hot  /  reviews  /  videos  /  cblogs  /  qposts

imports

PSone Imports photo
PSone Imports

GungHo releasing a half dozen PSone Imports on PSN today


JRPGs and dating-sims and bears. Oh my!
Mar 12
// Kyle MacGregor
GungHo Online has returned with another set of PlayStation Classics that never made it out of Japan. The Grasshopper Manufacture parent company has announced six titles for release via PlayStation Network as a part of th...
Darkstalkers photo
Darkstalkers

Darkstalkers Resurrection physical release has dual subs


Let's get physical!
Mar 06
// Kyle MacGregor
Darkstalkers Resurrection is slated for a global release on PlayStation Network and Xbox Live next week. Unlike other territories, however, Japan will be receiving a physical edition of the enhanced fighting compila...
Vita price drop photo
Vita price drop

Sony announces a price drop for PS Vita in Japan


About $200 for both WiFi and 3G
Feb 18
// Dale North
Opening this early morning's PlayStation Vita Japanese streaming event, Sony announced a price drop for Vita. The new price of 19,980 yen comes out to about $200 USD for both the WiFi and 3G models. Again, this is for Japan r...
 photo

Uh, what? Wii U GamePads are also region locked [Update]


Huh?
Dec 25
// Chris Carter
[Update: The Japanese message above reads, "The update cannot be completed with an overseas Wii U GamePad." In other words, it seems that you can use an imported GamePad to play games, you simply can't apply firmware updates ...
 photo

E.X. Troopers will probably never come to the West


Guess it's time to import the damn thing
Dec 13
// Kyle MacGregor
Capcom has done just about everything possible to waste any consumer goodwill they've built up over the years. Even recent attempts to reconcile with fans have been met with scorn by some. The other day, I surmised that even ...
 photo

GungHo Online releases six PS One Classics on PSN


Another importer!
Dec 04
// Dale North
I want all the Japanese PS One games as downloads on the PlayStation Network. Monkey Paw Games is doing a fine job of supplying us with titles, but now GungHo Online gets in on the act with six new digital imports. The best p...
 photo

E.X. Troopers is now available from Japanese importers


Lost Planet spin-off out now for PS3 and 3DS
Nov 24
// Kyle MacGregor
E.X. Troopers has yet to be announced for a release on Western shores. And if Capcom Senior Vice-President Christian Svensson's words are anything to go by that's not likely to happen. So unless you're still holding out ...

It Came from Japan! King of Demons

Oct 04 // Allistair Pinsof
King of Demons (Super Famicom)Developer: KSSReleased: August 25, 1995Current value: $175Fan translation: YesFor fans of: Super Castlevania IV, Splatterhouse 2, Contra For a seemingly cut-and-dried 2D action-platformer, King of Demons doesn’t feel like any other game. Opening with an ambitious, interactive cinematic on a bridge, the title immediately evokes a unique atmosphere. Like Splatterhouse’s antihero, Abel isn’t shy about embracing demonic powers in order to save his loved ones. The game opens with Abel’s friend Bayer betraying him by sacrificing Abel’s family in order to become ... THE KING OF DEMONS! Oh no! After some brief dialogue and fugly anime portraits, the game becomes a steadfast side-scrolling shooter that never lets up on its pace and generous -- or grueling, depending on how you look at it -- amount of boss fights. Abel is constantly running through gateways leading further into the hellish world, falling down pits, and even hopping a demon train full of demon turrets and other crazy demon shit. Abel becomes increasingly more devilish as the game continues, adopting three demonic forms. However, you’ll have to play the first stage as a fairly normal resurrected human. Abel feels like the way I imagine John McClane would feel if there was ever an awesome 2D Die Hard game. You dump on demons with a glock, have an awesome roll maneuver, and can perform a ridiculous double-jump. I’d disapprove on this break from reality if it weren’t for double-jumping being the greatest mechanic that God Satan ever gave developers. After you defeat a boss, you are bestowed a jewel that will change Abel into one of the game’s demon forms. Depending on the gem’s color, you will become a dragon, harpy, or whatever the heck the third form is supposed to be. Each character has its own pros and cons, since their attack, special, jump, and dash is different. Play the game enough times and you’ll know what form is best for which stage. There are even tricks to the system, such as using the same form to gain a more powerful version. Using all three forms will also grant a new more powerful form during the endgame. I’ve read others say the game is easy, but I have to disagree. The many bosses of King of Demons gave me grief for the longest time. It didn’t help that I had no understanding of specials or the demon transformation system, of course. The game is full of bosses with tricky movement patterns. The scale and detail of the later bosses is really impressive for the system. Even though you are meeting hell’s spawn on their own level through your transformations, I never felt that winning came so easy. King of Demons’ visuals and audio can be pretty underwhelming at times, especially for a ‘95 release. If you can look past these things and not compare it too much to Super Castlevania and Splatterhouse, you may find one of the better horror-themed 16-bit games. I can’t think of another SNES/SFC game with bosses this creepy, gross, and huge. The controls, action, and grim visuals make this an easy game to recommend to horror and action fans. What 16-bit games scared you? Is double-jumping the greatest? Y/N? Are you a fan of games with tons of bosses? Why?
It Came from Japan! photo

[It Came from Japan! is a series where I seek out and review the weirdest, most original and enjoyable titles that never left the Land of the Rising Sun. For the month of October, the series will focus on games that may make ...

 photo

Persona 4 Arena: Atlus statement clarifies region-lock


Jul 06
// Dale North
We heard yesterday that Persona 4 Arena could be region-locked on the PS3, and a statement from Atlus USA today confirms that. Bad news for importers, for sure. Atlus USA feels your frustration, though. Beyond this, Atlus wan...
 photo

Persona 4 Arena will be region-locked on PS3


Jul 05
// Dale North
Thinking about importing Persona 4 Arena for the PS3? Already have? Wait. Or maybe cancel your pre-order.  An Atlus representative dropped some bad news for importers on their official forums: The PS3 version of Persona ...
 photo

Anarchy Reigns release expected in 2013 now


Jun 18
// Conrad Zimmerman
Once again, we have a vague idea of when Platinum Games' brawling action title Anarchy Reigns will be arriving in North America and Europe. It's going to be another lengthy wait. Originally planned for release in Fall of...
 photo

Importers: US Vita PlayStation Store is now up...kinda


Feb 08
// Dale North
Conrad told you earlier that a few Vita games were up on the PlayStation Store tonight, but now the full Vita PS Store has launched. This is the day that importers with Japanese Vita systems and US PSN accounts have been wait...
 photo

Mushihime-sama HD buzzing onto the Xbox 360


Jan 31
// Chris Carter
Cave shooter Mushihime-sama, or "Bug/Insect Princess" in the West, is gearing up for an HD conversion on the Xbox 360. You may recognize the name from "the hardest video game boss ever" video, which featured the sequel, Mushi...
 photo

Kingdom Hearts 3D shows off three enticing flavors


Jan 20
// Hiroko Yamamura
Square Enix announced details regarding the Japanese release of the upcoming Nintendo 3DS title, Kingdom Hearts 3D: Dream Drop Distance, and now my 3DS isn't looking so appealing anymore. You can expect the highly anticipated...

How to use PS Vita with more than one PSN account

Dec 29 // Dale North
How to switch PSN accounts on the PS Vita: 1. Backup! Assuming that you've already set up your Vita with one PSN account, and that you're wanting to use another, you'll want to back up your game data and saves first. I was particularly nervous the first time I tried this, as I had game saves for several Vita games stored in the system. The backup process is very easy, though. Simply connect the Vita to a PC or PS3 and use the Content Manager app. You'll need Sony's software for PC use. "Backup" is one of the four options given in this app. Select this to dump the entire contents of your memory to the connected device. You'll be able to restore this with one touch through the same app later. If you don't need a full system backup, you can choose to simply export your game saves. 2. Restore and deactivate the PS Vita system You'll need to "restore" the PS Vita to sign on to the other account you want to use. This means that the data and settings will be wiped to factory standards, and that you'll have to set up the system all over again. The good news here is that this process is very quick.  Important: Note that you'll need to deactivate your Vita while logged into one PSN account to use it under another. You probably won't want to do this from a PC, as you're only given one activation every six months! Deactivating from the Vita makes it so that you can activate it again without issue. To do this you'll go to the Settings app, choose the PlayStation Network option, and then pick System Activation and follow the instructions. -OR- Or, you could start the Vita's Restore process. The system should prompt you to deactivate the system first before restoring. It should also ask if you'd like to delete all data on the memory card. The whole process takes less than a minute. 3. Set up the Vita with your other PSN account. It's simply a matter of logging in with your other PSN account. Again, the setup process only takes a minute or two. You'll set the language, date/time, and watch the silly mandatory opening movie. Then you're good to go! 4. Reload save files and content.  Content Manager makes it easy to select everything you'd want back on your Vita. Note that you won't be able to move over games that belong to another PSN account, but game saves and other data work just fine. 5. And when you want to go back to the first account, Restore. Don't even bother setting anything up. Just connect the same USB cable to the same PC/PS3 you used to back up. Start the Content Manager, click "Restore" and watch as your Vita goes back to the way you had it before you logged in. You could even create backups of each PSN account on your PC/PS3 to have ready for easy switching. It's quite wonderful how easy it is to back up everything on the Vita. ______________________ FAQ: Here are some questions we've been asked on account switching. Import related questions have also been included. These are in addition to our operational FAQ. Does a US PSN account work on a Japanese Vita? Yes, it works. You won't be able to access the US PS Store as it's not up yet. This means that you won't be able to download your games to the system, either. Still, you can access everything else, including friends lists, trophies and messaging.  Can I use Japanese games while logged into my US PSN account? All of mine work fine! What happens if you don't deactivate the Vita before restoring it? You may not be able to activate the system under another PSN account, as it's still tied to the previous one. Can you load PSP games from your PS3 or PC to your Vita on a US PSN account. Not yet, it seems. I tried it from both the PC and PS3 a couple of times.  Can you just switch out memory cards, using a dedicated card for each PSN account? Our second memory card is on order, so we can't test this yet. But I see no reason why it wouldn't work. We'll report back soon on this.  
 photo

It is possible to use one PlayStation Vita with more than one PlayStation Network account. And despite what others are saying, it's not that difficult to switch between two or more accounts. Really! Importers have been on the...

 photo

Importing Vita? Uncharted: Golden Abyss has English


Dec 05
// Dale North
Are you importing a PlayStation Vita? If so, we've got good news. While every other launch title you import will likely be in Japanese, at least one version of Uncharted: Golden Abyss will have an English option. It's no...
 photo

MonkeyPaw announces Magical Drop, Dezaemon Kids!


Nov 01
// Dale North
The PlayStation Network gets two more imports this week from MonkeyPaw. While we already have Magical Drop F on PSN the original is now on its way. Arcade Hits: Magical Drop is the first game, and it has the super-fun versus ...
 photo

MonkeyPaw to launch PS Import section in Europe


Oct 05
// Dale North
Yay for our Euro friends. MonkeyPaw Games will launch a PlayStation Import section on the PlayStation Store for Europe today. Like us here in the US, you'll now have access to direct-from-Japan PS One imports and classics. It...
 photo

Deus Ex boxed PC copies are only kind of region locked


Aug 21
// Liam Fisher
If you're thinking about importing a boxed retail copy Deus Ex: Human Revolution from the UK, you may want to reconsider. It came out on Thursday that the title would be region locked to both the UK and Russia. Initially, the...
 photo

Pandora's Tower, The Last Story coming to Europe in 2012


Aug 17
// Jim Sterling
It has now been confirmed that all three of the three titles Nintendo of America won't publish are coming to Europe, with news with Pandora's Tower and The Last Story will join Xenoblade Chronicles on the Wii in 2012.  O...
 photo

BioWare has no issue with you importing The Old Republic


Aug 09
// Jim Sterling
Australians have a hard time when it comes to games, with exorbitant prices, Nintendo snubbery and outright bans. One game not coming to the island is Star Wars: The Old Republic, but BioWare has gamers' backs. Ther...

Review: Yakiniku Bugyou (PSN import)

Jul 19 // Dale North
Yakiniku Bugyou (PlayStation Network)Developer: Media EntertainmentPublisher: MonkeyPaw GamesRelease date: July 5, 2011Price: $5.99 In Yakiniku Bugyou, you'll work over an in-table barbecue grill from a first-person view, with up to three hungry customers staring at you while you work. The goal of the game is to feed these customers their preferred cuts, cooked to their preferred doneness. Overcook/undercook their meat or send out soggy veggies and they'll let you know they didn't like it by yelling out something like "mazui," which means "gross" or "not good" in Japanese. Do them right and they'll blurt out a pleasured "oishi!" ("yummy!") instead.  During this service you're working against each customer's satisfaction meter. Feed them something they like and it will go up. Give 'em undercooked pork when they wanted charred beef and that meter will fall. Taking too long to serve food will also see that meter fall. Letting the meter fall too far will cause the customer to leave. You'll serve these customers in either the game's standard mode, which has several stages of increasingly picky eaters, or in the game's endless mode, which has diners constantly coming to fill the seats.  You'll man a grill that can cook twelve food items. A random indicator to the left of the grill shows the next two food items that are ready to be grilled. You're free to place them anywhere on the grill, but you'll have to be mindful of the grill's hot and cold spots. You'll also have to keep a close eye on the doneness of the meat, being sure to flip the meat just as it gets color and nice grill marks. Wait too long and you'll have a black, carbon-y piece of meat. Using the X button lets you place items on the grill, flip them, and even move them to other spots. It also lets you mash at an overcooked piece of meat until it disintegrates, making that spot free for the next piece of meat. The remaining face buttons are assigned to each of the three customers. You'll only need to select a food item and hit the button that corresponds to the customer to serve them that item.  As with many of the PSOne imports we've seen, part of the joy of Yakiniku Bugyou is the novelty factor. The opening menu screen is so serious and so Japanese that you have to laugh. The music is also a bit over-the-top with seriousness, and a bit out of place when you consider that the customers are anime-style drawings. There's just something funny about frantically throwing cartoon meat on a grill and then quickly throwing it into anime faces that are bitching at you.  Yakiniku Bugyou isn't the deepest puzzler there is, but it does provide a solid challenge in the later stages. The all-Japanese menus have not been translated, but it will take you all of three minutes to figure them out. And don't worry about what customers are saying to you as it's mostly unimportant. Look, this is probably the only Japanese meat cooking puzzle strategy game series out there. That alone makes it worth your $5.99. I think you'd have to be weird to pass up something so weird. 
 photo

You like yakiniku, don't you? Hell, it's not worth asking, as I'm convinced that everybody likes yakiniku. Even vegetarians. Yes. I'm telling you now that even if you haven't tried this Japanese/Korean barbecued meat on a woo...

 photo

Flying laser vacuum game coming to PSN


Jul 18
// Victoria Medina
The above video gives you a glimpse at Kyuuin a Japanese PlayStation 1 game that is getting a release next week on the PlayStation Network. The story seems to involve some kids saving a mythical book-world from evil with the...
 photo

New imports for PSN: Rapid Angel and Yakiniku Bugyou


Jul 05
// Dale North
It's like MonkeyPaw reads my mind. They keep cranking out import PSOne titles for the PlayStation Network that I've been wanting. This week they've announced two new titles for PSN: Rapid Angel and Yakiniku Bugyou. I wanted a...

Auto-loading more stories ... un momento, corazón ...