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Review: Shadowrun: Dragonfall photo
Review: Shadowrun: Dragonfall
by Alasdair Duncan

Shadowrun Returns was released last year after a successful Kickstarter campaign and seemed to please fans and backers alike. In our review, Fraser Brown commented on how the toolset provided with the game would provide plenty of content in the future, and whilst it has been well supported by modders, most fans were waiting patiently for the big expansion, Dragonfall

Dragonfall is an expansion in the old-school mold: it has a campaign that's equal to the length of the main Shadowrun story, a whole new setting and characters, and there's some nice refinements to the mechanics and structure. There's still some problems and frustrations but if you put up with them in the original Shadowrun, then Dragonfall will give you even more enjoyment. 

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Review: Yoshi's New Island photo
Review: Yoshi's New Island
by Chris Carter

The original Yoshi's Island is one of my favorite Mario games of all time. I don't know if it's the numerous and remarkably unique boss battles or the whimsical charm of throwing strategically bounced eggs, but it really resonated with me. I've gone back to it time and time again, and the DS remake was great for when I was on the go in its own way.

Yoshi's New Island for the 3DS seeks to bring back those good times, and the good news is Yoshi fans will mostly enjoy it. The bad news is it's not all that special.

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Review: Titanfall photo
Review: Titanfall
by Chris Carter

The first-person shooter business knows its audience. Year after year there are military shooters that are stuck in the "newer" era of shooters, offering up realistic experiences and killstreaks galore, which gamers eat up annually.

Lost is the art of the arena or twitch shooter, which are usually just relegated to downloadable titles or the PC platform, and scant see the light of day as a true wide console release. Enter Titanfall -- a game that seeks to shake up the genre with elements of twitch shooters of old, and of course, giant hulking robots.

Titanfall doesn't really break the mold or offer up many things we haven't seen before -- but that doesn't mean it isn't fun to play.

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Review: Infested Planet photo
Review: Infested Planet
by Conrad Zimmerman

This should sound somewhat familiar: a small band of mercenaries are on a forbidding planet, confronted by a horrific alien force that swarms across the landscape. Well-armed and entrenched, the soldiers have been easily keeping the enemy at bay despite being surrounded when, suddenly, the air becomes thick and acrid. Coughing and sputtering, the squad slowly begins to weaken from poison in the air while the aliens keep coming in force and threaten to overrun them.

That's the experience of playing Infested Planet. No matter how strong your defense or capable your soldiers, death is always just one mutation away.

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Review: Dark Souls II photo
Review: Dark Souls II
by Chris Carter

My experience with the Souls series is one of my favorite memories of my entire gaming career. Playing Demon's Souls for the first time made me feel like a kid again, back when games didn't hold your hand and explain every single facet of the adventure -- leaving everything to your imagination.

Even though Dark Souls was mainly just a refinement of the formula on a technical level, it offered up all-new experiences that felt wholly unique, and raised the bar in many respects. But then something changed -- Hidetaka Miyazaki, the producer and arguably the heart and soul of the franchise left, passing the torch to Tomohiro Shibuya and Yui Tanimura to carry on his legacy.

Once again, Dark Souls II remains relatively unchanged from its predecessors, and still offers up most of the same magic that you fell in love with the first two times around.

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Review: Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy photo
Review: Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy
by Darren Nakamura

With five previous games and one movie under his belt, Professor Layton's reputation precedes him. Since 2007's Professor Layton and the Curious Village, Level-5 has been giving players control of the eminent gentleman Layton and his spry apprentice Luke on an almost yearly basis, with 2012's Professor Layton and the Miracle Mask making the jump from the DS to the 3DS.

Azran Legacy picks up after the events in Miracle Mask, completing the prequel trilogy that began with Professor Layton and the Last Specter. Though it changes up the format slightly, anybody who has played any entry in the series knows what to expect: hunting for hint coins and engaging in unconventional mind puzzles.

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Review: Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster photo
Review: Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster
by Dale North

Y, R, P -- in position. It's showtime, girls. 

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Review: Fractured Soul (PC) photo
Review: Fractured Soul (PC)
by Chris Carter

Fractured Soul dropped in 2012 on the 3DS, and we never got around to reviewing it.

Let's fix that with the arrival of the brand new PC port two years later, shall we?

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Review: TowerFall: Ascension photo
Review: TowerFall: Ascension
by Patrick Hancock

TowerFall originally came out on the OUYA. I’ve played it on that console, and it was certainly a blast, so long as you weren’t the one stuck with the OUYA controller. TowerFall: Ascension brings the good time to a much wider audience, and it’s about damn time.

Matt Thorson, creator of games such as Jumper, An Untitled Story, Give Up, Robot, and co-creator of RunMan: Race Around the World is at the helm once again, so it’s no surprise that TowerFall has been highly sought after by us non-OUYA owners. Ascension has new modes, new maps, and new characters, and makes as strong a point as ever for Mr. Thorson to rename his company from “MattMakesGames” to “MattMakesPhenomenalGames.”

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Review: The Walking Dead Season 2: A House Divided photo
Review: The Walking Dead Season 2: A House Divided
by Chris Carter

Clementine has been through an awful lot since meeting Lee at the start of The Walking Dead series. She's grown, she's changed, and now, she's with a new group. Episode One sought to be a buffer of sorts between the two seasons, clinging on to some old adages and themes, but now, things are really starting to pick up in Season Two.

In case you were wondering, that's a good thing from a gameplay perspective, but a pretty terrible thing emotionally. Although I'll refrain from spoiling any major plotpoints, note that there will of course be minor story details discussed below, as well as spoilers for Season One and the first episode of Season Two.

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Review: South Park: The Stick of Truth photo
Review: South Park: The Stick of Truth
by Chris Carter

It's hard to believe that I've been watching South Park for almost 17 years. I vividly remember sneaking downstairs in the dead of night, quietly turning on Comedy Central to watch Eric Cartman get probed by an alien. I still watch the show to this day.

Although it's had its ups and downs, one thing is for certain -- South Park is still topical. Odds are even if you don't watch it, you've heard about the controversial premise to an episode at least once per season. Or more importantly in this instance, you've heard the tumultuous story about the coveted South Park game, which has taken years to see the light of day.

But it's finally here, and I have to say -- it was worth the wait. Barring a few mechanical issues, it's like watching a long, quality episode of the show.

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Review: Tower of Guns photo
Review: Tower of Guns
by Patrick Hancock

As a combination of the first-person shooter genre and the modern-day roguelikes, Tower of Guns is being pushed as a “lunchbreak FPS.” After playing, I can say this is a pretty accurate description, except I only have 40 minutes for lunch. Runs can be completed in under an hour, but tend to lean more towards that hour mark.  Tower of Guns will also require quick mouse dexterity and your probably-now-rusty circle-strafing and bunny-hopping skills.

It’s addicting, satisfying, and nails its themes better than most games of its ilk. As if we needed another great roguelike, in steps Tower of Guns

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Review: Redux: Dark Matters photo
Review: Redux: Dark Matters
by Wesley Ruscher

If you told me I’d be playing a brand new Dreamcast game in 2014, back when the system saw its demise in 2002, I’d probably have said you were crazy.

It was at that point that Sega moved on to become a software-only developer in most of the world. But as it turns out, they actually continued to support the system in their home country for an additional five years, primarily with quick and easy ports from arcade games built on the NAOMI board (the Dreamcast’s arcade counterpart). Titles such as Puyo Puyo Fever and Trigger Heart Exelica kept the system relevant, for the arcade aficionado at least. But even Sega eventually left their fabled console past behind.

In Sega’s absence, an indie scene has embraced the all but forgotten console and churned out more than a dozen titles since 2007. The latest, Redux: Dark Matters, is a blast from the past that harkens back to the console’s glory days.

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Review: Drunken Robot Pornography photo
Review: Drunken Robot Pornography
by Alasdair Duncan

Drunken Robot Pornography has a unique concept to go along with its memorable title. You take control of Reuben Mastumoto, who is having a real bad day. He accidentally made his robot bartender, Tim, self-aware and presumably being slightly freaked out by this, Tim burned down Reuben's bar and stole all the other robot staff members.

Now Reuben has to defend Boston from Tim and the awesome titans he's created from the former bar staff. The premise of Drunken Robot Pornography is absurd but it's the basis of a solid game that blends the massive bosses of a bullet-hell shmup and the tight first-person shooter arenas of something like Quake III

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Review: Pac-Man Museum photo
Review: Pac-Man Museum
by Chris Carter

Let's not beat around the bush here -- with the new Pac-Man Museum compilation, you're getting a bunch of really old games you've most likely played before, a few you probably already own, and Pac-Man Battle Royale. Royale is a bit of a unique release, as it's only been playable outside of Japan at special events and arcades, and has been highly sought out by fans of the genre.

To be blunt, this is the perfect opportunity to wait for a sale just to pick up Royale.

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Review: Gunslugs photo
Review: Gunslugs
by Ian Bonds

Sidescrolling run-and-gun games are, arguably, a classic that never seem to go out of style. Games like Contra and Gunstar Heroes, with their multiple weapon types, hundreds of attacking enemies, and billions of bullets whizzing past your head are a frantic and fun diversion. Naturally if you're going to make a run-and-gun game, these are the key elements you'll want to have present.

Gunslugs borrows heavily from these tropes, but still manages to come up as a unique and fun shooter with a large emphasis on the silly.

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