounded that a developer would make a game this easy. Unless I'm mistaken, the box cover doesn't have infants on it. Does the game get harder? I had to know, so I did a quick Google search. It turns out I wasn't the only one wondering this -- European players had the same question months earlier, and they all received the same response of "Yeah, pretty much, I never died once." This is a problem. A good game lets a player's skill progress alongside the narrative. Both the player's skill and the game's story should have an arc. A great game pairs them together so tightly that you can feel the protagonist's struggle. As you left Ravenholm in Half-Life 2, you could almost feel Gordon Freeman's exasperated gasps for air coming out of you. If I ever felt remotely challenged while playing Solatorobo, it most likely had more to do with the Indian food I ate the night before. Solatorobo is a game about lifting things and throwing them. Okay, to be fair, sometimes you catch instead of lift, but this only happens on a rare occasion. It's practically mind-blowing when it does happen, because it usually follows an hour of mindlessly lifting crates and placing them on giant red buttons. Don't worry! If you are too stupid to figure that out, the characters will tell you. They will literally say, "This is a puzzle... this is what you have to do." IT'S NOT A PUZZLE IF YOU TELL ME WHAT TO DO!!! You progress through the game by taking on quests that lead you into mini-dungeons full of mini-bosses and mini-puzzles. All of which are done with such little effort and creativity that you can't help but groan in apathy at the start of each, despite how visually different they may be. Whether it's a mining cavern or a large ship in the sky, you'll still need to slowly climb down a ladder to flip a switch and beat the boss by throwing its projectiles back at it. You'll occasionally come across some mini-games that are hit-and-miss. The fishing game is absolutely terrible. You have to press the A-button rapidly until it's over and it takes a lot longer than you'd like. However, the air-racing game is pretty great. You can even play it solo or with three friends, right from the main menu screen.  Along with fighting enemies and picking up boxes, you'll also collect lots of stuff. It's not quite Donkey Kong 64 amounts of crap, but it will make the OCD-gamer happy in an exhausted/depressed way. You have pigs that unlock pieces of concept art (YES!), plates you can buy that give access to cutscenes (THANK GOD!), and pianos that give access to background tunes (*tears*). You also have P. Crystals -- you can tell these things are important because this is an RPG and they are called "crystals." While you can level up by gaining experience points, you can also decrease the time it takes to lift an enemy and increase the throwing damage you deal by customizing your mech. No, this isn’t Armored Core -- The only thing you'll be changing is what Tetris-shaped blocks will make up your mech's interior. Each of these blocks give bonus points to your mobility, defense, attack, or hydraulics (lifting ability). You use P. Crystals to open up more space for placing blocks, which you buy at vendors in town. I never bothered optimizing my mech, because you can get by just fine without doing so -- the game really is that easy! I chose to devote all my space towards attack and hydraulics so I could get battles over faster. Now that's what I call strategy! You are probably thinking, "Why are other critics giving Solatorobo such glowing reviews, then?" Don't worry, I've thought it over too. One thing I can't argue with is Solatorobo's lively, detailed world and graphics that manage to impress, despite being on a seven-year-old system. As gamers, we like to explore original worlds that feel believable and mysterious. It's something rare in the current age of military shooters and the diminishing popularity of big-budget JRPGs. I wish I could celebrate Solotorobo as a whole due to CyberConnect2's efforts in world-building, but to do that I would need to ignore the game itself. It's telling that the Japanese collector's edition of Solatorobo came with a 94-page art book. This is a game that was in pre-production for seven years and in development for three. The decisions behind the story and backdrops were as thought-out as a Studio Ghibli film, which brings me back to my main point: Why make Solatorobo a videogame? Everything about the dungeons and combat feel like excuses to show off what CyberConnect2 and players really care about: The game's world. Our trips to the different locales of Solatorobo are too brief to impact us. Each area feels like six-or-so gorgeous, connected backgrounds rather than a world you can believe in. The same can be said of the game's cast of characters and overall story as well. So as you can see, even this aspect CyberConnect2 couldn't get completely right. There are so many distractions and interruptions in the narrative and action that Solatorobo never manages to build momentum. There is a pointless, chatty dialogue sequence at the end of every hallway and an abrupt change of scenery at the end of every chapter. As an animated film, Solatorobo could cull those ten years of production into a memorable adventure. Why settle for this shallow, repetitive interactive adaptation?
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I wish Solatorobo was an animated film instead of a game. Once you cut away the mind-numbing crate puzzles, monotonous combat, and maddening fetch quests, there is still a heart and soul to Solatorobo that keeps you from u...

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Solatorobo has gone gold, will drop on September 27


Sep 11
// Tony Ponce
XSEED has sent out a press release announcing that the colorful action RPG Solatorobo: Red the Hunter has gone gold and will ship across the US on September 27. Along with reiterating details that have been announced previou...
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Solatorobo videos showcase furry combat


Sep 03
// Tony Ponce
With a bunch of incredible-looking games arriving this fall for the DS (that will actually see release in the US, *ahem*), Nintendo's lame duck portable still has some vitality left in it. One such promising title is anthrop...
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Ground control to Fox McCloud ...


Jul 02
// Chad Concelmo
This is one of the oddest, but most awesome videos I have seen in a long time. I don't even know how to describe it. It is a short (the first of a series?) starring the Star Fox characters as stuffed animals, walking, talkin...
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DS Action RPG Solatorobo coming to Europe


Apr 11
// Tony Ponce
If it seems like I've been in a furry mood recently, I can assure you it's all one big unfortunate coincidence. Here's some news that isn't unfortunate! Remember that Japanese DS game Solatorobo that we mentioned a few months...
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Old and new Sonic have reconciled their differences...


Apr 11
// Tony Ponce
... and found love on the battlefield. "Modern x Classic Quickie" by SEGAMew [DeviantART]
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Hey Ash, Whatcha Playin: World of Warcraft


Feb 11
// Jonathan Holmes
HAWP just kicked off its third season, and the opening episode has something for everyone. Sex, Violence, World of Warcraft; it's all here. If you think you knew everything there was to know about the way the Burch family ope...
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Dtoid (the show) week 8: Bad ass Hollywood all stars


Dec 06
// Jonathan Holmes
I can't even begin to recap all the stuff that happened this week on The Destructoid Show. Despite the fact that we're in a pre-VGA's news lull, we still found plenty to talk about. Off the top of my head, I know that Tofu Bo...
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TGS: The Accidental Pervert's best of booth companions


Sep 18
// Jonathan Holmes
So, as it turns out, there is a law in Japan against taking a girl's picture without her permission. Not only did I not know this, but even if I did, I have no idea how to ask a girl in Japanese if I am allowed to take her p...
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Puppies and J-Pop combine in this Okamiden trailer


Aug 07
// Jonathan Holmes
I felt bad for all the DS games at E3 2010, especially Okamiden. How could any DS title possibly follow the unveiling of the 3DS? It just wasn't fair. I hope that Okami fans (all 200,000 or so of you) are still willing to bu...
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Hey, did you read Ben's review of BlazBlue: Continuum Shift? It's pretty awesome, much better than the review some bozo posted on Dtoid for the original game. Ragna is NOT a bounty hunter, OK? OMG, the fact that Ragna is NOT ...

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Ape Escape 4 is coming to Europe


Jul 05
// Jonathan Holmes
This is almost a Captain Obvious post, but hey, I'll take any excuse to talk about Ape Escape 4 that I can get. Not seeing the game at E3 10 was easily one of my biggest disappointments of the show. Sony still seems resistant...
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Squirrel girl Makoto comes to BlazBlue via DLC


Jun 23
// Ben Perlee
In ground breaking news for fans of BlazBlue and squirrels(!!!!), some Famitsu scans reveal that Arc System Works and Aksys are going to release downloads for brand new characters to BlazBlue: Continuum Shift when it lau...
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Animated Pokemon Black/White fights, now in blur-o-vision


May 16
// Jonathan Holmes
Forgive the blurriness of these videos taken straight from this week's Pokemon Sunday, but they're the best that I can post right now. Blurry or not, they show us one thing for certain; the days of fully static Pokemon battl...
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Silhouettes of the Pokemon Black/White starters revealed


May 09
// Jonathan Holmes
Every time a new Pokemon game comes out, people freak over the starters. They're never universally accepted, garnering a lot of "That one looks too much like a (blank) crossed with a (blank), and therefore, it sucks and I hat...

Review: Monster Hunter Tri

May 05 // Jonathan Holmes
Monster Hunter Tri (Wii) Developer: Capcom Publisher: Capcom Released: April 20, 2010 MSRP: $49.99 First off, a quick word about the genre that Monster Hunter falls into: though it may look like a standard adventure game, Monster Hunter is very much a sandbox series -- a Japanese sandbox series. Unlike Western sandbox games such as GTA and Saints Row, Japanese sandbox games tend to focus on expansive, open, largely unpopulated (by humans, anyway) spaces that provide tons to do, but where nothing ever needs to get done. Collecting stuff, leveling up, exploring, and getting away from real-life humanity is the priority here; doing crimes in bustling recreations of real-life cities would just be missing the point. Dead Rising, Animal Crossing, Shadow of the Colossus, The Wind Waker, and No More Heroes are just a few examples of games that fit the profile of the Japanese sandbox game, but when it comes to to providing that special mix of freedom and escapism, Monster Hunter Tri outdoes them all. The game puts you in the role of a (you guessed it) person who hunts monsters, but Monster-Hunter-and-Gatherer is more like it. You start the game by creating your character in a Mass Effect/Mii Channel manner. From there, you are introduced to the Monster Hunter World via some beautiful cut-scenes, meet some villagers, leave town, and do as you please. Wander the wilderness, go fishing, catch some bugs, mine precious stones, and oh yeah, beat a bunch of dinosaur-looking things in the head with a hammer (or sword, or multiple other weapons) until death, then cut into them and take their remains back to town, and repeat. That's your average game of Monster Hunter Tri. There are a lot of things you can do around town, too: pay cat people to cultivate plants and bugs for you on a little farm, cuddle with a pig, send some sailors out on expeditions, decorate your house, forge new items, change weapons and armor, change your hair style, and, of course, buy stuff. It feels like the old, pre-story-focused days of the JRPG: go to town, rest up, hit the road, kick ass, come home, and lick your wounds. It's nothing revolutionary, but it works. Part of that comes from the constant supply of little moments to enjoy. The game provides a constant stream of different items to find, monsters to fight, hidden areas to discover, and surprising interactions with monsters. Oh hey, what are these little cat people doing in this cave? Doing a dance? Awesome. Wait, now they're smashing me in the head and stealing my stuff? Bastards! That's just the cute stuff. You'll also come across giant bugs, dino-sharks, and most often, huge, huge dragon/dinos that own the world of Monster Hunter with an iron fist. This is the most intimidating and beautiful creature design this side of Shadow of the Colossus. The way these monsters look, act, and think is endlessly entertaining. As you play through the single-player mode, new areas open up as well, and though none of them are particularly massive, the land never runs out of surprises. Swimming is a big part of the game, too, with large underwater areas to explore. One second you're "ooh-ing" at the massive beasts, the next you're "aah-ing" at the marvelous backdrops. It's a non-stop awe-fest. The team working on the latest Zelda title has been cited for their respect for the visuals of Monster Hunter Tri, and how they are aspiring to make a game as attractive. Though like many Wii games, the textures in Monster Hunter Tri can look a bit janky when seen extremely up close, there is still no denying that the attention to detail in both the environmental and creature design is top of the class. When you're running through the mountain pass at night, while shooting stars fly overhead and a herd of large, beautiful animals gallop en masse in the valley below, it's nothing short of magnificent. It's especially fun when loads of different types of monsters end up hanging out together in the same area. You'll have a raptor-like Jaggi biting the ass of the heavily armored Rhenoplos. So much care and attention was put into this game's world; you'll really feel like you're living among the beasts. Just as much care was put into Monster Hunter Tri's gameplay. Though you don't capture and train monsters like you do in Pokémon, you do make weapons and armor out of them, and the level of detail and variation in the "evolution trees" of each weapon/armor is staggering. This game has tons of different weapons and armor, with the potential for elemental properties for added flair. There are seven types of weaponry in Monster Hunter Tri: sword and shield, great sword, hammer, lance, switch axe (an axe that can turn into a sword), long sword, and bow gun (light, medium, and heavy barreled). All seven play very differently from each other. They almost feel like Street Fighter II's original seven characters (or eight, if you count Ryu and Ken as two different ones) in their level of variation. The single-player mode is perfectly engaging. For storyline, we get a low-intensity tale of a town that needs saving from a giant sea monster, among other natural enemies. Your real motivation in the single-player comes from curiosity about the game's world, and amassing a plethora of cool weapons/armor/etc. That's all good stuff, but what makes Monster Hunter Tri really special, especially for the Wii, takes place online. The game allows you to take on quests with three other strangers at a time, chosen from a cast of thousands of online strangers, with no need for friend codes. That's right, Capcom somehow got around Nintendo's friend code system. There is a little warning before entering the game's online city about not giving out your phone number and address to people you meet online, but that's it. There's no more protection than that. Teaming up with strangers of different levels of experience is the best way to see new and exciting stuff in the game, and to pick up some awesome new gear along the way -- all of which can be brought back to the single-player experience. You can interact with strangers with in-game texting, a Wii-compatible keyboard, or the Wii Speak speaker/microphone combo. The in-game keyboard is a little clunky, and doesn't allow for pointer controls like those found in Animal Crossing: City Folk, but other than that, it's pretty much flawless. Also, no lag. This lack of online protection and hand-holding is surprising, and speaks to the game's overall philosophy. In fact, that's the one thing about Monster Hunter Tri that may turn people off. This game barely tries to help you out. Unlike many games these days, your character doesn't have a built-in healing factor, and there is often a high price for carelessness in combat. The game also isn't shy about throwing over-powered monsters your way before you're tough enough to take them on, or letting you sign up for a quest that you have no chance of completing. After the initial set of quests, you're rarely given much direction or instruction as to where to go or what you'll need to succeed, which gives the game a certain believability not found in many online-intensive titles. The most striking area where the game leaves you on your own is in actual combat. There is no lock-on, which really forces you to hone your skills on your own. Knowing which weapon is right for which quest will be sure to make or break the career of many a monster hunter, as will the drive to learn the behaviors, strengths, and weaknesses of the monsters you're hunting. It all takes place in real time. Like in Resident Evil 5, there is no pausing the action in the inventory screen. Dodging, charging up attacks, setting traps, retreating, accessing items in your inventory, barbecuing some meat, all while a fire breathing dragon with giant cobra-heads for wings stomps around and scares the crap out of you, is a required skill. To pull off all that, the game's controls will need to become second nature. That's another one of the game's strengths: control options. Not only does each weapon control and feel differently from each other, but there are three overall control schemes you can choose from before starting up a game. The Wii-Remote-and-Nunchuk scheme is definitely playable and for motion control enthusiasts it may actually be preferred, but it really feels like the game was built to be played with the optionally-packed-in Classic Controller Pro. The Classic Controller gets two different control schemes: one that's button-intensive, and one that's analog stick-intensive. Mini review-within-a-review time: the Classic Controller Pro is awesome -- it's more light and comfortable than any other analog pad on the market, Wii or otherwise. The last thing thing you really should know about Monster Hunter Tri is how truly endless it feels. As a wild guess, someone may be able to speed-run through all the quests in the single-player in 30 hours or so, but that's being really generous. For people who want to get the most out of the game, it'll take much longer than that to really see what the game has to offer. It's common to hear a Monster Hunter fan say they've put hundreds of hours into the game, and they're still making gains and seeing new things. Capcom has already promised to make new quests available online free of charge. People pay a monthly subscription fee for this stuff in Japan, but we get it for free.  Fans of Japanese-style sandbox games need to buy Monster Hunter Tri. The only bad thing about it I can think of is that it really doesn't do anything to try to win over today's lazy, lock-on/healing factor-reliant action gamer. Also, the game's local co-op mode is a little lacking. It only allows you to join with one local player and take on one of the game's "bosses" inside an arena, disallowing the option to explore or go item-farming. Other than those tiny complaints, everything else about the game pretty much nails it. For $50 ($60 with the Classic Controller Pro), Monster Hunter Tri provides a World of Warcraft-quality experience without the $14.99 monthly subscription. That makes Monster Hunter Tri the best value going in MMORPGs today. Add to that a more-than-adequate single-player mode, and you get a... Score: 9.0 -- Superb (9s are a hallmark of excellence. There may be flaws, but they are negligible and won't cause massive damage to what is a supreme title.)
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Did you play the Monster Hunter Tri demo? If not, don't bother. It sucked. Okay, that's subjective, but it's definitely fair to say that the Monster Hunter Tri demo did not accurately represent the full game. Imagine if Rocks...

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Rumor: Earthworm Jim 4 coming to Wii


Apr 29
// Jonathan Holmes
Some man went to someplace and met the man who created Earthworm Jim. The man said that the Earthworm Jim making-man said that Earthworm Jim 4 is coming to the Wii. I read what that man heard the other man say, so I decided t...
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Dtoid's guess-packed Marvel Vs. Capcom 3 prediction post


Apr 20
// Jonathan Holmes
After over ten years of waiting, Marvel Vs. Capcom 3 has finally been announced. Yes, we're psyched, but we're also freaked out. A lot has changed for both Marvel and Capcom over the past ten years. Multiple new Marvel and Ca...
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Here comes the new Pokemon...


Feb 06
// Jonathan Holmes
We've known for a little while that an all new Pokemon game is in the works, but that could mean a million different things. It could be a puzzle game, a Wii spin-off with Nintendo 64 quality graphics, or any number of other ...
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Unwrap Banjo-Kazooie 3 this Christmas


Mar 28
// Chad Concelmo
You already know about the appearance of a mysterious teaser site, but now Rare has confirmed that Banjo-Kazooie 3 (oh, please call it Banjo-Threeie) will be released for the Xbox 360 in time for the...

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