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RCR: Underground photo
RCR: Underground

River City Ransom: Underground comes to Steam Greenlight with new trailers


More delicious Disasterpeace music!
Aug 23
// Jed Whitaker
It has been nearly two years since River City Ransom: Underground was funded on Kickstarter, and the game has just recently went up for voting on Steam Greenlight with the above new trailer in tow. While you're giv...
Deals photo
Deals

There's finally a deal on Rocket League for PC


Save some money for the happy meal
Aug 21
// Dealzon
Rocket League, one of the current top-selling games on Steam, finally made its way onto third-party retailers. The game is now listed at UK-based Green Man Gaming, and you know what that means: discount time! Rocket League (...
Rick and Morty Dota 2 photo
Rick and Morty Dota 2

Now Rick and Morty can nar-*belch*-rate your Dota 2 matches


Radiant just wiped out the Roshan guy!
Aug 21
// Patrick Hancock
The announcer packs for Dota 2 are easily some of the best purchases available within the free-to-play game. Personally, I go back and forth between the Stanley Parable and Bastion announcers. Not only are the...

Review: Fingered

Aug 21 // Nic Rowen
Fingered (PC)Developer: Edmund McMillen and James IdPublisher: Edmund McMillen and James IdRelease Date: August 18, 2015MSRP: $1.87 Fingered, is a deduction game made by Edmund McMillen (Super Meat Boy, The Binding of Isaac) and his frequent collaborator James Id. Which means its a messed up deduction game. Fingered casts you as a detective/executioner determined to clean up this city by taking the shaky, confused, half-contradictory descriptions of criminals from a bunch of weirdo busybodies and fingering somebody with them (in the accusatory sense of the word). Find the person who fits the description best, put them in the chair, and throw the switch on them yourself. Give due process the finger. You start with a line-up of scumbags and shady characters. They all look guilty of something. Look at them, shuffling nervously under a flickering light, holding tiny number cards in front of them like flimsy shields. Who could it be? You can practically smell the flop sweat, the fear.   You go over the witness's clues again confirming the most important facts, what they know they know. The suspect is definitely a heavyset man, so you can let the skinny-boys go. He was probably wearing something hippy-ish (what counts as a hippy these days? Does the witness mean “hipster?”) He's maaaybe kind of a jock? (a fat hippy jock? The hell does that look like?) You do your best to ignore the “um's” and “er's” of indecision, the inherent haziness of memory. It's only a man's life on the line. NBD, right? Try to knock this out before lunch, it's nachos and wings in the cafeteria today -- finger food. One by one you winnow it down, until there’s just two suspects left. They both fit the profile, they're both so similar. But there is at least one big difference between them, one is going to go home while the other will never breath free air again. Which one is up to you. Pick one. Damn one. FINGER one. Whoops, wrong guy.   You get one freebie in Fingered. Sending a single innocent man to the chair will be swept under the rug, but fry up a second one and it's time to turn over your badge and finger gun. This is the likely outcome for most games of Fingered, there are 21 randomized cases to close (the suspects and clues are different each time out) and its so easy to finger the wrong guy. Especially since each witness throws their own curve ball into the mix. Negative Nancy describes everything in loopy double-negatives to trip you up. Bigot Barney has some obvious prejudices you should probably factor in before taking his testimony at face value. And forget about the non-human witnesses, those guys just don't get it at all. After about the tenth criminal, your job gets significantly harder. The witnesses clues get more confusing while external pressures like time-limits and vision obscuring accidents hinder your investigative efforts. The line-up of bizarre, procedurally generated suspects grows longer and stranger. It will take a sharp, quick eye to spot out the telltale details to make your case. It wouldn't be a game by Edmund McMillen if he didn't slide in a few cheeky references to some of his other games. Eagle eyed detectives will spot the occasional guest star or celebrity cameo in the line-up ranging from Meat Boy himself, to other more vilified characters like Charles Manson and Phil Fish. Always a pleasure to finger a familiar face. It would be easy to write Fingered off as weird for the sake of weird. It has a bizarre premise and is presented with the kind of perpetually adolescent gross-out art style of a lot of McMillen's games. It's scored with positively hypnotic jazz and narrated by a guy who sounds like the protagonist of Dragnet strung out on painkillers. It IS weird. But, it's also darkly subversive. A gallows humor take on a kind of justice that really did imprison and execute a lot of innocent people based on dubious descriptions and contrived conjecture. It's not belabored, but there is a bit of a message behind the poop jokes and easy double entendres. It's smarter than you might think at first glance. The randomized criminals and clues combined with the idiosyncrasies of the various witnesses can result in some tricky logic puzzles, line-ups that will leave you stumped. But it never seems unfair. Despite the randomized nature of the game, the perp always seems obvious in retrospect and it never feels like the game is cheating (except possibly the last witness, but it's a joke I won't spoil). Fingered is a pinky-sized bit of fun. It's not hard to get everything you need from the game in a single night of sleuthing, but at the bargain price of $1.87, it feels worth it. A wonderfully weird, smart little game for less than the price of a cup of coffee: you could call it steal or five-fingered discount if that kind of wordplay tickled you. Really though, in all sincerity, I think you should get Fingered.  [This review is based on a retail build of the game purchased by the reviewer.] 
Fingered review photo
Up to my knuckles in justice
Up until very recently, eyewitness testimony was the single most persuasive form of testimony a jury could hear. If someone could stand up in court, jab their accusing little finger at a suspect and say they definitely (well,...

Review: Gryphon Knight Epic

Aug 20 // Jed Whitaker
Gryphon Knight Epic (Linux, Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: Cyber Rhino Studios Publisher: Cyber Rhino Studios Released: August 20, 2015MSRP: $12.99  A diverse group of warriors set out on a journey to kill a great dragon, and upon doing so find a stash of treasure; Gryphon Knight Epic's intro is seemingly ripped straight out of J.R.R. Tolkien's writing. The same goes for Tree Stache, a mustached tree character met later in the game. The warriors all find weapons and take them with glee, while the gryphon knight himself, Sir Oliver, takes a shiny amulet. Turns out the weapons are cursed, causing all the characters to let their bad sides take control of them and, wouldn't ya know, the only thing that can cure them is the amulet. Sir Oliver is told this information in pretty plain English by his bad side that presents itself as a shadowy physical incarnation of him, but he doesn't seem to grasp it right away. I think Oliver not grasping what was just told to him was supposed to be funny, but it just wasn't, much like all of the writing in Gryphon Knight Epic. You could guess the story, as it has been told a thousand times: Knight frees all his friends, then faces the ultimate evil. The ending is especially cringeworthy. It abruptly sets up a sequel that surely no one will be clamoring for. On the surface level, Gryphon Knight Epic looks like it could be something new for the genre, but the only things it does original are terrible. If you've played more than one side-scrolling shooter, you've probably realized that most of them have one tiny hitbox where the player can take damage and they are otherwise invulnerable. This is not so in this case. If any part of Sir Oliver touches a projectile or enemy, including the feathers on top of his armor, he takes damage. This wouldn't be such a problem if he weren't such a large sprite to begin with.  [embed]307100:60084:0[/embed] Stages can be played in any order and at any of the three difficulty levels, which should be labeled: way too easy, way too hard, and why would I even bother? As a self-proclaimed seasoned veteran of bullet hell shooters, I found myself having to resort to easy mode. The difficulty mostly comes the aforementioned hitbox size, and the fact that bosses are brutally difficult and even a challenge at times on the easiest difficulty. Most games have boss fights with a pretty recognizable pattern that gives the player a visual cue of an impending attack with time to react. That isn't the case here. One particular boss, a giant frog, will quickly snatch Sir Oliver out of the air and chew him up, taking a large portion of his health with little to no time to try to avoid being attacked.  Upon running out of lives -- a concept that should have died with arcades -- you'll be forced back to the level selection map and will have to either play the whole level over again or half of it depending on how far you made it. While it is nice to have checkpoints in most games, this is the only side-scrolling shooter I can think of with them, as most games just let you continue at the exact screen you're at, costing you power-ups or score. Because of these checkpoints, you'll have the displeasure of repeating the same parts of level multiple times, and who doesn't like repeating entire sections of levels multiple times? Oh, that's right, everyone.  Sir Oliver can be made to look left or right with the press of a button, which is useful as enemies can come from both directions, but the way it is implemented mostly kills the usefulness. Say you're heading to the right and then enemies start to approach from your rear. Pressing the button to turn around to attack those enemies gives them time to approach and causes Sir Oliver to start moving towards them at the same time, thus allowing them to be right on top of him before he can even attack. Often times when battling enemies from both sides and maneuvering around the screen, I found myself unintentionally going the wrong direction, which isn't something you ever want a player to experience. Being able to turn back and go the way you just came from would be useful if the game weren't an overall linear affair. I believe there was only one level that required a bit of backtracking to unlock one of the hidden runes found in each level that grant abilities, better states, and some lore. The runes aren't really worth the time it takes to find them as the benefits are minor and the lore isn't all that interesting.  Each time a boss is defeated, you'll gain another magical weapon that uses a bit of an automatically refilling magic bar. These weapons can be used alongside Sir Oliver's trusty crossbow -- which is automatically spammed by holding the designated button -- and are vital to defeating larger enemies and bosses. They deal a considerable amount of damage after being upgraded. Upgrades can be purchased between levels from the gold earned by killing enemies, opening chests, and freeing prisoners in levels.  After playing for around five and a half hours, I found myself unable to afford most of the upgrades, even though I'd completed all of the levels because every time you die, you lose ten percent of your overall gold. Each time Sir Oliver gets hit by an enemy, his squires -- miniature helpers purchased from the store -- lose some of their power as well, making them mostly useless unless you somehow manage to never get attacked. Really, the punishments for getting attacked or dying in Gryphon Knight are far too extreme to allow the game to be enjoyable.  Gryphon Knight Epic isn't a great looking or sounding game. It mostly feels like something you would expect to see in the early days of the original PlayStation; the sprites are all right, the backgrounds are bland and repetitive, and the music is forgettable. At one point, I found myself laughing out loud when I noticed a stage set in the snowy mountains with vikings had elephants and rhinos in the background. From then on I started to realize that each level had an enemy or two that just kind of didn't feel like it fit there: a green blob that looked like a Metroid and a tentacled brain monster come to mind. It felt almost like the devs had created these sprites prior to coming up with the game and just decided to put them to use because they had them laying around.  With hitbox resizing, the ability to move in one direction while shooting in another, and some difficulty adjustments, Gryphon Knight Epic could be an okay game. As it stands, it's a messy medieval hodgepodge that you'd be better off avoiding at all costs. Save yourself some money by instead buying some feathers and a fake beak and putting them on your dog. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Review: Gryphon Knight photo
Part bird, part lion, part shit
I've played side-scrolling shooters starring space ships, fairies, gothic lolitas, but never had I played one starring a knight atop a gryphon. "How original," I thought, with fantasies of knightly glory on my mind. "Surely this theme won't be squandered on a poorly-designed game." Boy, was I wrong.

Cute-'em-up photo
Cute-'em-up

Shutshimi is a cute-'em-up about a muscular fish


Rapid rounds
Aug 20
// Jordan Devore
Strong-armed fish crack me up, so I had to give this game a look. It's a cute-'em-up in which levels last around 10 seconds or so, "then the player has ten seconds to pick a power-up from the shop for the next round." Except ...
Left 4 Dead photo
Left 4 Dead

Left 4 Dead survivors return for Zombie Army Trilogy


Typical Valve
Aug 20
// Jordan Devore
The survivors of the Left 4 Dead series are back for a cameo in Zombie Army Trilogy on PC. Folks who own Rebellion's Nazi zombie-shooting game can download a free update through Steam that adds Bill, Francis, L...

Review: RymdResa

Aug 20 // Conrad Zimmerman
RymdResa (Mac, PC [reviewed])Developer: MorgondagPublisher: MorgondagRelease Date: August 20, 2015MSRP: $11.99 RymdResa tells a story of humanity seeking new life for itself in the cosmos, told in three parts. As the game begins, Earth has been destroyed by an asteroid and the player is an explorer roaming a seemingly limitless, procedurally generated universe in search of a planet to colonize and ensure mankind's survival. Successive chapters have the player collecting resources and undertaking a larger journey to a separate universe, each expanding the gameplay with different mechanics and challenges. Early on, the game is about survival and that survival feels very much at risk. This is when RymdResa is at its most entertaining. Launched into space with the only most basic of ships, the player must conserve and protect their resources while traveling to nine sectors or they will die, lost and forgotten. Resources, in this case, means fuel, which doesn't deplete over time of its own accord, only used when the ship's thrusters are employed. Other things you encounter in space do affect your resource count, however. Collisions, mines and attacks from passing ships to can cause a considerable loss, and that's likely to happen quite a bit due to some design aspects working together to make it very difficult to understand how fast your ship is moving and predict collisions. The empty space environment provides little visual context to give that information to the player and a narrow, never changing view distance from the ship makes it such that when objects appear on the screen, they are as likely to fly right into you before a reaction is even possible as creep into the frame. [embed]307050:60067:0[/embed] Frustrating as this is (and it truly is), it also does reinforce the fragility of the player's situation and forces them to take it slow, further dragging out the empty gaps and feeding into the game's overlying thematic tone of helpless melancholy. RymdResa is not subtle about what the game wants the player to feel. Cutscene narration preceding chapters and diary pods produced within them ooze nostalgic regret and longing, delivered by a distant, electronically distorted voice that sounds more like a morose robot than a human. This first chapter in which the player is at their weakest captures that spirit most effectively, but it fades with time and progress. Even the most disastrous attempt to complete a voyage is rewarded in some ways. Players earn skill points with experience levels that can improve the efficiency of resource collection, provide the ability to interact with more environmental objects and help ships to perform better, and these levels carry over across all missions once earned. Spacepoints are constantly being added and subtracted, acting as a form of currency that can be spent to launch voyages with the game's seven other ships, and items to outfit those ships are carried in a general inventory accessible at all times. With these systems, by the time the player makes it through the first chapter and on to the second, they're probably pretty far along in their experience development (which caps out at 40 levels). And, suddenly, the stakes are pretty much gone. A seemingly constant accumulation of items to customize ships begins to provide all manner of attribute bonuses (introducing a whole different problem of inventory maintenance within a system desperate for sorting tools and a constant need to sell off useless junk to make room), so that while you're never invincible, it sure can feel that way. It soon becomes the default to quit a voyage out of a sense of not having anything to do rather than because of a failure to accomplish something. Chapters after the first have objectives which can be approached in a non-linear fashion and incremental progress an ultimately unsuccessful mission accomplishes is retained, removing all sense of urgency. What happens in them isn't all that interesting either, as the player collects "materials" (like resources, but green and serving no function outside of the second chapter's main objective) and faces down inscrutable guardians in a series of two-choice dialogue events where it's rarely clear that there is a right or wrong answer, but you're punished for choosing the wrong one anyway. Vast as the explorable region of the game is, which uses a grid-based system of sectors to indicate player location (the number of which may well be limitless and impossible to chart due to procedural generation), there isn't much one can reliably do within all of that space. In some ways, exploration off the beaten path is thoroughly discouraged despite the many opportunities presented. Teleporters dotted seemingly at random will send you off to a far flung sector, but what's to do once you're there? Drift back through possibly many hundreds of sectors, the vast majority of which will have nothing in them or wander off in some other random direction and hope maybe you come across anything of interest that way. I never have, and it's clear that there's more to this game that I have not experienced. A collection of "Research Notes" is referenced with a menu and there's a whole mechanic designed around using them to craft... something. I've never found one and wouldn't know where to start looking for them. Some people are going to dig into this game, absorb its extremely passive gameplay and have a curiosity which leads them to discover these things that I have not. I'm sure of that. If ambiguity and self-directed discovery are aspects of games you appreciate when they exist, and can handle one where you'll spend most of your time not doing anything, you're the audience RymdResa is looking for. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
RymdResa Review photo
The big empty
"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space." - The Hitchhiker's Guide ...

Team Fortress 2 update photo
Team Fortress 2 update

Team Fortress 2 gets the ball rolling with a new sports-themed game mode


Created by Bad Robot, of all companies
Aug 19
// Ben Davis
Ready for another off-the-wall Team Fortress 2 update? After the addition of bumper cars from last Halloween, it seems anything is possible with this game. Now the multiplayer shooter is getting another shot in the arm with a...
Heat Signature access photo
Heat Signature access

Gunpoint Exclusive Edition now grants access to Heat Signature


Tom Francis is a kind god
Aug 18
// Patrick Hancock
Tom Francis, creator of Gunpoint, is letting certain people alpha test his upcoming game, Heat Signature. Anyone who owns the "Exclusive Edition" of Gunpoint on Steam has access to the new game until August 30. While Mr....
Infinite nest photo
Infinite nest

Trippy widening gyre Circa Infinity dated for September 9


Woah
Aug 14
// Steven Hansen
I know what you're thinking: Circa Infinity is coming out September 9? Competing with Metal Gear Solid V, but coming up a week late? Seems like a tragic misstep. But perhaps not. Maybe a light, digestible game such as this is just what people need to cleanse their palates of The Phantom Pain's inscrutable weirdness.
Ty the Tasmanian Tiger photo
Ty the Tasmanian Tiger

Ty the Tasmanian Tiger 4 releasing on Steam September 18, first three games are also coming to PC


Well ain't that bonza, mate?
Aug 14
// Joe Parlock
Wow, Ty the Tasmanian Tiger is something I haven’t thought about in 10 years. I always thought it was a weird attempt to piggyback on the success Spyro and Crash Bandicoot had during the  generation before. Th...
Deals photo
Deals

Civ: Beyond Earth - Rising Tide pre-order deal shores up free Steam weekend


More to do in Civ: BE
Aug 13
// Dealzon
Update: GMG's deal dropped another $3 to account for the 10% off instant savings. Pre-orders for Civilization: Beyond Earth - Rising Tide (the first expansion) went live today, and you know what that means... deals coupl...
Deals photo
Deals

There's a big Devolver Digital sale on Steam


Hotline, Shadow Warrior, Talos Principle
Aug 13
// Jordan Devore
Devolver Digital has come a long way these past few years. The publisher is holding a weekend sale on Steam that covers Serious Sam and Hotline Miami, sure, but also a wide array of games including Titan Souls, Broforce, OlliOlli, Xeodrifter, and Hatoful Boyfriend. Movies, too. The discounts are up to 90 percent off and valid until Monday, August 17. Devolver Digital Publisher Weekend [Steam]
Half-off bread photo
Half-off bread

Team Fortress 2 also Am Bread, too


Free update and half-off sale
Aug 13
// Steven Hansen
By some cruel crust of fate, I still have not played I Am Bread, though all I would like to do is to go to bread. The game's rye sense of humor is on display here with a Team Fortress 2 level developed in conjunction with Valve and offered as a free update on Steam. The game's also half off in celebration ($6.50), if you have the dough.
Ark sale photo
Ark sale

Amazon has Ark: Survival Evolved cheaper than it has ever been


Even cheaper than that Steam sale
Aug 13
// Brett Makedonski
Anyone in the market for some more dinosaurs in their video games might be happy to know that Amazon has Ark: Survival Evolved discounted deeper than it has ever been before. The Early Access title has been on digital st...
Skyrim modding photo
Skyrim modding

Skyrim Script Extender is now on Steam, so you can easily fix Skyrim


Weird it's not on the Workshop though
Aug 13
// Joe Parlock
If you’ve done any level of Skyrim modding, you’ve probably come across Skyrim Script Extender. It’s an add-on which massively increases what mods can impact, and a lot of more intensive game-changing mods r...
Finger me daddy photo
Finger me daddy

Super Meat Boy's designer will let us get Fingered for cheap on August 18


New game on Steam for $1.87
Aug 12
// Jed Whitaker
Edmund McMillen, the designer of Super Meat Boy, has announced that his new game Fingered will release on Steam next Tuesday for $1.87, and it looks pretty awesome. The game was created in collaboration with James Id, t...
Terraria photo
Terraria

Terraria hits Mac and Linux at long last


PC save files are compatible
Aug 12
// Jordan Devore
Several years later, Terraria is still going strong. After a round of open beta testing, the Mac and Linux versions of the popular sandbox game have launched. If you're a Windows player, you won't need to pay for these new po...
Steamboy photo
Steamboy

Portable 'Steamboy' Steam machine coming late 2016


$300 pre-sale price
Aug 12
// Steven Hansen
Do you have $300 and less cents? Want to replace that Nvidia Shield that catches fire and is basically a big 'ol Ouya? The first batch of "Steam machines" -- computers with living room form factors meant to rival traditional ...
Humble Bundle photo
Humble Bundle

The Humble Namco Bundle bonus games are, uh, yeah


Star Trek and Beware Planet Earth!
Aug 11
// Jordan Devore
I said I'd hold off on the Humble Bandai Namco Bundle until the bonus games were announced, and that was for the best. The package now includes Digital Extremes' middling Star Trek and a tower defense game called Beware Planet Earth! for folks who pay more than the average. No thanks! If you don't own Pac-Man Championship Edition DX+, strongly consider chipping in for that.
Layers of Fear photo
Layers of Fear

Layers of Fear explores the horror of painting


Coming soon to PC
Aug 11
// Jordan Devore
Before watching this trailer for Layers of Fear, you should know that it's a horror game about a painter who has lost his sanity, and "each move of the camera can change your surroundings." There. Go watch it.
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Steam discounts Japanese indies for Comiket 88


Doujin deals abound
Aug 10
// Kyle MacGregor
Valve is always looking for an excuse to throw a sale, and this week Steam has deep discounts on Japanese indie games. The occasion? This summer's Comiket is taking place over the weekend. Comiket (Comic Market) is a biannual...
Stasis photo
Stasis

Stasis shows sci-fi horror from a different perspective


Isometric adventure game releasing soon
Aug 10
// Jordan Devore
More sci-fi horror games? Sign us up. This one, Stasis, was made possible thanks to crowdfunding. It's an isometric point-and-click adventure game with shades of Event Horizon (cue mental images of a sliced-up Sam Neill). Ahe...
The Phantom Pain photo
The Phantom Pain

Metal Gear Solid V 1080p PS4, 900p Xbox One and PC system requirements


4K Phantom Pain on PC
Aug 10
// Steven Hansen
Buried in last last week's PS4/PS3/360/One/PC comparison shots of Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain (they all look great!) are the underlying technical performance of the five versions. The PS3 and 360 versions both run at...
 photo

Friday Night Fights - We Will Not Fall!


Game with the Dtoid Community!
Aug 07
// Mike Martin
There's been changes lately and some problems in the forums as I'm sure some of you are aware. Even with the forums closing, FNF will not go quietly into the night though. We will stand, we will fight and we will fuck. Give m...

Dungeon League turns RPG action into a bloodsport

Aug 07 // Alessandro Fillari
[embed]297396:59857:0[/embed] After a dungeon master expresses disappointment with seeing that heroes have lost interest in his labyrinths full of traps and other dangers, he decides to turn his creations into a competitive sport in order to attract adventurers seeking gold and glory. With the creation of the Dungeon League, travelers from all over flock to his randomly conjured deathtraps in order to acquire gold, defeat the opposition, and come out on top. Designed with local multiplayer in mind, Dungeon League re-contextualizes the dungeon-crawl setting and shapes it into an old-school RPG battle arena. From the standard deathmatch variants, territory capture, to the more unusual race gametype, which tasks players with dashing through checkpoints around the dungeon while taking swipes at the opposition, the game does a lot of cool things to the roguelike gameplay system. As you acquire gold and experience, you can level up between matches, upgrade skills, and buy new items from the league vendors. In traditional roguelike and MOBA fashion, character growth is all from the ground up in every game, so you'll have to prioritize which areas you want to focus on. In case it wasn't clear, Dungeon League is very self-aware with its approach to the dungeon crawler. There are several different classes to choose from -- such as the traditional archetypes like Warrior, Rogue, and Archer -- to more bizarre classes such as the rainbow-spewing Unicorn. It's a rush to fight through dungeons filled with nasty traps while cutting down hoards of monsters that get stronger with each stage. It'll take a lot to stay a step ahead of the opposing side and become the champion of the Dungeon League, so choose your class wisely. It's not often we get a unique take on the dungeon crawler, especially one that doesn't take itself too seriously. I liked how lighthearted things are in Dungeon League despite all the over-the-top action and bloodshed, and had a blast battling it out with friends. While there are some single-player options where you can battle waves of monsters, the real draw here is multiplayer, and Dungeon League is quite clever in its design. If you're looking for something a bit different that channels the old-school RPG aesthetic, then this is one you'll want to keep an eye on. Dungeon League [Steam Early Access]
Dungeon League photo
Out now on Steam Early Access
What happens when you turn hardcore RPG gameplay, with hints of roguelike elements, into a sport? Imagine having to grind and acquire loot in order to score points and one-up your competition. Sounds pretty wild for an action...

Microsoft on GFWL photo
Microsoft on GFWL

Microsoft: 'Our goal right now isn't to do anything else other than support Steam'


Haha Games for Windows Live
Aug 07
// Chris Carter
Speaking to PC Gamer, Microsoft had a bit to say about the ol' Games for Windows Live and Steam feud. After shuttering the former down in favor of not screwing over its consumers with a bad service, they quickly shifted gears...
Humble Bundle photo
Humble Bundle

Humble Namco Bundle has Dark Souls, Enslaved


Good gift-giving potential
Aug 04
// Jordan Devore
Humble Bundle and Bandai Namco have partnered for a sale on some older games that are still well worth playing. If nothing else, I'd say this is a great way to give the gift of Pac-Man CE. Name your price: Pac-Man Championsh...
Metal Gear Solid V photo
Metal Gear Solid V

MGSV: The Phantom Pain for PC moved up, Metal Gear Online delayed


MGO on PC set for January 2016
Aug 03
// Alessandro Fillari
With less than thirty days until Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain's release, Konami has still been keeping things close to the vest. Which is amazing, considering that the recent extended gameplay demos and videos show...

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