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Twisted Metal

Twisted Metal sale photo
Twisted Metal sale

David Jaffe debuts the Twisted Metal Birthday Bundle


Twisted Metal 1, 2, Black, and TM 2012
Feb 12
// Chris Carter
It looks like Twisted Metal 1 and Black weren't the only ones joining the fun, as the PSN is getting an all-out four game birthday pack for $39.99. Should you decide to go with the piecemeal approach, the new 2012 Twiste...
Twisted Metal PSN photo
Twisted Metal PSN

Twisted Metal and Twisted Metal Black coming to the PSN


The original rooftops is still the best Twisted Metal stage
Feb 11
// Chris Carter
It appears as if the original PlayStation classic Twisted Metal and the adored semi-reboot Twisted Metal Black are heading to the PSN tomorrow.Right now, it appears as if (sadly) the latter is not going to be released in tand...
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Live show: Multiplayer Monday on Mash Tactics


Feb 20
// Bill Zoeker
It's 'Multiplayer Monday' today on Mash Tactics. King Foom is doubling up the action with two recent releases. First up is the vehicular combat resurrection Twisted Metal, followed by the cosplay bloodsport of Gotham City Imp...
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Twisted Metal movie being made by Crank co-director


Feb 15
// Tony Ponce
Crank and Crank: High Voltage were fun but extremely dumb movies. Gamer starring Gerard "Leonidas" Butler and Michael "Dexter" Hall was pretty much garbage with small glimmers of joy here and there. And for some reason, I'm r...
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The DTOID Show: Max's Twisted Metal Review


Feb 14
// Max Scoville
One of this week's biggest, and most anticipated releases is Twisted Metal. Jim Sterling's a die-hard fan of the series, and he gave his thoughts on the newest iteration in his review right here. On the other hand, I've neve...
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Live show: Twisted Metal and Undisputed 3 on Mash Tactics


Feb 14
// Bill Zoeker
It's going to be an amorous 'New Release Tuesday' on Mash Tactics. King Foom will be showing his love for destruction in Twisted Metal for the PlayStation 3. Foom's venture into the demo for this one proved less than fruitful...

Review: Twisted Metal

Feb 14 // Jim Sterling
Twisted Metal (PlayStation 3)Developer: Eat Sleep PlayPublisher: Sony Computer EntertainmentReleased: February 14, 2012 MSRP: $59.99 Although almost every Twisted Metal game exists within its own narrative bubble, this freshest iteration is as close to a full reboot as the series can get. The large cast of colorful characters, each with their own sick goals and personalized vehicles, has been tossed entirely out of the window in favor of one unified storyline. There are only four main characters -- Sweet Tooth, Mr. Grimm, Dollface and Preacher (who doesn't have his own story levels) -- all of whom are totally reimagined as darker and, dare I say it, slightly more grounded characters. At least, as grounded as a demonic serial killer clown can get. Their tales intertwine as they each sequentially enter the Twisted Metal tournament, hoping to win their ultimate wish from the nefarious Calypso -- and suffer an ironic fate in the process.  There is still a large variety of cars, although they are now operated by generic "gang" members inspired by the four named drivers. Familiar rides such as Sweet Tooth's ice cream truck and heavily armored Warthog are joined by such unique vehicles as the Meatwagon (a bloodstained ambulance that fires explosive patients strapped to remote-controlled gurneys) and the Junkyard Dog (a pickup truck that flings entire taxis at opponents). While many cars are unlocked during the course of campaign play, some of the more elusive rides will take momentous feats to obtain, such as completing all the story challenges on Twisted difficulty ... and getting a gold medal in every one! Each car can also be given a custom paint job, for that all-important personal touch.  At its root, the familiar combat of Twisted Metal remains almost entirely intact. Whether you've been a longtime follower of the series or haven't touched it in years, the steel butchery on offer is instantly recognizable. A variety of wide-open arenas are designed wonderfully for exaggerated destruction derby gameplay, as players fire rockets, lay mines, and rattle off machine gun fire in a bid to take down the opposition. Although the premise of cars shooting rockets at other cars is as shallow as ever, there's still plenty of rough-and-ready amusement to be had.  Each course is littered with weapon pickups, be they homing missiles, remote-controlled bomb carts, or deadly shotguns. Although each vehicle gets a permanent sidearm (such as a simple machine gun or a drive-by magnum), the expendable main weapons do far more damage. Cars also have unique special weapons that slowly recharge with time and vary in effectiveness. The Outlaw, for example, sports an SUV gun turret that locks onto a single enemy within a 360-degree radius, while the Roadboat features a magnet that can be used to trap an opponent and smash it into a wall (this trick in particular is an online troll's dream). One of the biggest new additions is the series' first flying vehicle, a helicopter known as Talon. Impressively, the helicopter does not break the game, as most weapons still lock onto it adequately and it remains fragile enough to be taken down in a few hits.  Car balance overall is quite remarkable. Smaller cars are great at avoiding incoming fire, but they're naturally frail, while larger machines such as Darkside and Juggernaut can deal heavy damage while struggling to keep track of sleeker, more maneuverable foes. My personal favorite class is the "middle ground" type that includes such beasts as the Outlaw and Meatwagon, sporting less-than-average speed but decent armor ratings and firepower. Whatever way one prefers to dish out an automotive assault, there's a car that does the trick. Unfortunately for Twisted Metal, the game spends far too much of its time trying not to do the one thing it's truly great at. This is evident in the single-player campaign, which is annoying at best and excruciatingly nightmarish at worst. Aside from the fact that playing against the CPU isn't much fun in the first place, the range of forced, gimmicky game modes that one must suffer in order to progress ruins the entire experience. By far the greatest offenders are the racing stages, which simply do not work. None of the courses are designed well enough for races, nor are the cartoonish car physics that see vehicles spinning wildly at the slightest clip. In a multiplayer scenario, this could be amusing, but in a solo race against aggressive A.I. that trains all enemy vehicles on the human player, it's nothing short of an ordeal. During races, enemy drivers are concerned only with making sure you don't win, even at their own expense. They'll fire weapons at nobody but you -- even firing behind themselves -- and they have no issue with running you off the road and into a wall, merrily sacrificing their position in the race to screw over a human player. Add to that the fact that it's almost impossible to catch up to the front-runner should one run afoul of the many chasms and obstacles, and one has a recipe for distilled, controller-destroying fury.  Much of the racing revolves around trial and error; players are expected to fail dozens of times in order to learn every inch of the racetrack. Even arming oneself with such knowledge might not be good enough, however, and I'm certain that only the lucky will beat the penultimate race on the first, second, or third try. I'm yet to do it, thanks to the random clipping and pitfalls that effectively kill the race before it's officially over. It's far too much patience than one should be expected to have. All this is before I mention the lengthy boss fights, which often require pure luck in order to complete. Such battles are not what one plays Twisted Metal for, and they ruin the experience. I'm all for variety and new ideas, but only if they're done well. In this game, they're forced, contrived, and slapdash. It saddens me that the campaign is so miserable, as its live-action story cutscenes and stylish, twist-in-the-tale storytelling are both fantastic. The grisly narrative arcs of Twisted Metal's grotesque anti-heroes are delightful, especially for someone who has always enjoyed the series' dark humor. Not only that, but every woeful tale feels like an episode of The Twilight Zone or Tales from the Crypt, which only adds to the entertainment value. Unfortunately, the narrative isn't quite good enough to justify the hassle it takes to uncover. Still, I'll say one thing for the campaign: those who think games are too easy these days can look forward to all their masochistic dreams coming true thanks to this little fiasco.  Fortunately, Twisted Metal's draw is not found in the campaign and its range of forced, unenjoyable game modes. My desire to kick the game's Blu-ray into a river dissipated with extended time spent online. I didn't play as much as I would've liked to, thanks to a disconcerting number of network errors, but I had a blast with the games I got into.  There is a range of game modes that keep the focus on simple, unfettered, 16-player car combat, and these modes can provide enough entertainment to make up for other failures. Deathmatches and team deathmatches are joined by elimination rounds and "Hunted" games that play out like a brutal, murderous game of tag.  Nuke is a new objective-based mode that has teams capturing an enemy leader and dragging them across the streets to a missile launcher. After "sacrificing" the leader to the launcher, a nuclear missile is sent to destroy an enemy statue. Enemy teams can recapture the leader and stop the sacrifice, so teamwork is essential in order to secure victory. It's a unique little spin on familiar competitive ideas, and should add a little longevity to the proceedings.  For those who don't like going online, there's great news -- LAN and split-screen multiplayer is also supported, so there's no excuse to not ditch the rubbish single-player and play the far superior competitive modes. While it's not the most graphically stunning PS3 game, Twisted Metal's destructible environments, squishy pedestrians and over-the-top, catapulting explosions at least make it one of the more visually exciting. An excellent soundtrack featuring tracks from Iggy Pop, White Zombie, Judas Priest, and Wolfmother complements the action wonderfully. When it comes to presentation and sheer, unabashed style, Eat Sleep Play has got it going on.  I did notice, however, that a few glitches reared their ugly heads occasionally. The sound can cut out suddenly for several seconds at a time, and I had one problem with a campaign elimination match that wouldn't spawn the final car I needed to defeat. I had to restart the mission about three or four times before all the enemies finally appeared on the map. So far, I've encountered nothing that truly breaks the game, but there are a few technical hiccups on display.  When it sticks to what it's good at, Twisted Metal provides plenty of homicidal -- if rather disposable -- entertainment. A number of modes and forced campaign levels that simply don't work, however, set the experience back, and I think that the game could have been truly superb had less effort gone into the failed aspects and more been poured into the type of Twisted Metal that fans know and love. For all its shortcomings and lack of depth, however, there really is no other car combat game that has the goods quite like Twisted Metal. It's a solid entry in a series that's difficult to hate, and hardcore destruction fans would do well to pick it up. 
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Twisted Metal 2 is one of the greatest videogames to ever grace the original PlayStation, and that's an undeniable scientific fact. Though my personal relationship with the series has been a spotty affair, my love for TM2's i...

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Twisted Metal: Be Mine is disturbingly funny


Feb 13
// Brett Zeidler
Blue Goggles Films had one of their newest videos featured on the Machinima channel recently, and it's absolutely brilliant. David Jaffe himself enjoyed the video, exclaiming "DAMN NICE!" on Twitter. It features Sweet Tooth ...
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David Jaffe wants you to shoot his truck


Feb 12
// Liam Fisher
I love the idea of promoting a new game release with a contest; it's a pretty foolproof concept. I definitely like the idea of being allowed to shoot Sweet Tooth's ice cream truck with a machine gun. Sounds perfect, rig...
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Twisted Metal dev hit with layoffs, David Jaffe leaving


Feb 07
// Jim Sterling
[Update: Jaffe has responded to today's news, confirming that layoffs were had, but addressing talk of casual development by saying, "I have zero plans to make games like FARMVILLE and ANGRY BIRDS. I never said what I was doi...
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Twisted Metal delayed and censored in Europe


Feb 03
// Jim Sterling
Twisted Metal is suffering a few localization problems, resulting in the car-on-car violence being delayed in Europe. The game is now due out in March for PAL gamers, although a solid release date is yet to be confirmed. ...
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David Jaffe invites YOU to a Twisted Metal Tournament!


Jan 27
// Jesse Cortez
Upon the news that a new Twisted Metal game was coming out, many gamers couldn't wait to sink their sweet teeth into it. Well, if you live in or near San Francisco, you will have the opportunity to check out this game next...
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Sweet Tooth is gonna take you for a ride on January 31


Jan 27
// Chris Carter
[Editor's Note: Ladies and gents, welcome Chris Carter to the front page and the Destructoid news staff. Regular readers will surely recognize his face and name from our community. As always, that's where our best people come...
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Yep, Twisted Metal is getting an online pass


Jan 23
// Jim Sterling
Despite David Jaffe stating he didn't want one, Twisted Metal is getting itself a lovely, shiny, pretty little online pass. Because inconveniencing all your customers is what gaming is all about.  It's absolutely not sup...
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First-print copies of Twisted Metal include TM: Black


Dec 28
// Jordan Devore
Those who purchase a first-edition copy of Twisted Metal will receive a voucher that can be redeemed for a free digital copy of the original Twisted Metal: Black. News of this thoughtful freebie comes by way of co-director Da...

Twisted Metal: A different kind of multiplayer game

Dec 19 // Samit Sarkar
Twisted Metal (PlayStation 3) Developer: Eat Sleep Play Publisher: Sony Computer Entertainment Release: February 14, 2012 In the hour or so that I spent with Twisted Metal, I kept noticing one aspect of the combat: it can take a pretty long time to kill someone. That’s not an accident, according to the Sony producer who demoed the game for me. He explained that the design decision was a result of Jaffe’s dislike of the pace in most multiplayer shooters -- the series co-creator isn’t a fan of the endless spawn-die-spawn cycle. In those games, it doesn’t take many bullets to kill you, and firefights rarely last long. Twisted Metal, on the other hand, offers a much higher degree of “survivability,” said the producer. You’re going to have to work for a kill, but the designers believe that increased survivability only makes the game more thrilling. Here, combat is “all about the chase,” which, I guess, makes sense for a game featuring vehicular mayhem. In addition, the folks at Eat Sleep Play are hoping that longer lives will help to reduce the amount of frustration that new players have to endure while learning the ropes. That decision makes a lot of sense, since it will likely take more than a few hours to understand Twisted Metal’s chaos. Multiplayer is the focus of this game, and it’s clear that Eat Sleep Play is devoting a great deal of development time to important facets such as balancing vehicles’ abilities and tweaking weapon damage, but the modes and options are so numerous and varied that I found myself overwhelmed during the demo. Jaffe has likened Twisted Metal to a fighting game, and the comparison seems apt -- I don’t have any understanding of the minutiae of fighting games, and it’s impossible for me to have fun with them unless I’m playing someone who’s just as clueless. The depth here is staggering; with such a steep learning curve, it’s important for the game to teach newbies well, and ensure that they can have fun, too. You can outfit vehicles with an arsenal of your choosing. Each car has two special attacks, in addition to its standard firepower. A high degree of destructibility means that level geometry is always in flux. Some of the cars are better used as support vehicles, like the Juggernaut, a slow tractor-trailer that can open its rear doors for up to two teammates to hang out and man turrets. Many weapons employ a risk/reward mechanic: charging attacks makes them more effective, but in many cases, also more difficult to succeed with. One of the playable vehicles is a damn helicopter, and Sweet Tooth can transform into a freakin’ mech. The variety of opportunities will likely give rise to high-level strategic play, and will hopefully lend Twisted Metal a long shelf life. I played in three different levels: one set in the suburbs, another in a theme park, and a snowy take on New York. Although there’s plenty of work to be done before the game’s Valentine’s Day launch, the environments impressed me with their size, destructibility, and variability. The level set in a fictionalized New York is full of secret shortcuts, and its verticality -- you can go up into buildings, or head down into the subway -- provides for great hide-and-seek gameplay. The theme park balances a large open area, complete with a Ferris wheel that can be detached from its moorings, and winding narrow paths on its outskirts. The suburban landscape is sparsely populated and offers near-total destruction. All of them seem to offer play spaces that are “fair” to both sides without having mirrored halves. I played with the classic control scheme, where the face buttons cover vehicle control and the triggers fire weapons. Eat Sleep Play is also including controls based on modern racing games, with acceleration and braking on the triggers. As I said earlier, Twisted Metal isn’t exactly a pick-up-and-play experience, but once I figured out the controls, I did manage to race around the maps and score some kills. The frame rate never dropped during the fast-paced action, and I didn’t see any silly AI bot behavior. While online play is the star of the show, the game also offers local split-screen action for up to four players, just like old times. However you play, you’ll need to invest a good amount of time to learn the ins and outs of Twisted Metal, even if you’re not new to the series. Thankfully, it looks like it will be worth it.
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Unless you count the continued popularity of Mario Kart, we’re a long way from the ’90s heyday of car combat games. Modern multiplayer combat primarily concerns games in which people shoot each other, but David Ja...

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Jaffe doesn't want online pass in Twisted Metal


Dec 08
// Jim Sterling
Twisted Metal director David Jaffe would rather not have an online pass in Twisted Metal, declaring that any lost sales due to used games would be acceptable if it generated new fans. He did, however, admit that it's ultimate...
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Twisted Metal sorts out my Halloween costume


Oct 31
// Jim Sterling
Of all the nonsense publishers dump on my doorstep, this latest offering from Sony is up there with my favorites. Just in time for Halloween, I stumbled upon this scary clown mask based on Twisted Metal's purveyor of ice crea...
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David Jaffe's PAX Prime 2011 keynote


Aug 30
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
David Jaffe kicked off PAX Prime 2011 this year and his keynote address was simply mesmerizing. Here's a man who has done amazing things in the videogame industry bearing it all, including all the hardships that's come with ...
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Twisted Metal gets romantic 2012 release date


Aug 25
// Nick Chester
After being pushed out of 2011, Twisted Metal has a firm release date: Valentine's Day 2012. (That's February 14 for those who aren't romantically inclined.) "What I predict is gonna happen is you're going to have people goin...
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Jaffe: $60 is a 'SH*T TON' to ask for a game


Aug 08
// Jim Sterling
David Jaffe has joined Bethesda's Todd Howard in admitting that $60 is a significant investment for gamers to make. However, just like Howard, he's also decided that his own Twisted Metal provides enough to justify the asking...
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The DTOID Show: Nolan North, Skyrim, and Torchlight LIVE!


Aug 05
// Max Scoville
[The Destructoid Show gives a rundown of all the top news from Destructoid.com every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Subscribe to us on YouTube, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.] Hello my special ...
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David Jaffe says that they're going to miss the date of October 4, and that Twisted Metal has to be pushed back. They need time to polish the title, he says. "Thing is, you gotta trust me when I tell you that – with thi...

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Twisted Metal now an 'HBO serial killer' with an M rating


Jul 25
// Nick Chester
Remember when Eat Sleep Play was aiming for a T-rating for the upcoming PlayStation 3 Twisted Metal? It's given up that plan; the game will now ship with an M-rating. "Without the blood," Eat Sleep Play's David Jaffe told a c...
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E3: Jaffe reveals boss, stage and robots in Twisted Metal


Jun 06
// Conrad Zimmerman
David Jaffe has revealed what we'll be seeing of Twisted Metal this week at E3. The above trailer reveals a little bit of the story behind Sweet Tooth's deadly ramapage as well as a boss named Iron Maiden, a semi-c...
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New Destructoid Episode: Twisted Golden Potato Gears 64


Apr 16
// Max Scoville
Whenever I finish shooting an episode of The Destructoid Show, and I think "Yeah! Nailed it!" I'm always horribly disappointed when I see the episode. Today was one of those days. Is it a good episode? I have no idea, but I ...
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Get your extended shot of Twisted Metal in action


Apr 15
// Maurice Tan
Twisted Metal certainly seems to be shaping up very nicely, and now there's an extended trailer to check out some of the gameplay as well. Axel's big two-wheeler monstrocity of a vehicle in Dale's preview has also been announced as a pre-order bonus vehicle. I guess I'll finally have to buy a bluetooth headset now. Thanks Jaffe!

Preview: Twisted Metal

Apr 14 // Dale North
Down to the Metal Jaffe says that Twisted Metal does a good job of bringing forth the fantasy that the original team had for creating their game back in the 1990s. He says this is the first time they've been able to get close to achieving that original vision. I got a better appreciation of that when I saw how deep Twisted Metal could be, and just how much work the team has put into this game. On the surface there's these crazy vehicles and weapons, new modes, and online connectivity to impress you with. But underneath the hood you'll find lots of deep strategy and fine levels of polish on the control and balance. The end result of their work is the ultimate competitive playground. Twisted Metal is so balanced that I can't find issue with any of the vehicles. You'd think that with so many different types of vehicles and weapons there would be an imbalance, but I couldn't find one. Granted, the game isn't finished yet, and there were a few types of vehicles we couldn't play with at this preview event, but from what I've seen there was no doubt that the development team spent a good amount of time making Twisted Metal fair and fun. Amazingly, despite this balance, no vehicle feels gimped. You truly feel like a badass with nearly limitless power in all of them. The level of polish also shows in the vehicle control. In all my matches I never had to question steering or braking; it was never an issue. I loved being able to mash the X button to slam on the brakes, turn on a dime, spin around and send a missile right into the windshield of the guy that has been tailing me. That felt great every time. Knowing exactly where you'll turn, skid or stop goes a long way toward making this chaotic game fun, as with so much going on, it could have been a big, sloppy mess. Even the helicopter's controls felt like a lot of thought went into it. Hats off to the Eat Sleep Play on how much polish went into the balance and control in Twisted Metal. Maybe you could meet with some of the modern day fighting game makers and teach them a thing or two. Beyond all of this, it's clear that so much thought went into making these vehicles play nice together. Just about every unique function of each vehicle seems to promote teamwork. Some functions are completely obvious, while others are uncovered after a bit of play experience. Those with a few battles under their belt can get incredibly deep into vehicle choices and uses in the different mode types.  It should be noted that David Jaffe addressed the level destruction in Twisted Metal. Some people had beef with the destruction model when the game was originally shown at last year's E3. Jaffe made it clear that this had been addressed since then. Now shit blows up real nice.  Vehicles Much of the fun of Twisted Metal lies in the awesome selection of vehicle types. While there's a bunch of different modes in the game, all of them let you go nuts with your favorite vehicle type, and they all let you change your vehicles during a match. There's never a dull moment with so many choices. Even when I was getting my ass handed to me, I still was having a blast trying out all the different vehicle types.  Juggernaut is one of the most devastating vehicles in a game. A normal big rig with trailer would already do heavy damage on the road, but this particular one has quite a few advantages over a standard semi. The sides of the trailer open up to reveal giant mines that can be dropped on the road. Hitting one of these is deadly for just about any vehicle. In a very Spy Hunter fashion, the back of the trailer can be opened to hold up to two other vehicles. This comes in handy during team play. The teammates inside can then man either the top-mounted or rear turrets while being transported, making Juggernaut a moving fortress. There is a key weakness to this vehicle: Opening the back door to let cars in leaves the vehicle vulnerable, with damage counting up to three times normal when open. Talon, the helicopter, is the first flying vehicle in Twisted Metal. Flying might sound unfair at first, but know that ground vehicles can just as easily take down this chopper with a missile. First time players may be surprised to find that the helicopter fits into the support class more than it does offensive.  Its magnet can pick up other teammates' cars and haul them to safety. It can also bring them quickly to a conflict zone. That said, the same magnet can pick up an enemy car and drop it from up high, causing damage. It's also equipped with a Gatling gun that can be fired from a first person view. Talon was beautifully implemented and I found myself picking it more than any other vehicle. I had the most fun with the ambulance called MeatWagon. There's guns and alternates to use in this car, much like the others, but the main appeal is MeatWagon's special, which fires off hospital patients on a gurney. They're strapped with TNT to become a rolling human missile. What's great is that you can use RC control to move this gurney in a first-person view and then blow it up at a key location. Place: Sunsprings, California, Mode: Team Death Match In Sunsprings you'll blow up movie theaters and grocery stores, crash through office building doors and run over innocent bystanders. Jaffe says he has always wanted the destruction to go down in a place we can all relate to. So this is like trashing your own hometown. You know you've always waned to do this. The mode was the standard team death match. We played 10 minute matches in our first hands-on sessions to get a feel for all the vehicles. I was too busy testing all all the different car types and getting a feel for their control and weapons to pay attention to how bad I was doing. In the very first round of multiplayer, going up against other games press members, I came in dead last with one kill, eight deaths, and the highest amount of damage taken. A QA rep told me that I wasn't that bad. I told him he was full of shit. In a second try I sped around the city, avoiding the town center where all the action was happening. I snatched up power-ups and then came into the action fully loaded, spewing forth everything I could find at enemy cars. It was here that I really got to see how tight the steering controls are, as I had to dodge and hide from everyone that was out for me after they figured out what I was doing. This mode is Twisted Metal in its simplest form, but it's still a delight. I could have played this mode all night. Place: Black Rock Arena, Mode: Team Last Man Standing Black Rock Arena is insane. It's an underground battle arena out in the desert. It has a Mad Max vibe, with fire and electricity and metal tracks up high around the perimiter, surrounding a pit for lots of car bashing. The walls are sloped and it's easy to slip down into this battle pit...or worse. The level itself is alive, with moving platforms, ramps and walls that can rise or fall at any time. They'll reconfigure during gameplay, creating a sort of living maze. I had walls popping up in my face during matches that made me giggle at first, as they seemed to be playfully dickish. Going down a tunnel to find a wall pop up right before I could exit was a particularly good dick move. Later I found a ramp that popped up from the ground. I took the bait and took the ramp, and found out too late that it guided me right for a lava pit. In the ultimate dick move, lava pits have been placed at the ends of all platforms. Take a corner or edge too fast and you'll be molten metal.  The fun in this locale continues with spiked wrecking balls that swing right into the zone where the best pick-ups are. A room with spikes on the roof has you following a small, safe path very carefully. Floating health orbs that you can drive under will definitely save your ass in this level. The best power-up opportunity ever comes from a pad that you park on to charge up. Charged, it launches into the stands to bring pedestrians out into the course. Plow into these fans and you'll get health and item power-ups.  The mode Team Last Man Standing gives each team a pool of shared lives. This means that each life really matters, which is a great contrast to shooters where you'd just die and respawn over and over. The team still standing, with lives remaining at the end, wins. Making each life important really promotes team play. With communication you could use the helicopter to pick up a team mate and drag them to a healing orb. You could use Juggernaut to pick up vehicles and haul them to safety. A player using the tow truck could drop health for teammates. With good communication, offensive team play really makes a difference. In my first play of this stage I was a helicopter, and I worked to pick off unsuspecting victims from up above. When word got out on the other team, I found that many of them respawned as choppers themselves, and they worked hard to take me out of the air.  On the ground this stage is absolutely nuts. I could almost feel the developers laughing at me as I frantically sped around in race car Spectre, with machine guns blazing, firing at nothing in particular. I felt like I was up against both the opposing team and the stage itself. I was happy to see that everyone else playing was just as lost as I was. They were all doing their best to boost out of lava pits or find their way off a wall that popped up out of nowhere. I'm sure the dev team had a great time creating this stage. Place: Harbor City, Mode: Nuke Harbor City is a gritty, industrial town. It features two factories, one on each side of town. It features dive bars and strip clubs, and there's plenty of gas stations and oil refineries to blow up. A large water canal runs down the middle of the level, connecting the two factories. It's the perfect stage for one of the most interesting and deep modes of Twisted Metal: Nuke. In Nuke the goal is to destroy the opposing team's statue with a launched missile. This mode plays out in innings, with teams playing either offense or defense for a set time, and then switching. When playing offensive, you'll drive to quickly find the enemy's faction leader and "grab" him. Once kidnapped, you'll drag the faction leader behind your vehicle to a missile launch point. At this launch point, staying in the launch area safely for a set period of time will transform the captured faction leader into a sacrificial missile. You'll then fire this missile and take control of it, working to guide it to the enemy's statue without being shot down. A point goes to a successfully missiled statue, and two points go to taking one down. The team with the most points, after all the innings and rounds are complete, wins. In these stages there are two missile launchers: one in the back of the factory and another that's mobile, and requires you to follow it to launch. Getting to either and staying there is going to be hard when the defensive team is out to get you and anyone that helps you. This all may sound pretty crazy, but helpful icons on the heads-up display make it easy to know what you're doing and where you're going. Playing offense, the location of faction leaders is always marked, telling you exactly where to drive to pick one up. Once you do, you'll follow another icon to the launch area. For defense, an icon will give you the location of your kidnapped faction leader. They've made it really easy -- you just get in and go. Matches don't have to be coordinated, but they can be, and there's potential for very deep competitive play in this mode. There's much to be gained from careful planning of vehicle types and roles. For instance, each vehicle type has a different wait time before a missile can launch. Some vehicles are better suited for defense or support while others are better for snatching the faction leader up. Of course, you can also just go in and go nuts. It works nicely either way.  The Twist: Twisted Metal expands upon everything that was great about the old series titles and then adds a bunch of depth, connectivity and creativity. Competitive gamers stuck in yet another war shooter will happily crawl out of the trenches for this game come October 4th. Eat Sleep Play have created a beast unlike anything we've ever seen. 
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Oh, you're not ready for Twisted Metal. You think you are, but you're not. You may think that you're prepared, being a fan of this PlayStation and PS2 predecessors, but you're not even close to being prepared. This game is in...

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Twisted Metal dated for October 4


Apr 08
// Jim Sterling
The long-awaited vehicular violence romp that is Twisted Metal has been given a release date of October 4, 2011.  The game's looking set to be a hot one. It doesn't appear to have changed much over the years, but does it need to? It's about cars shooting rockets at each other. That's a formula you don't really need to fix.  I'll be picking this one up for sure. Who else is planning to?






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