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Developer Stuff

Grand Theft Auto photo
Grand Theft Auto

Why doesn't Rockstar release a new GTA game every year?

Take-Two Talks
Nov 20
// Vikki Blake
Rockstar's parent company, Take-Two, has opened up about why it does not annualise the release its biggest titles like Grand Theft Auto, Max Payne, and Red Dead Redemption. Talking at MKM Partners Investor Day in New York Cit...
Free eBook photo
Free eBook

Amazon has The Untold History of Japanese Game Developers for free

Download Volume 1
Nov 13
// Jordan Devore
Just yesterday, I was reading up on a canceled decades-old Konami fighting game whose character sketches are, uh, better seen than described. What a what-if! The information originated from author John Szczepaniak and his boo...
Swery65 photo

Swery65 is taking a break from game development

Get well soon, Swery!
Nov 06
// Ben Davis
Game designer Swery65, best known for creating Deadly Premonition and D4: Dark Dreams Don't Die, posted on the Access Games blog today that he will be taking a short break from game development to recover from reactive hypogl...
Konami LA photo
Konami LA

Konami Los Angeles Studio to be closed, staff laid off

It's about sending a message
Nov 03
// Mike Cosimano
According to multiple industry sources (including former Dtoid CEO Hamza Aziz!), Konami has closed its Los Angeles studio, formerly known as Kojima Productions Los Angeles. Duke Nukem creator George Broussard was on...

Metal Gear photo
Metal Gear

Kojima shows how he made Metal Gear Solid V's 'Nuclear' trailer

Behind-the-scenes video translated
Nov 02
// Jordan Devore
Few trailers rival the "Nuclear" video for Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain. I must've watched it half a dozen times when it debuted last year at E3, and probably doubled that number leading up to the game's release in Se...

Review: Human Resource Machine

Oct 30 // Laura Kate Dale
Human Resource Machine (PC [reviewed], Wii U)Developer: Tomorrow CorporationPublisher: Tomorrow CorporationReleased: October 15, 2015MSRP: $9.99, £6.99 Human Resource Machine is a game that functionally aims to teach its players basic visual programming logic. You are a human, programming analogue tasks need completing on a day to day process. Players will need to create a visual programming loop that will allow you to mindlessly complete your task over and over. The reason you need to do your job in an efficient, automated, programming manner? Robots are coming to take your job. Initially, these programming tasks are accessible enough for non coders to wrap their head around quickly. Need to transport all inbox items to the outbox in an unchanged order? Take an item from the inbox, take it to the outbox, loop back to the start until everything has been moved. Need to take a pair of inbox items and take them to the outbox, but in the opposite order? Take the first item, place it on the floor, take the second item to the outbox. Pick the first item off the floor, take that to the outbox. Jump to the start and repeat. The problem is, around half way through the game starts requiring you to understand programming logic concepts it hasn't taught you before. Reading up on these concepts online can be complex, and working out how to build a programming function after only short while being hand held through basics can be rather frustrating. [embed]318222:60916:0[/embed] Here's one: build a machine that recognizes zero sum strings, then add up everything in the string, then create a Fibonacci sequence up to but not exceeding the value of your zero sum string, and place all values from the resulting Fibonacci sequence into the outbox using a limited set of tools. You can copy from or to limited memory spaces on the floor, add held and stored values together or increase a memory value by one. That kind of logic takes several considerable leaps, on top of trying to master a technique you only just learned for the first time. I think ultimately this is my biggest problem with Human Resource Machine. It's presented in advertising as a step by step tutorial on learning programming logic, but for newcomers to code some of the logical leaps are to complex to get through any method besides trial and error. For those who already program, much of the early game will likely be too easy. I feel like Machine doesn't really commit fully to being a game for new coders or for experienced programmers. It tries and fails to straddle a difficulty line. The game's plot is also essentially non-existent. The trailer tells you robots are coming for your job, which would clearly be better performed by a robot. Eventually, robots arrive and are better at your job than you. Some of the hints of an interesting story are there, but there is no pay off at all. Considering the subtly delivered narratives in World of Goo and Little Inferno, this was a real shame. Still, let's talk a little about what Human Resource Machine gets right. For those who keep up with the programming challenges as they are introduced, there are also a pair of optional optimization challenges for each puzzle -- such as, "have fewer than X instructions in your program," or "completely process the data in less than Y moves." Often it's impossible to complete both challenges with a single program, so it pushes you to re-optimize processes rather than just finding a solution that works. Learning where you could cut dead weight from a programming string felt hugely rewarding. The game also encourages players to not just successfully process a given set of data, but behind the scenes multiple sets of data are run through your program to ensure it works for every set, not just the current set. If a data set exists for which your program would break, that data set is provided to you, so you can debug the program step by step and see where it falls apart. The inclusion of step by step debugging tools to watch where your program's holes are was really beneficial, and encouraged understanding how your solution works, rather than just being content with the success itself. I came out of Human Resource Machine unsure who it was really designed for. It's at times too simple for experienced programmers, and often made leaps too large for beginners to overcome without obtuse outside research. While I had a sense of accomplishment every time I made progress, said progress at times felt like I was an infant thrown into water and expected to swim straight away. I might manage it, but it's not the ideal teaching method to leave me feeling comfortable going forward. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Human Resource Machine photo
My brain is not a machine
Tomorrow Corporation, the studio behind World of Goo and Little Inferno, is one of my favorite indie developers of the last couple of years. Known for creating polished indie games with accessible mechanics and interesti...

Rise of the Tomb Raider photo
Rise of the Tomb Raider

Find out more about Lara Croft in this new video series

Insert "Wild 'n' Wet" jokes here
Oct 22
// Vikki Blake
As we countdown to the launch of Rise of the Tomb Raider, Microsoft has released a new video series called "Woman vs. Wild." The new series will offer "a deep dive into the gameplay mechanics" in Croft's journey. 
Super Mario Maker photo
Super Mario Maker

Professional game developers try their hands at Super Mario Maker

Check out how the pros do it
Oct 12
// CJ Andriessen
Bertil Horberg, the creator of the fantastic Gunman Clive series, was once asked if he would create a level in Super Mario Maker worthy of his premier franchise. He declined, saying he already knows how painfully difficult le...
HoloLens photo

HoloLens dev kits are $3,000 (apply now!)

Shipping Q1 2016
Oct 06
// Jordan Devore
I remember hearing chatter that Microsoft's augmented-reality headset, HoloLens, would cost significantly more than an Xbox One. While we probably won't know the exact price tag for quite a while, the company has begun taking...
Conker photo

Before Conker's Bad Fur Day, there was Twelve Tales

Rare reminisces about the N64 days
Oct 02
// Jordan Devore
Rare has shared another behind-the-scenes video about Conker and this one sure brings me back. Conker's Quest, as it was originally called before undergoing a name change to Twelve Tales: Conker 64, debuted at E3 in 1997. It ...
Havok photo

Intel is selling Havok to Microsoft

Floppy bodies
Oct 02
// Jordan Devore
Microsoft is purchasing physics engine maker Havok from Intel for an undisclosed sum. The company confirmed with IGN that the technology will continue to be licensed to "the broad AAA games industry," including companies maki...
Gettin' Medieval photo
Gettin' Medieval

Rare opens up about its unreleased Conker game

Conker: Gettin' Medieval
Sep 28
// Jordan Devore
After finishing work on Conker: Live & Reloaded, Rare pursued another project set in that universe called Conker: Gettin' Medieval. It was going to be an Xbox multiplayer game, not a direct continuation of the Bad Fur Day...
Documentary photo

Upcoming film explores Japan's indie scene

Branching Paths
Sep 22
// Jordan Devore
I'm always searching for new documentaries, preferably ones that cover subjects, stories, or processes I don't yet know much about. As of last night, I have my eye on Branching Paths. It examines the growing independent video...
Hohokum photo

Hohokum dev Honeyslug disbands after 7 years

Co-founders now pursuing solo careers
Sep 20
// Kyle MacGregor
After seven years in business, Hohokum studio Honeyslug is splitting up, with co-founders Ricky Haggett, Nat Marco and Mark Inman going their separate ways to pursue solo careers. In addition to Hohokum, the team is responsib...
From Software photo
From Software

From Software opening new studio in Fukuoka

Focused on creating CG assets for now
Sep 12
// Kyle MacGregor
From Software is establishing a new studio in Fukuoka, the company announced today. The satellite, formed to expand the company's existing development capabilities, intends to focus its efforts on "creating 3D CG assets for g...
UK Industry photo
UK Industry

UK tax relief has 'positive impact' on UK games development

It's not the most generous tax relief in the world, apparently
Aug 24
// Vikki Blake
Though the UK games industry still needs to be "on par" with the British film industry, tax relief is already having a positive impact on the UK games industry. "In 2014 the European Commission gave the green light and the ta...
FNAF dev is a nice guy photo
FNAF dev is a nice guy

Five Nights at Freddy's dev delivers motivational speech

Five Nights and seven bears ago...
Jul 29
// Jed Whitaker
Love it or hate it, the Five Nights at Freddy's series is a roaring success, and is surely raking in even more cash after the recently released fourth game. Developer Scott Cawthon has taken to the Steam Community forums to answer the haters and inspire his fans. 
Ouya photo

Update: Razer/Ouya deal means no money for indies, devs encouraged to not talk to press

Free the Games fund goes kaput?
Jul 28
// Mike Cosimano
[Update: In a call with Polygon, Razer CEO Min-Liang Tan confirmed that the company would be looking into fulfilling the contracts made by Ouya. "We are going to try and make good on this fund and give these developers an opt...
Deus Ex men united photo
Deus Ex men united

Deus Ex creators play the original 15 years later

Warren Spector on his seminal project
Jul 17
// Steven Hansen
The Deus Ex YouTube took a break from giving me fodder for Mick Foley jokes to host some of creators of the original game for a "Let's Play" down memory lane. Project director Warren Spector, writer Sheldon Pacotti, and lead...
The Last of Us photo
The Last of Us

Naughty Dog devs thought The Last of Us would ruin the studio's name

It obviously didn't
Jul 14
// Brett Makedonski
The Last of Us was the game that proved to a lot of people that Naughty Dog could handle a mature narrative. Its writing explores the human condition and examines the child/guardian protective emotional bond. Upon relea...
Electronic Arts photo
Electronic Arts

Jade Raymond joins EA to open new studio

Overseeing Visceral Games as well
Jul 13
// Kyle MacGregor
Jade Raymond, formerly of Ubisoft, has taken a post at Electronic Arts to open a new studio. "I’m happy to announce that I’m joining Electronic Arts and opening Motive, a new development studio in my home tow...
Smash Bros photo
Smash Bros

Sakurai uses action figures to plan attacks for Smash Bros.

Source Gaming spills the beans
Jul 12
// Jonathan Holmes
Source Gaming has quickly made a name for itself in the Smash community, thanks to its in-depth research on the development of the Smash series, its expert data miners, and its general passion for all aspects of the franchise...
Inafune photo
Also slams Ubisoft-style design
Keiji Inafune isn't one to pull punches. In recent years, the Mega Man co-creator has become one of the most outspoken critics of the Japanese video game industry, making remarks like "Japan is over." Recalling those "bold st...

Guest editorial photo
Guest editorial


So many games!
Jun 30
// thegamedesigner
[Here's a promoted community blog from Electronic Super Joy creator Michael Todd. Thanks Michael!] Wanna make a game? That’s cool! Let’s say you download Unity3D, you roll up your sleeves and you get to work. Six ...
Amazon photo

Amazon looking to develop its own PC game

Please make a Tarzan game
Jun 08
// Joe Parlock
Amazon has been trying to get a foot in the door for a while when it comes to gaming. Originally it was the move into digital distribution, then it was the the acquisition of, and now it looks like it wants to ...
Devs Play photo
Devs Play

Watch IGA play Symphony of the Night with Double Fine

May 08
// Jordan Devore
I hadn't really thought about it until now, but man, I would like to spend two hours today watching designer Koji Igarashi play Castlevania: Symphony of the Night alongside Double Fine senior gameplay programmer Anna Kipnis ...
Hotline Miami photo
Hotline Miami

The Hotline Miami Story covers the making of this trippy series

Cocaine Cowboys and Neon Lights
May 07
// Alessandro Fillari
I still remember how the original Hotline Miami suddenly came out of nowhere and left an incredible impression on those who took a chance on it. It was such an unusual title. Its bright, vivid visuals, along with the overhea...
Imageepoch photo

Imageepoch's CEO is still missing, Twitter account deleted

Ryoei Mikage has yet to be found
May 06
// Chris Carter
Imageepoch, a Japanese developer that has worked on games such as Luminous Arc and Arc Rise Fantasia, has a problem. Ryoei Mikage, the CEO of the company, has been missing for over a month, and now, his Tw...
Magnet gun photo
Magnet gun

A cancelled Half-Life episode included a magnet gun

Apr 30
// Brett Makedonski
Everyone who yearns for more Half-Life content might take solace (or find frustration) in the fact that more has been created. However, it's also been scrapped. And, at least some of it had the intent of introducing a ne...
$20 game tools photo
$20 game tools

Bored with your games? Make your own with this dev tools bundle

Put me in your game, too
Apr 30
// Steven Hansen
Me, I'm never bored with games, because I have literally dozens of them to ignore while I just replay Resident Evil 4 forever, but maybe you're feeling like getting your creative juices flowing. Well, lovely site full of cool...

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