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Asuras Wrath

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Mega Man art book

PAX: UDON releasing updated Mega Man art book


Best videogame art book ever!
Mar 23
// Tony Ponce
Hyrule Historia is pretty awesome. The History of Sonic The Hedgehog is not bad either. But for me, the best game series bible is Mega Man Official Complete Works. Released to celebrate the franchise's 20th anniversary, it co...
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Akuma is coming to Asura's Wrath


Mar 27
// Chris Carter
We already reported that Street Fighter veteran Ryu would be coming to Asura's Wrath, but now we have evidence that Akuma is on his way as well. Will Asura be able to defend against the deadly Shun Goku Satsu?! Tune into "As...
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GAME won't stock Street Fighter X Tekken, Asura's Wrath


Mar 06
// Jim Sterling
The parade of indignity just hasn't stopped marching for the United Kingdom's biggest game retailer. Recently, GAME has had to announce that it couldn't stock The Last Story, nor could it sell Mass Effect 3. Now, Capcom revea...

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Live show: Asura & Syndicate full runs on Mash Tactics


Feb 21
// Bill Zoeker
It's Tuesday, which means another 'New Release Showcase' on Mash Tactics. King Foom is going for a double-header with full playthroughs of both Asura's Wrath and Syndicate, all in one sitting. Tune in to get a good look at th...

Review: Asura's Wrath

Feb 21 // Jim Sterling
Asura's Wrath (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: CyberConnect2Publisher: CapcomReleased: February 21, 2012 MSRP: $59.99 Asura is an angry, angry man. The personification of wrath, his temper makes him an able fighter as one of the eight guardians of the planet, tasked with defeating a cosmic horror that threatens the world. That's enough to make Asura mad, but things get worse when his fellow guardians betray him -- kidnapping his daughter, murdering his wife, and sending him to hell for 12,000 years. When he finally escapes, he's just a little bit upset.  The plot of Asura's Wrath will be familiar to any anime fan, telling the tale of a vengeful warrior who must fight his way through an army of eccentric and overpowered foes. Fist of the North Star blends with Ninja Scroll and everything else you remember watching on VHS in the nineties, producing a tale that comes off almost as a parody of Japanese storytelling. Smirking bishōnen and big-breasted women are surrounded by violently manly men who needlessly shout all the time with gritted teeth and pounding fists. It's ludicrous, bombastic, and very loud. It's both a love letter and a merciless pastiche of Japanese animation, through and through.  Now, had Asura's Wrath been an anime, it would have been highly enjoyable. For much of the experience, CyberConnect2's tale of love and revenge is an anime, with cutscenes that could rival even Metal Gear Solid in terms of length and silliness. So much of the game is spent simply watching, with pieces of cutscenes even repeating themselves shortly after having already been played. Pretentiously separated into episodes (with arrogant credit sequences thrown into each one), Asura's Wrath seems to wish it was a television series as opposed to a videogame.  [embed]222319:42757[/embed] That isn't to say the entire adventure is a hands-off experience. When it's not shouting at you, Asura's Wrath is being one of three things -- a beat 'em up, a shooter, and a quick-time-event sequence. Much has been made of the fact that barely interactive QTEs comprise half the game, to the point where you might as well unplug the console and play Simon Says with real people. However, it's not so much the frequency of the QTE segments that disappoints me, it's the fact that not one of Asura's Wrath's elements play off each other to create a unified game. Instead, it is a disjointed, segregated, spluttering fiasco, a game that never allows itself to build to a satisfying end because it can't start anything without stopping first.  Most episodes follow a very predictable pattern. It starts with a simple beat 'em up section, in which Asura must take on either a group of monsters or a single, boss-like entity. These fights are theoretically indefinite, as regular enemies will continue to spawn and bosses have no health bars. Instead, Asura has a "burst" meter that fills whenever he gives or takes damage. The goal is to fill the burst meter without losing one's health, so that Asura can unleash his rage and kick off the QTE sections. What will follow is a long-winded set of animations in which the player's actions have very little influence. One is supposed to follow on-screen prompts to push buttons or move analog sticks, but even if one fails, Asura will often continue his work unhindered. Once finished, there will usually be another brawler section, followed by another set of QTEs. At random junctures, there will be shoot 'em up sequences where Asura fires off magic energy balls with his fist. These sections are fast-paced, but overload the screen with information to the point where it's difficult to see what's happening. Dragging the reticule over targets will lock onto them, and once you've locked onto enough, you can send multiple strong projectiles into the opposing obstacles. Asura is moved around using the very same stick as the reticule, meaning that if you want to evade an incoming enemy, you have to stop aiming properly. Meanwhile, the right analog stick sits doing nothing. Still, this is a minor inconvenience, given how easy the shooting sections are. It would be easy to complain that there's little hands-on gameplay compared to the amount of time spent watching semi-interactive movies. However, as I noted, that's not the core issue. The issue is the lack of fluidity. Had Asura's Wrath been able to blend the brawling, shooting and QTEs more efficiently, it would have been an exciting game that I'd proudly be able to rave about. Instead, the game won't move onto one section without forcing you to watch a dull transition animation, or a static screen. The various gameplay elements never transition smoothly into one another to create a cohesive game, instead sectioning everything off. Not only that, but these segments are all so brief that it's impossible to get invested in a single one. Just as you've gotten into the rhythm of a brawling section, you're told to stop, wait a second, and then start with the quicktiming. Even the QTEs fail to excite at a most basic level, being very slow from an input perspective and giving you plenty of time between commands to sit and do nothing.  Ultimately, what happens is that you're constantly being lifted up and suddenly dropped. Asura's Wrath forever builds to crescendos that never happen. It is as close as gaming gets to that shuddering moment one spends before a sneeze, without the blessed, explosive relief at the end.  Only once does Asura's Wrath bring its elements together, and it's truly masterful stuff. After several hours in, Chapter 13 provides a level in which the player constantly moves from brawler to shooter to QTE and even throws in some speeding moments reminiscent of latter-day Sonic the Hedgehog. Furthermore, it does this all with such a beautifully liquid flow that it single-handedly proves the game's entire concept. For this one chapter, all the things Wrath has to offer bleed into each other superbly, giving us a taste of the game that CyberConnect2 could have made. It doesn't last, however, and then the game instantly subsides into the same old faltering routine.  Quite why the developers chose to make it this way is a mystery, but it's frustrating to a painful degree. Behind all the terrible implementation and gated content lies an incredibly solid combat system, based around counterattacking and performing devastating executions on downed foes. Although the core attacks consist of simple button mashing, every enemy has a unique moveset with patterns that require crucial recognition and swift exploitation. Punches have a real weight to them, and melee feels incredibly pleasurable. It just doesn't last long enough before you're watching movies of men shouting at each other and looking at hand-drawn screenshots. Nothing ever sticks around to satisfy, and it undermines what a good game actually lies underneath all the waffling crap. Everything about Asura's Wrath seems designed to waste time, which is especially egregious since it takes only a few hours to beat. Every chapter must be manually started, for example, and there's a long-winded set of result screens at the end of each one. At one point, I started a chapter which made me move Asura slowly along a path. I did so for two or three seconds before the screen faded to black, then faded back up to show a little girl waving for less than a second, then faded back to black and returned to Asura. I then walked him forward for another three or four seconds before it went to a big cutscene.  What was the point of that? What was the reason, other than to waste my time?  If you took out all the time spent doing nothing in Asura's Wrath, you'd not have much of a game left. What you do play is solid, but you barely play anything. One spends ages waiting to play, then gets maybe a minute of interactivity, before being told to shut up again while the game sits on the lavatory and fiddles with itself. It's a party that you're not invited to, but have nevertheless been made to stand outside the house and look in from the window, hoping someone will toss you a scrap of food. Asura's Wrath is having plenty of fun on its own and rarely notices the player is there.  With its gorgeous animation, wonderful soundtrack, and fantastic cast of audacious characters, Asura's Wrath is a game everybody should want to love. I certainly wanted to love it. I desperately tried to tell myself I was enjoying the show, but no matter how many times I attempted to laugh at Asura's overwrought screaming, no matter how many times I told myself Steve Blum's voice acting (as the flamboyant Augus) was hilarious, I had to admit that I was being seduced by a game that had no intention of delivering on its honeyed promises. Any charm and amusement that Asura's Wrath provides only serves to highlight what a wasted opportunity the entire affair is.  Asura's Wrath would have been a superb anime or an excellent videogame. However, it couldn't decide what it wanted to be and instead served up tiny slivers of both, pulled together in a fashion so clumsy that you can see the stitching from miles away. It's not so much a game as it is a collection of concepts, roughly thrown into the same box and jumbled around in the vain hope that something good would come out at the end. Unfortunately, no one element is ever given enough time to shine, and for all its attempts to be something special and unique, Asura's Wrath is nothing but a disappointing selection of inconclusive ideas.
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Many people will tell you that Asura's Wrath is unlike anything you've seen before, which is interesting because its components can all be compared to things we've seen for years. Elements of Dragon's Lair, Heavy Rain, God of...

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Street Fighter's Ryu coming to Asura's Wrath as DLC


Feb 17
// Jim Sterling
The utterly ludicrous quick-time-event festival that is Asura's Wrath shall be getting downloadable content, and it tastes like Street Fighter. Ryu will be available post-launch, and you'll be able to take him on in a traditi...
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Asura's Wrath delayed in UK by two weeks


Feb 09
// Chris Carter
According to Eurogamer, Asura's Wrath is being delayed two weeks in the UK due to "the uncertainty of the UK retail market." Evidently the Brits aren't the biggest fans of six-armed demi-Gods punching holes into other giant D...

Demo Jimpressions: Asura's Wrath

Jan 10 // Jim Sterling
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Dragon's Lair: The Videogame.

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Asura's Wrath JP date and limited edition confirmed


Nov 03
// Raz Rauf
The upcoming Capcom and CyberConnect2 game Asura's Wrath has been gathering some significant attention this year, with Destructoid offering not just one, but TWO previews of the game, as well as a very thorough interview duri...
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Preview: Fighting gods in Asura's Wrath


Oct 31
// Steven Hansen
Developed by CyberConnect 2 and published by Capcom, Asura’s Wrath has some serious action game pedigree behind it, but it’s becoming more and more apparent that it’s not your typical action title. I got to ...

TGS: Asura's Wrath is totally not like having diarrhea

Sep 17 // Allistair Pinsof
[embed]211656:40891[/embed] The entire demo consisted of one, prolonged epic fight on the moon between Asura and another half-naked, roided-out god. If this sounds over the top and awesome, it’s probably because the game is Japanese. The pomposity of the dialogue, characters and action gives the game a lot of personality. It’s a game where a character says, “I don’t fight for evil. I don’t fight for good. I just fight.” If that isn’t incredibly rad, I don’t know what is. The combat itself is like a bizarre hybrid of Virtual-On, Street Fighter and God of War. Like a fighting game, you have various power bars you fill up to unleash devastating special moves. Like Virtual-On, you quickly glide and dodge across the stage and spam projectiles when away from your opponent. Like God of War, the game is ripe with QTEs that help tie together actions in different areas while providing some eye-candy. The HUD layout and visual style reminds me of Street Fighter IV in a very good way. The game looks more like a fighter than an action-adventure title. It makes sense then that fights are more about building up your Unlimited Mode meter, using Bursts attacks to pummel enemies and finishing them off with some Counters (via QTEs). The moon is a pretty big place. Rather than locking Asura into a confined arena, this stage feels almost endless in space. The game takes advantage of this by having the opponent make large attacks that require quick dodges and jumps for the player to evade. On paper, it sounds no different than God of War but the flow of combat and sense of space lends Asura’s Wrath a unique feel that sets it apart from other action games. Dodging between laser blasts and flying toward an enemy is a lot of fun. The demo ends with the opposing deity unsheathing and stabbing Asura with the longest sword ever. Asura gets stabbed off the face of the moon, his body dragged all the way down to Earth (approx. 380,000 kilometers). It’s pretty ridiculous and it's pretty awesome: I think that just about sums up Asura’s Wrath.
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It’s fitting that I saw Asura’s Wrath alongside Dragon’s Dogma at TGS, because both their titles sound like euphuisms for diarrhea. This is kind of ironic because Asura’s Wrath is kind of the opposit...

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Asura's Wrath's TGS trailer gets pretty intense


Sep 15
// Liam Fisher
I've been excited for Asura's Wrath since day one, but this new TGS trailer has piqued that interest even further; each new trailer delves deeper into the game's plot. Yasha, Asura's "rival" is on the hunt (apparently p...
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Asura's Wrath: New playable character, screens


Sep 08
// Kyle MacGregor
Capcom has unveiled a new playable character in their upcoming action title Asura's Wrath. And if you're familiar with the game's E3 trailer you just might recognize him. While the E3 footage illustrates a dramatic fight...
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Asura's Wrath gets some ANGRY screenshots RAWR!


Sep 02
// Jim Sterling
I admit that I've not seen a great deal of Asura's Wrath, but everything I have seen just looks so ... so angry. The game seems to be about nothing more than looking weird and flipping out over everything at all times.  ...
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Watch Asura's Wrath with the worst narration in the world


Jul 19
// Jim Sterling
Here's some gameplay footage of Capcom's promising new action title, Asura's Wrath. Make sure you concentrate on the visuals, because otherwise you might hear the narrator. He is the worst person in the world.  Not much more to be said other than the game looks pretty badass!

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