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Deals photo

Green Man Gaming squeezes into sale madness with Thursday deals

Aka Black Friday / Cyber Monday sale
Nov 26
// Dealzon
PC gamers aren't left out in the cold this Black Friday, what with the Steam Autumn sale and a myriad of other ongoing sales. Green Man Gaming is squeezing into the "me too" pie with a fresh batch of deals during its wee...
Sup Holmes photo
Sup Holmes

Rally 'round the family with Runbow and Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime

Sup Holmes every Sunday at 2:30pm EST!
Nov 25
// Jonathan Holmes
[Sup Holmes is a weekly talk show for people that make great videogames. It airs live every Sunday at 4pm EST on YouTube, and can be found in Podcast form on Libsyn and iTunes.] With Thanksgiving almost u...
Steam sale photo
Steam sale

Steam's autumn sale is different this year

Prepare to scroll
Nov 25
// Jordan Devore
Send help! It's that deal-filled time of year when I have far too many browser tabs open. As you might have noticed from the new storefront illustration, Steam began its autumn sale today (officially, it's the "Exploration Sa...
Tokyo School Life photo
Tokyo School Life

A couple of age-gated visual novels are on sale on Steam

Up to 40% off...the price
Nov 25
// Steven Hansen
You know, those weird ass god damn Clannad eyes got me thinking; I'm not sure about what, but I'll get back to you if I figure it out. Anyways, a couple more visual novels are on Steam and these ones at a more reasonable pric...

Austrania photo

Xbox 360 shmup Strania - The Stella Machina sups on Steam

From Ikaruga co-developers
Nov 24
// Steven Hansen
Who wants to read a Destructoid review from 2011? Strania - The Stella Machina has come to Steam today apropos of nothing (the product page notes it's developer G.rev's "long-awaited debut on Steam," by whom I do not know). ...
Clannad releases photo
Clannad releases

Clannad visual novel on Steam, briefly outsells Call of Duty

Cheap this week, too
Nov 24
// Steven Hansen
Visual novel Clannad released on PC in Japan back in 2004 and since spawned various adaptations, including an anime series. Publisher Sekai Project ran a Kickstarter last year for an official English release that was funded ...
Fallout update notes photo
Fallout update notes

You can nab the first Fallout 4 update on Steam

I thought you'd be bigger
Nov 23
// Jordan Devore
Bethesda has released a beta version of the first Fallout 4 update on PC, and if you were expecting a bunch of sweeping changes and bug fixes, well, give it some time. New Features Number pad keys can now be used for remappi...
Last Horizon photo
Last Horizon

Take a fateful trip beyond the sun in Last Horizon

Goodbye Earth, hello yawning black death
Nov 23
// Jonathan Holmes
Last Horizon is a space exploration game on Steam, Android, and iTunes where it's up to you to find a new home for the entire human race. It has the underlying sense of loneliness and dread that you might find in films like ...
Slain photo
I've been keeping an eye on Slain!, a PC project (and PS4 + Xbox One, eventually, with a possible Vita edition) that's going to be released soon on Steam. Well, it was going to be released soon, as developer Wolf Brew Games h...

Review: Mayan Death Robots

Nov 21 // Patrick Hancock
Mayan Death Robots (PC)Developer: Sileni StudiosPublisher: SOEDESCO PublishingReleased: November 20, 2015MSRP: $14.99  Mayan Death Robots pits two giant robots against each other as a television sport for other robots, I suppose, to watch. Each season of this television show chooses a new planet, and it just so happens that this season is on Earth around the 1500s. The premise is loose and really only serves to usher the player from one mission to the next, but it's definitely cute. Mayan Death Robots is a 1v1 match that plays out similar to the classic Worms games. Players pick one of the eight unique robots and are then plopped into a battlefield. The objective of each game is to destroy the opponent's Core, which is a small box somewhere behind them. In the way, however, is plenty of terrain as well as the enemy robot. Each robot has two types of attacks, the ability to jump, and the ability to create new terrain. That last bit is interesting; each player can create terrain in the form of Tetris blocks anywhere within a certain radius of their robot, as long as it's not floating mid-air. This allows some interesting defensive play in a game that would otherwise be entirely offensive. There's a limit to the amount of blocks, and using it consecutively yields less and less blocks. [embed]321771:61215:0[/embed] Turns happen simultaneously and publicly. There's a short time period to choose an action, then another time period to aim said action, then both players' actions happen at once. However, knowing what an opponent is going to do doesn't mean it can be stopped. If a player sees their opponent shooting straight at the core, that shot will go off. Shooting the ground beneath them or the robot itself won't affect anything since both shots are fired at once. Tiny pixelated Mayans roam about on each player's side, worshiping the giant robot from the sky. Killing the enemy's Mayans will grant a bonus to the explosion size of the player, but it's rarely worth it to fire specifically at Mayans; it is usually just an added benefit of firing at something else. Mayans will also attack the enemy robot if they stand nearby. This is legitimately useful, since they are constantly doing damage while the turn timer is ticking down, and it prevents the opponent from jumping right next to the Core and blowing it to bits. Every so often, an item wheel will spin and award both players randomly selected items. These items are one-time use, but provide some variety to the gameplay that can start to feel tedious after long play sessions. The game incentivizes the player to use the item quickly, since they are lost upon death. If a player is dead when the wheel spins, they do not receive the item. The core gameplay is great. Playing against another human can lead to intense back-and-forth matches. Multiplayer supports two players locally (no online) with either gamepads or the keyboard. It's a nice feature that both players can use the keyboard, since not everyone has controllers for their PC. An odd omission is the total lack of mouse support, even in menus. In a game that focuses on aiming precise shots, it would have been a boon to be able to use the mouse. Perhaps the most unfortunate aspect is that players are forced to unlock the playable robots and the more interesting items. Of the ten robots available, six are unlocked from the start and the rest are acquired through the campaign. While I understand the necessity to give the player a feeling of progression, those who buy the game and just want to play with a friend will be disappointed. Luckily, the campaign can be played through with a buddy. All of the robots feel different from each other, despite the only difference being their two attacks. Some of them have special properties, like having their attacks become more powerful the longer they are in the air, or being able to shoot through certain terrain. While they feel unique, all robots play very similarly: get into a position that your attacks benefit from, and shoot away. Each match has the potential to be an intense back-and-forth or a complete slog; it all depends on the players (or AI) involved. The campaign is set up as a series of over 30 "episodes." There is no tutorial, but players will likely pick up the mechanics quickly. Occasionally, these episodes will modify the standard gameplay by adding stage hazards. These hazards tend to be either incredibly annoying or completely useless. Only rarely do they affect gameplay in a unique, interesting way. There is also an occasional stage boss, which removes the cores from the map and asks both players to destroy the monster. This is great, if you're playing with another human. Cooperating with the AI is downright awful. You see, the boss has to be "summoned" by performing certain actions on the map, but the AI doesn't give a shit. The AI is more concerned with destroying the player's core, making it a huge pain to even get the boss to appear most of the time. If the match ends before the boss is summoned, the player must restart the level. The bosses each have their own mechanics, which are very hit or miss. Some bosses, like the map modifiers, are more annoying than they are worth. Plus, after defeating a boss, the cores come back and the match continues like normal. It's a strange cooperative-to-competitive swing that just feels random. Other than the boss levels, there is no way to lose a level while playing the campaign. Sure, the AI can win, but it doesn't matter, the player progresses to the next stage anyway. This makes sense if two humans are playing each other, since one will always win, but not when playing solo. There's no incentive for a single player to all. There are no rankings, stars, or scores to do better in, there's no leaderboards, nothing. A solo player could go through each level and lose, as long as they summon the boss in the boss levels, and progress through the entire campaign and unlock everything.  There's also a Versus mode which is as straightforward as they come. Players can only compete on the modified maps by going through the campaign and selecting that specific episode to play on, but it would have been great to be able to choose these modifiers from a list in Versus mode, potentially mixing and matching some to create some zany situations. Unfortunately, nothing of the sort exists. Versus is as vanilla as it gets. Despite my enjoyment of the game mechanically, I cannot recommend Mayan Death Robots to anyone looking for a worthwhile single-player experience. For those wanting another entertaining local multiplayer game, however, it provides some unique strategic gameplay. It likely won't keep players enthralled for hours on end, but serves as a great addition to any local-multiplayer library.
Mayan Death Robots review photo
Maybe they're friendly death robots...
I really enjoyed my time with Mayan Death Robots at PAX East this year. My buddy and I played a few matches and left anticipating its eventual release. Now that it is released, I was excited to jump in and see the final ...

Doujin bundle photo
Doujin bundle

Humble Weekly brings back the Japanese indies

Good variety
Nov 21
// Jordan Devore
The doujin scene isn't my usual beat, but Astebreed is cool as hell and I like sharing deals whenever possible. As such, hey, you may want to take a look at this Japan-centric Humble Weekly Bundle. No rush! You've got several...
Steam sales photo
Steam sales

The next big Steam sales will have more stable discounts

So long, daily and flash deals
Nov 20
// Jordan Devore
Valve is tweaking the way it handles major sales on Steam -- at least the next pair. The upcoming autumn sale (November 25 - December 1) and winter sale (December 22 - January 4) will not feature the limited-time daily deals ...

Friday Night Fights - Destroy the Rebel scum!

Game with the Dtoid Community!
Nov 20
// Mike Martin
I got to play Battlefront at my brothers... It is not the best... It may not even hold a candle to the old ones (2 ftw!). Holy fuck though. The sound, the feel and the looks? Damn. I might have to take this brain-dead, hunk o...
Giveaway!  photo

Game with the devs of WH40K: Regicide again!

And maybe score some keys or hoodies!
Nov 20
// Mike Martin
Hammerfall Publishing, the awesome folks behind Warhammer 40K: Regicide, want to play with you again! We somehow didn't deter them last time! What is Regicide you ask (again, I might add)? It's about the bloodiest, most ama...
Lightning Returns photo
Lightning Returns

Lightning Returns is coming to Steam on December 10

Now PC players can finish the trilogy
Nov 20
// Joe Parlock
The Final Fantasy XIII series has long been over for console players. Lightning Returns originally released back in 2013, and since then the fanbase’s attention has been split between Final Fantasy XIV, Final Fanta...
RIP Afro Samurai 2 photo
RIP Afro Samurai 2

Afro Samurai 2 pulled from PSN, publisher apologizes for game

Further episodes cancelled
Nov 19
// Jed Whitaker
Update: The game is no longer available to purchase on Steam. Remember Afro Samurai 2? I'm sure our very own Chris Carter wishes he could forget after reviewing the game. He gave it the lowest score possible, citing bugs and ...
Hotline photo

This Hotline Miami sale supports the musicians

Both games and OSTs discounted on Steam
Nov 19
// Jordan Devore
The music for Hotline Miami has stuck with me like few other video game soundtracks. Carpenter Brut, M|O|O|N, Perturbator, and Magic Sword all in one brutal, high-octane place. It's exceptional. While the games have been disc...
Payday 2 photo
Payday 2

Overkill: Payday 2 microtransactions are 'not a success if people are angry'

In a long discussion with Steam mods
Nov 19
// Joe Parlock
Sit down and get comfortable, ladies and gentlemen, for the next gripping chapter of the ‘When Will Overkill Stop Being Shitty’ Chronicles begins now! You may remember a while ago that the Payday 2 Steam communit...

Review: Hard West

Nov 18 // Zack Furniss
Hard West (PC [reviewed], Mac, Linux)Developer: CreativeForge GamesPublisher: Gambitious Digital EntertainmentMSRP: $19.99Released: November 18, 2015 Hard West starts off so promising. Instead of one big campaign, it's divvied up into eight little chunks starring different characters. The first one stars a father and his son trying to make their own way in life through a combination of mining for gold and killing the men that would try to stop them. This chapter serves as a tutorial of sorts, teaching you the basics of combat. You have two action points, which you can use to move, shoot, or use special abilities. Shooting always ends your turn (some weapons alleviate this), so it's always best to keep moving.  In some circumstances, you can make your own cover by kicking over tables or lifting up barriers. One of the special abilities enables you to ricochet bullets off of metal surfaces in a zig-zag of death across the battlefield, but you're never taught how to do this. Halfway through the game I noticed the slight glow that some metallic objects emanate denoting that you can use this ability. Once you get the hang of these shots, they become an impressive and effective method of dealing death. Though the battles feel mechanically similar to XCOM, one of the main differences in Hard West doesn't stick the landing. Whereas in the former game it was perhaps to easy to rely on the Overwatch ability (wherein you automatically attack enemies who pass your field of vision), here there's no such thing...for the player. If you get too close to an enemy, they have a small range around them in which they can use an attack of opportunity, but you're never afforded this same benefit. This leads to repeated scenarios where you're trying to cautiously approach the enemy so that you don't get too close and get blasted, and then they walk right up to you and shoot you from behind for higher damage. Another new system that Hard West tries is the "setup stage." In some levels, you have the drop on your opponents and you can sneak around. You only have one action point, so you move much more cautiously. In order to successfully infiltrate an area, you have to use the Subdue ability, which prevents enemies from firing at you for a few turns. Enemies sometimes have cones showing their field of vision, but this is inconsistent. Whether that was because of a glitch or my character's stats, I was never sure, The whole system is poorly explained, but luckily you're never forced to use it. Even when I figured out how to successfully do this, going in guns blazing always seemed to be the better option. One of the best parts of the combat is the Luck meter. While you still have percentages telling you how likely you are to hit an enemy, they don't feel as random as most tactical RPGs. Your Aim stat and your position determine if you'll hit, and the enemy's cover simply lessens the damage they receive. Each character has a luck bar that serves as both a sort of armor and your ability resource pool. If you have enough luck, when you get shot at, it'll soar right past you. If you get hit, your luck replenishes so you'll have better odds next time. Once you get a feel for this, you'll learn to risk taking weak hits through cover so you can use your more powerful skills. This all adds up to incredibly entertaining combat when it's not doing its best to frustrate you. Getting bum-rushed time and again isn't fun. But earning increasingly fantastical weapons and cards (which give you active and passive skills) in each campaign remains compelling throughout. When you aren't in combat, each chapter has its own world map and goal. In the aforementioned starting story, part of your HUD shows your family's gold-mining tools. Another chapter sees you managing peons à la Oregon Trail, making sure you have enough food to keep them strong enough to do your bidding, One of my favorites stars a clairvoyant woman as your main character, using her abilities to cheat both poker and death. If we're being reductive, these world map moments are just variations of text adventures, but they're enjoyable and convey a lot of flavor through both these different goals and the story text you have to parse. Once in a while you'll solve a puzzle for better gear, or choose the wrong thing and gain a crippling injury. All of these have a direct effect on the many battles you'll fight, so there's not as much of a disconnect as you might expect. Some choices you make will lead to differences in missions as well, such as choosing to sneak in through the back or charging in through the front. Consumable items, clothing, and weapons don't carry over into the next campaign, so each time is small arms race to get back up to the top. I initially thought this would be frustrating, but since each story is two hours long at the maximum, it never becomes monotonous. Each character's chapter has three special items that they can unlock through a variety of methods that are sold at a vendor who appears throughout the game. This allows you to get to the punch more quickly if you like, and it encourages thorough examination of the map. The playing cards that I mentioned previously are randomly earned by finishing battles and exploring and give you passive and active abilities like being able to turn into a demon or heal whenever you're in the shadows. In keeping with the theme of the ol' west, arranging them into straights and royal flushes provide additional stat bonuses. Since characters don't level up, this provides just enough customization to be interesting instead of overwhelming. So again, this all sounds great! But then there are the bugs. The hot desert sun didn't cook Hard West enough. This is evident everywhere, from menus that take entirely too long to open, to a glitch where accidentally hitting the delete key sets the camera at a horizontal angle on the ground that renders the game nigh-unplayable. There are typos galore in the text and there are times when said text implies that there should be another dialogue option, but there's nothing to be found. I also dealt with a handful of hard crashes. This is frustrating because there's a legitimately great game to be found underneath all of the blood and sand. I'm going to fondly remember the small vignettes in this game. Running around as an inquisitor, manipulating people into killing others so that I can build an eldritch artifact. Seeking revenge as a half-man, half-demon. Playing as the villains I saw in previous chapters, understanding what motivated them to become such evil pricks.  This is a world worth exploring, and I have a feeling we'll be seeing more of it. Maybe that'll be in the form of a huge patch that puts this broken machine back together, or a sequel that brings the best of Hard West to the forefront. What I'd really like to see is a tabletop game in this setting, because it honestly feels like it might be better suited in that realm. Either way, I hope there'll be a reason to come back. 
Hard West photo
A fistful of sand, blood, and bugs
After twenty or so hours in the blistering sun (my cold, unkempt room) with my hands on the well-used revolver (bargain basement keyboard and mouse), I'm walking away from Hard West in turmoil. A tactical turn-based west...

Review: Knight Squad

Nov 17 // Jordan Devore
Knight Squad (PC, Xbox One [reviewed])Developer: Chainsawesome GamesPublisher: Chainsawesome GamesMSRP: $14.99Released: November 16, 2015 One of the things I appreciate about Knight Squad is its simplicity. You move and aim with the analog stick, and attack with a button press. That's about it! Whether you're wielding the default sword or you pick up a laser gun, a bow, or a boomerang, it's those same basic controls. The modes, while varied, aren't hard to grasp, either. Regardless of the objective at hand, you're going to kill or be killed. Death is swift. There's almost always a little ghost floating off a skeleton, because there's almost always someone dying. Knights have one health point (two if they nab a shield power-up). With seven other players running amok on a single-screen arena, it sure is easy to get taken out. Thankfully, you'll be back on the battlefield mere seconds later. There is very little downtime. [embed]321181:61130:0[/embed] As far as modes go, nine are included with the base game and several more are available as DLC. I suspect folks will quickly narrow the list down to two or three personal favorites and ignore the rest. Capture the Grail (free for all) Capture the Flag (four vs. four) Soccer (four vs. four) Gladiator (free for all) Last Man Standing (free for all) Team Deathmatch (four vs. four) Juggernaut (free for all) Domination (four vs. four) Crystal Rush (four vs. four) Knight Squad covers the usual bases. Excluding the standard deathmatch, all of the modes actively encourage players to congregate. You're either going after a flag, a grail, a soccer ball, a particular spot that grants bonus points, a particular player with an overpowered weapon, or an object that needs to be captured, attacked, or defended. The end result is chaos. Pure chaos. I like Capture the Flag best. It's classic, and it works well in this top-down, fast-paced arena format. I also dig Juggernaut. Matches begin with a minigun in the center of the map. If you reach it first, you'll not only have a ridiculously good weapon, you'll gain a shield, too. From this point on, the other players tend to team up. They'll charge at you from all directions. Most won't make it. But eventually, someone will manage to break your shield, and someone else will get close enough to strike the killing blow, grab the gun, and become the new juggernaut. That cycle repeats until the timer hits zero, and it's thrilling the whole way through. When you don't have a full lineup of human players, AI bots will fill out the roster -- but they aren't nearly as exciting to compete against. I'd go so far as to specifically not recommend getting Knight Squad unless you have people to play with, whether that's locally or online. The game also offers six standalone single-player challenges. They're challenging, all right, but I'd hesitate to call them enjoyable. You'll face skeletons, worms, trolls, dragons, knights, and a bullet-hell boss. These encounters could have been good, but there are too many needless frustrations holding them back. Your character is really dang slow relative to the enemies, for one. There aren't checkpoints. If you mess up once, you die, and when you die, there isn't an "instant restart" option. Finally, the levels are gated, so most players won't even see them all. At best, these challenges are a distraction from the real fun. It's important to note that now through December 15, 2015, Knight Squad is free to download with an Xbox Live Gold account. If you're thinking of playing, this is a good time to do so while the player base is at its largest and most active. I didn't have much trouble getting into matches, aside from technical issues (a couple of crashes) and hosts dropping out (there aren't dedicated servers). So far, I haven't encountered any noticeable lag. There's no shortage of cool party games these days, and Knight Squad stands among them. It's not something I see myself returning to time and time again like some of its peers, but I got a kick out its accessible, action-packed multiplayer. If you're coming along for the ride, be sure to bring friends. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Knight Squad review photo
Dibs on the blue one!
Gauntlet as an eight-person competitive arena game? Sure, I'm in. That more-or-less accurate summary is about all it took for me to give Knight Squad a look. Hearing a few co-workers sing the game's praises at conventions als...

Bubsy on Greenlight photo
Bubsy on Greenlight


I didn't even know he was sick
Nov 16
// Nic Rowen
Almost did a spit-take when I saw this slide into my inbox today. Apparently, Retroism is on the quest to save Bubsy (yes, the platforming feline with radical CATtitude) and wants your help to do it. They're re-releasing two ...
Disgaea on Steam photo
Disgaea on Steam

I hope Disgaea on Steam is a sign of things to come

The first game hits PC in February
Nov 16
// Jordan Devore
NIS is bringing the original Disgaea to Steam. Cool, right? The strategy role-playing game will be available on PC in February with enhancements including an updated user interface and textures, Steam achievements and cloud s...
Win one of 20 Steam copies!
Thanks to the amazingly generous folks at NeocoreGames we have 20 copies of the The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing: Final Cut to giveaway! What is Van Helsing: Final Cut? It's an ARPG that has all three previous episode...

Van Helsing Final Cut photo
Van Helsing Final Cut

Van Helsing's Final Cut is the most 'Incredible' yet

Unless you've already played
Nov 15
// Patrick Hancock
Recently, NeocoreGames released The Incredible Adventures of Van Helsing: Final Cut on Steam, a compilation of the three games in the series. Past titles have varied in quality; the first game was good but buggy, the sec...
MWO moving to Steam photo
MWO moving to Steam

MechWarrior Online is coming to Steam in December

Stomping on up
Nov 13
// Nic Rowen
After what seems like years of rumors and speculation, the free-to-play shooter MechWarrior Online is finally making the move to Steam. According to a news post on the MWO website, the Steam launch will happen on December 10,...
Friday Night Fights photo
Friday Night Fights

Friday Night Fights - Ch-ch-ch-chaaaanges

Change with the Dtoid community
Nov 13
// Mike Martin
Well isn't this Hunky Dory? A nice little Friday. We have a new Call of Duty to play together. We have a new Fallout to play with ourselves (HA! HA!). We have herpes. Wait, that's just me. My bad. "So shut up and tell us what...
Steam Weekend photo
Steam Weekend

Klei's games are free to play on Steam this weekend

Discounts, too
Nov 12
// Jordan Devore
Between Don't Starve and Mark of the Ninja, there's a lot of love for Klei around these parts. The studio is now a decade old, and it's celebrating that milestone with a Steam promotion. You can play these titles for free on ...
Dragon Quest Heroes photo
Dragon Quest Heroes

Well well, it looks like Dragon Quest Heroes was just stealth confirmed for PC

Square Enix you bunch of rascals
Nov 12
// Chris Carter
Just moments ago I got a number of texts from friends telling me to boot up Steam to confirm a message they had obtained. Apparently, Dragon Quest Heroes is coming to PC, and Steam users are being asked to pre-purchase t...
Impossible Creatures photo
Impossible Creatures

Impossible Creatures finally releases on Steam, 13 years after being announced

It was used to unveil Steam in 2002
Nov 12
// Joe Parlock
In gaming, a few days ago is considered ancient history. So, if Fallout 4 being released two days ago is now considered old news, what the hell do we call news from 2002? That’s pretty much the time when fish with legs ...
Fallout 4 photo
Fallout 4

Steam analyst claims 1.2 million people owned Fallout 4 at launch

No info on actual launch sales
Nov 11
// Mike Cosimano
Sergey Galyonkin, the man behind Steam analytics site SteamSpy, recently published some initial thoughts on Fallout 4's PC launch via Twitter. Galyonkin acknowledged the unreliability inherent to the way the site pulls in dat...

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