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3DS photo
3DS

3D Sonic the Hedgehog 2's trailer confirms Tails co-op support


Two copies of the game
Jul 15
// Chris Carter
Sega has released a trailer for 3D Sonic the Hedgehog 2 on the Japanese eShop (which is posted above, courtesy of NintenDaan), and it evidently confirms two-player co-op in the shop listing and at the end of the video itself...
Hollowpoint photo
Hollowpoint

Hollowpoint gives co-op shooting a fresh perspective


Cover shooting from all angles
Jun 17
// Alessandro Fillari
Update: Cross-play for PS4 and PC will not be a feature for Hollowpoint.It feels like you can't go anywhere without seeing another co-op shooter set for release or being announced for the first time. Since the success of titl...
Steam photo
Steam

3D platformer The Last Tinker hits Steam in May


There aren't enough of these games being made
Apr 28
// Jordan Devore
Mimimi Productions has announced a May 12 Steam launch for its 3D platform adventure The Last Tinker: City of Colors, a game described as being influenced by such titles as Banjo-Kazooie and Jak and Daxter. Yep, that descrip...

Earthbound photo
Earthbound

Fan recreates Earthbound with HD visuals


Artist Christopher Behr gives the retro cult hit a new look
Dec 18
// Alessandro Fillari
To say that Earthbound, or Mother as it's referred to in Japan, is a much loved and admired game, is an understatement. From fans creating charity drives, to organized campaigns to get the game on Nintendo's virtual console -...
Hadron's Forge photo
Hadron's Forge

Hadron's Forge features asteroid mining, real elements


Check for updates Periodically
Jul 31
// Darren Nakamura
Minecraft in space isn't exactly an original idea. StarForge showed up last year with impressive technology to back up that basic conceit and a greater focus on combat. Hadron's Forge starts with some of the same ideas: coll...
3D Sonic 1 on eShop photo
3D Sonic 1 on eShop

3D Sonic The Hedgehog coming to 3DS eShop in Japan


The other side of the rainbow
May 12
// Tony Ponce
It's been a while since any region outside of Japan received a new 3D Classics touch-up on the 3DS eShop. You may think that the only difference between the originals and their 3D remakes is the added stereoscopic effect, but...
ATV Wild Ride 3D photo
ATV Wild Ride 3D

ATV Wild Ride 3D is on sale this week


$5.99 on the 3DS eShop
Apr 26
// Chris Carter
Despite the fact that I had a fairly lukewarm experience with ATV Wild Ride 3D, the fact of the matter is it delivers for racing fanatics, and has a working online component. So if you've been eying it recently, you can grab ...
Did you hear that Zach photo
Did you hear that Zach

Deadly Premonition PS3's pre-order bonuses detailed


From releasing into obscurity to retail-specific pre-order bonuses!
Mar 29
// Steven Hansen
Deadly Premonition: Director's Cut comes out next month (4/30) on PS3 and it will offer retailer-specific pre-order bonuses, which is a little bit of an oddity for a game getting its unexpected second life. Almost takes the s...
3D Super Hang-On photo
3D Super Hang-On

Japan gets to rev its 3DS with 3D Super Hang-On


What a view
Mar 19
// Raz Rauf
The Sega Genesis classic Super Hang-On is getting a 3D makeover for the 3DS, due out on Nintendo's eShop on March 27 for 600 Yen. Following on from Sega's first 3D re-release of 3D Space Harrier, you can play Super Hang-On us...

Nintendo must pay $30M due to 3D patent infringement

Mar 13 // Allistair Pinsof
"We are thankful to the jurors for their diligence and hard work," Joe Diamante, Tomita's lawyer, said in an e-mail sent to Reuters. "It has been a honor to represent Mr. Tomita and to protect his invention." Nintendo replied with a statement given to Polygon: "Nintendo is confident that the result will be set aside. The jury's verdict will not impact Nintendo's continued sales in the United States of its highly acclaimed line of video game hardware, software and accessories, including the Nintendo 3DS. Nintendo has a long history of developing innovative products while respecting the intellectual property rights of others." U.S. jury finds Nintendo liable for patent infringement [Reuters via Polygon]
Nintendo lawsuit photo
Sony inventor claims Nintendo used his tech in 3DS
Today, a federal jury found Nintendo guilty of infringing on a former Sony employee's glasses-free 3D tech with the release of the 3DS handheld. Nintendo is looking at a payout of $30.2 million in compensatory damages. Invent...

Talking Deadly Premonition: Director’s Cut with SWERY

Jan 29 // Steven Hansen
Deadly Premonition: The Director’s Cut (PlayStation 3) Developer: Access Games Publisher: Rising Star Games Release: April 2013 From the onset, things are looking good. We funnel into a room and shake hands with SWERY and Tomio Kanazawa, who does SWERY’s more laborious translating. Kanazawa is a producer and the Vice President of Toybox Inc., where he works with Harvest Moon creator Toybox founder Yasuhiro Wada. The two know each other from Marvelous, where Kanazawa was a producer and Wada the eventual CEO. Marvelous published Deadly Premonition in Japan. There’s more than a little luck to the game’s perseverance and eventual release. Kanazawa and SWERY have been working together for some time now and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. At first glance the two seem rather juxtaposed. Kanazawa sits upright in a sensible black blazer and fields questions. SWERY is laid back on the couch as if at a Roman banquet, his eyebrows contorting with life behind black, thick framed glasses. But their great relationship quickly becomes evident. Later in the interview, after talking Revenge of the Killer Tomatoes and even more obscure 80’s flick Gotcha! while driving around in Deadly Premonition, Destructoid video personality and generally debonair gent Spencer Hayes (expect an on camera interview soon) asked if any new in car diatribes were among the game’s new additions. SWERY’s eyebrows emoted further still as Kanazawa explained how SWERY had written a bunch more but, “I had to say ‘no,’ there was not enough time,” he offered, a tad bereft. “He was so upset,” Kanazawa continued, laughing. “He still complains,” Kanazawa smiled as SWERY, who plans to add those lost dialogue pieces to his blog post release, presumably complained a bit more. While driving around we were shown one of the new additions, a response to criticism of the game. The minimap caught flack for being too small in relation to the large environment. Though it looked rather massive on the enormous set the game was being demoed on, it was a surprise to see a translucent version of the minimap then expand further over much of the screen while York was still driving. Cool. The first thing that struck me when I took a look toward the TV was Deadly Premonition’s remarkable sharp, clean title menu. When you start a new game, gone is the difficulty option, the harder iterations of which previously kept some players from completing or continuing with the game. SWERY wants people to play the game, wholly and to the end. The visual upgrade is obvious. As we open up to a mutilated corpse of a girl eerily strung up on a tree, details that were previously lost are for the first time seen, like a clear demarcation of tears on the ghastly face. Mind, it isn’t an entirely rebuilt game. It still shows age and budget, but it also looks damn good. This is a proper director’s cut, of course, not just an HD rebuild. 3D and PlayStation Move support have both been integrated into the game. In the realm of controls, the default scheme has been remapped to better match the expected third-person shooter scheme (right analog to aim and so on; you’re still stuck in one place when shooting). “This game is too unique,” SWERY offered. There’s a concerted effort to appeal to a new audience as well as possible (better visuals, slightly more standardized controls) without compromising the game. Additional scenes, from SWERY, have been added to Director’s Cut. There is a new prologue, for instance, that then cuts right into the introduction fans are familiar with. SWERY also wrote an epilogue that he says will address certain concerns over narrative elements. “It was not difficult to write the new ending,” he said, noting that after three months of discussion he was able to write it in a week.  The pair insists that the additional content was handled so as to “not destroy the original story.” The DLC will not be story-based, either, though further details are being kept under wraps. There haven’t been too many fundamental additions in terms of gameplay beyond fixes and the like, either. When asked if there were any new weapons, Kanazawa responded with a negative, mentioning there were already so many unique weapons, “like a guitar, like a rock star,” at which point SWERY, behind him, pantomimes Pete Townshend going to town on a guitar. With a custom moniker like SWERY (or SWERY65), you might expect a bit of the rock star persona in the chap, but there’s no hint of ego here. Just a calm fluidity, affable nature, a penchant for obscure American culture, and those wild eyebrows that add life to every expression. At one point during the demo SWERY gracefully, silently elevated himself from his laid back position and opened the inexplicably closed air conditioning vent in the slowly overheating room and laid back down. It was strangely cool (pun intended), and relished. Speaking of relish, he loves hamburgers. SWERY’s simultaneously placid and plucky demeanor are a fit for Deadly Premonition’s peaceful, small town vibes. In talking about the town and why he chose to set the game there, he mentioned how its peaceful nature contrasted sharply with the horrific depravity occurring there. Making the normal seem alien is an effective horror tool. “Something you are always watching in your normal life begins turning into horrible things,” Kanazawa translated. But don’t call it a survival horror game. “Sometimes the game is categorized as survival horror but he did not mean for it fall into this genre,” Kanazawa explained. “Solving the mystery is the main part of the game,” he added, likening it to the detective story it is in spite of more otherworldly horror elements. Of course, just breathing in the daily life of the town is a main part of the game, by which you’re breathing in a part of SWERY. There is a squirrel obsessed character in the game because squirrels are uncommon in Japan, but we’re filthy with them. Similarly, one of the times SWERY was here researching for Deadly Premonition he stumbled upon a scene in which two individuals sat separate from each other at a cartoonishly long table. That scene made it straight into the game. If you haven’t played Deadly Premonition yet -- and even if you have -- you owe it to yourself to pick up the Director’s Cut. It’s unlike anything out there and brimming with personality. That the game even exists defies credulity. Countless times the duo was told to stop making it. It was almost cancelled multiple times. It was almost given a rating that would’ve made it unsellable. It had little appeal to the Japanese audience and did poorly there. In spite of this, Deadly Premonition and its creators have persevered. And now we’re getting a full-fledged director’s cut. Do you feel that, Zach? That’s a heartwarming success story in an occasionally bleakly unoriginal industry. It feels good.
Deadly Premonition photo
Gazing into an abyss of hamburgers, eyebrows, and coffee
Destructoid’s love affair with the inimitable, idiosyncratic Deadly Premonition is a point of public record. Jim’s infamous, glowing, 10/10 review turned a lot of people onto the game -- myself included -- and for...

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CES: Latest Oculus Rift prototype makes an appearance


Dev kit looks near final
Jan 08
// Dale North
At CES, Oculus is showing off the latest Rift prototype from the factory of the Kickstarter developer kit that is expected to ship soon. While the latest version of the handmade prototype is being demoed off here, the fancy l...
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NYCC: Puppeteer looks amazing in 3D


Oct 13
// Dale North
I got a fair bit of hands-on time with Puppeteer at New York Comic-Con this weekend, but the best of what I've seen of the game so far was still hands off. And in 3D. Sony was kind enough to give us a peek at a boss fight fro...
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Sony: consumers decided 3D is not important now


So much for being the 'future' of existence
Oct 01
// Jim Sterling
Back in 2009, it seemed everybody was jumping on the 3D bandwagon. Mouthpieces were declaring it the future, publishers were clambering over each other to praise it, and Sony went all-in with 3D PlayStation 3 support. It's sa...
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TGS: Gaming with Sony's HMZ-T2 3D headset


Sep 22
// Dale North
I had the chance to go face-on with Sony's new HMZ-T2 3D headset at Tokyo Game Show this week, putting it to the test as a face-worn gaming display. Sony dedicated a good sized portion of their booth to it this year in a push...
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Kingdom Hearts AR Cards now available at Club Nintendo UK


Aug 24
// Chris Carter
It looks like the "US versus UK" Club Nintendo wars are about to enter another chapter, as our Euro friends are getting a chance to pony up 200 Stars for Kingdom Hearts 3D AR cards.The cards are actually just physical un...
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God of War, inFAMOUS, Ratchet all getting PS Collections


Aug 06
// Jim Sterling
You already knew that Ratchet & Clank was getting an HD Collection of its very own, but Sony has waved a magic wand and conjured new teets on the milky udder of re-releases. On August 28, not only will you be able to pick...

QuakeCon Preview: Going to hell in Doom 3's Lost Mission

Aug 04 // Allistair Pinsof
[embed]232545:44598[/embed] Doom 3: BFG Edition (PC [previewed], Xbox 360, PlayStation 3)Developer: id SoftwarePublisher: Bethesda SoftworksRelease: October 16, 2012MSRP: $39.99Whether out of curved expectations or improvements made to an eight-year-old game, I was surprised to find myself thoroughly enjoying Lost Mission. Though the game still lacks the open space, high enemy count, and ridiculous speed that defined Doom 1 & 2, this new environment brings Doom 3 a bit closer to its heritage. Instead of creeping down dark corridors with a flashlight in hand, I strafed past enemy projectiles while filing the screen with rockets. I didn’t play Doom 3 until 2008 but I was still impressed with its visuals on a PC with max settings. BFG makes the game look even better with a redesigned lighting system and impressive 3D capabilities (for those with the proper hardware to use it). The game looks better than many current releases, yet doesn’t seem all that different than I remember. That’s pretty much all you can ask of a HD re-release. As Jim Sterling said in his E3 preview, BFG Edition makes some minor changes to the combat. Most noticeably, the flashlight is now accessible while carrying a weapon. However, the flashlight has a battery that drains quickly. I personally was a fan of the flashlight in the original, since some memorable moments came from it. One moment had the player defending moving cargo on a track in a pitch black room. The tension between shooting enemies and seeing where the track extends to was unreal. I am worried how this new mechanic will affect that amazing scenario and others like it. Though changes were made, BFG Edition isn’t perfect. One thing that really irked me is the infuriatingly slow reload speed on the double-barreled shotgun. It rendered Doom 2’s defining weapon useless which is a real bummer as a series fan. There are a less lost souls, closet spawns, and other annoying features of the original Doom 3 but this is largely the same game. Well, except for Lost Mission. Lost Mission can be accessed at any time from the main menu. It takes place in Hell and is centered around killing hordes of enemies until the path forward unveils itself. It’s nothing groundbreaking but its the sort of cathartic, violent release that Doom 3 largely neglected to offer the player. It was a real shame too because the game has such amazing gun and enemy design that it begs for these big bombastic battles. Lost Mission gives the player a couple hours worth which may merit the return for some Doom fans. Though this expansion has no new weapons, it does contain modifications of established Doom 3 enemies, including a boss. It's also quite difficult, designed for players who have already mastered the game and its previous expansion. Doom 3 BFG Edition will come with the Xbox Live arcade ports of Doom 1 & 2, Resurrection of Evil expansion, and a revised, visually updated Doom 3. No word on whether the co-op mode exclusive to the Xbox port will be part of the package but one can hope. Though I don’t look forward to going through the slow start of Doom 3, there is still a lot to love about this re-imagining of a bold but flawed shooter. If nothing else, BFG stands as a definitive collection of the series highs and lows, all while trying to make its rough moments a bit more smooth.
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[Destructoid is grabbing its rail gun and heading to Dallas, Texas this weekend for QuakeCon. Stay posted for game news, previews, and strange happenings from the infamous LAN room.] In 2004, Doom 3 was a disappointment. It n...

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Iwata: 3D not quite as popular as it once was


Jul 12
// Jim Sterling
Nintendo president Satoru Iwata has said that the 3D fad might be dying down a little bit, and that while the visual effect makes for better graphics, it will only be a minor part of future gaming generations.  "I think ...
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E3: Star Trek hands-off event was NOT like Disney World


Jun 07
// Tony Ponce
It's kind of unfair to compare Star Trek to Star Wars 1313, and I know I'm only furthering the Star Wars vs. Star Trek rivalry, but there's no way I could not think about my hands-off LucasArts session. Whereas the Star Wars ...
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CES: Gaming with Sony's goofy-ass 3D space visor thing


Jan 12
// Dale North
We saw an early version of Sony's wearable visor television thing at last year's CES and laughed loudly and rudely in Sony's face. Now that silly space visor is a real thing, called the Personal 3D Viewer, model number HMZ-T1...
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Peep at these 3D Mutant Mudds screens on your 3DS


Jan 10
// Tony Ponce
I'm hearing that Renegade Kid's unapologetically retro platformer Mutant Mudds has breached the last defensive line and should be invading the eShop some time in February, if all goes according to plan. Nintendo isn't exactly...

Review: Sony PlayStation 3D Display

Nov 21 // Jim Sterling
Sony PlayStation 3D DisplayManufacturer: SonyReleased: November 26, 2011MSRP: $499.99 The Sony PlayStation 3D Display is light and thin, and can go pretty much anywhere in the house. Easy to assemble with its own stand, the monitor's been designed with usability entirely in mind. Connecting it to a console or PC is as simple as plugging an HDMI cable into both ends. There's very little fiddling around required, especially if you're hooking it up to a PS3, which it was obviously designed for.  With no TV tuner and just two HMDI ports, the monitor's intended purpose as a streamlined, user-friendly console display is self evident. There are few customization options once it's hooked up, either. You can switch between two 3D modes, and there are the usual volume and channel controls, all situated behind the screen. There's no included remote control, which is slightly annoying considering it has no standby mode and will need to be switched manually every time you want to use it. Still, if you hate fiddling around and just want something that can be hooked up and switched on, this thing does the trick.  The screen is reflective, and by that I mean you can see the world in it. My cat cannot leave it alone, as it presents a beautiful mirror image of her to attack. It's up there with the PSP in terms of needlessly glossy screens that put aesthetics above functionality. It certainly looks pretty, but you'll want to be careful about playing it near any light sources, and you'll want to invest in some kitten mittens to stop wayward felines from scratching the hell out of it.  Once plugged in and switched on, you do have a very nice looking 240Hz LCD display. Colors are bright and contrast is pretty solid, and games look rather beautiful on it. The 3D is generally decent, although certain games ghost pretty badly. Dynasty Warriors 7 practically has two characters instead of one running around the battlefield, but Killzone 3 looks really great. The monitor supports Simulview, which uses the glasses to have two players seeing entirely different things on the screen. You can play local co-op with two players having the entire screen to themselves, thanks to the glasses filtering out what the other player can see. Sadly, this trick is restricted to only a handful of Sony titles so far.  The bundled 3D glasses aren't the most comfortable or attractive of items, certainly nowhere near as good as the Nvidia 3D Vision glasses that I'm used to. They feel quite bulky and boast some harsh, angular corners, but they get the job done.  Stereo sound has been built into the monitor, with two prominent speakers on either end. As you might expect from built-in sound, it's not very good and an exterior sound source comes highly recommended. Despite claims of an included subwoofer, games sound tinny and flat. It can get some decent volume on it, but above a certain threshold it just becomes unpleasant to listen to.  The PlayStation 3D Display has an express purpose in mind, and it fulfills that purpose adequately. It's a good looking screen that showcases 3D imagery decently enough, and the added PlayStation branding is certainly going to attract some hardcore fans. Nevertheless, with only a 24" monitor size, its audience is incredibly limited. In fact, I'd say it's limited almost exclusively to small dorm rooms or people who live in tiny, one-room apartments. For those who live in real places, the screen is entirely too small for a decent gaming experience, and certainly does a bad job of capturing a PS3 gaming experience.  Bigger isn't necessarily better, but you're never going to be able to communicate the visual majesty of Uncharted 3 on a screen this small. For the past few years, the PS3 has been about created gorgeous looking games that punch you in the face with explosions or beautiful, big environments. This monitor just cannot do those graphics justice, and I struggle to see the benefit in showing off the PS3's 3D capabilities on something that doesn't adequately exploit the 2D potential of the console.  Furthermore, there are better 3D PC monitors on the market than this one, so I would suggest saving that $500 and going for something a little more versatile. Whether you need a display for console or computer, Sony's new offering just doesn't quite have enough to make its decent price and usability worth investing in.  As I said, if you're really tight on space and want a pretty gaming display that doesn't take up much room, then the Sony PlayStation 3D Display will give you what you need in a pinch. If you have more room or you're looking for a PC monitor, then I would suggest shopping around. There are displays out there far more suited to your needs than this. 
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Sony's love for 3D is no secret, with the company being unable to shut up about the gimmick's future potential. In order to show that potential, the company has taken matters into its own hands to create a PlayStation-branded...

Mario Clash: The first, forgotten 3D Mario game

Nov 11 // Chad Concelmo
For anyone that doesn’t know, the Virtual Boy was Nintendo’s failed videogame console released in 1995 that displayed games in fancy stereoscopic 3D. In fact, it was the first system to display its games in 3D right out of the box! Take that, 3DS! Unfortunately, all of this cool technology was implemented in a horrible way. Unlike the sleek, easy-to-use 3DS, the Virtual Boy was an uncomfortable, ludicrous console. The strange system had players placing their head against a weird goggle/helmet thing and controlling with an admittedly cool boomerang-shaped controller. Too big to be used as a handheld (or faceheld?), the entire setup was ridiculously cumbersome, as the system had to be placed on a table at the perfect height in order to be comfortable. But that wasn’t the worst of it. Because of the 3D technology, all of the games on the Virtual Boy could only be displayed in red, void of any other colors. On top of all this, the discomfort level was so high (be it the headache caused by the red 3D or the neck and back pain caused from hunching over a table) that players could never play for more than a few minutes. The Virtual Boy may go down as Nintendo’s biggest, weirdest disaster. But there was a light at the end of the really red tunnel ... Despite all of the system’s shortcomings, there were actually a couple really great games for the Virtual Boy. The first was Virtual Boy Wario Land -- a really solid, creative platformer -- and the other was Mario Clash. In a refreshing twist, Mario Clash plays much more like the arcade Mario games than the more recent 2D Mario platformers we have all come to know and love. When people mention an “old school” Mario game, they are usually referring to one that plays like Super Mario Bros. Mario Clash is so “old school” that it plays like Mario Bros., the arcade classic that pre-dated Super Mario Bros. by two whole years! In the game, you play as Mario as he navigates a simple series of platforms at various heights, trying to destroy all the enemies in the single-screen level. Putting the 3D effects of the Virtual Boy to good use, Mario can travel between the foreground and background using a set of pipes. Each level consists of various enemies, each having to be taken down in a different way. To do this, Mario must use a turtle shell, which he can either kick from side to side (like in most Mario games), or, in a clever twist, throw between the foreground and background. This is what makes Mario Clash so neat. It is a really cool effect to throw the turtle shell back and forth between two layers of depth, all in 3D. Maybe it was the harmful rays being admitted into my head by the Virtual Boy, but, when I first played Mario Clash, I thought the game looked and played great! The game is very basic, but its solid design, addictive combo-based gameplay, and large collection of levels makes Mario Clash a tough game to put down. Or, step away from. Whatever you call it when you stop playing the Virtual Boy. It may be a little embarrassing to admit, but I still find myself playing Mario Clash every once and a while. Playing the game itself is not the embarrassing part, but nothing is more humiliating than dragging out a Virtual Boy from your closet, sitting down, placing your head in the crazy ass system, and grabbing that funky controller. I think it is physically impossible for someone to look cool playing the Virtual Boy. It is so uncool, that there is a reason no pictures of me playing the Virtual Boy exist. I HAVE BURNED THEM ALL! Looking past all the theatrics, Mario Clash is actually something special. It is a solid game with really fun gameplay, and, most importantly, it was the first 3D Mario game ever -- one that was released 16 years ago! That is an entire new driver’s lifetime before this weekend’s Super Mario 3D Land. That alone is worth celebrating. Once you get past the initial embarrassment of putting your head in a giant pain-making machine, Mario Clash is really fun. I know most of you don’t own a Virtual Boy, but if you are ever hanging out at my house, I will make sure to pull out the system and let you try out the game. You may be surprised by how much fun you actually have with it. Okay, that decides it: VIRTUAL BOY PARTY AT MY HOUSE! Someone bring the aspirin.
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When people complain about getting a headache from playing the 3DS, I want to roll up my old man sleeves, wave my cane, and tell them how much worse it was back in the days of the Virtual Boy. “You think a little headac...

Review: The House of the Dead: Overkill - Extended Cut

Oct 25 // Jim Sterling
The House of the Dead: Overkill - Extended Cut (PlayStation 3)Developer: Headstrong GamesPublisher: SEGAReleased: October 25, 2011MSRP: $39.99 For those who did not play the Wii original, The House of the Dead: Overkill takes the arcade on-rails shooting of the House of the Dead series and transplants it into an over-the-top grindhouse setting, as Agent G and Isaac Washington team up to chase down the nefarious Papa Caesar. Along the way, they'll meet audacious sex object Varla Guns and shoot their way through an army of violent undead mutants and utterly horrific bosses.  Much of the game is unchanged from the 2009 version. You'll defend yourself from incoming mutants using either the PlayStation Move or SIXAXIS controller while the camera does all the movement for you. Bonuses such as concept art, 3D models or music can be unlocked by shooting special items in the environment while health packs, bullet-time power-ups and grenades can also be fired at and collected throughout every stage.  New to Extended Cut are two levels focused around Varla Guns and stripper friend Candy -- Naked Terror and Creeping Flesh. Set in a strip club and slaughterhouse respectively, these stages feature fresh banter between the two extra characters, a selection of new mutants and a pair of previously unseen bosses. These new levels are decent and the bosses are some of the most disgusting ever seen in the series, although they're not quite as challenging as what the established stages offer. Also, the new cutscenes between Varla and Candy are rather offensive with the "dumb bimbo stripper" stereotype portraying Candy as borderline autistic. Her child-like personality is juxtaposed with so many upskirt camera angles that the whole thing comes across as disturbing -- and not in a fun way.  Extended Cut supports 3D (both stereoscopic and anaglyphic) and the game has even retooled itself a little to justify the experience. Stages and boss fights feature new elements that throw the combat right into the player's face, but while these moments might be cool for those wearing 3D glasses, they waste the time of anybody else. They're rather forced and come across as little better than when a 3D movie constantly tosses garbage at the camera in slow motion. It's tacky and excluding, not to mention rather annoying with excessive repetition to the point where even those wearing 3D glasses might get tired of it. Naturally, the game's visuals have been upgraded in the transition from Wii to PS3 so that everything gets an HD lick of paint. That said, it's definitely still a very basic looking game, with awkward animations and simple textures remaining in place. While the HD boost is very welcome, the visual changes aren't amazing to the point of revelation and don't quite do enough to justify a purchase from those who have experienced it on the Wii.  Even with the two new scenarios, Overkill is still a rather short game, able to be beaten in a handful of hours. There's a "Director's Cut" version that unlocks upon completion, extra guns to purchase with in-game cash and several bonus levels to keep things spicy but this is a game designed around replay and will only truly reward those who intend to keep beating the same stages in a bid to top their high scores. That poses a large issue, however -- while Overkill is a lot of fun, Extended Cut has taught me that it's not a game worth playing more than once.  Playing The House of the Dead: Overkill a second time round, I found it significantly less entertaining than it was on the Wii. Much of this is due to the shock value fading away as the endless stream of swearing and sex jokes fails to maintain the element of surprise. Initially hilarious, the vulgarity comes across as rather desperate on a second playthrough. The relative ease and simplicity of the game compared to others in the House of the Dead series if far more evident, too. That does not mean the game will fail to amuse new players. What it does mean, however, is this isn't a game I feel fans of the original need to play. The visual boost is nice but not overly significant, the extra levels are nothing to write home about and the new 3D elements are annoying more than complimentary. Those who played Overkill in 2009 won't miss anything of great value by skipping over this new iteration.  However, those who are yet to experience a game so foul it broke a world record for most F-bombs in a game will likely carve out a portion of entertainment from the experience. At the very least, it gives PlayStation Move owners a damn solid game to enjoy and one might imagine that Move owners are desperate for anything at this point. That said, the fact that even SIXAXIS controllers are supported means that any PS3 owner can enjoy it.  For those fresh to Overkill's saucy blend of violence and crude humor, The House of the Dead: Overkill - Extended Cut is a fun little game that will soak up a few hours and provide some laughs along the way. Those who have been to the rodeo before, however, don't need to get on the horse again. In fact, I'd go so far as to say that the Wii version is better for not shoving the 3D gimmickry down anybody's throat and providing a more streamlined experience without the addition of that infuriating Candy character. Whatever version you play, you only need one, because this is a game that just isn't as much fun the second time around.
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The House of the Dead: Overkill is one of my favorite Wii games. Not because it's of the quality of its gameplay or its narrative depth, but because it's one of the most gloriously stupid productions ever committed to disc. F...

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The DTOID Show: It's our Saints Row 3 EXTRAVAGAZMO!


Oct 19
// Tara Long
Good news, everyone! The Destructoid Show is back for our 215th episode EXTRAVAGAZMO! It's a lot like a regular episode, except we add the word 'extravagazmo' at the end to make it sound interesting! On today's extravagazmo,...
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Sony 3D display: Available Nov 13, FAQ


Oct 19
// Dale North
I want that Sony 3D gaming display. I want it bad. I've wanted it from the moment I saw it at E3 this year. It's finally coming out, with the release date set for November 13. This is the easy way into 3D gaming. For $499 you...
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Nintendo partners with DreamWorks for 3DS videos


Oct 04
// Dale North
Nintendo has signed a deal with DreamWorks Animation to bring their videos to the 3DS...in stunning 3D. Kicking this partnership off will be a couple of Halloween-themed animated shorts, the first of which, a "Monsters vs. Al...
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Study says 51 percent of gamers are against 3D consoles


Sep 29
// Dale North
I'm not against 3D consoles; I just don't want one. You can have one -- sure. If it doesn't hurt your eyes and scramble your brain like it does for me, enjoy.  Games comparison and marketplace site Playr2.com h...
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The House of the Dead on PS3 may make your eyes hate you


Sep 27
// Liam Fisher
The nostalgia-fest that is The House of the Dead: Overkill - Extended Cut for PS3 continues with Sega's announcement that the game will support not only Sterescopic 3D on your fancy new display, but also the anaglyphic 3...

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