hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

Doom

 photo
This one's for you, Morph.
Today there are a bunch of new trailers for games like Assassin's Creed Unity, Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare, and The Last of Us Remastered (which is on sale) but Bill and I would rather talk about superhero cartoons from twenty years ago, and guns we can't remember the names of in Unreal Tournament. 

 photo
Try not to rip off any arms in anticipation
As we reported earlier today, attendees of QuakeCon last week were treated to a sneak peak of id Software's upcoming interplanetary demon slaughterfest, simply title Doom. Word came in from Doom publisher Bethesda that the l...

Id & Doom (& abs) photo
Id & Doom (& abs)

Don't expect to see any Doom until 2015


QuakeCon footage just meant to appease fans
Jul 21
// Steven Hansen
QuakeCon attendees got to see some Doom footage. Anyone streaming was said "good-bye" to as the stream cut out. Bethesda Softworks VP of PR and Marketing Pete Hines told PC Gamer that the new Doom just isn...
Doom photo
Doom

We can't see the new Doom yet, but it sounds like a return to form


'A demon just ripped the player's arms off and beat him to death with them'
Jul 17
// Jordan Devore
Bethesda said its big reveal of Doom -- that is in fact "Doom," not "Doom 4" -- at QuakeCon would be for attendees only, not for us Internet ne'er-do-wells, but I still watched the QuakeCon stream like a sucker, anyway. When ...
Doom photo
Doom

Upcoming Doom sneak peek is only meant for QuakeCon attendees


We'll see about that
Jul 02
// Jordan Devore
The teaser trailer for Doom (4) didn't do much for me, but I'm looking forward to the long-awaited reveal. We'll see more of the game at this year's QuakeCon, set to take place in Dallas, Texas from July 17 - 20, or so I thou...
id Software photo
id Software

Check out this trip down memory lane with id Software


Ah, memories
Jun 30
// Brittany Vincent
I was barely old enough to game in 1993, let alone take trips to id Software for office tours. That's why I'm so jealous of one Dan Linton, owner of a wildly successful BBS known as Software Creation, who took a trip down to...
Doom photo
Doom

Did You Know Gaming tackles Doom


Everything from movie to music references
Jun 30
// Chris Carter
I grew up with FPS games like Catacomb, Wolfenstein, and Doom, so this episode of Did You Know Gaming is a real treat. It goes over pretty much everything from the origins of the game, the origins of the name, and most of th...
Doom photo
Hey there, good-lookin'!
Oh, sweet Cyberdemon. It's been far too long since I danced with thee. And now you're looking so very...refreshed. You've had a facelift. Even though you're a little bit older than the last time we met, you're still just as ...

Wolfenstein: TNO photo
Wolfenstein: TNO

Pre-order Wolfenstein: The New Order on Steam and wear swanky hats in TF2


Deck yourself out in some sweet new hats for buying early
Apr 16
// Brittany Vincent
Wolfenstein: The New Order is up for pre-order on Steam, and while my finger is hovering over the mouse to pull the trigger and make it Steam official, here's an interesting tidbit that might sway you into giving it a chance ...
Molyneux photo
Molyneux

Enjoy the indie craze whilst it lasts, says Peter Molyneux


Just as well he's still in bed with Microsoft, eh? Oh wait...
Mar 26
// Alasdair Duncan
Peter Molyneux is at it again, this time saying that the recent indie game boom of the last few years isn't going to last. Sound the doom sirens! Speaking to CVG, Molyneux explained, "These things go in cycles, what I'd say i...
Doom photo
Doom

Gaming Heads' Doom diorama is droolworthy


They nailed the midriff
Mar 10
// Jordan Devore
Gaming Heads is taking pre-orders for its new Doom diorama based on the game's iconic box art. The polystone statue is 12.5 inches tall by 17 inches wide and, okay, I'll stop stalling -- this thing is unsurprisingly not cheap...
 photo
DTOID News is wearing a dumb scarf
Hey everybody, I’m back from Japan! And here’s your quasi-timely news update for the first two thirds of this week. Irrational Games closed, pre-ordering Wolfenstein: The New Order gets you a beta for the new and...

Doom photo
Doom

Doom was inspired by Tom Cruise's The Color of Money?


John Romero and Tom Hall reminisce about the 1993 FPS
Jan 27
// Alasdair Duncan
I love reading about the development history of games especially some of the medium's classics. Doom is one such classic, the seminal first-person shooter turned 20 years old in 2013. Creators John Romero and Tom Hall have re...

Wii U development drama: Nintendo's box is a Nintendo-box

Jan 14 // Steven Hansen
This mob-anointed expose on the Wii U comes at a time where it fits the narrative neatly. The Wii U is doing badly, barring unreleased holiday numbers of peculiar goodness (Wind Waker HD drove sales up several hundred percent and the holidays were deemed "very strong" by Reggie). However, the Eurogamer-hosted piece is clearly covering pre-console-launch shenanigans and tribulations, which isn't necessarily indicative of how the company has handled itself since or how development woes are affecting the Wii U's prosperity.  What it is is an interesting snapshot in time by one of many people developing for the Wii U. Some of the recount can be telling. The apparent pitch for, "a console that was the same size as the Wii and wouldn't make much noise, so 'mum wouldn't mind having it in the living room,'" could hint at Nintendo's attempts to recapture the Wii's sales lightning in a Tesla-coiled bottle. It's certainly catchy, the notion that senior Nintendo officials feigned ignorance as to how Xbox Live or PSN worked. Still, the Wii U, including Nintendo's approach with it, has surely evolved from concept pitches and development unit issues. Just look at how hard Nintendo has campaigned the Wii U as an indie haven after launch, for example, trying to make it easier on developers to get games onto the system. Dan Adelman, who helped developed Xbox Live, is Nintendo's Business Development Manager. He has broken down age old barriers that made it difficult for small outfits to become registered Nintendo developers.  The responses in this "drama" are levelheaded and plain. Chris Arnold of Nami Tentou explained that points made in the Eurogamer article are based on "pre-retail release SDK problems" and that "the new post release SDK kits do not contain any of the listed problems." This all feels like a response to the hundreds of comments and arguments the topic has incited more than counters to the original article. The Eurogamer piece wasn't, "Wii U has no games right now because development is a nightmare." It's, "pre-console-launch development was a struggle and possibly because of this a lot of people with money hats put their bets on Sony/Microsoft." Of course, there will always be back and forth here. Apparently Darksiders II came along for the Wii U in those early days swimmingly -- though one of the anonymous developer's biggest hitches did seem to be on the online infrastructure end. 5th Cell was okay with the Wii U's power. Hideki Kamiya, curt as always, seemed okay developing The Wonderful 101. But, really, everyone is probably right. The anonymous developer had their trouble. Watsham and company seemed to have had an okay time on the Wii U. Arnold gave a plain reminder that these problems are no longer an issue currently impeding development, whatever their legacy may be. This just exposes the same nerve we've been rubbing up against since the N64. The Wii U is a Nintendo-Box. It is, first and foremost, the way to play Nintendo games that Nintendo makes for you, as most Nintendo consoles have been for some time. Barring the lunatic commenters who arbitrarily want to see a company (Nintendo) fail, all of these 600+ comment threads, all of this back and forth, stems from people wanting more games and concern over the release landscape. There are would-be Nintendo fans who want to invest in the system, there are Wii U owners uncomfortable with the checkered release calendar and inexplicably still uncomfortable with the idea of owning a system dedicated, primarily, to Nintendo games. I love the GameCube. A lack of third-party support is said to be what hurt the little lunchbox that could. My favorite GameCube games are third-party, but Nintendo has never and likely will never aggressively lobby third-parties. And maybe it doesn't need to. With the Wii U, Nintendo has, again, firmly entrenched itself aloof of where Sony and Microsoft are headed. It's unlikely for the company to pull a SEGA as so many would like. Nintendo doesn't like to sell systems at a loss. Nintendo's software pulls in mad cash for it. The 3DS is explosive -- its 2013 software sales shot up almost 50%. The Eurogamer piece, a singular snapshot into over a year ago, reads as doom and gloom because the Wii U reads as doom and gloom. Because the internet wants to argue about this and that (and, especially, tell Nintendo what it needs to do). And, hey, maybe Nintendo should farm out some IP to capable developers, like it did successfully with the amazing Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon. The Wii U is, first and foremost, a box that lets you play Nintendo games. It's been the case for a while. Everything else is gravy. Nintendo would love Wii-caliber sales, but it seems to be doing okay with its current position, playing its own long game.  The Wii U is still sustainable. A pubescent, PS3-styled push isn't out of the question (see also: 3DS). Other games -- the weird and different and cool -- will trickle in. Nintendo games will do gangbusters. Being "hard to develop for" didn't sink the PS3 and there's no need to trip beyond mild interest over rocky pre-launch tech when development works now. GameCube wasn't terribly profitable hardware as Nintendo slashed prices to compete. Just look at the price of Nintendo games years after release. Nintendo doesn't like slashing prices. If the Wii U was counting on AAA support parity with PS4, Xbox One, and PC, Nintendo would've made a pricier, comparable box. STFUAJPG, I guess. Even on the Wii U, there are some good ones. And if you've played them all, buy a Vita and play those while you wait for Bayonetta 2 and Smash Bros.
Wii U dev drama photo
Everyone is right. The Wii U still needs games.
There was a bit of gloom and Nintendoom over the weekend. An anonymous, chronological account of Wii U development hit Eurogamer. It begins as early as Nintendo touring studios for feedback on its next console venture and end...

 photo

Resident Evil 4 invades the original Doom in this mod


It's all in third-person too
Dec 23
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Just in time for the holiday break is this wonderful Doom mod that lets you play the game as one of the characters from Resident Evil 4. Play as Leon, Albert Wesker, Krauser, Ada Wong, or Hunk and all in third-person view. The mod can be grabbed here. Merry Christmas!
Doom anniversary photo
Doom anniversary

A love letter to Cacodemons, Carmack, and Doom


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Dec 14
// Maxwell Roahrig
[In honor of Doom's 20th anniversary earlier this week, Max shares this remembrance. Want to see your own blog appear on our front page? Go write something! --Mr Andy Dixon] When I was eight years old, my dad brought home my ...
Doom photo
Doom

Happy 20th Anniversary, Doom


This was the game that cemented my love for FPS titles
Dec 10
// Chris Carter
On December 10, 1993, Doom was released. Although it was far from the first FPS game I ever played (I was rocking Catacomb and Wolfenstein already), it had a profound effect on me, as I tirelessly spent hundreds of hours...
Bethesda photo
Bethesda

Bethesda is seeking playtesters for unannounced game


Anyone in the Dallas-Fort Worth area can apply to test unknown title
Dec 03
// Alessandro Fillari
There's been a lot of chatter lately about what the developers at Bethesda Softworks have got in the works. With the recent survivor2299 website popping up, and the trademarks for Fallout 4 being registered, many people are c...
Doom photo
Doom

What if Doom were produced today?


Screen full of jelly, soft drink ads, and DLC!
Nov 19
// Alessandro Fillari
Doom was an immensely popular and genre-defining game back when it was released in 1993. It paved the way for many titles that followed and is still seen as one of the purest forms of first-person shooter gameplay. But thing...
DOOM photo
DOOM

The Cacodemon has never looked so adorable


DOOM plushies from Gaming Heads
Sep 06
// Jordan Devore
I'm not normally one to go for plush toys, but my inner DOOM fanatic is coming out now that I've seen Gaming Heads' Cacodemon and Pain Elemental. Priced at $14.99 each, these six-inch plushes are currently available for those...
Doom photo
Doom

Prior to restart, Doom 4 lacked a 'personality'


All of id is focused on the project now
Aug 05
// Jordan Devore
Coming into this year's QuakeCon, I didn't expect to hear much of anything about Doom 4. Like a child who doesn't get that one specific toy for Christmas year after year, I can only have my heart broken so many times. It's co...
 photo

Every Bethesda and id game is on sale on Steam right now


Skyrim, Fallout, Quake, and so much more
Aug 01
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
[Update: I somehow missed this earlier, but ALL the games on sale here can be yours for $89.99 in the QuakeCon pack. That's 44 games, folks!] QuakeCon is happening down in Texas this week! For those of you that can't make it,...
Doom photo
Doom

Symbiote Studios Doom and Elder Scrolls figures are sweet


Cute and deadly to say the least
Jul 27
// Wesley Ruscher
Every year there are some pretty awesome exclusive toys and figures to grab at Comic-Con for the would-be collector. With this year's holy grail being none other than the Green and White Ranger's Legacy Power Morpher -- which...
 photo

Doom 4 project rebooted, aiming for next-gen consoles


RAGE 2 canceled, if you care
Apr 03
// Jim Sterling
Bethesda has announced that work on the perpetually developed Doom 4 has begun anew, with aims to now launch the shooter on next generation consoles. The news follows reports from Kotaku that the game's development was "not g...
Doom + Half-Life 2 photo
Doom + Half-Life 2

New mod adds Doom weapons and characters to Half-Life 2


No matter what, the shotgun is still your best option
Apr 02
// Jason Cabral
Have you ever asked yourself, "What if someone took the concept of fighting flat 2D enemies from Eat Lead: The Return of Matt Hazard and put it into a much better game?" I know I have, and thankfully the modder Ghor has answ...
Oculus Rift photo
Oculus Rift

Doom 3 won't be ready for the Oculus Rift dev kit launch


Reward replacements and refunds are being offered
Mar 18
// Jordan Devore
Those who Kickstarted Oculus Rift were originally supposed to get a copy of Doom 3: BFG included with their order, but that is no longer the case. "Unfortunately, we've been informed that [the game] will not support the Rift ...
Bethesda Shop photo
Bethesda Shop

Get Skyrim shirts from the official Bethesda store


Celebrate the pubs of Skyrim
Mar 14
// Joshua Derocher
Bethesda now has an official shop where you can buy a good-sized and varied selection of merchandise related to Skyrim, Dishonored, Fallout, Doom, Quake, and Wolfenstein. Everything from t-shirts, hoodies, mugs, figurines, lithographs, and messenger bags.  Personally, I would love to wear a Winking Skeever shirt with a pair of Vault 101 sneakers. That's the pinnacle of fashion my friends.

PlayStation 4 launch vs. reality: Don't believe the hype

Feb 20 // Allistair Pinsof
PlayStation - 1994 [embed]246023:47080:0[/embed] See also: Manta Ray tech demo PC games at the time: [embed]246023:47081:0[/embed] See also: System Shock What PSX launch games actually looked like: [embed]246023:47084:0[/embed] See also: Battle Arena Toshinden What history can teach us: In the mid-'90s, console and PC hardware were constantly leap-frogging each other, which is perfectly evidenced in the above comparison. Driving and fighting games will always look the best, due to smaller environments, less models, and A.I. to fiddle with. Nevertheless, Ridge Racer looks a great deal cleaner and smoother than Need for Speed on PC (a game used for PC bragging rights at the time.) System Shock never came to PS, but I have no doubt that it could have handled it, considering it ran the brilliant-looking (for the time) Disruptor. All this would soon change with the arrival of Quake and 3D graphics cards. I can't fault the tech demos for the PS too much, since they focused on very small environments and singular detailed models. The polygonal models of Vagrant Story, Dino Crisis, and Metal Gear Solid would reach similar heights in time, but the launch titles were a good way off from that level of visual tour de force. This would be the last time that a system launch would outshine contemporary PC titles to such a great degree. PlayStation 2 - 1999 [embed]246023:47065:0[/embed] See also: Final Fantasy VIII tech demo PC games at the time: [embed]246023:47067:0[/embed] See also: Grim Fandango What PS2 launch games actually looked like: [embed]246023:47069:0[/embed] See also: Dynasty Warriors 2 What history can teach us: It was incredible to see the dance hall scene between Final Fantasy VIII's Squall and Rinoa realized in real-time 3D, before even watching it as a pre-rendered scene on the PlayStation, the same year. Square would make good on the tech demo with Final Fantasy X, three years later. The launch titles told a different story. Comparing the dated models and lighting of PS2's launch titles to what was happening on PC at the time, with the Quake 3 and Unreal engine, it really hits home how manipulative and false these tech demos can be. Sure, that's what a game with an old man's face would look like but in what game would that even exist? As detailed as MGS2 was, Max Payne looked comparable (dare I say, better) on PC. PC had the PS2 beat out the gate and continued to pummel Sony's hardware, which never did offer the facial detail of those early tech demos. PlayStation 3 - 2005 [embed]246023:47071:0[/embed] See also: Killzone 2 trailer PC games at the time: [embed]246023:47074:0[/embed] See also: Battlefield 2 What PS3 launch games actually looked like: [embed]246023:47076:0[/embed] See also: Madden NFL 07 What history can teach us: Unlike previous tech demos, Sony cooked up a much more accurate batch of tech demos -- if not in performance, at least in representing something that actually resembles games. The target render of Killzone 2 was presented as in-game footage at the time, so I'm still unsure of how to judge it in reflection. For the first time since the original PlayStation, launch titles compared fairly well with PC. I still can't decide if Doom 3 or Resistance looks better; though, I have my doubts that a PS2 can handle the scale of a max-player-count Battlefield 2 match, upon release. We never did get games that looked as good as the Final Fantasy VII and Killzone 2 tech demos, however. PlayStation 4 - 2013 [embed]246023:47086:0[/embed] See also: Unreal Engine 4 demo PC games at the time: [embed]246023:47087:0[/embed] See also: Max Payne 3 What history can teach us: At this point, there is a common link among these that we should recognize: launch titles never look as good as the initial tech demos, but usually look slightly better than the best PC games from the year before. With hardware specs comparable to a high-end PC, we have no reason to believe the PS4 will be any different. So, dream about playing Crysis 3 and Max Payne 3 with all the bells and whistles enabled, and recognize those Unreal 4 and Square tech demos for what they are: a dream that likely won't be realized until next-next-gen console rumors start appearing on Destructoid's homepage. Sorry, but that's reality for you. [Pug image courtesy of Greenpolis]
PS4 tech demos photo
What history can tell us about PS4's launch titles
A new console generation. A new batch of tech demos that mislead consumer expectations. As perfectly evidenced by Gearbox's recent Aliens demo, savvy game enthusiasts don't take kindly to developers promising one thing and de...

LEGO Cacodemon photo
LEGO Cacodemon

Doom's Cacodemon bursts forth from LEGO Hell


OH GOD KILL IT
Feb 13
// Tony Ponce
Allistair Pinsof, is that you? Whoops! My mistake! The hideous Cacodemon. Born from the depths of Hell -- or from the cover of a D&D manual, but whatevs. Now he's returned in LEGO form, badder (and a little bit fatter) th...

Review: DOOM 3 BFG Edition

Oct 19 // Jim Sterling
DOOM 3 BFG Edition (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed], PC)Developer: id SoftwarePublisher: BethesdaRelease: October 16, 2012MSRP: $39.99 I'm somewhat surprised Bethesda and id Software chose to market this release as DOOM 3, since the inclusion of the original two titles makes it far more akin to a full-on DOOM collection and, in my opinion, would have made it a lot more marketable. Nevertheless, this compilation of titles and additional content works most adequately in celebrating three classic shooters ... provided you're not a PC gamer, that is.  The star of the show is, by virtue of name, DOOM 3. You've got at least ten hours of gameplay from the solo campaign, alongside a fully functioning online multiplayer mode, and while it's clear that the game has aged considerably since 2004, I still find it not only gratifying in its combat, but still highly effective as a scary horror game. Say what you will about "cheap" jump scares, but DOOM 3 had it mastered, and it can still make a player jump when it wants to.  [embed]237084:45490[/embed] The fact that monsters can spawn anywhere, even several rooms behind the player so their advance can't be detected, fosters a sense of paranoia that many modern horror games have failed to replicate, at least in the premium retail space. DOOM 3's aggressive, resilient bestiary of demons and zombies still makes for an impressive and intimidating array of opposition, while the dark industrial levels are oppressive and increasingly macabre.  All that said, the game's campaign keeps up such a relentless onslaught of monsters that it does get mentally exhausting before the adventure has concluded. The game plays but one note, and while it plays it very well, it's an experience that only grows more draining as time goes by. Lacking the environmental variety and general oddity of the original DOOM titles, id's third crack of the whip constantly risks boring the player, a risk made all the more real at the end of a generation propelled by the idea of player choice, dizzying setpieces, and dynamic combat.  I still have a ton of respect for DOOM 3 regardless, a game that showcased how horror can still work in a combat-heavy game, and maintains a sense of satisfyingly simple action in a world of cover systems and regenerating health. The A.I. isn't very good anymore and the enemies don't react to your gunfire much, but at its core, DOOM 3 still provides a rock solid dose of old-fashioned first-person shooting.  The controls have been "optimized" for consoles, giving newer players a familiar button layout that mostly works fine, save for the fact that sprinting is done by pressing and holding the left stick, rather than just clicking it on and off, which always feels pointless and harder to maintain while moving around corners. This release also sees the game embrace the PC version's "Duct Tape" mod as standard. Rather than have players scroll through and use the flashlight in place of a firearm, the torch is now activated alongside the equipped weapon with a simple press. Some will welcome this convenient change, others will see it as an elimination of an effective horror tool, as DOOM 3 originally had players trade off offensive ability for visibility. Personally, I'm none too bothered by it. It does indeed remove an element of tension, but the game is still plenty tense already.  The graphics have been given an HD overhaul, and despite character models and animations that appear simplistic by today's standards, the overall remaster job is pretty damn good. Being a bit of a visual darling in its time, DOOM 3 doesn't look ugly in 2012 by any stretch of the imagination. It also has a 3D option for those owning the required televisions. Not the biggest selling point, especially with the fad having died down considerably, but it's there if you need it.  In addition to the main campaign and the rather simplistic multiplayer options, the Resurrection of Evil expansion has been included, as well as an all-new series of chapters, The Lost Mission. This latter addition places players into the boots of a marine whose team was cut down during the original campaign. In essence, it's just more of the same, as you run around, shoot demons, and collect PDAs to open doors. It doesn't really add anything new to the game, but it does amount to several more hours of content for those who really can't get enough of the Hell-soaked madness.  When one grows tired of DOOM 3's chicanery, both DOOM and DOOM II are included for your amusement. Still instantly replayable classics, these two seminal FPS adventures are still a bunch of fun to play, and their inclusion makes the BFG Edition package that much more attractive. One thing I lament is the inability to get the games running fullscreen on a TV monitor, and I really don't appreciate having no way of quitting out to get back to the main BFG menu without having to restart the disc. These quibbles aside, it's great to play two shooters that remain some of the best examples of pure FPS gameplay and cut pretty damn close to perfection in terms of accomplishing a very clear goal. Speaking of accomplishments, both these games have their own separate set of Trophies/Achievements, rather than having to share from a common pool as is usually the case with HD collections.  It's worth noting that these games are, essentially, the Xbox Live Arcade versions, even sharing the same save data if you have any. This means multiplayer is included, but it also means that if you install the BFG disc data, the games won't work off the disc. It's a weird situation, but Bethesda has said installing the disc doesn't do anything anyway, so don't bother.  All this said, there's no escaping the fact that you can already get DOOM 3, in HD, on your PC, along with all sorts of relevant and useful mods. Same can be said for the other games included. The only thing you'd risk missing is Lost Mission, which really isn't significant enough to miss on any appreciable level. If you're a PC gamer, getting the BFG Edition really isn't worth your time and money.  However, the game is undoubtedly geared toward console users. Those looking to play this on an Xbox 360 or PlayStation 3 will certainly get a ton of content for their money, and a trio of games that, despite their age and the scorn at least one of them receives, still amount to hours of simple entertainment. Whether you have the energy to experience all of that entertainment depends entirely on your tolerance for non-stop, mostly immutable FPS action, but nevertheless, this is worth nabbing for any DOOM fan currently not rocking a gaming rig. 
 photo
All the doom without the gloom
Mention DOOM 3 to most fans, and the common (disparaging) response will be, "Monster Closets." Earning criticism for its jump scares, lack of charisma, and stylistic departure from previous DOOM titles, DOOM 3 has not aged we...







Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
What is the meaning of life, and do you have any more pizza rolls?
You may remix all content on this site under Creative Commons with Attribution
- Living the dream, Since 2006 -