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Velvet Dark photo
Velvet Dark

Rare was going to make Velvet Dark, a sister title to the N64 Perfect Dark


Too bad this didn't happen
Jul 30
// Brett Makedonski
Perfect Dark -- or, as it's called on my block, "the game that fixed everything bad about GoldenEye" -- told the story of Carrington Institute's Joanna Dark as she attempted to thwart dataDyne's evil intentions and all t...
The Last of Us 2 photo
The Last of Us 2

Nolan North lets slip The Last of Us 2 is coming


Nolan North's a pretty fun-gi... eh...
Jun 30
// Joe Parlock
I know most of us assumed it was coming after the massive, massive popularity and success of Naughty Dog’s The Last of Us, but Nolan “The Voice of Fucking Everything” North has accidentally let slip The Last...
Alan Wake photo
Alan Wake

Alan Wake port might be heading for Xbox One


And the sequel could be coming to any major platform
Apr 22
// Vikki Blake
Further to yesterday's revelations that a sequel for Alan Wake was still very much on the cards, Polygon has managed to squeeze even more information out of Remedy's chief creative officer, Sam Lake, including confi...
Alan Wake photo
Alan Wake

Remedy plans to Wake up Alan once more


Developer says horror sequel may still return
Apr 21
// Vikki Blake
I loved Alan Wake. Maybe it's because I overdosed on Stephen King as a kid and have always had a particular penchant for that whole fiction-becomes-fact thing (if only to keep alive the dream that one day, McDreamy is go...

What can save Titanfall 2?

Mar 14 // Nic Rowen
Fine, just go ahead and make a single player campaign As someone who almost never bothers with the single player campaign in a shooter, I applauded Respawn's decision to axe any kind of bloated, roller-coaster ride of narrative mode like I was a 18th century French peasant cheering at the guillotine. I looked at all the stats and figures showing how most CoD players never touch the SP game and thought of my own history of aggressively ignoring most shooter stories since Quake 3 and thought it was a savvy move. A good way to cut down the cost of development while making sure the full focus of the project was placed on the most important part of the game, the multiplayer. And I was wrong. Well sort of. Personally, stubbornly, I STILL think it was a good idea. I was fine with the window dressing of the “campaign multiplayer” mode which added a few lines of story-based radio chatter over the usual MP action, leaving the player to draw in the details. But given the massive popular backlash against the decision, it's clear that the absence of a SP campaign hurt the reputation and perception of Titanfall more than whatever dollars they saved in the process could have. It may be silly, but so many people were offended by the lack of a SP campaign (that they were statistically unlikely to have played) that it killed a lot of enthusiasm for the title. It made Titanfall feel like half a game sold at the price of a full title. Even as just an optics thing, the trade-off wasn't worth it. As much as I hate to admit it, Titanfall 2 should have an SP campaign. Whether it's fair or not, it is something that is seen as part of the complete package for a first-person shooter. They gave it a shot without one and it didn't work, to stick to that stance on principle would be foolish. Besides, I don't know about anyone else, but I could probably stand to learn a little bit more about the history behind the development of the Titans and the lives of the colonists living on those monster-infested planets. Ironically, Titanfall's world is probably one of the only FPS settings that actually could get me to sit through a five-to-eight hour campaign! For God's sake, give us more robots Surprising nobody, the biggest draw about Titanfall was the mechs. I thought they looked cool, had a satisfying weight in the world compared to the pixie-like pilots, and had an intimidating presence on the battlefield. They were powerful and desirable without making the average pilot on foot feel useless. I just wish there were more of them. Three Titans aren't enough. Not by a long shot. I get why, from a gameplay perspective, Respawn might have wanted to keep it simple and stick with “the fast one, the Ryu, and the big one” so players could clearly see the trade-offs of each and easily size up the opposition while wall-running down a four story building trying to aim a rapid-fire rocket launcher. Maybe that was the right call for the first game, but this is the sequel. It's time to add some more wrinkles, some more complexity, some more crunch. I want to see weirder, more specialized Titans. Robots with particular abilities and roles, or weapons that can only be equipped on specific chassis rather than one-size-fits-all solutions. Maybe mechs that can use larger cannons or launchers by deploying in a static position, making themselves an easy target temporarily while they break out the big guns. Or maybe a Titan that has less offensive power but a sophisticated sensor system to compensate, creating a more tactically minded option for coordinated teams. I don't want to get bogged down in imagineering up robots (that's a rabbit hole I could waste an entire day in), but you get the idea. The Titans are supposed to be what sets the game apart against all of the other “hold left-trigger, squeeze right-trigger” shooters out there, they should be front and center and there should be plenty of them. Robot bling  While emblems and custom AI voice options for your Titans were eventually added into Titanfall with a patch almost half a year after release, it was a classic case of too little, too late. It's mind boggling to me that those options weren't in the game from the start and that Respawn was so timid with them when they finally added them in. I mean, one little patch on the shoulder of your three story tall robot? Nuts to that. I want to be able to paint my Titan hazard yellow with orange and gold trim, people should recognize me when I come stomping. I want to be able to select between a few different types of leg joints and shoulder pads, give my robot just the right swagger. I want to be able to adjust the look of my individual pilot characters by class and type, deck out my own imaginary crew of jetpack-wearing badasses. This is a futuristic sci-fi setting, why not have some fun with it? Adding in a ton of unlockable cosmetic gear isn't just fun for players, it also solves another problem Titanfall had -- content and progression goals. While I personally liked that there were only so many guns and attachments in the game and they were all relatively quick to unlock, a lot of players complained that it felt like there was nothing to “do” in Titanfall, that they were never working towards a goal (like you need more incentive to climb into the cockpit of a missile spewing robot? I don't understand people). Cosmetic gear could be used to give progression minded players something to shoot for without messing up the pace of weapon unlocks or stuffing the game full of useless sights and foregrips just for the sake of having them. If Respawn sticks to its admirable “no micro-transaction” policy, fancy helmets and mech bling could be a nice long-term carrot for players that who don't hold robot brawling as a self-justifying reward. What do you think? As I said before, I loved Titanfall, so while I have plenty of suggestions on how to improve the game, maybe I'm not seeing what turned everyone else off. So what do you think? Is there anything Titanfall 2 could do to make you interested in a jet-pack/robot deathmatch, or is Respawn doomed to repeat history a second time out?
Titanfall 2 wishlist photo
I've got a few ideas
I absolutely adored Titanfall, but going by the comments and blogs I've read over the past year, it seems like I'm the only person on Earth who did. Every article, news post, or blog written about the game invariably becomes ...

Civilization Revolution 2 photo
Civilization Revolution 2

Sid Meier's Civilization Revolution 2 announced as a mobile exclusive


Real emotional roller coaster of a headline, that one
Jun 23
// Darren Nakamura
Civilization Revolution was an interesting thing. As it was pared down to function well on consoles, handhelds, and eventually mobile devices, many diehards considered it dumbed down from the roots of the series. Still, it so...
Titanfall on PS4 photo
Titanfall on PS4

Titanfall sequel is reportedly coming to PlayStation 4


Not so exclusive
Jun 09
// Brett Makedonski
Microsoft's biggest third-party console exclusive won't stay that way for long, if reports are to be believed. Rumor has it that the follow-up to Titanfall will land on PlayStation 4 whenever it's set to release. Accordi...
Rogue Legacy photo
Rogue Legacy

Cellar Door wants to do another Rogue Legacy, but not yet


Its next game will probably be in a different genre
Mar 28
// Jordan Devore
Cellar Door Games didn't get its start with the "rogue-lite" Rogue Legacy -- it previously found success in making browser-based games -- but that's likely going to be the title we associate with the studio for years to come....
Ecko Unlimited photo
Ecko Unlimited

Ecko Unlimited teases sequel to 'Getting Up'


I've been wondering what Marc Ecko's been 'Up 2'
Mar 23
// Ian Bonds
Because random announcements happen without realizing they're announcements, Ecko Unlimited's Twitter feed revealed that a sequel to Marc Ecko's Getting Up: Contents Under Pressure is in the works. The tweet came as a reply t...
Last of Us sequel photo
Last of Us sequel

Chances of a Last of Us sequel: '50/50'


The next of us
Feb 24
// Steven Hansen
I love The Last of Us. I also don't think it needs a sequel. When asked about a sequel in a Reddit AUA, Last of Us Creative Director Neil Druckmann said "right now I'd say it's 50/50." I'm team 50. That is, the 50 that r...
Castlevania photo
Castlevania

No plans for Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 on next-gen


Konami and MercurySteam are more focused on the future
Jan 09
// Alessandro Fillari
During our session with Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 back in December, we got the chance to sit down and talk with the game producer Dave Cox about the expansions and innovations the sequel has made over the original. We le...

Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 is bold and uncompromising

Jan 09 // Alessandro Fillari
Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 (Xbox 360, PC, PlayStation 3 [previewed])Developer: MercurySteamPublisher: KonamiRelease: February 25, 2014 Lords of Shadow 2 does well to try and ease players back into the action. In the opening level of the game, which takes place in the past during Dracula's prime, his castle is being raided by humans looking to vanquish him in the name of God. This epic and fairly ambitious area serves as the tutorial, where players learn the ins and outs of the combat and traversal gameplay. The controls are largely untouched, but feel much more tight and responsive than the previous game. Eventually, the Prince of Darkness succeeds in wiping out the army of Paladins and their man-made titan, but not before being surprised by the appearance of his son, Alucard. This sets the stage for what follows in a story that transcends the bonds of family and time itself. Immediately after the twist ending of Lords of Shadow, we find Gabriel Belmont, now known as Dracula, in a weakened state. After his resurrection from his defeat in Castlevania: Lords of Shadow - Mirror of Fate by the hands of his own kin Simon Belmont and Alucard, he ventures out into the modern world looking for answers. With the promise to free him of his immortality by Zobek, a central villain from the previous game, Dracula must reacquire his powers and strength to defeat the army of Satan and prevent his return to the modern world. It's clear that everything in Lords of Shadow 2 is going for a much darker tone, and far more personal storyline. As the end of the former Belmont's story, MercurySteam plans to tell an uncompromisingly dark and sinister tale of redemption. And when it gets dark, it really gets dark. That includes placing players in positions that would disturb and trouble many. When Zobek realizes that Dracula won't last long in his weary state, he places the Prince of Darkness in a secured room, along with a frightened and helpless family of three. From here, players enter a first-person view and must go about slaughtering and feeding on each of them to replenish the Prince of Darkness’ powers. As you can imagine, this scene is very tough to stomach, let alone play through -- and the game pulls no punches as killing off one member of the family will cause the others to panic and become paralyzed with fear. It was sickening, painful, and heartbreaking to witness; however, this scene is incredibly effective in illustrating that Dracula is NOT the good guy of this story. I can already tell this sequence will be controversial, and may cause some to feel conflicted about the main character, but this was something that Konami and MercurySteam were very sure of conveying in their story. "That scene caused a lot of discussions between us and the marketing guys, as they believed we went too far," said Producer Dave Cox while discussing the feeding scene. "But we thought this wasn't going to be a Twilight or True Blood vampire, this is going back to what vampires used to be. Scary, evil. This is a character that has feelings and has emotions, but this is a guy who is not afraid to do horrible things." Not long after restoring his powers, we regain control of Dracula and must explore the modern world. As we progress further with our playthrough, things begin to open up. Gone were the awkward and jarring chapter breaks from the previous games, replaced with a more organic, natural flow. More and more, the linear progression faded and we were presented with choice and room for exploration. This title is not a simple improvement over the original, it is an evolution from years of design work and refinement that attempts to create a world that is alive and without limits. As many fans know, the original Lords of Shadow moved away from the famous Metroidvania style and flowed in a more traditional linear progression and focused heavily on set-piece moments scattered around the various levels;  his of course was the first thing that MercurySteam wanted to do away with. "We wanted to present everything seamlessly," said Dave Cox while discussing the world design. "In the beginning it's a very linear experience, but as you progress and explore the world it becomes more and more open. We did a lot of research with the fanbase, got the fans involved and asked for their opinions about what they wanted to see for the sequel. Almost every single person said they wanted to explore more and return to previous areas for new content." Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 sees a return to the open-ended approach in the vein of series titles following the Metroidvania design formula. While the developers were keen to move away from that label, they sought to evoke the same level of gradual open-world progression and exploration seen in titles like The Legend of Zelda and Batman: Arkham Asylum. Lords of Shadow 2 takes things much further by including the connection between two unique open worlds. Yes, there are two open-world settings to explore, each one possessing a unique setting and content such sidequests, NPC characters to interact with, and lore journals to collect. While fans might anticipate callbacks to the inverted castle of Symphony of the Night, the two worlds presented are wholly unique and independent from one another. As Dracula's Castle is set seemingly in the past, you'll encounter enemies and allies alike from that time period. The enemies range from humans, to the undead, that use traditional swords and magic to battle Dracula. Moreover, the layout of the castle represents a classic gothic style in keeping to series aesthetic. However, things change once Dracula is within the open world of the city. In the modern day, Satan's army has taken to the abandoned and derelict streets of the city, utilizing more advanced means to battle Dracula. These include giant robots, firearms, explosives, and power armor for the weaker minions. During the span of 10 minutes, our session saw Dracula battling waves of Paladins while exploring and completing side-objectives in his castle, and then transporting himself back to the modern day where he battled Lycans and Satan's Acolytes controlling mech suits complete with missile launchers. It was mind-blowing to say the least. You'd think something so different stylistically couldn't work, but it does. In many ways, the developers at MercurySteam sought to make a sequel that solved all the issues and criticisms of the original. As they were hampered by technical limitations for the first game, they spent the first nine months of development crafting a brand new engine to handle the scope and vision of their epic story. One of the benefits of the new engine allowed for the inclusion of a fully controllable camera. One such issue that has thankfully been fixed was the severe frame-rate issues of the original, which were often times below 20FPS during gameplay. With the performance of the new engine, the game now runs at a solid 30FPS without visual hiccups hindering the experience. With the solid frame rate, players can marvel at the stunning art direction that evokes the series' past while showing a new spin on the classic style. Although many of the new features present in the game may put off some fans, at its core, Lords of Shadow 2 is functionally the same as its predecessor -- yet it includes far more depth and content. In particular, the talent at MercurySteam wanted to include a larger focus on skill and variety to experience. One such area that benefits is the combat, which is more refined and tighter than ever. Though Dracula's powers are vast, he will still need to utilize dodging, blocks, and other strategies to wear down his enemies. The focus system from the previous game returns, where performing efficiently in combat can earn magic power to fill up both Light and Dark magic meters. "It's a thinking-man's hack-n-slash," Cox explained. "That's how I've always described it." A key element that MercurySteam wanted to include in combat is a greater level of variety and focus on tactics. Dracula is now armed with three central weapons, including his iconic whip. The light magic-focused Void Sword can freeze enemies and heal the Prince of Darkness' wounds, and the dark magic-powered Chaos Gauntlets can break enemy defenses with flame attacks. Like the original game, the use of light and dark magic plays a key role in combat. With both forms of magic, Dracula can heal himself and increase attack power of his moves. As the sword and gauntlets require light and dark energy to work, there is greater incentive for players to utilizes Dracula's offensive and defensive skills to exploit the benefits of the focus system. The Prince of Darkness also possesses an arsenal of relics to assist him in his fight against Satan's Acolytes and the Belmont clan. As a more advanced version of the sub-weapon system, relics function on a cooldown system and are powered by Dracula's blood energy. The daggers make a return in the form of the shadow daggers, but a brand new relic called Stola's Clock allows Dracula to manipulate time. During combat he can create a temporary circle on the ground where time is slowed along with anything else in it. This allows for some interesting chances for combos and crowd-control. It's pretty easy to become overwhelmed, unfortunately not for all the right reasons. While you have a number of options during combat, the action can get hectic and visually busy at points, which can become a distraction. Hopefully, the developers can tone it down a bit before release. It's not often you're playing as Dracula -- the vampire in fiction -- and the developers wanted to truly make players feel as if you were controlling a supreme creature of the night. "We wanted to tell Dracula's story, we wanted to present a character that had depth and depiction and wasn't just another Bela Lugosi depiction of the character," said Dave Cox. "From the previous Castlevania titles he was a one-dimensional character. We wanted to present a character that had shades of grey." In addition to his prowess in combat, he possesses many unique and interesting abilities that take advantage of his vampiric status. The fan-favorite Mist form returns and lets players enter special areas and evade waves of enemies while traversing through the world space. Another skill is Possession, which allows players to control the minds and bodies of enemies for their own benefit. Surprisingly, stealth can be a much better option when traversing through new locations. As some enemies possess skills and items which can prove fatal to the Prince of Darkness, it's best to get the jump on them whenever possible. During an early segment from our session, Dracula snuck his way into a massive pharmaceutical factory controlled by Satan's army and came across a special enemy utilizing modern weaponry. Using his powers, Dracula possesses a small rat and sneaks past this foe to use a special stealth takedown to enter its body and venture further in disguise. Of course, when things get too tough in a fight, Dracula can call upon his powers to transform into a dragon and unleash a massive attack on all nearby foes. Unfortunately, while you don't control this beast, you do get to watch a short but satisfying cutscene of him morphing into a massive beast and unleashing his fury. When you view both games side by side, it's clear that they both contain different design philosophies and ideas. While one game was limited by technology and time, the developers found no constraints for the sequel and were left unshackled by the past. In many ways, and if I may be so bold, Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 represents the Symphony of the Night of the Lords of Shadow series. In terms of sheer expansion and game-changing elements. It's like night and day. So to speak. In a year with so many heavy hitters, it's best not to underestimate MercurySteam's new and final entry in the Lords of Shadow series. With a campaign spanning over 20 hours, improved world design, and a strong reverence for the source material that's still not afraid to tell its own story; Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2 is a title to watch out for. Even in the first few hours, its ambitions could not be contained by the tutorial and opening segments. Konami and MercurySteam certainly have a winner on their hands, and this game is poised to become one of the biggest surprises of 2014. As this is the conclusion of the Lords of Shadow storyline, they have every intent to make sure it will not go out quietly into the night.
Castlevania: LoS 2 photo
Dracula Unchained
In 2010, Konami took a chance on the obscure Spanish development studio MercurySteam to create a reboot for one of the most adored and quoted game series ever. While Castlevania: Lords of Shadow went on to become a popular se...

CoD Ghosts' future photo
CoD Ghosts' future

BOO-hoo: Call of Duty: Ghosts might not be a trilogy


'Cause ghosts say "boo"
Nov 07
// Steven Hansen
Call of Duty: Ghosts has done decidedly less well than usual with critics. Gaming everyman Chris Carter called for a stop to annualization. Call of Duty fan Jim Sterling even gave it a 5. Still, the litmus test for CoD succes...
Terraria 2 photo
Terraria 2

Re-Logic reveals that development has begun on Terraria 2


'I really want you to have infinite worlds.'
Oct 03
// Darren Nakamura
It's a great time to be a fan of 2011's hit open-world game Terraria. Just two days ago, update 1.2 released, adding a huge amount of content for free. Today, Andrew "Redigit" Spinks of Re-Logic has announced even juicier new...

Jimquisition: Time To Get Paid

Aug 26 // Jim Sterling
 photo
Jimquisition happens every Monday!
Payday 2 is a success, because the people making and publishing it weren't completely stupid. What sorcery is this? Yes, it's one of those episodes where we celebrate one game getting it right and not stuffing everything up. Speaking of stuffing, Jim at last unveils the Dragon Dildo ... and does things with it. Terrible things.

Dishonored photo
Dishonored

Arkane hints at what's next for Dishonored


The studio is 'keeping an eye out for ways to do multiplayer the right way'
Aug 15
// Jordan Devore
Arkane Studios has -- for the time being, anyway -- wrapped up Dishonored, now that The Brigmore Witches DLC is out. The stealth-action title has done well enough to be considered a full franchise by publisher Bethesda and it...
Metal Gear Rising photo
Metal Gear Rising

Konami survey asks about potential sequel to Revengeance


What are we going to say? No?
Aug 02
// Jordan Devore
Not to get our hopes up too much, but Konami is currently hosting a survey about Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance that, after going through a bunch of highly specific questions, gauges interest in a follow-up game. You'd like o...
Tomb Raider photo
Tomb Raider

Upcoming Tomb Raider comic to 'lead directly' into sequel


The story continues next year
Jul 23
// Jordan Devore
Having only recently finished up my first and only Lara Croft adventure outside of Guardian of Light, it was heartbreaking to remember that at 3.4 million copies sold as of March, Tomb Raider didn't live up to publisher Squar...
 photo
Jimquisition happens every Monday!
Must every new videogame become a sequel-spawning franchise? Is it through necessity, or simple avarice that mainstream game development makes it so? A little dash of jarnalizm, a spoonful of introspection, and two massive barrels of furious indignation bore to the core of this subject, in the only way Jimquisition knows how -- brutally. And without mercy.

The next great indies photo
The next great indies

Broken Age, Below, and more: The games of HORIZON


A parade of indies
Jun 20
// Liz Rugg
As previously discussed, Venus Patrol and MOCAtv's "alternative E3 event" HORIZON was pretty interesting both conceptually and in how it was executed. But what about the games?! That's why we're even here, right!? A few of the larger announcements to come out of the event have already been covered here at Dtoid, but what about those smaller, beautiful indie games HORIZON promised?
Guacamelee DLC photo
Guacamelee DLC

Drinkbox talks Guacamelee DLC, possibility of sequel


Chupacabracadabra!
May 31
// Darren Nakamura
Guacamelee! came as a bit of a surprise to me, as I generally don't enjoy brawlers, but the goofy charm and streamlined Metroidvania elements came together to be something genuinely special. Fortunately, the title did really ...
SMB2: The Movie Sequel photo
SMB2: The Movie Sequel

Mario movie has a pseudo-official comic sequel


Like Luigi said, "Nothing's impossible"
May 27
// Tony Ponce
The Super Mario Bros. movie 20th anniversary celebration continues! After holding a special midnight screening of the pleasantly schlock film, during which John Leguizamo delivered a special pre-recorded message to attendees,...
 photo

Confirmed: Game sequel in development right now


Devolver Digital CFO spills the beans
May 14
// Jim Sterling
Today, Devolver Digital has confirmed that a sequel to a game you like is in development as we speak. This exciting news, delivered by CFO Fork Park via Twitter, could be taken as absolute confirmation that Shadow Hearts IV i...
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ZombiU sequel prototype in development


But survival horror NEVER SUCCEEDS EVER WAAAAH!
May 14
// Jim Sterling
Wii U launch title ZombiU may be getting a sequel, at least if Ubisoft's prototype version is deemed successful. Ubisoft Montpellier has an early version in the works, according to creative director Jean-Philippe Caro.  ...
Blood Dragon sequel? photo
Blood Dragon sequel?

Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon may get a sequel


Michael Biehn may have made a goof
May 06
// Chris Carter
Far Cry 3: Blood Dragon went from an April Fools joke, to sort-of-kind-of a thing, to a real release. It pretty much came out of nowhere and wowed gamers of all shapes and sizes, which naturally leads to the burning question ...
Hot-Blooded Tough Guy photo
Hot-Blooded Tough Guy

Japan to get its own River City Ransom 3DS sequel


Pompadours all up in this mother
May 04
// Tony Ponce
A fresh-faced dev called Combit Studios recently announced plans to do a proper River City Ransom sequel for Western audiences. If you happen to live in Japan, that news probably wasn't anything special, considering you get a...
River City Ransom 2 photo
River City Ransom 2

Deja vu! River City Ransom sequel coming next year


Indie dev Combit Studios is working closely with IP holder Million Co.
Apr 29
// Tony Ponce
A sequel to classic NES brawler River City Ransom? Hmmm... now where have I heard that before...? That's right! Back in 2011, a Japanese studio called Miracle Kidz was working on just such a project for PC and home console di...
Soul Sacrifice sequel? photo
Soul Sacrifice sequel?

Talks are ongoing for Soul Sacrifice sequel, says Inafune


It'll likely be for the Vita if plans move forward
Apr 25
// Jordan Devore
Speaking to IGN, Soul Sacrifice designer Keiji Inafune shared his interest in working on a sequel to the upcoming PlayStation Vita game, which shouldn't come up as much of a surprise. The same could be said of countless ...
Bulletstorm 2 photo
Bulletstorm 2

Bulletstorm sequel would have been 'a big risk'


Former People Can Fly boss talks Bulletstorm and Gears
Apr 23
// Jordan Devore
Speaking to Eurogamer, People Can Fly founder Adrian Chmielarz has expressed the Bulletstorm sequel that could have been, and why the studio moved on to Gears of War: Judgment instead of seeing the project through to com...
Assassin's Creed  photo
Or until everybody is already murdered
With the Assassin's Creed series getting new instalments annually, there are, perhaps, those who will grow tired of franchise -- if they haven't already. Since Assassin's Creed II, there's been a new title in the main series ...


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