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Command and Conquer

EA photo
EA

These are the EA games going offline on June 30


*Shakes fist at GameSpy*
May 12
// Jordan Devore
Electronic Arts said last month that it was working to find a solution to the GameSpy Technology shutdown on May 31, 2014 that will mean the end of online functionality, including multiplayer, for a number of titles that rely...
New C&C studio photo
New C&C studio

Command & Conquer games will continue with new studio


Kill them like watermelon
Nov 20
// Joshua Derocher
EA stopped development on the latest Command & Conquer, and closed the studio working on it. The game was in its early alpha stages as a free-to-play title, and EA released a statement saying that all purchases during the...
C&C photo
C&C

EA cans free-to-play Command & Conquer


Developer Victory Games 'disbanded'
Oct 29
// Jordan Devore
We'd like more Command & Conquer -- without the hooks of free-to-play digging into our skin, if at all possible. I guess it's not. Electronic Arts has canceled the new C&C, which has been playable in an alpha capacity...
C&C single-player photo
C&C single-player

Story-driven campaign coming to Command & Conquer


Coming next year
Aug 20
// Patrick Hancock
It feels weird to write a headline like that. If you told my high-school self that campaign missions coming to a Command & Conquer game was news, I'd call you a goofy goober. Yet, here I am. Years older and wiser, t...

Command and Conquer photo
Command and Conquer

Command & Conquer will offend everyone equally


May take a page from League of Legends
Jun 13
// Wesley Ruscher
Command and Conquer is back, and this time it's going the free-to-play route. Now before you cringe too hard from the last statement, much is still undecided when it comes to the freemium model that will be in place when the ...

Why people hate Electronic Arts

Apr 22 // Vito Gesualdi
Lack of creativity Electronic Arts is terribly afraid of the word "creativity." Being creative means taking risks, trying things which haven’t been tried before. EA, meanwhile, prefers to release the same game as many times as possible, seeing just how much money they can milk out of a franchise before the public realizes they probably don’t need the “Extreme Farming” expansion for The Sims.  I've said it before, but this is still the stupidest thing ever. For a good example of how shameless Electronic Arts is about their lack of original ideas, look no further than Goldeneye: Rogue Agent. After snatching the Bond license away from Rare and churning out an endless procession of uninspired shooters, EA finally decided to just try and trick people into thinking they'd crafted a sequel to the N64 hit. The game wasn’t even based on the movie Goldeneye, it was about a dude with an actual golden eye, which makes literally no sense whatsoever.  Worst of all, EA doesn't even have the decency to recognize when they've published another uninspired piece of crap. Medal of Honor: Warfighter was universally panned by critics, though rather than recognize their failure and learn from it, EA execs decided to loudly whine about how unfair the scores were. Is there anything more pathetic than a bunch of filthy rich executives crying because reviewers judged their game based on its merits rather than its gigantic marketing budget? Buying out the competition As established, EA hates coming up with new ideas, and nowhere is this more apparent than their massive lineup of cookie-cutter sports titles. Of course, who can really fault them for taking advantage of those knuckle-dragging cretins who are happy to pay $60 for the exact same game they bought last year? Look at how excited John Madden is about his royalty check.  That being said, it’s pretty pathetic to see how terrified EA is of their competition, likely aware that any developer with even a sliver of respect for the customer could easily blow their half-assed efforts out of the water. That’s exactly what happened in the case of Sega’s NFL 2K5, a game which was not only hailed as one of the best football games of all time, but actually sold for $10 less than EA’s latest lazy installment in the Madden franchise. Sweating profusely as they considered the idea of actually having to work for their consumer's money, the EA execs frantically called up their chums at the NFL, negotiating an exclusive contract and killing off any competing NFL game series, including NFL 2K and NFL Blitz.  Of course, Electronic Arts themselves actually brought back the NFL Blitz franchise in 2012, which is pretty disgusting when you think about it. It’s one thing to commit murder, it’s another to reanimate your victim's corpse and force it to dance for nickels.  Treating workers like Slave Labor You might argue that EA can’t be faulted simply for being good at business, and I’ll be the first to admit I’ve got nothing against good old fashioned capitalism. Problem is, Electronic Arts is a little too old fashioned, the company clearly pining for the days when where treating your workers like slaves was just par for the course. Ah, the good ol' days. See, in America we have something called “overtime law,” where any employee working in excess of forty hours in a week get paid at 1.5 times their normal rate for those additional hours. It’s supposed to encourage companies to hire additional workers, rather than simply hiring a burly guy with a whip to provide encouragement. Somehow though, EA never got the memo about not forcing your programmers to work like sweatshop laborers. In 2004, Erin Hoffman, the so-called “EA Spouse,” posted a scathing expose on how the electronic giant had treated her husband and other employees, forcing them to work as many at 84 hours a week  without any overtime compensation. Her speaking out led to three separate class-action lawsuits being filed against EA, the software giant forced to shelve their plans for motivational shock-collars. Beatings will continue until morale improves. Ruining companies In the 90s Electronic Arts set about buying up every awesome PC developer they could find, with the hopes of working with these talented studios to create great software values for the consumer... Wait, that’s wrong. What EA actually wanted was to buy up a bunch of already popular franchises, then force the developers to release an endless stream of crappy bug-laden sequels. Remember the biblical story of Abraham, who was commanded by god to take his son Issac up to a mountain and stab the kid with the first sharp rock he could find? It was kind of like that, except Issac was the Command and Conquer series and Electronic Arts wasn't kidding around about the “murder your child” decree.    C'mon Abraham, just ship Ultima IX. Who cares if it sucks? Not that EA cared as they helped run studios like Westwood and Origin into the ground. Once the studios were no longer profitable, they simply fired everybody and pocketed whatever cash they'd made. Everybody wins, except of course for those developers who were forced to stab their most-beloved creations to death.  Poor Richard Garriott. I hope he's happy now that he lives in space. Shamless Money-grubbing Though most publishers these days have resorted to a variety of tactics to earn some additional cash, Electronic Arts is perhaps the most shameless about these practices, eagerly trying to squeeze every possible dollar out of your wallet. Countless hours of login screen fun. Downloadable content - You can be sure every EA release will come loaded with it, much of which probably should’ve been included in the retail release.  Used games - Sorry buddy. If you want to play with your friends, you’re gonna need this ridiculous online pass.  Micro-transactions - Because your favorite video games are made better when you're constantly being asked to feed them quarters Digital-rights management - EA promises to make sure that playing the game you bought is as frustrating as possible, either loading your computer up with DRM software, or forcing you to wait weeks for them to fix the servers before you can actually play that copy of SimCity you bought. See, the reason gamers love companies like Valve, is because Valve makes it clear they loves the consumer. Gabe Newell has proven you don’t have to constantly shit all over your customers just to turn a profit. Every time I buy a game on Steam, I feel like I’m supporting a company which actually cares about me as a customer. With Electronic Arts, I get the feeling my money is being used to purchase orphaned children, whose souls are used to power EA's massive fear engine, gradually opening the portal to the hellish nightmare realm where their demonic overlords plot the total enslavement of humanity. Call it a hunch. Non-Existent Customer Service It’s interesting to see how different companies approach the issue of customer service. Many retailers hold by the old adage “the customer is always right,” going out of their way to please every patron. Electronic Arts goes by the motto "we hate you, give us your money," something which has unsurprisingly earned them few fans. Hi! How can we make your life miserable today?  EA's inability to care about their consumers was less of a problem back in the retail days, though the move towards digital downloads has forced people to deal with Origin's incompetent customer service reps. Got charged twice for Battlefield 3? That's a banning. An opponent swore at you during a game session? That's another banning. You pre-ordered Command & Conquer: Generals 2 before it got announced as free-to-play and now need a refund? Sorry bro, better luck next time. The recent SimCity debacle was excellent evidence of how little Electronic Arts cares about their customers. When you sell somebody a $60 product that doesn’t work, the right thing to do is offer them a refund. However, the idea of swimming in a slightly smaller money pool was enough to send EA executives to tears. No refunds for anybody, though you do get a free copy of whatever game EA calculated would least affect their bottom line. So, Electronic Arts has established the precedent that they are allowed to sell you something that doesn’t work, then refuse to give you back your money, and potentially ban you for complaining about it. If that’s not enough cause to cancel your Battlefield 4 pre-order, I don’t know what is. Preorder your inexplicable Origin banning today! In summary, Electronic Arts is like most American companies, their blind greedy love of money resulting in a terrible experience for the consumer. Though we can't argue that they put out some great games now and again, it's their crappy business practices which are the problem. The Worst Company in America? Maybe not, but they're definitely working hard to keep the title.  
Why EA Sucks photo
Worst company in America? You decide.
It wasn't much of a surprise when Electronic Arts was recently voted the Worst Company in America by readers of Consumerist for the second year in a row. Though the game publisher's sins are arguably less substantial than tho...

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BAM! Command & Conquer: Ultimate Collection released


Oct 02
// Jason Cabral
Electronic Arts has just released the poignantly titled Command & Conquer: Ultimate Collection to the hungry PC masses. If you missed the initial announcement earlier in September, this package contains 17 games in the C...
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Command & Conquer all 17 C&C titles for $49.99


Sep 02
// Allistair Pinsof
Command & Conquer The Ultimate Collection brings together the 17 influential real-time strategy games released in the series over the past 17 years for cheaper than most retail games. It's kind of like a Steam deal withou...
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gamescom: EA announces free-to-play Command & Conquer


Aug 15
// Harry Monogenis
EA has unveiled a brand new, free to play Command & Conquer game that they're simply calling Command & Conquer. Now I know that many who have been following the franchise recently would have undoubtedly hea...
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Command & Conquer Tiberium Alliances enters open beta


Mar 15
// Jordan Devore
So long as you're waiting for Command & Conquer Generals 2 like the rest of us, perhaps you'd like to try Command & Conquer Tiberium Alliances? It's a browser-based MMO that is now playable in open beta. If you have a...

Preview: Fighting an evil U.N. in End of Nations

Mar 01 // Ryan Perez
End of Nations (PC) Developer: Petroglyph Games Publisher: Trion Worlds Release: Fall 2012 Freedom is indeed free I'm just going to get this out of the way, because plenty of people still think that "free" is synonymous with "cheap," especially with regards to game design. However, anyone who has played games like League of Legends or Heroes of Newerth can tell you that that's completely untrue. Also, anyone who has played Trion Worlds' previous MMO, Rift, can testify that this company certainly makes quality games. End of Nations is completely free. Yes, you read that correctly; you don't have to pay a single cent to experience all of the game's content. That's a pretty sweet deal. So if you're on the fence about whether or not to give this one a try, at least you aren't risking anything by doing so. I know you're probably thinking, "How do they plan on making any money?" Simply by providing anyone with time constraints (i.e. actual adults) the choice to buy experience boosts and other types of handicaps so they can enjoy the later content of the game a bit sooner than us leeches. That's all ... no pay-to-win crap that people usually complain about when it comes to F2P games. So freakin' relax. War has changed From what I played, I didn't manage resources or build bases of any kind. Matches were won by meeting a set of pre-existing conditions, or simply by outlasting the other player. Players start off by choosing one of two factions -- the Liberation Front or the Shadow Revolution -- before entering matches with their "squads," customizable sets of units that each player controls. As they progress through the game, players earn points that go towards upgrades, new units, and better super weapons ... pretty self-explanatory stuff. The first mode I played was creatively named "Last Man Standing," where I and another press member battled against waves of enemy forces -- both of us at separate ends of the map. Before the match, we picked a squad of units, and were tasked with defending our capture point for as long as we could; whoever lasted the longest won the match. The best part about this mode (and what led to my victory) was that I could send "gifts" over to the other player's blockade. In this case, "gifts" translates to clusters of mines that I dropped directly into his units. Other modes were a bit more directly competitive. At the event, the opposing side of the table consisted of Liberation Front players, whereas my side (designated as "Team Stinkeye" by yours truly) was nothing but Shadow Revolution. After starting at opposite ends of the map, both teams fought for control over different points on the battlefield; some points granted a bigger cash flow to repair units and buy super weapons, whereas others depleted enemy reinforcements at a faster rate. We lost, unfortunately, though Team Stinkeye shall never be forgotten I must say, having each member of the team control their own set amount of units is a rather interesting approach to RTS multiplayer. While most players at the event controlled their squads as a single entity, rather than splitting them up, I'm curious to see what strategies are formed with this different style of gameplay. The smell of napalm in the morning For those who don't know, the developer of End of Nations, Petroglyph Games, was founded by ex-employees of Westood Studios. Anyone familiar with Westwood surely knows of their flagship franchise, Command & Conquer, which is now seeing decent success under the guidance of Electronic Arts. So with End of Nations being developed by key minds behind one of the most influential strategy games ever, you can bet your war bonds that I'm enthusiastic. Also, it should come as no surprise that End of Nations features a similarly epic, baroque style that Command & Conquer had. Global conflict, evil military organizations and odd technologies are but a few of the features that'll make you Brotherhood of Nod fans feel right at home. The conflict itself is particularly familiar. Basically, some jerk decided that the United Nations wasn't living up to its intended purpose, so he decided to form the Order of Nations. Their goal: to wipe out all of the world's individual governments and replace them with a singular one. Unfortunately for all fascist regimes, people don't take too kindly to control these days, so, as a result, the two aforementioned factions were formed to combat this evil empire. To make things more interesting, both factions happen to dislike each other a bit ... hence FedExing landmines to my opponent. The overall conflict is a bit crude and cartoonish, but it does fit well with the game's number of modes and locales. These types of games never really lend themselves to plausibility, anyhow. Just fun. ...Only who is left End of Nations is an idea that I've always been interested in. Social titles like Empires and Allies have shown that strategy games work nicely with open and seamless communities, so I'm anxious to see how crazy the clashes in EoN will get. I won't lie, it is a different kind of RTS. If you're some sort of RTS god (or if you're Korean), then End of Nations is going to be unfamiliar territory for you. Still, that's no excuse to not give this game a shot when it launches this fall. Your wallet will remain untouched. Your pride, however, is another story. Later in the event, every member of the press teamed up against the Trion Worlds QA department. To say we were massacred and humiliated is a gross understatement. Jerks.
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I've never had much of a knack for strategy or warfare. I'm not relentlessly evil enough to be a dictator, and I'm not selfless and stalwart enough to be some sort of freedom fighter. So when the big WWIII hits, I'm probably ...

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Command & Conquer goes F2P MMO with Tiberium Alliances


Dec 14
// Jordan Devore
Up next for Electronic Arts Phenomic, the studio behind BattleForge and SpellForce, is a free-to-play MMO take on Command & Conquer. It was only a matter of time. In a less obvious move, C&C Tiberium Alliances will b...
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First screenshots of Command & Conquer Generals 2


Dec 10
// Jordan Devore
You've likely seen the reveal trailer for Command & Conquer Generals 2 by now, so let's talk about the first details and screenshots. Powered by the Frostbite 2 engine, this one is coming to PC in 2013 by way of BioWare V...
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No major actors in Command & Conquer 4, and here's why


Feb 19
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Earlier this week, Electronic Arts invited Destructoid out to its studios in Redwood Shores to check out Command & Conquer 4: Tiberian Twilight for the PC. While most people's priorities would be to find out how Command &...
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Command & Conquer 4 devs discuss gameplay


Feb 15
// Matthew Razak
There is a lot going on in the above dev diary for the upcoming Command & Conquer 4. The short video takes you through most of the new changes in the game and talks about what they were trying to do this time around with...
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Command and Conquer Classics gives you C&C for free


Feb 14
// Matthew Razak
While it's hard to believe that the "conclusion" of a franchise as storied and long running as Command & Conquer is not the biggest RTS release of the year, it's still kind of a big deal. To celebrate this big deal EA has...
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C&C 4 Tiberian Twilight enters into open beta


Feb 01
// Brad Nicholson
EALA's Command & Conquer 4 Tiberian Twilight -- the conclusion to the ancient Tiberian saga -- is entering open beta, and as such, you'll be able to give it a spin. So if hardcore RTS is your jam, or you just really like...
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PSA: Sign up for Command & Conquer 4 beta now


Jan 28
// Nick Chester
Hot on the heels of the news of an incoming Command & Conquer 4 beta comes... the Command & Conquer 4 beta! As expected, Electronic Arts has partnered with Gamespot for the program -- anyone who signs up for a free Ga...
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Command & Conquer 4 public beta 'very soon'


Jan 27
// Nick Chester
Itching to get your GDI and NOD on? Why fire up an old Command and Conquer title when you can play Command and Conquer 4: Tiberium Twilight? According to Command and Conquer community manager Aaron "APOC" Kaufman, you'll...
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Command & Conquer coming to a 'new medium' in 2010


Dec 29
// Jim Sterling
The classic real-time-strategy series Command & Conquer is apparently coming to a "new medium" next year, according to the hypemongers at Electronic Arts. An image of what looks like London has been given a black-and-whit...
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EALA takes us through a Command & Conquer 4 mission


Dec 16
// Jordan Devore
Command & Conquer 4: Tiberian Twilight sure does look like a modern-day warrior real-time strategy game. If that wasn't apparent to you before, this walkthrough of a GDI mission will open your eyes to the fact. Someone i...
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Confirmed: Command & Conquer 4 contains snow


Nov 16
// Jordan Devore
In the future, wars will be fought with machines designed by guys who love them some Transformers. If Command & Conquer 4: Tiberian Twilight is an accurate portrayal of the future, that is. In this set of new screenshots ...
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Command & Conquer 4 hits March 16, beta program announced


Nov 12
// Nick Chester
March 16. Mark it down.  That's the day the Command & Conquer 4 Tiberian Twilight hits store shelves. EA says the game will bring "the 15 year-long fan-beloved Tiberium saga to an epic and stunning conclusion." That ...
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Command & Conquer 4 screens love them some neon colors


Oct 13
// Jordan Devore
Similar to the shift from Dawn of War to its successor, so too will Command & Conquer 4: Tiberian Twilight have less of an emphasis on all-out base building. Not that there isn't a time and a place for that style of play,...
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Name a unit in Command & Conquer 4


Oct 03
// Matthew Razak
You've always wanted to go down in videogame history, but you've got no game design skills, you're not good enough at games to be a professional gamer and blogging on the weekends at Destructoid is already a filled position. ...
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EA wants you to play Command & Conquer 4 online


Sep 14
// Jordan Devore
Ever wonder how many people hop online to play a real-time strategy game like, I don't know, Command & Conquer? Well, wonder no more! Talking to gamesindustry.biz, EALA studio head Sean Decker revealed that the number hov...
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Command and Conquer 4 gets fancy name


Aug 26
// Nick Chester
From here on out, saying "Command and Conquer 4" simply won't cut it. EA Los Angeles has announced that it's now officially called -- hear that? it's a drum roll -- Command and Conquer 4 Tiberian Twilight.  Cho...
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Commander's Challenge for PSN, XBLA a bargain at $10


Aug 14
// Nick Chester
The ESRB and a leaked achievements already let this cat out of the bag, but Electronic Arts has confirmed that Command & Conquer Red Alert 3 Commander's Challenge is coming to Xbox LIVE Arcade and PlayStation Network this...
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New Command & Conquer 4 images and details emerge


Aug 12
// Brad Nicholson
An early build of Command & Conquer 4 is being shown to media in sunny California. As the early survey suggested, there’s a lot of new in this next iteration of the now-classic RTS series. It has a persistent leveli...
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Red Alert: Commander's Challenge coming to XBLA, PSN


Aug 10
// Nick Chester
A set of leaked achievements seem to confirm what the ESRB has been hinting at all along -- Red Alert 3: Commander's Challenge is coming to Xbox LIVE Arcade and PlayStation Network. Based on the list, the game appears to be a...

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