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Alien

Sega financials photo
Sega financials

Sega calls Alien: Isolation sales 'weak' at 2.1 million


And a poor showing by Sonic Boom
May 11
// Brett Makedonski
Creative Assembly's Alien: Isolation was one of the most well-received games of 2014, but "well-received" seemingly doesn't cut it for its publisher. Sega released its year-end financial results today, and in it expresse...
Alien glitch photo
Alien glitch

Maybe Ripley's arms are made of fire?


Amanda? More like Ash
Apr 13
// Brett Makedonski
In what was probably an alternate ending to Alien: Isolation, Amanda Ripley looked down and noticed that her arms were fire. How she went through decades of life without realizing that her limbs were constant chemical combus...
SEGA Steam sale photo
SEGA Steam sale

Steam SEGA Super Bundle gives you $370 worth of games for $80


There are also a bunch of separate bundles if only certain things interest you
Mar 27
// Steven Hansen
Sega is sailing onto Steam with sales this sweekend. On this page you'll find a general list of things on sale. It is deceptive because a $2.50 Jet Set Radio or a $6.80 Valkyria Chronicles share as much screen space as the "S...
GDC photo
GDC

Creative Assembly reveals inital pitch video for Alien: Isolation


See the never before shown video that started development
Mar 04
// Alessandro Fillari
Alien: Isolation was one of my biggest surprises of last year. As huge fan of the film series, I always wanted to play a title that emulated the original movie's tone and style. Though the action of the James Cameron-he...
GDC photo
GDC

Never seen Alien: Isolation third-person footage shown at GDC


Gameplay showing abandoned alternate camera set-up shown during panel
Mar 04
// Alessandro Fillari
One of the great joys of attending GDC is going to panels conducted by developers talking about your favorite games. Not only will you learn new and exciting details about the development, but you might even see somethi...
Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Alien: Isolation's latest add-on serves up a gruff face to the Xenomorph


Axel's back
Feb 10
// Brett Makedonski
Just like Alien: Isolation's last piece of content, the newest add-on again asks you to decide what's more important: a shot at leaderboard fame or safety? The two are mutually exclusive, and there's a pissed off Xenomorph t...
Writers Guild Award photo
Writers Guild Award

Big names dominate Writers Guild Award nominations


Two Assassin's Creeds, Alien, and The Last of Us DLC
Jan 13
// Brett Makedonski
Anyone that's of the belief that mainstream videogames are often devoid of great writing will need to look somewhere other than the Writers Guild of America for vindication. The organization's nominees for Outstanding Achieve...
Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Alien: Isolation's new mode asks you to sacrifice success for security


That Xenomorph's as lethal as ever
Jan 13
// Brett Makedonski
Creative Assembly's Alien: Isolation is a constant struggle for survival, and maybe more precisely, a neverending search for those few fleeting moments when you feel safe, even if you know danger's probably mere seconds...
AVP 2010 photo
AVP 2010

Aliens: Colonial Marines and AVP 2010 are back on Steam after a snafu


The former could have stayed off
Jan 09
// Chris Carter
Last week, Steam removed Aliens: Colonial Marines and Alien vs. Predator 2010. Speculation arose as to why it happened -- was it because of all the Colonial Marines drama at Gearbox in the past, or is it because of ...
Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Creative Assembly sees opportunity in an Alien: Isolation sequel


*Spoilers ahead*
Dec 15
// Brett Makedonski
[Update: As expected, Sega's official comment to Destructoid is "Creative Assembly is focused on their post-launch content for Alien: Isolation, and have no comment on plans for a sequel.] Without doubt, Alien: Isolation...
Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Attention all masochists: Alien: Isolation has a Nightmare difficulty now


Because that game isn't hard enough
Dec 09
// Brett Makedonski
Anyone that's tried tackling Alien: Isolation on the toughest difficulty knows that it's a painstakingly hard endeavor. There's little room for error, as the alien is quite adept at adapting to your strategies. As if it ...

Review: The Art of Alien: Isolation

Oct 17 // Alasdair Duncan
The Art of Alien: Isolation (Book)Author: Andy McVitiePublisher: Titan BooksPrice: $34.95/£29.99Released: October 7, 2014 Despite being set 15 years after the first film, Alien: Isolation copies the design and art style of the movie almost exactly. This is still grungy, industrial, workman-like sci-fi, not flashy, shiny space opera. Each chapter of the book shows that plenty of thought went into making every visual element stand out and fit in with the style of the original Alien. The book is a good opportunity to get a better look at protagonist Amanda Ripley, who only fully appears in the game's cutscenes. There's a whole heap of costume designs and concept art that looks like it came right out of the sketchbook of either Ron Cobb or John Mollo. You're given a better sense of what went into attempting to make the art of Isolation have that "lived-in" feel. There are also quite a few drawings of various space craft, which is just like catnip to me. The center piece of the game is the one thing you don't want to see, the Xenomorph itself. Again, the concept art does a fine job of showing the changes in design the team went through. The initial sketches depict a more muscular alien, whereas the final model ended up being a thinner, more lithe creature. Of course, if you've seen any of the films, you'll already be very familiar with the design of H. R. Giger's iconic monster. On that note, the only really disappointing element is how familiar much of the artwork feels. For fans of the Alien franchise or gritty sci-fi in general, there isn't anything unexpected here. The team at Creative Assembly has done an excellent job recreating the look of the original film but it's a shame there aren't more surprises to be found. There is artwork of sequences cut from the game, like a brief zero-G section and storyboards for unused dialog sequences. Still, Alien: Isolation is undoubtedly a faithful recreation of a beloved film and this art book shows how dedicated Creative Assembly was in making the game.
Art of Alien: Isolation photo
This art book is much less scary than the game
Alien: Isolation has received a lot of praise over its faithful recreation of the original film's lo-fi take on science fiction. "Truckers in space" was the aesthetic director Ridley Scott set out to capture and the decks and...

Alien Art Book Contest photo
Three US and three UK copies up for grabs
Our friends at Titan Books have given us a bunch of copies of The Art of Alien: Isolation to hand out to lucky Dtoiders! To enter, just leave a comment in this thread! Limit one entry per person, and you have until this Frida...

Very Quick Tips: Alien: Isolation

Oct 07 // Chris Carter
General tips: Don't use the flashlight often. The game really does follow the Resident Evil 1 style concept of limited resources, and your battery is a resource. Flick it on and off as needed. Remember that you can load the save prior to your current one after death. Don't get trigger happy with saves. It's important to save often, but you don't want two saves right next to each other, for instance. Do it after a big event/item collection. Distractions are key with humans. Early on, there's a part where it feels almost impossible to escape a room full of people. Throw a flare carefully into the corner of a room, wait, and sneak up the stairs in the other direction. Always check every terminal, period. Click on every note. Even if you aren't reading them, as the game stores it in the pause button database. Follow the principle of almost never using your items unless you need to. Before you waste multiple objects in a given situation, try to get by with wits alone through multiple deaths. If you really can't do it, then spring for your items. If you're full on scrap, you aren't crafting enough. Keep making items, as you get resources. Also, err on the side of keeping at least two medkits. You can't crawl prone on the ground, but if you approach desks while crouched you can hide underneath them. Don't corner yourself with synthetics. They will cut you off if you only have one or two escapes. Try to juke them in hallways by running to the side with plenty of clearance. If you're on PC, consider playing with a controller. The game's rumble feature will let you know when people are near after you pick up the motion sensor. Isolation also plays a sound cue, but often times feeling the rumble will jolt you into paying attention quicker. Should you find yourself confused on the "select matching input when the circuit blinks" puzzle (you'll know it when you see it), keep in mind that the correct button to press for each circuit is the one that doesn't have the dot on it. You don't always have to crouch and sneak when the alien is around. You can also walk to get around quicker without making noise. Just try not to sprint. If you need to hack a door and the alien is present, check your motion tracker and don't attempt to open it until it starts walking away in another direction -- then go as fast as you can. Also, you can start moving the analog stick toward the next way before the game registers your previous direction. Watch out for air vents. Keep a note of where they are toward the ceiling and stay away from their range.
Alien: Isolation photo
Xeno-tricks
That Xenomorph can be one tricky asshole in Alien: Isolation. One time it walked out of a room, waited a second, then turned back around to find me awkwardly climbing out of the cabinet I had been hiding in. What a dick. Here's how to avoid that situation and more.

Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Yeah, that flamethrower won't do much to help you survive in Alien: Isolation


Maybe the Xenomorph just hates annoying hashtag campaigns
Oct 03
// Brett Makedonski
In the days leading up to Sega's release of Alien: Isolation, it mocks us with the semi-question "#HowWillYouSurvive," because Twitter-speak is what appeals to the cool local teens. This video firmly suggests that a flamethr...

Review: Alien: Isolation

Oct 03 // Chris Carter
Alien: Isolation (PC [reviewed], PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: The Creative AssemblyPublisher: SegaReleased: October 7, 2014MSRP: $49.99 (PC, PS3, Xbox 360) / $59.99 (PS4, Xbox One)Rig: Origin Millennium: Overclocked Intel Core i7 4770K Quad-Core (4.0GHz-4.7GHz), Dual 3GB NVIDIA GTX 780 Ti  Alien: Isolation takes place 15 years after the first Alien film and before Aliens. It follows the tale of Amanda Ripley, daughter of legendary Ellen Ripley -- the woman who took on a Xenomorph and lived to tell the tale. Unlike her mother who eventually became more of a soldier, Amanda is still just an engineer who is still searching for her mother, who mysteriously disappeared aboard the Nostromo. What starts off as a routine mission to investigate the flight recorder ends up resulting in Amanda and her crew getting stranded on yet another ship, kicking off the game proper. What I like about Amanda as a character is that she fits into the franchise rather well, with an interesting enough backstory giving her a reason to be there. She's hardened in a different way compared to her mother, having experienced space travel far longer than a lot of her peers, allowing her a certain amount of confidence. On the flipside, Amanda's character isn't pushed as heavily on us as you'd expect. Rather than constantly have her making lengthy expositions, we're meant to experience the game with Amanda, like we're both getting through the ordeal together. The campaign is ostensibly a first-person adventure game with mild action elements. You're not alone as you have a small cast of supporting characters to interact with occasionally, but they don't get in the way -- make no mistake, survival is at the forefront of Isolation, in a good way. There's a focus on small-scale puzzles, either in the form of locating certain objectives on your own, solving small scavenger hunts, or completing minigames while the world is still operating around you. Isolation doesn't go out of its way to spoil solutions or over-explain anything, which should delight people who are tired of constant HUD-based objective markers that detail how many meters you are away from the next bread crumb on the trail. The map strikes a perfect balance of ushering players into the next portion of the story without giving everything away. [embed]281651:55767:0[/embed] There are also terminals that provide more highlighted areas just like Metroid, and the ship in general is a ton of fun to get lost in -- I felt compelled to just wander around and find extra materials. In fact the game is anything but linear outside of story progression, as you can freely explore areas, return to past zones with new tools, and generally just scavenge around at any time. And you'll need to scavenge, as Isolation feels like an old school survival horror game with regard to item management. At the heart of this mechanic is the crafting system, which lets you build items like flashbangs, medkits, noise makers, and flares. Since the game is so challenging, you'll feel like you need to craft and locate materials, and minor pickups feel like small victories. Even your flashlight (which is head-mounted) has a drawback, as batteries drain rather quickly and you'll have to locate spares. It really feels like Resident Evil 1 again where every item matters. While there are a few offensive tools at your disposal (such as a revolver and molotov cocktails), the core focus is decidedly defensive, as you won't come across a whole lot of ammo. Less is more in this instance, and you won't take using precious bullets lightly. But while the survival portions of Isolation are well done, the atmosphere is where the development team really nailed it. This feels like Alien incarnate, like you were dropped right onto the film set. The smoke, the details of particles in the air, the equipment -- the art team went above and beyond here. I love just walking around taking in the sights because it feels so authentic, like you are a part of the universe. On higher-end platforms the detail shines even more -- we've progressed to the point where you can clearly see writing on small objects like calendars and notes, all of which add to the magic. Tiny things like notes and audio logs from PCs are also a nice touch. Yes, the atmosphere and tension holds up throughout the entire game. If you're worried about the game being all jump scares -- don't be. Isolation has its fair share of jumps, but it gets off on building its tension with a steady pace. Whether it's chilling bits of the game's soundtrack or classic horror movie sounds, odds are you'll be feeling a bit on edge the entire time. As previously mentioned, the atmosphere is incredible, and the ominous art direction keeps you guessing throughout. Playing in the dark with surround-enabled headphones only amplifies the experience. So, what about arguably the biggest part of the game -- the alien! Isolation features a Xenomorph -- yes one -- in all its glory, mostly modeled after the style in the first film. Creative Assembly really tried to give us the sense that the alien learned new tactics as the game went on and had a host of formidable tricks up its sleeve. I have to say, they succeeded. While it sounds like an overstatement, the alien was one of the most interesting AIs I've seen in a long time. At first, I thought it was entirely scripted. While some cinematic portions do play out in the same manner every time à la BioShock, the actual alien is quite dynamic. There was one point in the game where I called for an elevator, and I heard the alien hiss in the distance. I thought, "Hey, this is scripted; I'll just wait here and I'll be fine" -- nope! The bugger actually turned the corner, saw me, and popped my skull open. On the next spawn, I hid behind a stack of barrels and he didn't even enter the room. Almost immediately, I saw that this concept had potential. In another area entirely, I walked through a door and never thought to lock it behind me, thinking "This area is pretty far off the beaten path; it won't follow me in here." Wrong again! It promptly turned around (likely due to some noise I made), then followed me into the room where I hid in a locker, nervously watching it walk by with its tail slithering on the ground. To give you a visual example of the options that the alien can take in any given spawn, check out this crude diagram. You can use the alien to your advantage as well, clearing out unwanted hostiles and distracting it to suit your needs. Likewise, you'll have to adapt to it on a constant basis, as it won't always fall for your parlor tricks. Figuring out new ways to outwit the alien with a clever use of tools is paramount to your success. In that regard, Isolation does a damn good job of making you feel vulnerable. Even without the alien being physically present in any given area, it reminded me of the Nemesis from Resident Evil 3. It might not be there but the threat is, which is another welcomed layer entirely. As you may have heard, there are human enemies too. Thankfully these portions actually are few and far between and actually aren't that bad at all, even if they're nowhere near as entertaining as when the alien is on the prowl (though they aren't mutually exclusive). You do have a melee option (that will do absolute jack-all to the alien) to initiate some stealth kills, but again, you can sneak past most of these enemies just fine. They also never go overboard with this -- there are no "wave-based" forced killing spree sections like the new Tomb Raider and BioShock: Infinite. There are a few frustrating sections though, mostly involving the presence of humans. Said frustration mostly stems from the no-nonsense save system, which only saves when you manually interact with a save point, littered randomly about the game's world. There are some sections that have very difficult stealth sections that are roughly five minutes long, and failure of any kind usually results in death. Old school PC gamers who remember titles that lacked a quicksave feature will likely be unfazed, but it's something to be aware of -- especially when the alien can always kill you instantly, leaving little margin for error.On the other hand, to make up for the familiar human-on-human confrontations, synthetic robots are masterfully injected in a few areas -- and man, they are creepy as hell. Devoid of emotion, these robots are more deliberate in their movements. They're slow and zombie-like, speedwalking their way in a delightfully terrifying fashion. They're much more ominous and fun to interact with, especially given the fact that they can take a beating (just like the films) and keep on going. If you're so inclined after the roughly 15 hour (or more) story mode, you can tackle the Survivor mode portion, which is basically a challenge room type deal. You'll be timed and get an appropriate score for achieving certain bonus objectives, all while you evade the terrifying alien in a toe-to-toe matchup. With a limited toolset, you'll have to outwit the creature and make it to the objective in the fastest time possible for leaderboard purposes. It's basically the best part of the game, distilled. The single included map is static, but every time you play it, it will feel different. One time, I found myself sprinting to a door to lock it behind me, stopping the alien right before it could get in, freeing up about 20 precious seconds before it found its way back to the level through the vent system. The very next run, it bypassed the door entirely before I could get there and was lurking on a staircase right above me. This is the kind of randomness challenge modes should strive for. Sadly, Survivor mode will only ship with one map, with the rest arriving as DLC. It's a shame because it showcases what makes the game so special so concisely, and it's the perfect thing to show someone in the dead of night in a dark room with headphones. Halfway into playing Alien: Isolation, I stopped to watch the first four Alien movies again. It wasn't just for research purposes, but mostly because the game had me yearning for more of the universe. Isolation has some flaws, but it's faithful to the film series, and I'd love to see a follow-up with a few extra alien evolutions.
Alien: Isolation photo
Ripley's Believe It
From the old school "20th Century Fox" opening to the first few seconds, Alien: Isolation wants you to know that it takes after the first film from the series it was based on. One alien, one spaceship, one chance at survival. This is the game we should have gotten from Gearbox.

Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Playing Alien: Isolation on a convention floor isn't the best idea


Turns out demoing a horror game isn't easy
Sep 29
// Alasdair Duncan
Demoing a game like Alien: Isolation at a convention such as EGX or PAX has always been problematic since horror works best when there's time for quieter moments between the scares. There has to be a period of tension buildin...
Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Something's stalking us in Alien: Isolation's television ad


I bet it's an alien
Sep 26
// Brett Makedonski
The latest piece of media for Creative Assembly's impending Alien: Isolation prods "How will you survive?" It's a fair question. With that hulking Xenomorph nimbly crawling out of the airshaft, stalking its prey before terrifyingly ending its life, it'll certainly be a tough task. When the game releases on October 7, the most likely answer will probably be "There's a good chance we won't."
Alien photo
Alien

Most of Alien: Isolation's Survivor Mode will be DLC


And not the free kind
Sep 17
// Jordan Devore
Survivor Mode in Alien: Isolation, as described here in this video and further detailed in Steven's hands-on coverage, sounds cool. You'll have to complete certain objectives on a timer while being hunted, and factors like w...
Alien photo
Alien

How not to survive in Alien: Isolation


The game has gone gold
Sep 09
// Jordan Devore
From everything I've heard of Alien: Isolation, it's best not to run around when you think the coast is clear much less when the Xenomorph is right there in the same room. See: the trailer above. Creative Assembly plans to put out more of these videos throughout the month, and I have to imagine most will end with the demise of Amanda Ripley. It's just like playing the game, then.
Sega photo
Sega

Check out Sega's booth at PAX Prime and hop in an Alien egg pod


I really wish I were going now
Aug 27
// Brittany Vincent
If you're headed to PAX Prime this weekend, first of all, I'm jealous and you should take me with you. Second, you should hit up the Sega booth, where you can get friendly with hands-on demos of Alien: Isolation, Sonic Boom: ...

Alien: Isolation is haunting and uncompromisingly scary

Aug 13 // Alessandro Fillari
Alien: Isolation (PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4 [previewed], PC, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: Creative AssemblyPublisher: SegaRelease Date: October 7, 2014 Back when the uproar over Aliens: Colonial Marines happened, the developers at Creative Assembly were hard at work on Isolation and waiting for the time to unveil their project. "No one ever made the Alien game I wanted to play, which was about taking you back to the roots of the series -- which is one Alien, who is really meaningful," said creative lead Alistair Hope. "What would it be like to encounter Ridley Scott's original Alien? Who's massive, intelligent, and just something that's hunting you down." First off, forget everything you know about the sequels to the original Alien. This game is set several decades before those events, and many of the buzzwords, tropes, and other plot points for the colonial space-marines don't exist yet. The ship from the original film, the Nostromo, is destroyed, the Alien was blown out of the airlock, and the fate of lone survivor Ellen Ripley is unknown. Taking place 15 years after the original film, Alien: Isolation tells the story of Amanda Ripley, the daughter of the series' central character. After receiving word that the space station Sevastopol has recovered the Nostromo's flight recorder, she hurries to the station to learn of her mother's fate. Upon arriving, she finds the station in chaos as staff have gone into disarray after an Alien has taken up residence there. Now with the lives of herself and her crew on the line, Amanda must venture through the Sevastopol looking for answers, while evading the near omnipresent Alien. Now when I first heard that we'd be playing as the daughter of Ellen Ripley, I sorta rolled my eyes and thought of it as a gimmick to eek some connection from the first movie. But I was wrong -- in the few hours I had with the game, I saw a lot to like with Amanda's character. She's scrappy, determined, and can definitely handle herself. "We wanted to tell a story that had an emotional connection to that first film, to focus on someone who actually cared about the Nostromo," said Hope. "She has a lot of the same qualities of her mother, but she's taken her own path and she's very much her own character." With more people clamoring for strong female heroes to play as, Ripley is exactly the kind of character many would like. Not only does she set herself apart from her mother by being more talkative, and more knowledgeable and handy, but she feels like a unique character that works well on her own. It's refreshing to play as a regular character with an unusual history brought into a trying circumstance, as opposed to just another space-marine that you'd likely forget about by game's end. In more ways than one, Alien: Isolation is very much a throwback to the bleak and haunting sci-fi and horror films of the 1970s. Everything from the character look, atmosphere, and visual style have been recreated to match the tone and style of the original Alien film. To take things further, film grain and the color palette match with what many fans saw from the first film, and Creative Assembly wanted to recreate the same atmosphere for this new game. "One of the big things I love about Alien is that '70s view of the future," said Hope. "That low-fi sci-fi. It's cool because it owns its own space, it's not the style of science fiction that we're used to, and it looks great and very immersive." One of the big takeaways I had from this game is the art design. Isolation's aesthetic comes from the past's view of the future. As future prediction is relative to the times, the 1970s view of the future features structural designs and computers that feel analog and mechanical, CRT monitors with charming and antiquated graphics are placed in every room, and multilingual welcome signs show a coalesced human society of the future. The developers at Creative Assembly did an admirable job with replicating the "used" future look, as seen in Alien, Moon, and Star Wars. And it definitely makes for a more visually appealing haunted house. In case you haven't figured it out by now, Alien: Isolation is almost the opposite style and tone seen in James Cameron's Aliens, and from all the derivatives that followed. While Aliens emphasized action-horror with powerful characters stretched to their limits, Alien is a horror-thriller with characters who are outmatched by an unknown force. Creative Assembly wanted to return to the original tone and atmosphere, as it's still largely unknown for gaming. "One of the things we put up on the wall [during initial design] was to 're-Alien the Alien'. You can go back to the original Alien, which is over 35 years old, and even though it's old you can still get an emotional response from it," Hope stated. "And it's a testament to the power of the craft. It was important to me to have the Alien not run around your waist like a rabid dog, but to be big and imposing, that commanded your respect." Respect is a great way of putting it. In the previous games, players are used to mowing down swarms of aliens without feeling any real fear. It's very ingrained, when you think about it. This aspect of the human vs. alien conflict is what CA wanted to change, and in order to do so, players had to be knocked down a few pegs. "Horror I think is about small victories. It's those tiny moments where you think 'maybe I can make it,' and if I keep doing it maybe I can." In an atmosphere filled with dread, the tension is incredibly heavy. You're not playing as a badass space-marine with ammo and firepower to blow away swarms of Aliens; you're a regular person with limited resources that has to think about firing a shot or even whether to make the tough decision to peek around a corner to see if the enemy is near. You're vulnerable, and the odds are against you. And the creature you're up against is intelligent, cunning, and unkillable by conventional means. And encountering it is quite possibly the worst thing that can happen to your character. During my session, I had to find a trauma kit to heal an injured crew member. I carefully made my way through an abandoned crew's quarters, and suddenly the Alien crashed down from a shaft in the ceiling. Not noticing me, I ducked under a table and watched as he lurked through the halls, looking for a new prey. For most other Alien games, we would've ended the encounter there with a few shots from a pulse rifle. Not so here. Stealth and careful use of your gadgets, such as the invaluable motion tracker (which shows movement and objectives) and noisemaker gadget (which does exactly that) are necessary for survival.  Once the Alien discovers you, you're pretty much done for. Within the first ten minutes of encountering this thing, I was killed twice. Both times featured unique death animations, one where the Alien yanks Ripley and finishes her with a single bite, and another where the Alien crawls on top of Ripley and goes for the kill. It was certainly humbling to face against something that I was no match for, I was definitely on edge throughout my few hours with the game. In keeping with its "throwback" style, the gameplay feels very much like a return to classic survival horror. Specifically in the vein of early Resident Evil titles and Alone in the Dark. Your resources are limited and sparse, you face unrelenting and powerful odds, and you're vulnerable to attack at the unlikeliest of moments -- to say things are tense would be putting it lightly. Moreover, Isolation also uses a fixed save point system. Creative Assembly cited this as a design choice to get players to think about where they want to set their flag, but also to prevent players from taking advantage of checkpoints and save-anywhere options, which would mitigate the tension. There were definitely times where I felt too nervous to make a move, as the Alien would have a general sense of where I was and stay around the area. And no, it usually won't go away if it knows you're there. Safety feels like a luxury, and moments that felt like downtime only resulted in the creature re-emerging from its hiding spot, almost as if to remind players who's boss. "We certainly don't want players to feel 100 percent safe, however this game has to be about tension and release," said Hope, while discussing the balance between creating tension. "It can't be unrelentingly oppressive and constantly overbearing, you need to be able to breath, before you can embark into the unknown." While he's definitely correct about striking a balance between tension and release, I myself was mostly tense throughout the experience. One major criticism I had was that the objective locations are kept fairly vague while only giving you a general direction to head to. Picture this: you're looking for a small keycard located in a hallway with multiple rooms. You don't know where it is, and you have to sneak through each room searching for it, all the while having the Alien lurking about. You begin to get frustrated, you can't find what you need to leave and you start to panic, you knock over a nearby object (objects create noise which attracts the Alien), and the creature rushes off to your room. At times, it felt like I was in a hopeless situation and that a restart was necessary. I was stuck in a supply closet and the Alien stuck its head toward the vents of the closets to see if I was inside. During this point, you can hold your breath and wait for the Alien to pass, but I let go of the button and let out a big gasp for air -- of course, the Alien heard it, ripped the doors off its hinges and dragged me to my death. It's moments like these that make the experience incredibly suspenseful, but in order to survive, you have to be prepared. To get the upper hand on the Alien and overcome many other obstacles, Ripley must use her engineering skills to craft items and weaponry to survive her trek through the Sevastopol. The in-game crafting system allows players to make Medkits, ammo, and other tools to survive. While you will acquire core weaponry, such as the revolver, stun-baton, and flamethrower, many other gadgets like the noisemaker and Molotov cocktails require components that are found from looting dead bodies and crates. Though be careful, crafting will not pause the game and if you're in an unsafe location, you can be easily picked off by the Alien. While the Alien is unrelenting and intimidating, it isn't the only enemy you have to worry about. Throughout the station you'll find other humans doing whatever it takes to survive the chaos. Even if means taking out Ripley. While there are people that players can peacefully interact with, others will attack on sight. Which is not only a problem, but the noise from this conflict will also attract the Alien. Though depending on how you play, this can work to your advantage. If you're clever enough, you can lure the beast out of hiding with gadgets and use the humans as a distraction. If done right, the Alien will leap out from whatever vent or rafter it's hiding from and make quick work of them, allowing you to pick up resources after the carnage. "It's not about killing, it's about survival. It felt like there had to more interaction with this creature than just pulling a trigger," said Hope while discussing the different options you have for combat." You can actually finish the game without killing anyone, so it's down to your choice. It's a big part of the game experience, we put these situations in your hands." Another enemy to watch out for are the Working Joes, or synthetic androids as seen from the films. Throughout the Sevastopol there are Working Joes on standby, and in some cases players can activate them for assistance, such as locating and procuring sensitive equipment. However, the Working Joes are also kept to maintain the integrity of the station, and if players tamper or destroy sensitive equipment, the androids will treat you as a hostile threat and enter a search-and-destroy protocol. While they appear slow and crude, they're extremely powerful and possess some sharper senses than the creature. The Alien is intimidating and scary, but Working Joes are just plain creepy. I came in expecting a game that would be better than the previous titles by default, but I ended up playing a game that not only surprised me with its cleverness and complexity, it gave me a greater appreciation for the original film as well. Alien: Isolation knows exactly what it's doing, and its approach to offering an uncompromising and harsh experience that'll frighten and humble players should win over many who wrote off the series. With its release on October 7, Isolation's return to classic horror will likely give gamers looking for a survivalist experience -- and those in need of a good scare -- something to look anticipate. And with the Alien lurking the halls of the space station, the odds will certainly be against you. But to quote the cunning android Ash from the original film, "I can't lie to you about your chances, but … you have my sympathies."
Alien: Isolation photo
Admire its purity
Though it was initially seen as "Jaws-in-space," the legacy for Alien is certainly much more pristine than the one with the giant shark. Originally released in 1979, the first Alien would eventually become a much-loved horror...

Alien: Isolation photo
Alien: Isolation

Original Alien cast discuss how great the movie was while voicing Isolation


Makes you want to go watch it again
Jul 24
// Brett Makedonski
While voicing lines for the upcoming Alien: Isolation pre-order DLC, the crew of the original Alien took a few moments to compare the movie and videogame mediums while also reminiscing about the 1979 classic. Tom S...
SEGA at Comic-Con photo
SEGA at Comic-Con

Go play Alien: Isolation at Comic-Con


Sonic and Hatsune Miku, too, I guess
Jul 16
// Steven Hansen
SEGA has announced its plans for San Diego Comic-Con, which is to chill at some place called Nerd HQ ironically held at the San Diego Padre's baseball park.  With how much videogame nerds try to bully sportsters for soci...
Alien DLC photo
Alien DLC

Alien Isolation Ripley DLC not pre-order exclusive, will release later


Could do better than that
Jul 11
// Steven Hansen
I think that Alien: Isolation could be great. Pre-order DLC is bad. Especially when it's actually cool sounding content, like a few missions starring the original Alien cast in the upcoming Alien: Isolation. After a...
Alien pre-orders photo
Alien pre-orders

Here's what Ripley and friends look and sound like in Alien: Isolation


Must. Stay. Strong.
Jul 10
// Brett Makedonski
Someone needs to take Sega aside and politely inform it that pre-order incentives aren't actually supposed to be enticing. Years of custom gun skins and XP boosts have made the whole affair predictable and boring, and then S...
 photo
Is this Harry Dean-Stanton's first game appearance? Who cares.
The pre-order bonuses for Alien: Isolation have been announced, and they're really, really cool... but should we take it at some kind of sign? After all, it was a very similar lust for bonuses that led to the crew of The Nostromo investigating the distress signal coming from LV-426, in the process granting passage to the film's titular nightmarish stowaway.

Alien: Isolation preorder photo
Alien: Isolation preorder

Original Alien cast returns for Alien: Isolation bonus content, available for those who pre-order


Believe it or not, you can play as Ripley
Jul 09
// Darren Nakamura
Alien: Isolation is supposed to be more like the 1979 horror film Alien, and less like the action shooter that some other Aliens game tried to be. Thus far, it looks like it has stuck to that design philosophy well enough, an...
Alien: Isolation VR photo
Alien: Isolation VR

Alien: Isolation on Oculus Rift won't see the light of day


That's a bummer
Jul 07
// Brett Makedonski
One of my favorite experiences at E3 was playing Alien: Isolation on Oculus Rift. The extra layer of immersion that virtual reality could provide did wonders for an already terrifying game. Unfortunately, it seems as if...
Alien: Isolation  photo
Alien: Isolation

It looks like people really dug Alien: Isolation at E3 2014


Check out the E3 Accolades trailer
Jun 26
// Brittany Vincent
Another day, another bit of info about Alien: Isolation. I already know I want to buy it. I don't honestly need trailer after trailer with tiny morsels of gameplay. I'm about ready to jump right in, especially after Steven's...






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