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11:15 AM on 02.06.2013

Uh oh! Hip Hop Gamer is ECA's brand ambassador

Update: Heather Ellertson, vice president of marketing at the ECA, provided this response via email and Facebook: Gerard approached us wanting to know what he could do to help the cause. He's in the process of turning his li...

Allistair Pinsof




Fireside chat with ECA President Hal Halpin photo
Fireside chat with ECA President Hal Halpin
by Daniel Starkey

There's been a lot going on at the intersection of gaming and politics recently. SOPA, PIPA, ACTA, and now CISPA, our recent Supreme Court win, and the like have given us all a lot of reason to hope and to remain on our guard.

The first line of defense for many in the gaming community is the Entertainment Consumers Association. If you haven't heard of the ECA, you should probably educate yourself. Regardless of how you ultimately feel about them, the organization wields a fair amount of political power, and they focus almost exclusively on issues that are relevant to pretty much anyone reading this.

Recently, I had the opportunity to speak with the president of the ECA, Hal Halpin, about a few things that have been getting a lot of attention in the press recently. Astute readers will notice that we already published the interview in the form of a feature. We received enough requests for the full-text Q and A that we decided to go ahead and push that out as well.

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5:00 PM on 05.01.2012

Destructoid interviews ECA President Hal Halpin

Defending games and gamers isn’t easy. Sometimes it’s the popular press whipped into frenzy by politicians looking for a scapegoat and sometimes it’s corporations looking to squeeze a few extra bucks to make...

Daniel Starkey

12:30 PM on 04.27.2012

Hal Halpin, CISPA, and YOU

Most of our readers will remember our SOPA/PIPA blackout in January. Destructoid was joined by little-known sites like Wikipedia to protest the twin bills SOPA and PIPA that were working their way through the US House and Sen...

Daniel Starkey

9:20 AM on 01.14.2012

Donating money to oppose SOPA on the industry's behalf

Over the holidays, I received a package from THQ, just one among many pieces of swag and nonsense that publishers ply bloggers with on a regular basis. However, unlike the usual bits of miscellanea, this was something a bit m...

Jim Sterling

6:45 PM on 01.12.2012

Destructoid joins PIPA/SOPA Blackout Protest on 18th

When your kids say "Where were you when the government made the internet lame?" you'll hopefully respond with unflinching certainty: "raising hell." On January 18th members of the House Committee will be discussing PIPA/SOPA ...

Niero Gonzalez



ESA bad, ECA good  photo
ESA bad, ECA good
by Jim Sterling

Recently, we've been chatting quite a bit about the Entertainment Software Association, and its involvement with SOPA. The ESA is a trade association, looking after the interests of videogames while pretending to fight for free speech and gamer causes. The ESA's support of SOPA pretty much confirms that its Videogame Voters Network is little more than insincere astroturfing, but the ECA is on the level. 

The Entertainment Consumers Association, unlike the VGVN, is an actual gamer advocacy group, and has been fighting against SOPA as well (it's also been incredibly supportive of Destructoid's efforts). If you care about the rights of videogame consumers, it's pretty much the best place to start. 

Like Destructoid, the ECA has provided gamers with some help in getting their voices out about SOPA. This page contains information on the bill and useful tools in getting your message out to the people that matter.

They do good work, so check them out!

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Hal Halpin tackles the 'Anti-Streaming Bill' photo
Hal Halpin tackles the 'Anti-Streaming Bill'
by Jim Sterling

There has been growing concern over Bill S.978, a proposed "Anti-Streaming" bill that seeks to make felons of those who stream live entertainment without the permission of license holders. The concerns have extended to gamers, many of whom enjoy watching live plays of popular games, and now wonder if those who stream could face fines or jail in the future. 

Destructoid spoke to Hal Halpin, founder of the Entertainment Consumer Association and long-time gamer advocate, about the bill. He let us know why we, as gamers, should be concerned, what this bill could mean for the future, and what we can all do about it.

I'd like to thank Hal for his time and for chatting to us about what is a very worrying issue.

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2:00 AM on 07.27.2009

ECA wants you to inform the President about gaming

In case you don't watch the news or read a newspaper to stay up-to-date on current trends -- sadly, this is becoming an ever-increasing population -- the United States is in the middle of revamping its healthcare system. A ma...

Matthew Razak