hot  /  reviews  /  video  /  blogs  /  forum

It won't be easy to release console games in China with all the censorship rules

5:30 PM on 04.23.2014 // Steven Hansen
  @dtoidsteven

But it will still probably make some people a lot of money while I worry about paying rent

China has lifted the ban on foreign console sales, opening up a potentially huge market (if not per capita, then by volume). There's money to be made, but Chinese regulations aren't going to make it entirely easy.

Games in Asia picked up on a a Shanghai government release that dictates rules for foreign game makers. For example, just to sell consoles in China, companies, "have to work with a local partner and operate out of the Shanghai Free Trade Zone," which doesn't seem too hard.

But things get more difficult when it comes to the games themselves. "All games will have to be approved by the 'culture department in charge,'" which Games in Asia explains, "refers to the local Shanghai government culture department, not the probably-more-strict national Ministry of Culture." Thankfully, this approval process will take less than 20 days and games that aren't approved will be returned with a reason for disapproval.

It all sounds pretty good. China clearly wants in on what is fast becoming the most moneyed industry and I'm sure the bigs want access to that huge population. Things might get a bit disappointing for fans when it comes to specific instances of censorship, though, which could bar a lot of titles from entry. The list below includes content that isn't allowed.

  • Gambling-related content or game features
  • Anything that violates China’s constitution
  • Anything that threatens China’s national unity, sovereignty, or territorial integrity.
  • Anything that harms the nation’s reputation, security, or interests.
  • Anything that instigates racial/ethnic hatred, or harms ethnic traditions and cultures.
  • Anything that violates China’s policy on religion by promoting cults or superstitions.
  • Anything that promotes or incites obscenity, drug use, violence, or gambling.
  • Anything that harms public ethics or China’s culture and traditions.
  • Anything that insults, slanders, or violates the rights of others.
  • Other content that violates the law

Obviously a lot of vagueness there and rules that could knock out large swaths of the AAA market.

China releases censorship rules for console games, and there are a lot of them [Games in Asia]




 Reblog (or) Blog Reply

Steven Hansen, Features Editor
 Follow Blog + disclosure dtoidsteven Tips
Steven watches anime & sports, buys meat out of trucks, dates a Muppet, and is only good at cooking. He stands before you bereft of solace and well on the road to perdition. ('^ω^) more   |   staff directory

Get more destructoid:   We're indie-run, blogging for the love of it, and our site will always be free. Optionally, you can support us and get: (1) Faster pages from our cloud server (3) Wide(r)screen (3) No big ads on Dtoid, Japanator, Tomopop, or Flixist (4) Auto contest entries, and (5) Dibs on betas & downloads. Try it out

 Setup email comments

Unsavory comments? Please report harassment, spam, and hate speech to our moderators, and flag the user (we will ban users dishing bad karma). Can't see comments? Apps like Avast or browser extensions can cause it. You can fix it by adding *.disqus.com to your whitelists.


  Around the web (login to improve these)




Back to Top


We follow moms on   Facebook  and   Twitter
  Light Theme      Dark Theme
Pssst. Konami Code + Enter?
You may remix stuff our site under creative commons w/@
- Destructoid means family. Living the dream, since 2006 -