Quantcast
Indie Nation #36: Karoshi 2 - Destructoid




Game database:   #ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ         ALL     Xbox One     PS4     360     PS3     WiiU     Wii     PC     3DS     DS     PS Vita     PSP     iOS     Android


Indie Nation #36: Karoshi 2


9:02 PM on 10.17.2008
Indie Nation #36: Karoshi 2 photo



Karoshi 2.0 is the following things:

-Insane

-Clever

-Hilarious

-Rule-breaking

-Free, and downloadable here.

Since much of Karoshi 2.0's charm comes from its ability to consistently surprise and befuddle the player, I won't say anything more. It's really fun, really original, and the best Karoshi game ever (in other words, don't bother with the first one, Karoshi Factory, or the online flash adaptation until you've finished Karoshi 2.0).

Hit the jump for a more detailed explanation of why this game kicks butt, but be warned -- you will be spoiling a lot of the fun for yourself, should you do so.

The sequel to Karoshi (Japanese for "death by overwork"), Karoshi 2.0 has one goal, spread throughout 42 levels and a boss fight: kill yourself. Find a way to throw yourself on spikes, shoot yourself in the face, or crush yourself under some boxes. Whatever you gotta do to end your own life, that's how you win.

The first half of the game plays almost exactly like the original Karoshi, which is to say it's full of cute block pushing, switch pulling, and bullet bouncing puzzles. That's great and all, and was definitely fun enough to sustain the original Karoshi's humble running time, but Karoshi 2.0 thankfully begins to get rather bored with itself about a dozen rooms in.

For no apparent reason, and with little to no explanation, Karoshi 2.0 devotes the rest of its levels to breaking the fourth wall whenever and however possible.

And it's awesome.

Since all but one of the game rules (namely, the suicide goal) begin changing from room to room, the player is put in a state of constant, bemused confusion. You'll trek across a level full of pits and small platforms just to get to a blue button which, when pressed, will teleport you back to the beginning of the level. You'll be given cryptic instructions which seem to make no real sense until you actually begin to follow them. You'll even have to use the damned pause menu to solve certain levels.

ere

Karoshi doesn't really adhere to a particular design philosophy or even deliver consistent gameplay, and that's what makes it so enthralling. It's a game that hates conventional rules and limitations: so what if custom dictates you shouldn't have to insert a music CD into your disk drive in order to solve a puzzle? Even if it's so mind-bending a solution that you might not think of it without a walkthrough, it's weird, unexpected, and startlingly imaginative, so Karoshi 2.0 does it. By comparison, other puzzle games seem square.

The only problem, I think, might be that the solutions are so off-the-wall that many players will resign themselves to assuming that whenever they come across a particularly difficult puzzle, it involves some degree of insanely lateral thinking like editing the command line of the game's executable or something, and will quickly rush to a walkthrough and have all the magic spoiled for them.

I'd be lying if I said I didn't end up running to a walkthrough after getting about 60% through the game, and, as is always the case with walkthroughs, I became far too reliant on the guide and used my own skills of deduction less and less as the puzzles got harder and harder. I feel like it's possible I would never have solved something like the music CD puzzle without looking it up online, but I have a sneaking suspicion that I'm just trying to comfort myself from the reality that if I had, it'd be one of the most brick-shittingly awesome solutions to a videogame puzzle I'd ever encountered.

erere

Either way, Karoshi 2.0 is one of the only games of its ilk I can think of. The next Karoshi game, Karoshi Factory, reverts to the traditional puzzles of the first game only you control several characters instead of just one. I really love fourth-wall-breaking gameplay, though, and I'd really love to see more of it (I pray that, given the plot and marketing campaign, Matt Hazard will include a lot of this metagaming awesomeness). 

Once again, get Karoshi 2.0 here.






Comments not appearing? Anti-virus apps like Avast or some browser extensions can cause this.
Easy fix: Add   [*].disqus.com   to your software's white list. Tada! Happy comments time again.

Did you know? You can now get daily or weekly email notifications when humans reply to your comments.



Indie Nation: Evoland photo
Indie Nation: Evoland
6:00 PM on 12.08.2012


Indie Nation: Zineth photo
Indie Nation: Zineth
4:00 PM on 11.03.2012


Indie Nation: Venus Patrol games photo


Indie Nation: To the Moon photo
Indie Nation: To the Moon
4:00 PM on 08.25.2012


Indie Nation: Ergon/Logos photo
Indie Nation: Ergon/Logos
12:00 PM on 08.29.2009






Platform games

8:30 AM on 09.22.2014
Mighty No. 9's beta just got a new level

Some time ago the Mighty No. 9 beta hit Steam. It consisted of one level, and the developers weren't sure if they were going to add anything more to it. Well that day has come, so boot up your game and you'll find yet a...more



1:00 PM on 09.19.2014
Nice! Housemarque's Outland is coming to Steam

Back in 2011, Super Stardust HD and Resogun developer Housemarque released an action-platformer called Outland for Xbox Live Arcade and PlayStation Network. It's coming to Steam on September 29, priced at $9.99/£6,99, ...more



12:30 PM on 09.19.2014
Thomas Was Alone hopping on over to PlayStation 4

Thomas Was Alone is making the leap to PS4 later this year, Curve Studios announced this week. The PS4 version will feature cross-buy compatibility with the PS3 and Vita iterations, so veterans will be able to upgrade at...more



View all Platform games






Back to Top




All content is yours to recycle through our Creative Commons License permitting non-commercial sharing requiring attribution. Our communities are obsessed with videoGames, movies, anime, and toys.

Living the dream since March 16, 2006

Advertising on destructoid is available: Please contact them to learn more