hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

Dragon Age

Free Dragon Age photo
Free Dragon Age

Dragon Age: Origins is free on Origin until Tuesday


DLC not included
Oct 08
// Jordan Devore
Many of you haven't seemed too thrilled with EA's free game offerings on Origin, which is understandable -- they've been hit or miss. This one should prove a bit more compelling. The standard edition of Dragon Age: Origins is...
Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

Get a look a Dragon Age: Inquisition's customization options


Can you make your character look like Brad Pitt?
Sep 30
// Chris Carter
I know a lot of people that are really into creation options in games. Dragon Age Origins was partial to this ideology, as the entire point was to craft a character that you had complete control of. This new video by Bi...

BioWare is working to specifically differentiate Dragon Age: Inquisition from Dragon Age II

Sep 12 // Chris Carter
Speaking to BioWare's Mark Darrah (Executive Producer, Inquisition), and Aaryn Flynn (BioWare Edmonton General Manager), I immediately led with the question "what did you guys learn from Dragon Age II that didn't go over as well as you had hoped?" Darrah fielded this by stating that "we did a lot of experimentation in Dragon Age II. The hero is a reactive hero, as opposed to a hero that causes reactions like the Warden from Origins. I think that lack of clarity made the story more convoluted. It's a story of people as opposed to a story of events, and I think that was a problem for many people." Darrah continued, speaking on the issues with combat in Dragon Age II. "I think that's what got us in trouble with Dragon Age II -- the new story method, and that it was faster and easier gameplay wise. It feels like you're just swinging this sword around and it doesn't weigh anything, whereas combat was more deliberate in Origins. We're fixing that in Inquisition. Combat will have a lot more weight to it than both prior games. We're balancing it towards a more difficulty middle-ground, so that you have to use some of the tools you're given. Maybe you don't have to master the tactical camera, but you'll have to master some aspect of the game and use them together to really master Inquisition." Flynn sounded off as well, stating, "I think we misjudged there with Dragon Age II. People wanted something that they could really master over time. We didn't do that with the sequel." To me, that's good news in terms of where Inquisition is headed. A middle-ground of fun, engaging combat that's maybe a little less clunky than Origins but deeper than Dragon Age II is a great compromise. Another thing that bothered me though about DA II though was the lack of customization of party members and characters, so I pushed on that point. Darrah commented on how they are addressing that in Inquisition, stating, "in the sequel, we removed the ability to equip armor to your followers. That was intended as a way to really make the characters stand out, but we realized that people wanted that element in the game. So in Inquisition we added it back, but still kept that feel of individuality. We didn't want people putting plate mail on every character and having four walking trash cans. In Inquisition if you put armor on Cassandra for instance, she still looks like Cassandra." [embed]279148:55276:0[/embed] Flynn shed some light on the developmental process of both existing games as well. "Origins was a six-year project. There was a big desire to experiment on Dragon Age II after that long development time. A lot of people thought that their ideas weren't heard for the original, so we incorporated some into the sequel. I do think we experimented too much in Dragon Age II. Some of it was too big of a price to pay." Following up, I asked if there was a certain group of people that reacted well to the game. Darrah responded, "yeah, I think what a lot of people had a problem with was that it felt like a different series. Most of the people who loved Dragon Age II didn't play Origins. If you go to the sequel after playing tons of Origins you'll probably wonder how the series could progress that way. That was its biggest sin. It was too many new things." Another big thing that disappointed me in DA II was player choice -- or the lack thereof. I described the scenario in Origins where you've given at least five choices as to what to do with a possessed child. In the sequel there's nothing comparable, and choices are usually limited to two major options. I continued on down that path, asking how BioWare was going to improve on player choice in Inquisition, and got some pretty good answers. Darrah responded, saying, "Yeah the tone icons caused some confusion in Dragon Age II. We meant well with them, but we're backing away from them in the third game. We're using them now sparingly, just to warn players that they're being sarcastic, for instance, or letting them know that they're about to jump in bed with someone. It's not so much to spoil the surprise, but prevent players from reloading the game after accidentally kicking a party member out of the group." The duo also went on to cite Mass Effect's Saren as a great way to ground moral choices in games. On the topic of anchoring morality, Flynn stated, "I think that the lack of clarity in Dragon Age II hurt things a bit. With Origins you had a clear evil, and you could play off that. It's what made Saren such a tragic figure -- you could really see his evil side as well as his clear good side, and that made him more complex. But there was some grey there, just not all grey. That's something we are looking to bring to Inquisition." So how about gameplay? Darrah was on point with the improvements in Inquisition. "You can dye items, and Inquisition will feature the most advanced crafting system we've ever had. The tactical camera is also even better than it was in Origins. Before, you could just pause, give orders, and unpause. Now you can move the camera around a lot better in more advanced ways. The creature inspector tool will give you more information now. There are still synergies and now you can see how to combine them better. Weapons will have hilts and blades. Runes will be more customizable to give you the weapon you want." The romance system is something I always felt that was lacking in either game, and Darrah was excited to tell us how they're changing it. "The affection system was always very gamey, in a bad way. We made it a bit more organic. All your party members can approve or disapprove of your choices. You can't just give them 30 wet loaves of bread to make them fall in love with you. You really have to talk to your companions to romance them rather than game them. There are no meters anymore, you have to have a real conversation." Of course, I had to bring up DLC at some point. People are rightfully wary of EA's influence, and Darrah noted that they are going to mostly going to listen to fan demand to shape post-game support. Although he wasn't able to confirm anything, DLC will likely be comprised of sandboxes -- large new areas that players can wander around and complete a main quest in, but also find sidequests for. There isn't going to be another expansion like Awakening though, sadly. Darrah said that it was "far too much work, and very expensive, as everything has to interact with the original game." Well there you have it. Whether you enjoy Origins or Dragon Age II more, it seems as if elements of both will make their way into Inquisition. From what I've played that's a very good thing, but time will tell if it all pays off when the actual game launches on November 18.
BioWare interview photo
They learned quite a bit from the second iteration
When I entered BioWare's offices and had a chance to speak to the game's Executive Producer and Studio GM, I had one goal in mind -- to find out how Dragon Age: Inquisition was going to be more like Origins, and les...

Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

BioWare: 'We will support Dragon Age: Inquisition's multiplayer far beyond Mass Effect 3'


Free DLC and microtransactions are a part of that
Aug 27
// Chris Carter
During my time with Dragon Age: Inquisition's multiplayer, I had a chance to chat with the team who was responsible, specifically regarding their plans for the future. A BioWare representative confirmed that they would "suppo...

I enjoyed Dragon Age: Inquisition's multiplayer more than I thought

Aug 27 // Chris Carter
Dragon Age: Inquisition (PC [previewed], PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: BioWarePublisher: Electronic ArtsReleased: November 18, 2014MSRP: $59.99 So how does it work? Simply put, it's four-player co-op, but with more deliberate map designs that attempt to emulate a quest -- in other words, it's not just a wave-based horde mode that's in every other game these days. Think Uncharted 3's story-like co-op and you'll have a better idea of what I'm talking about. Over the course of a few games we ran with a fairly balanced party of two tanks (Legionnaires), a ranged DPS (Archer), and a support-based caster (Keeper). As a tank it was my job to keep enemies off our team, while the archer picked off targets and the caster dealt damage while keeping up a magic-reducing shield on us. That's not to say that you have to stick to your roles to a tee, as I often ran off doing my own thing while the archer took care of himself. As level one adventurers we only had access to a few abilities, but even with just three powers (things like stuns and charges) and a standard attack combat was engaging and fun. The enemy variety kept things interesting as well, as we constantly had to adapt to faster or more damaging foes with new skills, and we subsequently talked strategy as a team while it was happening. In case you're wondering, combo-based skills are in, and are more fun than ever with other players to coordinate with. It's not just a mindless slog from room to room either, as the dungeon we ran had a more twisted labyrinthine format. During each "run," certain bonus doors can be opened by a lockpick skill (rogues) or by dispelling an enchantment on it (casters) -- these routes often grant you treasure, but can also bypass rooms and lead to shortcuts. It's not required by any means, but having a well balanced team will grant you certain bonuses beyond just spells and ability synergy. Having said that, you don't have to worry about fighting over loot. Just like Diablo III loot is "instanced," so you'll get your fair share of items. Gold works the same way, and I was told that this is clearly the case to influence cooperative play. There is still some form of competition though by way of a scoring system. Any gold you earn can be used to buy new items (like potions), equipment, and craft new characters. As you can tell by the following screen, there's a decent amount of character options to choose from (I'm told around 12 or more will be available at launch). But instead of having static classes that just perform a job, BioWare has made them a little more interesting in Inquisition. Instead of merely having access to certain stats and powers, each "character" will give off a certain aura and personality. For instance the archer might be particularly cheeky, and the Legionnaire gets down to business. You can expect some amount of banter just like the core games, which is a nice feature for multiplayer. If BioWare gates off progress and leans too heavily on its microtransaction system, I don't know if Inquisition's multiplayer will take off. But given that they handled Mass Effect 3's progression systems fairly well, I'm excited to see what the future holds for Dragon Age co-op. The good news is based on what I've seen of the single-player so far, no resources have been "diverted" from the two separate development teams. BioWare said that we can expect multiplayer to ship with several co-op maps, with more to come after launch.
Dragon Age Multiplayer photo
Co-op! Hacking! Slashing! Class warfare!
There have been rumors of a multiplayer component in Dragon Age: Inquisition for quite a while. BioWare has been keeping things under wraps for months after a small hint of its inclusion, and speculation was rampan...

Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Dragon Age: Inquisition

BioWare states that one complete playthrough of Dragon Age: Inquisition is 150 hours


That's with collecting everything
Aug 13
// Chris Carter
Today at EA's gamescom press conference, BioWare's Aaryn Flynn talked a bit about how long Dragon Age: Inquisition would take to complete. The answer? If you did everything in one playthrough, it would take roughly 150 hours. Sounds like a lot, right? Well let me break that statement down based on my experiences with the game at a recent preview event.

Dragon Age: Inquisition plays like a solid mix of Origins and Dragon Age II

Aug 13 // Chris Carter
Dragon Age: Inquisition (PC [previewed], PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: BioWarePublisher: Electronic ArtsReleased: November 18, 2014MSRP: $59.99 I got a chance to play Dragon Age: Inquisition extensively with multiple classes, and one of the areas I encountered was "The Bog" -- the subject of the gamescom demo. During this portion, I played as a Qunari warrior, who happened to be taking advantage of the two-handed skill tree. One of the first things I noticed is that attacks actually had weight to them in Inquisition, as opposed to the floaty feel of Dragon Age II. As executive producer Mark Darrah told me, "faster and easier [combat] got us in trouble in Dragon Age II, so we're moving away from that." The two-handed skillset in Inquisition is ferocious, consisting of abilities like a running charge attack, multiple stuns, and whirlwinds. I was able to answer just about any situation, and close the gap with my dash -- but all of the Warrior's powers felt right within the confines of the class. You can also jump now, which allows you to tactically retreat or gain a better vantage point. There were multiple times where I found a new foothold by way of leaping up to a new location and it felt natural -- like the option had always been there. Of course, the classic tactical camera is back, with all-new improvements in tow for those of you who loved the option in the PC version of Origins. I found myself going back and forth from the satisfying behind-the-back action camera and the tactical view consistently, enjoying both on their own merits. Inside and out, combat has been improved this time around. When asked how much tougher it will be even on normal mode, Darrah responded, "You'll have more tools at your disposal, and you'll have to master at least one of them to get by. Whereas in Dragon Age II you could just wing it, Inquisition will challenge players to master something." In terms of player choice, BioWare notes that it's "going back to the personal story that was originally contained in Origins, while opening up the scale." One of the core faults of Dragon Age II, I felt, was that it had such a small scale and didn't really do much in terms of advancing a personal story. Speaking to the developers, they stated that Inquisition aims to fix those issues, with four playable races and two genders. BioWare informed me that not only will your race and gender affect how people around the world treat you, but it will also change the core story a bit. [embed]279148:55276:0[/embed] Just as your Origins avatar was the Warden, the new Inquisitor position comes with a lot of responsibility, which ramps up over the course of the game. While your authority may be rather tame towards the start, eventually you'll be able to pass judgments on others -- with the choice to make them an agent of the Inquisition, a prisoner, or even execute them yourself. Even with experimenting on select scenarios throughout my gametime, it seemed clear that the story would have an impact on the rest of the world, which is great news for those of you who crave a more open, epic tale. The build I played was on PC, and you could really see that new engine working overtime. As the wind blew and the rain fell in The Bog, trees really twisted and flapped in the breeze, adding to the feel of the environment as you hacked your way through hordes of the undead. As a general rule I'm not a big proponent of visuals over gameplay, but it's nice to know that Inquisition has both bases covered, and has plenty of detail. I was assured again that no areas would be re-used like in Dragon Age II, and everything I saw during my time spent with the demo backed up that claim. BioWare states that the current-generation versions of the game should look roughly the same as the PC build. I also got a chance to test out the new map icon system, which adds a bit more exploration to the mix. In short, many objectives aren't exactly spelled out for you with a conveniently-wrapped Google Map-esque tack like in the past. Instead, select quests will give you a giant circular "gist" icon as I call it, letting you know that your quest is somewhere in the area. It's a nice compromise since the exploration zones are around ten times bigger than any previous zone in the series, so you won't get completely lost -- but you'll have to at least work for it. Dragon Age: Inquisition is shaping up to be a glorious return to most of what made Origins so great. The jury is still out on whether or not BioWare can keep that greatness up throughout the course of the entire adventure, but from what I've played so far, I'm pretty satisfied, and most of my fears have been quelled. There's more Inquisition coverage on the way later this month, including a big announcement that I can't wait to share.
Dragon Age 3 preview photo
This is coming from a big supporter of Origins
I wasn't very happy with Dragon Age II. Whereas Origins was a glorious return to old-school RPG sensibilities, Dragon Age II played like an action game that took place in the same universe. I liked the sequel for di...

Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Dragon Age: Inquisition

Dragon Age: Inquisition's tactical camera is better than it was in Origins


A welcome return for the essential feature
Aug 07
// Chris Carter
I had a lot of problems with Dragon Age II, but one of my chief complaints was the lack of a tactical camera, which really took a lot of strategy out of major encounters. So when I sat down with the team from Dragon Age: ...
Inquisition combat photo
Inquisition combat

Dragon Age: Inquisition combat makes me want to play Final Fantasy XII


No you have a problem
Jul 29
// Steven Hansen
Let's be fair, a lot of seemingly arbitrary things make me want to replay Final Fantasy XII. A lack of time coupled with a naive hope for an HD re-release always keep me from doing so, leaving me in a perpetual state of want...
Electronic Arts photo
Electronic Arts

EA improves revenue in first quarter of 2014, delays Dragon Age and Battlefield


KOTOR 3 still not in development
Jul 23
// Brittany Vincent
As Electronic Arts' first fiscal quarter came to a close on June 30, the publisher found that it had beaten expectations for profits and revenue. EA credits much of this success to the runaway success of Titanfall. CEO Andrew...
Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

Dragon Age: Inquisition pushed to November


The longer I stare at this guy's flesh, the grosser it looks
Jul 22
// Jordan Devore
Battlefield Hardline, and now Dragon Age: Inquisition -- it's delay day at Electronic Arts. BioWare has moved Inquisition from October 7 to November 18 (Nov. 21 in Europe). Considering how stupidly packed with high-profile re...
Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Dragon Age: Inquisition

Dragon Age: Inquisition is just as pretty indoors as out


Snap some necks with thighs of steel
Jul 11
// Steven Hansen
The first part of this walkthrough with creative director Mike Laidlaw managed to get me excited for Inquisition despite not touching previous Dragon Age games. This one, too, looks pretty darn cool, even without bears to freeze. Plus, Dorian's sweet mustache. 
 photo
Lemme ride them big lizards
I've liked just about everything I've seen from Dragon Age: Inquisition, which is weird, because historically I've basically avoided the series. Here is literally everything I knew about the previous Dragon Age games go...

Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Dragon Age: Inquisition

This one area in Dragon Age: Inquisition is bigger than all of Origins


This developer demo is actually getting me excited
Jul 09
// Steven Hansen
So big they've added mounts, from regular old horses to the more exotic.  I never felt the Dragon Age games looked too hot, but BioWare has done a nice job making a more lush world. And then you get attacked by a g...
Dragon Age 3 photo
Dragon Age 3

Leliana re-confirmed to have a part to play in Dragon Age: Inquisition


What part is unknown
Jul 07
// Chris Carter
According to Bioware's official Dragon Age site, Leliana will be returning for Inqusition. Not a whole lot is known in terms of whether or not she will be playable, or just influencing the story, but they are building he...
 photo
Sometimes dudes just want to kiss dudes
The most recent character announced for Dragon Age: Inquisition, Dorian, is BioWare's first totally gay party member character. Only male player characters will be able to engage Dorian romantically. As well, Doria...

Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

Dragon Age: Inquisition has a gay male party member


That mustache
Jul 01
// Jordan Devore
Dorian, the next character BioWare has revealed for Dragon Age: Inquisition, sounds like a welcome addition to the cast. First off, he's not Cole, which is a huge plus. Secondly, this party member, a mage from the Tevinter Im...
Dumb hair photo
Dumb hair

Dragon Age: Inquisition's Cole is an angsty teen listening to CKY


Dumb hair? Dumb hair
Jun 23
// Steven Hansen
I've never actually listened to CKY. However, I knew two angsty teens that did. Both were white and had dirty blonde hair over their eyes just like Dragon Age: Inquisition's Cole. "All Cole knows for certain is that the world...
Freddie Prinze. Jr. photo
Freddie Prinze. Jr.

Freddie Prinze Jr. tells us a bit about his role in Dragon Age: Inquisition


He sounds a lot better than Vega did in ME3
Jun 23
// Chris Carter
I wasn't a big fan of Freddie Prinze Jr.'s role of James Vega in Mass Effect 3, but his new turn as "Iron Bull" in Dragon Age Inquisition sounds a lot more interesting. This new video from Bioware gives us a glimps...

I couldn't believe the size of Dragon Age: Inquisition's world

Jun 18 // Brett Makedonski
Dragon Age: Inquisition centers around the on-going war between the mages and templars. The presenter emphatically stated several times throughout the demo that this was our goal. That might be what's on BioWare's mind, but honestly, it seems like the more important objective in Inquisition is simply keeping the world from tearing itself apart. All across the land are breaches that need to be repaired, which is the protagonist's duty as the Inquisitor leading the Inquisition. There's plenty of room for customization here as four races and nine specializations (as well as choice of gender) are offered. If Inquisition's going to ask the player to make decisions to affect the outcome of the game, it's a good thing that the option to play several different ways is represented. Not that the Inquisitor would attempt this on his/her own, however. Inquisition has many playable characters that are leaders in their own right, effectively making the player a leader of leaders. These characters react based on choices made throughout the game. For instance, in the demo, we sent one to Redcliffe Castle where she was captured and tortured. We eventually freed her, but the presenter remarked that it'll have a long-term effect on our relationship moving forward. It's probably for the best that relationships be tended to as carefully as possible, because you'll anyone and everyone on your side in the thick of battle. The combat system has been sort of reworked for Inquisition to compromise between Origins' and Dragon Age 2's. Now, the player is able to pause time entirely to take an overhead tactical approach, or get into the fray themselves while switching characters on-the-fly. This was displayed flawlessly in a battle against a ferocious Fereldan Frostback dragon. With different reticules aiming for specific parts of the dragon, the team chipped away. This is where Focus was shown off -- a shared resource that slows down time for everyone but our party. After inflicting some major damage, the dragon was wounded enough that we could move in and deliver the coup de grâce. By the time the 30-minute presentation was up, I realized that we had barely even scratched the surface of what Dragon Age: Inquisition will have to offer. With a massive play space that changes based on in-game decisions and actions, dynamic RPG offerings, and an entire story to tell, Inquisition needs several hours to express what it's all about -- not just a thirty minutes. That being said, a half hour was sufficient time to impress; I can't imagine more time wouldn't just build on that.
Dragon Age preview photo
The rest of the game looked damn fine, too
Fantasy games have some of my favorite settings in all of videogames. Forests, mountains, chasms, rivers -- they all have a serenity and majesty about them that wonderfully adds to the sense of scale. It shouldn't surprise me...

Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Get up, stand up
Honestly, I'm a little lukewarm on Dragon Age: Inquisition. The footage out of E3 2014 failed to impress, and I find myself joining The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt's camp instead. But this trailer piqued my interest in a strange wa...

Dragon Age: Inquisition photo
Dragon Age: Inquisition

New Dragon Age: Inquisition trailer is magical


Also, swordical and dragonical
Jun 09
// Darren Nakamura
Fans of BioWare's plastic-faced role-playing series Dragon Age have a lot to look forward to with the upcoming Dragon Age: Inquisition, and Microsoft was able to show more of it off at its E3 press conference this morning. T...
Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

Dragon Age: Inquisition has a $170 collector's edition


Keep away from small children
May 13
// Jordan Devore
For the Dragon Age fan who needs more stuff in their life, there's the collector's edition of Inquisition to consider. Or should I say the "Dragon Age Inquisition Inquisitor's Edition," to be precise. It's really called that,...
Tuesday Newsday photo
Breaking: my hair looks great today
Here's your Tuesday Newsday for the last week or so! Today, we got a sexy new Dragon Age III: Inquisition trailer, some HD footage of Star Citizen out of PAX East, announcements of a new Fatal Frame on Wii-U as well as a bun...

Dragon Age photo
'I'm starting to think this is a world in love with crisis'
The Blight is over, the Qunari have been driven from Kirkwall, and the mages have gone to all out war with their Templar oppressors. We've seen a lot of crisis across Thedas, but all that doesn't seem to compare when demons ...

Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

You know, Dragon Age: Inquisition's box art is pretty cool


I'm happy they didn't go with red again
Apr 21
// Jordan Devore
It's rare that videogame cover art can energize me enough to want to write about it (unless we're talking the oft-excellent fan-made stuff), but there are exceptions. Not to oversell you on Dragon Age: Inquisition's cover, or anything. It's good! Better than expected coming off of Dragon Age II, certainly. Let's hope that rings true for all aspects of the game.
DTOID News photo
KAZAAM!
Sweet Christmas do we have some great news about video games today! Let’s see… My previews for Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes went up, a new Batman game was announced by Rocksteady, Batman: Arkham Knight...

Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

Dragon Age: Inquisition makes great use of Frostbite 3


Think you can handle swaying spider webs?
Mar 06
// Jordan Devore
The Frostbite 3 engine shows its stuff in this new trailer for Dragon Age: Inquisition covering the game's stunning landscapes. Those leafless tress, that shimmering water -- I'm impressed. This kind of visual fidelity is al...
Dragon Age photo
Dragon Age

BioWare gives a status update on Dragon Age: Inquisition


Trees, faces, and 'dead things'
Dec 19
// Jordan Devore
Before its teams head off for the holidays, BioWare has shared where it's at with Dragon Age: Inquisition. Since the game's last big push at PAX Prime, the studio has gotten to a point where the main storyline is playable fro...
 photo

Heroes of Dragon Age launches on Android and iOS


Who asked for this?
Dec 07
// Harry Monogenis
Remember Heroes of Dragon Age, that upcoming free-to-play title for Android and iOS EA announced back in August? Don't worry, I didn't either. Well, it's out now. The spin-off title focuses around players collecting char...

  Around the web (login to improve these)




Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter!
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -