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What gaming locations would you want turned into a Smash Bros. stage?

Oct 03 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
By awesome I mean extremely silly, of course. Since the bottom of the 3DS screen is dedicated to your stats, I think a level based inside of Bowser's body would really only work out best on the Wii U version of the game, stylized like the 3DS so there's "two screens" on your TV.   On the bottom half of your display is the traditional setup, with up to four players battling it out inside Bowser. On the upper half of the screen is Bowser himself, looking exactly as he does in the DS title. Your actions in his stomach will make Bowser do a variety of stuff, like say use too many fire type attacks and maybe it'll cause Bowser to guzzle down a ton of water, thus filling up the fighting arena full of water for a duration of time.  [embed]282035:55841:0[/embed] There's a lot of potential here, but I think something tied to the giant-sized Bowser fights would be the best thing ever. Essentially having the players hit certain points/objects inside Bowser in order to help him fight Midbus, or one of the castle bosses as seen in the above video.  A stage like this is obviously more for the fun aspect of Smash over it being a super serious battle. Those are the kind of levels I like the most, really. The Planet Zebes: Brinstar Depths stage from Super Smash Bros. Melee that featured Kraid spinning the level around is a good example of one such interactive stage.  I think the funniest part about all this is the idea that the Koopalings and Bowser Jr. would be able to fight inside Bowser's stomach. That just sounds demented to me. Oh, and you're probably asking how Bowser himself would be able to fight inside his own stomach. Well the answer to that is "because videogames." Duh. So what about you? What videogame location would you like a stage to be based on in a Super Smash Bros. game? 
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Let's battle inside Bowser's stomach!
I was driving home from having lunch with Dale North the other day when I got to thinking about Super Mario RPG, aka the best game ever. I think about that game a lot, and it tends to pop into my head quite often for one reas...

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Nintendo DSi price drop: DSi $99, DSi XL $129


May 10
// Dale North
There's some new pricing for Nintendo's older handhelds. Starting May 20, the DSi XL will retail for $129.99, and it's smaller screened little brother, the standard DSi, will go for $99.99. Both will still be packed with Flip...
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Nintendo tests DSi text-to-speech in Japanese classrooms


Jan 30
// Dale North
Nintendo and NTT are testing a voice recognition project in Japanese schoolrooms that would help hearing impaired students in their schooling. In these test classrooms, speech from a teacher is captured into an electronic bla...
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New DSi XL bundles for the holiday: Blue and Rose colors


Oct 25
// Dale North
I always think that Nintendo invites trouble each holiday with these bundles, especially with the ones that contain older hardware. The gamer kids I know would be pissed if they got a DSi XL for Christmas instead of a 3DS. Su...

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The DTOID Show: Our Friday live show happened!


Sep 10
// Tara Long
Hiya, fellas! Sorry I'm late on posting yesterday's episode of The Destructoid Show, but Max and I stayed up all last night playing Dead Island with some of the guys from Bitmob. The things we do for work! Anyway, yesterday'...
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Not a typo: Nintendo reveals new DSi XL color


Sep 09
// Nick Chester
After struggling with initial 3DS sales, Nintendo must think it's golden on that front after the price drop. The company announced last night that sales of handheld were up 260% following the price reduction to $169.99. So wi...
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Nintendo DLC: Gargoyle's Quest, Ignition Factor, and more


Aug 25
// Nick Chester
I'm on a plane, so I'm going to make this brief: it's Thursday so some downloadable stuff is coming to Nintendo platforms. It's this stuff: Nintendo eShop (3DS) Gargoyle's Quest ($3.99) eShop/DSiWare Let's Create! Pottery ...
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Max and the Magic Marker coming to Nintendo DS


Aug 15
// Nick Chester
Indie title Max & the Magic Marker is coming to the Nintendo DS this holiday, publisher Easy Interactive has announced. The game seems like a perfect fit for the handheld, too. At its core, Max is a platformer, with the t...
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Nintendo hosting 25th Zelda anniversary celebration


Aug 08
// Nick Chester
So Nintendo released the original The Legend of Zelda for the NES 25 years ago. Thinking about that makes me want to barf, because that means I'm super old. But it's also very exciting, and Nintendo is celebrating in all sort...

Hands-on with Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker 2

Aug 03 // Robert Fooks
Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker 2 (DS)Developer: TOSE Publisher: Square Enix (Japan) / Nintendo (US, Euro) To be released: March 31, 2011 (Japan) / September 19, 2011 (US) / October 7, 2011 (EU) The first thing new players will notice is the host of new and improved fully 3D graphics and effects which outshine the visual experience of the original Dragon Quest Monsters Joker in nearly every way imaginable. After taking in the graphics, I got some hands-on time with the head-to-head local multiplayer tournament portion of DQMJ2. After receiving a brief overview of its features, I felt confident in my ability to choose a competent line up of monsters. Naturally, I made a team which rivaled the 2008 Detroit Lion's considerable ability to defy the laws of chance. I was soon competing for victory with my first, and equally under informed, foe in a similar fashion as two Tee Ball teams might “compete for victory.” After a short battle, I found myself basking in the sweet, sultry essence of victory. That was simply the rise before the fall. The final battle saw me crash and burn, earning myself about as much glory as Battlefield Earth earned money. Wi-Fi and local multiplayer is supported by DQMJ2 in several formats and all three regional versions (US, Japan and Europe) are compatible with each other when utilizing the Wi-Fi features. Players can engage in “Tag Mode” which will exchange the monster party data of two players, allowing both individuals to fight each other’s parties without the player's input. Owners of Dragon Quest IX may also engage in tag mode with the new game. For those of you who would rather get together with some friends and flip open a couple of DSs, head-to-head and eight person tournament modes are available locally. One-on-one Wi-Fi battles is also included in the game's already impressive suite of multiplayer functionality and players may choose to have opponents selected for them at random or they may even challenge those on their friends list.  Such small scale competition may sate the thirst for dominance of some, but for the truly competitive at heart, the Wi-Fi tournament will be your bread and butter. The Wi-Fi tournament, held every week, will see players all across the country duking it out for points as they fight for the honor of being “that guy.” Prizes for winning the tournament range from rare monsters to access to items which will help give you the upper hand in your future Dragon Quest endeavors. Just in case you require proof of your exploits, a leaderboard, hosted by Nintendo.com, will be available should the need arise to validate your gaming prowess. Combat was sufficiently streamlined and quite intuitive to my beginner’s eye. Even though I lacked a great deal of experience with the games platform and genre, the controls felt natural and after a single round of multiplayer I would say I could demonstrate a competent grasp of the combat mechanics. DQMJ2 allows players to exercise varying levels of control over their minions during combat such as letting the computer handle the decision making for them. Control freaks may also plan out their own intricately woven assaults, forcing their foes to weather their wit as well as their brawn. Different physical attacks and spells are available for use depending on the monster you use. Provided the user is familiar with the effects of their available magic, knowing ones opponent can go a long way towards winning as certain elemental attacks will have varying consequences when used on different monsters. Monsters come in three sizes; small, medium and large. Having personally witnessed a medium sized monster fill most of the screen, I can only imagine the large ones are comparable to battleships with legs. The size of your monster will also determine how many monsters you can have on a battlefield. So you can either have three small monsters, one small and one medium monster or just one giant monster up against your opponent. Players will be able to easily swap to different monsters right from the item menu too. Through a process of Synthesis, players may attempt to combine monsters with the goal of creating a new and unique creature which will hopefully dispense win while pwning in your name. This system of combining and creating monsters seems promising as the game boasts over 240 unique skill trees which can be “bred” into your new monsters. Finding the right monsters to mix and match might not be as easy as it first seems though. As in previous installments of the Dragon Quest series, a full day/night cycle will determine which monsters are roaming the wild at any given time. If one wishes to scout the perfect pair of monsters for their next synthesized creation, they just might have to explore the island in every condition possible. The game’s single-player storyline, though nothing to get overly excited about, succeeds in providing context to the events of the game. As players advance through the single-player story, they must rescue missing people by exploring and defeating boss monsters of epic proportions. To put it simply, a child who wishes nothing more than to be a Monster Scout, has stowed away on a massive airship destined for the World Monster Championship. Under mysterious circumstances, the ship, passengers and all, becomes marooned on a feral island inhabited by the very monsters he wishes to scout. With little more than able feet and a thirst for the destiny he so desires, the child ventures forth from the relative harborage of the airship’s mangled husk in search of adventure. Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker 2 is a fun and charming game that anyone will be able to pick up easily. Dragon Quest fans will definitely enjoy the latest DS offering and it's just nice to see there's still some good support left on Nintendo's non-3D handheld.
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Dragon Quest Monsters: Joker 2 (DQMJ2) is the upcoming monster hunting role-playing game for the DS. The player assumes the role of a child who quite possibly aspires to follow in the footsteps of Michael Vick as he captures...

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3DS and DSi XL are the same price! No cuts planned


Jul 29
// Dale North
Maybe you were hoping that Nintendo would also push down the price of their other portables after yesterday's 3DS price drop from $249 to $169. IGN asked following yesterday's announcement and get a flat "No" back from Ninten...
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Sega finally announces WayForward's Aliens: Infestation


Jul 20
// Nick Chester
Great news for Aliens fans and Jim Sterling: Sega has finally officially announced Aliens: Infestation for the Nintendo DS. The side-scrolling action game, as we already knew, is being developed by the 2D, side-scrolling mast...

So many Kirbys! Kirby Mass Attack preview

Jul 14 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
[embed]203224:39139[/embed] Kirby Mass Attack (DS)Developer: HAL LaboratoryPublisher: NintendoTo be released: September 19 This time around you need to use your little Kirby army to get through the game, as opposed to the traditional consuming of your enemy's abilities. You start off with one Kirby and must collect fruit to fill up a meter to get more Kirbys. You can get up to ten, after which you'll just continue to accumulate points for collecting fruits. Having multiple Kirbys will be key in order to progress, as there are numerous obstacles and paths that can only be accessed by a certain amount of the pink heroes. Certain obstacles, like giant plants for example, can only be pulled down if you have a few Kirbys latched on. Levels themselves need a minimum amount of Kirbys before you can enter them too, such as the boss stage that requires all ten Kirbys. There will be plenty of replayability too as you go to levels multiple times in order to collect goodies you missed the first go-around like special coins due to lack of Kirbys. Other than that, you can proceed to any level on a map in any order you want, so long as you have the right number of Kirbys. Even though you have a little army, the controls are simple enough so that all the Kirbys respond together. You just tap or hold on the touch screen to move your Kirbys forward. To attack, you tap on an enemy and watch your Kirbys swarm over their target. By doing a flicking motion with the stylus, you can fling your Kirbys at enemies or blocks. You'll also be able to guide your Kirbys by drawing a path, like in Kirby: Canvas Curse. By holding down the stylus on the touch screen, all the Kirbys will clamor around the point you're touching. They'll then follow the path you trace until you've hit the line's length limit. When a Kirby gets hurt, it'll turn blue. If it gets hurt again, it turns into an angel and drifts away. Angel Kirbys can be saved by flicking another Kirby to pull them back down. If the angel escapes though, you can just repeat the whole fruit-collecting thing to bring it one back -- there's plenty of fruit to spare. There's also a healing loop located at the mid-point of each level to heal blue Kirbys. That's basically the gist of it. It's an odd-sounding concept, but just watch the trailer above to get a basic sense of it all. Despite the weird premise, Kirby Mass Attack was plenty of fun. Controls were simple and intuitive, and you're a horrible, inhuman filth monster if you don't like Kirby!
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Kirby Kirby Kirby Kirby Kirby Kirby Kirby Kirby Kirby Kirby! Yes, I'm excited for a new Kirby game, but the reason I just repeated the pink little suckball's name is because that's exactly how many Kirbys you'll be controlling in Kirby Mass Attack. An evil villain has split Kirby up into ten pieces, and you need to find a way to put Kirby back together as one.

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Valet Parking 1989 developer diary brings the discomfort


Jun 02
// Jonathan Holmes
This video sort of feels like a sequel to Napoleon Dynamite, set in Sweden, with no scripted jokes, focused on some guys who made a DSiWare game about the least fun parts of old Grand Theft Auto PC games. That's supposed to ...
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Nintendo DLC: MDK 2, WayForward's Mighty Milky Way


May 09
// Nick Chester
After a few weeks of slim-pickings, there's a few cool things of note coming to DSiWare and WiiWare this week. Specifically, games that involve space -- WayForward's DSi title Mighty Milky Way and MDK 2 (originally developed ...
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Target accepting trade-ins on Nintendo DS systems


Mar 23
// Nick Chester
Targets getting into the trading game, offering up store credit towards if you're willing to part with Nintendo's older handhelds. The retailer has partnered with NextWorth for the in-store trade-in options, just in time for ...
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Nintendo DLC: Faxanadu, a fire place, and more


Feb 21
// Nick Chester
I can't be the only one who thinks of the 1980's musical film, Xanadu, when someone mentions Faxanadu. Right? Anyone? Guys? Well, it's out on Virtual Console this week. Faxanadu, not Xanadu. Although I'd totally buy that. If ...

Review: ATV Wild Ride

Feb 03 // Nick Chester
ATV Wild Ride (Nintendo DS)Publisher: DestineerDeveloper: Renegade KidRelease date: TBD ATV Wild Ride isn’t breaking any new ground, taking cues from games that have come before it like Black Rock’s Pure and even Nintendo’s own Excitebike 64. It plays it safe, a straightforward racer where players earn nitro for tricks, cashing in their boost to gain ground over their opposition. So it’s not really what ATV Wild Ride does that makes it so great, it’s really how well Renegade Kid was able to pull it off on the handheld. While the Nintendo DS is best suited to colorful, 2D games, Renegade Kid has never shied away from pushing the handheld into the third dimension. With ATV Wild Ride, the developer does it again, and the results are certainly appreciable on the handheld’s small screen. The game’s impressive engine also lends itself to some smooth-as-butter movement, at what appears to be 60 frames per second. You certainly appreciate it in action, as it adds to that sense of speed you’re looking for in any racer, handheld or otherwise. Behind the wheel of an ATV, fans of arcade-style racing will feel right at home. Wild Ride eschews the use of the touch screen, relying entirely on the game’s physical controls. No fault of the game, the Nintendo DS controls do feel a bit cramped for my tastes, a complaint I’d have of almost any racer on the handheld. But Renegade Kid had enough forethought to include multiple control schemes, and with some time I was able to ease right in without much trouble. The ATVs themselves feel good on the track, even on the tightest turns I never felt out of control. Pulling of tricks is a simple combination of the buttons and use of the d-pad. It’s a three-tiered system that ranges from easy one-offs to more wild tricks that will end in disaster if you don’t have enough air. Fortunately, most of the game’s tracks are cleverly designed to take advantage of the tricks system. Ramps and hills are generally placed in such a way that you’ll be able to gain enough to pull off some of the biggest tricks, gaining enough boost to get ahead in a pinch. There’s also a impressive amount of game content crammed onto the DS cart, including a World Tour mode that spans more than 20 tracks across a variety of exotic locations. Broken up into four tours, I found that the earliest races were almost mind-numblingly easy. The spike in difficulty once you hit the later races is somewhat of a shock, however. It goes from an enjoyable, leaned back cruise-control racing experience to nail-biting near-miss first place finishes… and fast. It’s certainly not a bad thing -- there was a point when I was concerned Wild Ride wouldn’t offer me any challenge at all. While World Tour mode can be completed by competent racers in a relatively short amount of time, Wild Ride does offer up a number of unlockables, varied racers and ATVs to put to the test. I found myself going back for more, even after I completed the tours, because it just felt right in my hands. The game also supports local multiplayer, which I unfortunately didn’t get a chance to use myself, but should go a long way to adding value to the Wild Ride experience. If you had to fault Renegade Kid for anything about this excellent handheld racing package, you could probably say they played it too safe. It’s fairly straightforward in almost every way, never really venturing into any new territory in terms of racing or trick mechanics. Still, if you manage to hit all of the right notes, it sometimes doesn’t matter that you’re playing the same song as your predecessors, because the notes still sound damned good together. Ultimately, it boils down to this: ATV Wild Ride is your only real choice for an arcade-style ATV racer on Nintendo's handheld. It's not that there are no other options, but where others have tried and failed, Renegade Kid succeeds in building a solid portable DS racer with ATV Wild Ride.
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With ATV Wild Ride, Renegade Kid veers wildly from territory its best known for, be it the nightmarish halls of a mental hospital in Dementium, or the sci-fi action of Moon. But the developer feels right at home with its latest, delivering one of the best racer offerings on Nintendo’s handheld to date.

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Know your Dragon Quest, win a chance to meet its creator


Jan 31
// Nick Chester
How's your Dragon Quest knowledge? Nintendo's looking to test it, in anticipation of the forthcoming release of Dragon Quest VI: Realms of Revelation for the Nintendo DS. Get your pitchforks out anti-social media folks, this ...
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Nintendo DLC: Dolphins, predictions, and diaries


Jan 31
// Jordan Devore
I was so ready to call this week's DSiWare releases the same old stuff we've seen time and time again, but then something caught my eye. Something called 101 Dolphin Pets. We're told to "Choose from more than 101 baby dolphin...
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3DS eShop, DSiWare transfers may not come until May


Jan 28
// Nick Chester
According to rumored details out of a Japanese investor meeting, the eShop, web browser, and DSiWare transfer capabilities of the Nintendo 3D won't be available until May. At Nintendo's 3DS event in New York City last week, N...
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Nintendo DLC: Time traveling toast, animal boxing


Jan 17
// Nick Chester
Time traveling toasted sandwiches? Animal pugilists? This week's downloads for Nintendo's consoles are madness!WiiWare Doc Clock: The Toasted Sandwich of Time (Stickmen Studios, 1 player, 1000 Wii Points) Urbanix (Nordcurre...

Review: Ghost Trick: Phantom Detective

Jan 11 // Nick Chester
Ghost Trick: Phantom Detective (Nintendo DS)Publisher: CapcomDeveloper: CapcomReleased: January 11, 2011Price: $29.99 Start up Ghost Trick and you’re immediately dead. Shot. Game over, right? Not quite. You’ll come to, but surprise (!), you’re dead, and along with your life went your memory. With no recollection of who you are or who planted a slug in you, you’re compelled to solve your own mystery. In your death, you’re faced with a good news/bad news situation. “Good,” it turns out you’re blessed with paranormal powers which give you the ability to possess and manipulate objects in the real world. The bad? Well, you’ve got a short amount of time to solve your mystery, because when the sun rises, you’ll disappear completely. Ghost Trick is broken up into chapters, different scenarios in which Sissel (that’s you, the dead guy with the funky hairdo and fancy red suit) must use his ghostly powers to not only piece together puzzles, but even change fates. In the game’s ghost mode, time stops, and you’re able to move your spirit -- a glowing, blue flame -- into different objects scattered about the environment. Sometimes you’ll have to activate an object, like turning on a light or moving a cart, to catch the attention of folks in the real world or manipulate their actions. Other times you’ll just use them as vessels, moving from one object to another in an attempt to reach a destination or get closer to conversations that may provide clues. The bulk of the game’s challenge and puzzles, however, come from using your ghost tricks on the newly deceased. By doing so, you’ll not only be able to communicate with the recently passed, but you’ll be able to rewind time to four minutes prior to their death. This gives you the chance to change their fate by using your ghost tricks, sort of a reverse Final Destination situation, if you will. With only four minutes to change the course of history and save a life, you’ll have to quickly hop around and manipulate objects to influence the outcome of a scenario. It’s a mixture of clever thinking, trial and error, and timing the manipulation of multiple objects concurrently that leads to success. It’s a game of environmental puzzles, sort of like the board game "Mouse Trap," with a clear end goal in every situation. The way the objects and the characters in the game world react to your ghost tricks is relentlessly clever, full of “ah-ha!” moments and satisfying outcomes. Entering the ghost world, you’ll be presented with a handful of haunt-able objects, clearly marked in the game world; there’s very little excess here, so it never gets overly complicated. That said, the game’s chapters and scenarios can feel a bit linear -- there’s basically one path to you goal in every situation, with not much wiggle room for creativity on the player’s part. As direct as some of the puzzles can be, that doesn’t mean they’re not a joy to suss out, and I still wanted to work them through in order to access the next chain of events and move the story forward. Ghost Trick is not a game that can easily be put down, thanks in part to its smart writing, witty dialogue, and a cast of characters that you’re sure not to forget. It’s a world full of style, color, and personality, one that (for better or for worse) will inspire cosplayers for years to come. Despite its linearity, Ghost Trick still is going to provide you with anywhere between eight and ten hours of gameplay and story, each hour more compelling than the last as the mysteries unfold. Its a completely fresh experience on Nitnendo’s handheld, or anywhere else for that matter, and certainly not one you’ll want to skip. 
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Murder mysterious are a dime a dozen, but it’s not every day the gumshoe is investigating his own death from beyond the grave. Then again, Ghost Trick: Phantom Detective -- the latest game by Ace Attorney creator Shu...

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Renegade Kid won't be bringing Mutant Mudds to DSiWare


Jan 11
// Nick Chester
Renegade Kid's once canceled DS title, Maximillian and the Rise of the Mutant Mudds, will not be getting a DSiWare release after all. The developer put out a call to gamers about a month ago, asking for 1000 blog comments "v...
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LEGO Battles: Ninjago coming to DS this spring


Jan 11
// Nick Chester
If you love LEGO and you wish you were a ninja (who doesn't?), LEGO Battles: Ninjago for the Nintendo DS is right up your alley. The game will be releasing this spring, and focuses on LEGO Ninja who use the art of "Spinjitzu"...
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Nintendo president to keynote GDC 2011


Jan 11
// Nick Chester
Sounds like Nintendo intends on making a big splash at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco. It's just been revealed that company president Satoru Iwata will keynote the event, which is now in its 25th year. Iwata'...
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Nintenhorse, Nintendolphin almost happened


Jan 10
// Nick Chester
The stuff of your potential nightmares -- Nintenhorse and Nintendolphin -- were almost 3DS games. This massive bombshell was dropped by Nintendo's president Satoru Iwata during the Nintendo World Event in Japan last week. Unf...
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Nintendo DLC: Jelly cars, ghosts, petz, and more


Jan 10
// Nick Chester
Cars made out of jelly? Ghosts? Goblins? Petz Catz Family? Clearly this is the most frightening Nintendo download update to date!
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Burnout Freestyle for Wii/DS was a thing, then canceled


Dec 31
// Nick Chester
[Update: Reader hatesyou points out, there was a Burnout title for the DS, called Burnout Legends. Oops! Sorry about the confusion.] The high-speed arcade racing franchise Burnout has found a home on nearly every platform ove...
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Bizarre looking Guilty Gear spin-off headed stateside


Dec 27
// Jonathan Holmes
So, Super Meat Boy is having a tough time getting a publisher for the Wii, but Towel Slappin' Pro Jumper already has a DSiWare publisher for the United States? Seriously? As weird as that is, I can't really complain. I've ha...

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