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Avalanche

Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

New Just Cause 3 patch coming 'later' this month


Expect new DLC later this month, too
Jan 06
// Vikki Blake
The first instalment of Just Cause 3's Air, Land and Sea Expansion Pass DLC - Sky Fortress - is almost complete.  "Whilst one side of the studio is working on patches, fixes and optimisations for the game, which wil...
Just Cause 3 multiplayer photo
Just Cause 3 multiplayer

Modders are bringing multiplayer to Just Cause 3


They move fast
Dec 31
// Jordan Devore
If you expected the modders responsible for giving Just Cause 2 multiplayer to do the same thing for Just Cause 3, well, you aren't going to be disappointed. A month after the game's release, they are already far enough into production that there's a trailer offering an early glimpse at the mod. JC3-MP isn't available for download yet, and there's no ETA, but it's coming.
Just Cause 3 patch photo
Just Cause 3 patch

Just Cause 3 is getting 'significantly improved' loading times


Update for all platforms this week
Dec 16
// Jordan Devore
I'm playing Just Cause 3 far less than I thought I would, and that can be single-handedly attributed to the lengthy loading times. The initial one takes quite a while, but it isn't a huge pain considering it's up front -- you...
Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

A patch for Just Cause 3's performance problems is in the works


No definite release date yet
Dec 03
// Joe Parlock
Just Cause 3 launched this week, and blimey has it been a bit of a mess. Patrick’s review of it was positive, saying it “provides some of the best open-world tools ever.” It seems like it's a good game, but ...

Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

Are you having trouble running Just Cause 3?


You're not alone :(
Dec 01
// Vikki Blake
According to reports on reddit, some players are experiencing significant issues with newly launched Just Cause 3. As reported by VG247, some framerate and performance issues can be resolved on PC by way of a graphi...

Review: Just Cause 3

Nov 30 // Patrick Hancock
Just Cause 3 (PC [reviewed], PlayStation 4, Xbox One)Developer: Avalanche StudiosPublisher: Square EnixMSRP: $59.99Release Date: December 1, 2015 Reviewed on: Intel i7-4770k 3.50 GHz, 8GB of RAM, Geforce GTX 970, Windows 10.  Just Cause 3 once again follows the exploits of Rico Rodriguez on a quest to liberate a region from a corrupt dictator, settlement by settlement. This time Rico has access to Medici, a nation under the control of Sebastiano Di Ravello. Medici is about the same size of Just Cause 2's Panau, which is to say it is huge. One big reason why Medici is a sought-after nation is due to its resource of Bavarium, a super-resource that allows for all sorts of militaristic applications. While I'm sure most players are not coming for the plot, the writers do a great job to keep the player entertained with the cast of characters involved. Rico has a handful of allies that aid him and the rebels throughout the campaign, and each character is great. Sure, they're essentially B-movie caricatures, but they're lovable caricatures. Despite the urgency and political turmoil constantly woven into each action Rico undertakes, his allies always seemed to put a big grin on my face. A lot of this comes down to two three things: the writing, voice acting, and animations. Again, the overarching narrative isn't going to blow any minds, but the moment-to-moment dialogue between the few important characters is consistently wonderful. Best of all, each voice actor delivers lines in a casual and believable way, something that is helped by realistic accompanying animations. No, there's no Bolo Santosi, but not every game is perfect. [embed]322878:61303:0[/embed] The bulk of the experience involves blowing the shit out of anything and everything. In order to take down Di Ravello, Rico must go from location to location, destroying everything owned by the evil dictator. It just so happens that about 95 percent of those items are highly explosive! When entering an area, whether it be a military base or a settlement, a list of destructible objects appear on the left side of the screen and it is the player's job to take them out. As less and less objects remain, they become more and more visible on the game's map, preventing the player from searching forever for that one last thing. The most useful tools at Rico's disposal are his grappling hooks. Not only is it possible to grapple onto a surface and travel straight to it, but Rico can use it to attach two separate items and pull them together. In Just Cause 3, it is possible to have up to six grappling hooks at a time. Six! This means twelve items can be linked to each other in a number of ways, and they can all converge on each other at once. Anyone who has played the previous game knows just how ridiculous that sounds. Okay, so there's explosives and grappling, but those aren't even the best mechanics, all things told. Movement in Just Cause 3 is easily the most fluid and beautiful system I've ever used. Seriously, I have never enjoyed moving around an open world as much as I have in Just Cause 3. There are three systems that mesh together: the grappling hook, the parachute, and, most importantly, the newly-acquired wing suit.  There's a lot of verticality to Medici, which makes flying around with the wing suit an absolute thrill. Plus, with the grappling hook available, it's possible to glide almost indefinitely at high speeds. I rarely used a vehicle to get around at all, since it was often slower and way less entertaining. The exception is when traveling over a large amount of water, since there is nothing to grapple onto and pull Rico along. Other than the campaign missions and settlements to liberate, Medici has random events, challenges, and collectibles. The random events might be to help tow someone's car to a gas station, or to prevent a group of friendly rebels from suffering the fate of a firing squad. There aren't too many varieties, but the distractions are quick and the rewards can easily be worth it. Some of the challenges are the standard "maneuvering a vehicle through rings," but others perfectly show off the game's mechanics and carefree attitude. Perhaps my favorite is a very Burnout-esque challenge that has players drive a car with a bomb strapped to it to a desired location only to jump out at the last moment to create chaos. The twist here is that, like Keanu Reeves in Speed, if the car goes below a certain speed, the bomb will explode. It's not as strict as the movie, but if a player goes too slow for too long, the challenge is failed. Others, like the wing suit courses, are also great and help hone specific skills. Players are awarded up to five "gears," depending on performance. Think of them like star ratings. Acquiring gears in certain challenge categories go towards unlocking new upgrades in those areas. For example, performing well in the Speed challenges gives Rico more upgrades for his explosives. Many of the upgrades make things simply better or more useful, like adding explosive charges, but some are more play-style driven. Players can turn these upgrades on and off at will once they are unlocked. For those looking to get more gears in challenges, keep this in mind; it is way easier to get a high score at the end of the game than it is at the beginning due to upgrades. Since this is an open world game in 2015, there's a smattering of collectibles strewn throughout Medici. I'm not one to care about them, but for those who do, Just Cause 3 has your back. If anything collectible is nearby, a small radar blip appears on the bottom of the screen that increases in signal strength as the item draws near. In addition, liberating a province (usually made of three to seven settlements) pinpoints the locations of these hidden items on the map. The biggest thing to realize while playing Just Cause 3 is it is mostly up to the player to keep things interesting. Liberating settlement after settlement does get stale, especially because they're essentially identical to one other, just with different layouts. Always using the same weapons to destroy the same objects gets old quickly. If players aren't inspired to get creative with their destruction, it's easy to get bored. The game gives the players all the tools needed to keep things fresh, but provides no tangible incentive to do so, therefore any such incentive must be intrinsically motivated. My recommendation is to keep doing challenges. By completing challenges and unlocking new upgrades, players will naturally want to play around with those upgrades. Well, what better way to test them out then when liberating a settlement? It would have been appreciated if various weapons had their own challenges, which would push players into switching it up more often. The story missions spice things up with some different objectives, but even those tend to repeat and feel "samey" after a while. Occasionally story missions will be locked, forcing the player to liberate more provinces or specific settlements before progressing. There's usually a canonical reason given for this, but it can easily lead to the player feeling burnt out. Liberating two or three provinces means going through about 15 settlements in a row. That's....a lot, especially considering how similar each one is to any other. Again, I'll offer some advice. Liberate settlements as you travel around. See a settlement? Blow the shit out of it and free those people! This will leave random settlements already completed, which means when you are forced to do so, it's much less tedious. Another way to help break the monotony is to call in Rebel Drops. These allow Rico to ask for some presents like vehicles, weapons, and explosives, to be dropped right in front of him. They are limited, but the system is much easier to understand and operate than the previous game's black market. If the feeling of staleness is creeping up, call in a rebel drop containing any assortment of items, and find the best way to use them in tandem! Visually, Just Cause 3 looks great, especially in motion on PC. The visuals are highly customizable with the standard graphical options expected on the platform. I ran everything at "Very High" and got a constant 60 frames-per-second... once I turned the motion blur off. I experimented with many different settings, and the lack of motion blur easily yielded the best performance. I did have some rare instances of artifacting, but was never able to actually reproduce them intentionally. I also ran in to a terrible glitch where Rico was performing the "dammit I got hit" animation every three-seconds, preventing me from doing, well, anything. A quick restart fixed the issue and I never saw it again, fortunately enough. Then, there's the issue with signing in to the Square Enix servers. The first thing the game does upon booting it up is to log in to the servers. The game is not always-online, but wants to connect to show players leaderboards for a variety of categories. These are things like longest time in a wing suit or most consecutive headshots. If a player loses connection, it pauses the game immediately and tries to reconnect. If it can't, the player can elect to go into offline mode. Great! Offline mode sounds wonderful. Except it tries to reconnect all the damn time. After a short while of being in offline mode, whenever the player checks the map, pauses the game, or initiates a challenge, the game will try to reconnect to the servers. The result is a constant view of the connection screen - either disconnecting or attempting to reconnect. This makes the game nigh unplayable with a spotty Internet connection. If that worries you, a solution on PC is to play the game through Steam's "offline mode." I can only hope there's an easier solution down the road. The enjoyment players get from Just Cause 3 will come from exactly how they approach the game. Those looking to fly around and blow up just about everything in sight will be elated with one of the most fluid movement systems in any game and the gorgeous explosion visuals that really pack a punch. As bizarre as it sounds though, blowing everything sky high can start to feel tedious after a while without proper motivation.  I'm sure you'll be seeing a ton of animated GIFs of Just Cause 3 for a while to come, due to all of the wacky things that can happen within the game. It truly is an insane, explosion-filled romp through a beautiful nation chock-full of cheeky humor. It provides some of the best open-world tools ever. This is definitely a case of "it is what you make of it," and for those with intrinsic motivation to make it the best will be greeted with just that. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Just Cause 3 Review! photo
The best Spider-Man game yet
While driving down the New Jersey parkway for Thanksgiving, I began to notice a lot of water and radio towers perched high above the trees. "Wow, I could easily blow them up or tether them to the ground and bring them down," ...

Just Cause photo
Just Cause

The first hour of Just Cause 3 is predictably wild


See it now, or just wait a week
Nov 24
// Jordan Devore
It's common for media to share the "first __ minutes!" of a new game release, but I don't recall too many big-name developers partaking in that practice. Avalanche has put up the first hour of Just Cause 3. If you are concern...
Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

Just Cause 3's PC specs are a little high because Rico has a lot to blow up


Explosions in the sky
Nov 23
// Brett Makedonski
With just little more than a week remaining before Just Cause 3's release, the required and recommended PC specs come parachuting in. Right on time too, as some players may find themselves needing to take advantage of some Bl...
Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

Just Cause 3's newest trailer nails it all on the head


Explosions? Check. Uh, more explosions?
Nov 19
// Brett Makedonski
Just Cause is such a marketable game. Any footage, trailers, or screenshots inevitably capture what makes its mayhem so marvelous. Everything is just non-stop action and the viewer always comes away thinking "Yep, that'...
Just Cause 4K photo
Just Cause 4K

See Just Cause 3 running on max settings in 4K


You know who else had the initials JC?
Nov 18
// Steven Hansen
After the whole usual pre-release kerfuffle and grumbling about Just Cause 3 running at 1080p on PS4 and 900p on Xbox One, here is some dedicated space for PC players to boast about how much extra P they're getting. PC playe...
Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

Just Cause 3 runs better on PS4 than Xbox One


Surprising absolutely nobody
Nov 05
// Laura Kate Dale
Thanks to a new interview we now know what resolution Just Cause 3 will run at on PS4 and Xbox One. Surprising absolutely nobody, the PS4 version runs at a higher resolution. According to an interview with GamingBolt, the gam...
Avalanche Studios photo
Avalanche Studios

Avalanche Studios just cut a handful of jobs


24 staff members given notice
Nov 02
// Laura Kate Dale
Avalanche Studios, the developer of Just Cause 3 and Mad Max, cut roughly 24 staff across its Stockholm and New York studios, as its current round of projects came to a close. In a statement to Game Informer, Avalanche stated...
Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

Oh, right, Just Cause 3 has a story


Or so they say
Oct 23
// Jordan Devore
I'm a fan of the Just Cause series for its freedom of movement, particularly when it comes to aerial antics, but some people live for all-out destruction. Others, like Destructoid reader Coil_Whine, are into the story. That's...
Just Cause  photo
Just Cause

Just Cause 3 makes for a neat 360-degree video


Come glide with me
Oct 21
// Jordan Devore
It might just be that I'm still new to 360° videos and my sense of wonder hasn't worn off yet, but I got a kick out of this one for Just Cause 3. We get to follow protagonist Rico Rodriguez on a wingsuit ride as he blows up bases and shrugs off a bunch of bullet wounds.
Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

Just Cause 3's Xbox One file size is kind of extreme, but not really


There's still time, Avalanche
Oct 14
// Brett Makedonski
Just Cause revels in its penchant for doing everything over-the-top. It wants you to hang upside-down from a helicopter, plant C4, dive toward the earth as the whirlybird explodes above you, grapple onto another helicopter, h...
Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

Just Cause 3 looks like such dumb fun


Sometimes, that's all you need
Oct 08
// Jordan Devore
I'm looking forward to closing out the year with a month of Just Cause 3. I can see it now: staying inside, all warm and slightly drunk, playing a game about a man with a rocket launcher strapped to his back who glides around...
Just 'cause photo
Just 'cause

Producer of embarassing Hitman: Agent 47 making Just Cause 3 movie


Why? Just 'cause! Also, money
Sep 09
// Steven Hansen
Hitman: Agent 47 managed to review substantially worse than Pixels and the last, retconned Hitman movie. It also made over $63 million (and cost just $35 million to make) because the world is a cruel joke played on us all sav...

Review: Mad Max

Sep 02 // Chris Carter
Mad Max (PC, PS4 [review], Xbox One)Developer: Avalanche StudiosPublisher: Warner Bros. Interactive EntertainmentReleased: September 1, 2015MSRP: $59.99 Mad Max is, at its heart, a revenge tale. You aren't going to get much high commentary here (like Beyond Thunderdome's exemplary exploration of the power of language and speech), just a good old fashioned showdown between series protagonist Max Rockatansky, and Scabrous Scrotus (which, as silly as it is, is par for the Mad Max course), who happens to be a son of Fury Road's Immortan Joe. That's about where the link with the film series ends, though, as the game is not a direct tie-in, and mostly benefits from that fact. Max is scorned by Scrotus, who takes everything he owns and destroys his prized car. Teaming up with the psychotic, yet harmless Chumbucket, it's up to the player to hunt down Scrotus, and rebuild your ride in the form of the greatest car known to man, the Magnum Opus. What I like about this setup is that it allows Avalanche to tell a new tale of the wasteland without having to retread on certain areas. I mean yes, there are a few re-used locations like Gas Town, as well as some familiar thematic elements, but for the most part, this is an encapsulated tale. The enhanced Avalanche Engine is quite the achievement, and I can see why the developer opted to shuck the PS3 and Xbox 360 versions of the game. Screens simply don't do this game justice, especially when you're scouting out far away locations high up in a hot air balloon while the scorching sun beams down on you, or when vicious sandstorms pop up. A built-in camera capture mechanic (on top of the PS4's standard capabilities) is the cherry on top. Taking a different approach to the typical open world formula, Mad Max's core gameplay is built around driving. Any racing game fan will instantly find themselves familiar with the control scheme, and the vast majority of the vehicles operate similarly to some of the best racing titles out right now. Car combat is handled well, since your companion Chumbucket rides along with you, repairing the car and using weapons in real time -- so it's both cinematic and functional. While the "slo-mo" feature is pretty much dead at this point, it allows players to actually get some hits in while aiming vehicle-centric weaponry, and blowing out enemy tires or harpooning them right out of the driver's seat is satisfying in all the right ways. The customization aspect also feels justified here, since changing up your car will significantly alter how it functions. There's hundreds of options here, from ramming grills, to spikes that protect your car from boarders, to new paint jobs and bodies, to explosive harpoons. The way the concept of the Magnum Opus is presented actually fits inline with this bit of the game, and I never felt pressured or compelled to go out and seek other cars to use. You can basically just drive and switch up your own custom car from start to finish, and it's easy to get attached to certain elements of your ride. Where Mad Max starts to falter is the on-foot sections, or more specifically, how these areas were designed. Combat is basically a carbon copy of the Batman: Arkham games, albeit with more brutal finishers, so that works well enough, but it's the actual zones -- where you can't bring the car mind you -- that often feel uninspired and bland. Since Max can only climb on certain surfaces, and only exhibits a pathetic GTA-style "hop" when pressing the jump button, on-foot sections feel out of place and gamey. It reminds me of the Prince of Persia reboot, which gave you this awesome-looking, sprawling world, and forced you to only explore it within a rigid set of rules. There are also a few other issues I had with these sections, like collision detection problems while climbing, and annoying mechanics like the fact that Max limps for a few seconds after falling the smallest distances. Exploring these zones simply isn't as satisfying without say, the aerial prowess of Talion, or the wonderful toys of Batman, to use direct comparisons to similar open-world WB titles in recent memory. While the story is engaging enough to string you along, a lot of the other activities aren't all that intriguing. It's like the team took the typical Ubisoft blueprint and stuck with it -- radio towers (balloons), fortresses, collectibles, sidequest races, smaller towers to knock down to lower "influence" -- it's all there. That's not to say that the game is mostly boring, far from it actually, as driving around is always a joy given how great the vehicular mechanics are, and there are a lot of naturally occurring events out in the wild to keep things interesting. I went back and forth in terms of my assessment multiple times throughout my time with Mad Max. I'd be having a blast in the car, and then I'd get to a particularly samey part on foot, and so on. But ultimately, I did enjoy my time in the wasteland, even if it doesn't offer up a whole lot that we haven't seen before. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Mad Max review photo
Who run Bartertown?!
I grew up with Mad Max. It was one of the first R-rated film series I viewed as a child, and naturally, I saw Fury Road, and enjoyed it like everyone else on the planet. My infatuation with the films is mostly due to George M...

Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

Just Cause 3 is giving away a goddamn island, and you probably want no part of it


No bueno
Aug 25
// Brett Makedonski
We like to discourage pre-ordering video games. Sometimes games are broken. Sometimes games suck. No one needs to fork over money before they know the final verdict. However, sometimes video games use their pre-order siren s...
Wingsuit photo
Wingsuit

Just Cause 3 has Super Monkey Ball style challenge mode


Also wonton destruction, natch
Aug 18
// Steven Hansen
Curious: does anyone pronounce Just Cause like Just 'Cuz? Just wondering. Why? Just 'cause. Hah. But seriously. I know some of you must've started with that pronunciation and it stuck, right? I mean, it works, too. That was ...
I choose Metal Gear photo
I choose Metal Gear

Mad Max gets a choose-your-own-trailer


I choose Metal Gear
Aug 17
// Steven Hansen
"See that mountain? You can walk to it." The audience, hushed, is stunned. The presentation script writer leans back, whiskey in hand and a hunk draped around her like a fur. The audience, catching up to the transcendent rea...
Mad Max photo
Mad Max

On the fence with Mad Max? Here's over an hour of gameplay


Imperator? I hardly even know her
Aug 14
// Steven Hansen
As much as I loved the recent Fury Road, I've had a tepid response to Avalanche's (Just Cause 3) Mad Max game, which has looked bland and lacked all the vitality of the film. It's basically looked like the first Borderlands ...
Final Fantasy XV photo
Final Fantasy XV

Final Fantasy XV airships might not make launch, Just Cause 3 dev helping


Aiming for seamless, 'full-scale' ships
Aug 10
// Steven Hansen
At the start of this year, Final Fantasy XV director Hajime Tabata called airships "a huge technical challenge" and "to be determined," but they make sense for the game's big, organically connected world. At gamescom last we...
Mad Max photo
Mad Max

Here's what your PC needs to run Mad Max


Minimum and recommended specs revealed
Aug 07
// Vikki Blake
Wondering if your PC can handle new Mad Max? Here are the recommended - and minimum - specifications. Minimum: OS: 64 bit: Vista, Win 7, Win 8 Processor: Intel Core i5-650, 3.2 GHz or AMD Phenom II X4 965, 3.4 Ghz Memory: 6 ...
Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

I won some Doritos out of a dumb Just Cause 3 claw machine


Did I say dumb? I meant awesome
Aug 05
// Brett Makedonski
Square Enix has no problem embracing how stupid and great and terrible and awesome its game -- and all video games, really -- can be. That's why there's a Just Cause 3-branded claw machine that's dishing out Doritos at gamesc...
Mad Max: Fury Road photo
Mad Max: Fury Road

This new Mad Max trailer is kinda awesome


Check out the Strongholds along the way
Aug 04
// Vikki Blake
Warner Bros. has dropped an all-new Mad Max trailer.  This video gives us a glimpse of what to expect at the various "fortified garrisons, or strongholds, located throughout the open world of the post-apocalyp...
Just Cause 3 photo
Just Cause 3

Just Cause 3's interactive trailer drives home the agency of chaos


Project Mayhem
Jul 15
// Brett Makedonski
This isn't your typical video game trailer, because Just Cause 3 is not your typical video game. Instead of a carefully crafted sizzle reel, the audience gets to determine how the sizzle plays out. That's because Just C...

Just Cause 3 somehow makes explosions easier than ever before

Jun 16 // Brett Makedonski
Immediately after beginning, fellow editor Jordan Devore tethered three grapples to the crotch on a statue of an oppressive ruler, pulled it until the entire thing crumbled to pieces (dick tater, am I right?), hooked the statue's head to a helicopter, and flew it off a cliff to a fiery death. Yep, Just Cause 3 is pretty fucking wonderful. The third installment in Avalanche's over-the-top action thriller franchise has a plot, but you wouldn't know it from what we played. Now that he has a few kills under his belt, Rico's returned to the Mediterranean-inspired area that he left as a child to overthrow an evil dictator. Our sandbox was more concerned with defying physics with the parachute and grappling hook, and using the wingsuit to glide far over the land and sea alike. Ironically, the wingsuit moments provided a nice touch of tranquility as we floated over the gorgeous landscape. From that high up, everything looked so serene and peaceful -- it was almost impossible to believe it's the work of an oppressive regime. That was immediately cut short when the next thought was "this needs more explosions." Because Just Cause 3 prioritizes the ridiculous over the believable, Rico is a one-man demolition crew and his supply never wanes. Avalanche has equipped him with a never-ending supply of C4, meaning that explosions are never more than a second or two away. What's the best way to dismantle this factory or to put this bridge out of commission? Our good friend C4 does the trick nicely. A lot of the design decisions were seemingly made as a result of Avalanche shrugging its shoulders. Regarding infinite C4, a studio representative told us "Why not?" Likewise, a new helicopter stunt trick where you hang upside down from the bottom was implemented because "That's just cool." After playing Just Cause 3 for a half hour, it appears that the developer put anything in the game that would make for a good time. It's certainly not a bad direction to take. Another point of emphasis for Avalanche pertains to traversal. The developer wanted to create a world that's easy and fun to move around. That's why the wingsuit, grappling hook, and parachute seemingly offer an infinite amount of momentum -- because slowing to a crawl just isn't as thrilling. It's also the reason why cars can be saved in garages and then recalled anytime you're near one. Hey, if you're going to take the discreet way around Just Cause 3, you may as well do it in style. Regardless of method, getting around Just Cause 3 may take a bit longer than you'd think. Avalanche developers tell us that the world is at least as big as Just Cause 2, but the layout's inherently different. The third installment will feature lots of islands, archipelagos, and little towns (Just Cause 2 kind of did too, but we're just going with what we're told). Also, Avalanche says that all the towns feel varied from one another and have their own sense of culture, so to speak. We wouldn't know a ton about that, because we were restricted to the first area of the game. Zooming out on the map, we could see the other two regions. They were significantly larger, and, as we were assured, significantly more difficult. When that's all available, players will get to experience what might be the developer's biggest goal: To create a perfect flow through the world. When all is said and done, Avalanche wants you to be able to flawlessly travel anywhere you want, however you want, and have a blast doing it. While it was nice seeing first-hand that Just Cause 3 nails all the things you'd expect Just Cause to nail, it was almost disappointing that the demo was completely unstructured. Okay, the sandbox element works great, but what does it have to offer players who want a reason to press forward? We weren't given a glimpse at that. Hopefully it's as competent as the free reign component is. Really, the takeaway from our time with Just Cause 3 is blowing up a lot of stuff makes for an enthralling time. It's not a revelation necessarily, so much as it is a good reminder. As we concluded the demo by demolishing a water tower that towered over a military base, a rep for the developer told us with a half-grin on his face "we're not really into subtlety." That's great, Avalanche, because neither are we.
Just Cause preview photo
That's saying something
So many preview events obsess themselves with presenting a carefully crafted slice of game. Here's a chunk of gameplay that puts the title's best foot forward. Don't deviate too far off the path, stick to the rules, and a P...

Mad Max game photo
Mad Max game

Mad Max trailer is seriously missing some Furiosa


Warboy pale in comparison
May 26
// Steven Hansen
Oh, man. Look, I trust in Avalanche's (Just Cause) ability to make crazy, fun, open action games, even if I'm leery about the studio putting out two in one year (Mad Max and Just Cause 3).  But! And this is a honking 'o...
Mad Max photo
Mad Max

What happened to Fallout dev's cancelled Mad Max game?


Oh, to think what could have been!
May 19
// Vikki Blake
If Mad Max: Fury Road had been released twenty years ago, the accompanying video game - currently in development by Avalanche Studios and scheduled for release this coming September - might've been created by Fallout develope...

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