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Review: Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty photo
Review: Oddworld: New 'n' Tasty
by Chris Carter

One of the first games I ever played on PlayStation was Oddworld: Abe's Oddysee. I remember opening up the jewel case, adorned by a creepy looking creature with his mouth sewn shut, with no idea of what to expect. Over the course of the next few weeks I became acquainted with that creature called Abe, and slowly made my way through the difficult puzzle platformer at a slow, but steady pace.

2014's New N' Tasty is basically a recreation of that same experience from 1997, for better and for worse.

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Now's a nice time to buy a Wii U: Here's everything you should know photo
Now's a nice time to buy a Wii U: Here's everything you should know
by Steven Hansen

Even if you must play all the Hot New Games, you don't need a PlayStation 4 or an Xbox One to do so until 2015. Enough of them are still releasing on PS3 and 360 this fall. The rest, on PC (and, for some of us, handhelds). 

With the recent release of Mario Kart 8 and the upcoming release of Super Smash Bros., you might consider buying a Wii U, though. 

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Smash Bros. 4: Hopes, Fears, and Predictions photo
Smash Bros. 4: Hopes, Fears, and Predictions
by Jonathan Holmes

When it comes to writing about Smash Bros, I'm a control freak. If Destructoid goes more than a day without posting about the series, I get impatient. Smash Bros is actually a big reason why I got started here. Back in 2007, the great Adam Dork hosted a weekly Smash Bros Dojo contest where readers were invited to guess what the daily Smash Bros news would be for the day.

Those were simpler times. No responsibility, no accidentally enraging thousands of people by having opinions about game design, no accusations of only working for Dtoid for the fame and fortune, or of being a being hipster who only writes about videogames to impress women who wear wooden glasses and ride bicycles made of hemp. While I'm happy to be where I am today, there's definitely advantages to being "just a fan" and not a "a videogame editorialist" (whatever that means). 

Patrick Hancock and I decided to approach this article from strictly a fan's perspective. We love Smash Bros. We think about it everyday. Getting those thoughts out of our brains felt good, and we hope it feels good for you to read about them.

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Review: Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn (Patch 2.3) photo
Review: Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn (Patch 2.3)
by Chris Carter

The last time we left off in our assessment of Final Fantasy XIV's patch 2.3, I had experienced most of the tertiary level content, ready to face off against the big boss Ramuh himself in his true form, alongside of playing more Frontlines PVP and of course, more hunting.

Over the past week and a half I've tried just about everything there is to try, and I found that overall, it's getting people to do a diverse array of content -- as opposed to 2.2 which generally funneled people into a few venues. It's not the most balanced patch, but it adds a ton of stuff to do other than grind out end-game tokens, and I'm sure that makes a lot of former subscribers happy.

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To dye for: Invisible Inc. is my kind of strategy-stealth game photo
To dye for: Invisible Inc. is my kind of strategy-stealth game
by Steven Hansen

A chasm in stealth games tends to be player skill and the supposed skills of super sleuth avatars. You're often eased into the situation, your lack of skill assumed, or you just fumble your way through -- especially with the recent trend of stealth-optional games -- feeling like Mr. Magoo. Or you're good at stealth games. It's one of the reason's they can hold up to replays. Coming back with mechanical knowledge and slinking through areas like the pro you're meant to be is exhilarating. 

Invisible, Inc. is meant to be replayed, but that familiarity and advance knowledge is not where you get your sense of empowerment, as everything is procedurally generated and, thus, different each time. 

Klei's founder Jamie Cheng sat down with me and showed me how "active stealth, by moving and doing rather than waiting," is a great fit for a turn-based system. 

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First look at Tecmo's new Fatal Frame for Wii U photo
First look at Tecmo's new Fatal Frame for Wii U
by Kyle MacGregor

Koei Tecmo unveiled the next entry in the Fatal Frame series, Zero: Nuregarasu no Miko, today during a NicoNico Live event.

The Wii U horror title, which Siliconera translates as Fatal Frame: The Black Haired Shrine Maiden, will be summoned to Japan starting September 27, 2014.

Zero: Nuregarasu no Miko is set against the backdrop of a cursed lakeside manor in the mountains, where themes of water and hydrophobia will feature prominently.

The Wii U GamePad also figures to be a core part of the experience. Koei Tecmo asserts the title will make use of the controller's unique qualities to mimic the trademark Camera Obscura, allowing players to spot things that might otherwise go unseen by the naked eye.

「零」シリーズ最新作/「零」メディアミックス 発表会 [NicoNico, 4Gamer]

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EVO 2014 recap: Here's who won photo
EVO 2014 recap: Here's who won
by Jordan Devore

And just like that, another EVO has come and gone. What a weekend.

Despite not playing fighting games much myself, I'll never miss watching the year's big tournament. The audience's energy, the drama that unfolds on stage -- it never ceases to amaze.

If you missed out on the grand finals for Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Super Smash Bros. Melee, Ultra Street Fighter IV, or any of the other featured games, look no further.

You're gonna want to watch that BlazBlue final.

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Those new Smash Bros. mystery characters are Lucina and Robin from Fire Emblem photo
Those new Smash Bros. mystery characters are Lucina and Robin from Fire Emblem
by Chris Carter

Today, Nintendo was set to tease a "New Fighter Intro Video" at 7AM PST, and tease they did. The new fighter was revealed to be none other than Lucina from Fire Emblem: Awakening. But wait, there's more! Robin from Fire Emblem is also in, and he has a female gender swapped costume! Chrom was revealed as well, but it isn't clear if he is a playable character or just a skin/assist trophy/Final Smash, but all signs point to the latter.

Finally, Captain Falcon was revealed as a returning fighter. That's three confirmed characters with two new additions and one returning character (we'll see what Chrom is soon enough). Sakurai noted last week that they were "nearing the bottom of the stash" in terms of new announcements, so I wouldn't expect a whole lot more.

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I'm going to miss tripping in Super Smash Bros. 4 photo
I'm going to miss tripping in Super Smash Bros. 4
by Jonathan Holmes

[Art by Fallen Party]

[Update: Some of you are pretty upset about the article! Sorry about that.

Also, a few people pointed out a couple of mistakes I made. First, I wrote that you can block in the air in Smash Bros. Looks like I "tripped" up! I meant to say "dodge." Sometimes when you type too fast, you put down the wrong word, and it may not get caught in the proofread. My apologies.

Also, there is some dispute over if "L-canceling" is an "unintended abuse" of the game's system, or something intended by the developers. My guess is that it's both -- that "L-canceling" was intended by the developers, but players learned to exploit it to a degree that Sakurai and the gang didn't intend, which could be why it was removed from Brawl entirely. It's hard to say for sure though, as Sakurai hasn't made any comment on the subject that I know of. Either way, you should know that "L-canceling" may be an intended mechanic in Melee and Smash Bros on the N64. Hope that helps, and if you find any other mistakes, you can let me know on twitter- @tronknotts. Thanks everybody!]

[Update 2: I asked Michael "Mr Bean" Molinary to write a counterpoint to my point and it's really good.]

There's a Smash Bros. tournament going on tonight at a local comic book store. The creator of Catlateral Damage and I were planning on attending, but they changed the game from Brawl to Melee at the last minute. We both backed out, resigned to the reality of the situation, but still disappointed. It's totally understandable that the majority of competitive Smash players prefer the increased level of fast and precise character control that Melee offers over Brawl, but as diehard Lucas, Olimar, and Squirtle fans, Melee isn't worth the $15 entry fee. 

I figured I'd get over it by watching some Melee at EVO, and I quickly found myself feeling frowny. It seems like the longer the game is played, the less high level competitors try new things. Most of the matches were just a high-speed poke and fake contest. The only times things got really interesting was when a character is in the clutch, trying to recover from being knocked off the edge, but those mechanics are just as fun to watch in Brawl or even the original N64 Smash Bros

I wondered how much more interesting it would be to watch some aggressive play in Brawl. Yes, even though it has tripping. Especially because it has tripping. 

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The best stuff on Destructoid this week [7/12] photo
The best stuff on Destructoid this week [7/12]
by Steven Hansen

You should watch Ping Pong: The Animation. It's why Lebron James realized he needed to go back to Cleveland, true story. But be warned, watching other anime after will be hard because it leaves you extra acutely aware of how mediocre and awful most anime is. Sorry, Beck.

There's only two World Cup games left to occupy yourself with, anyway. What else are you going to do?

Here's last week's post. Let's begin anew.

[We post a lot of articles here at Destructoid. The endless, ouroboros news cycle has us burning the snake at both ends, which will ultimately push big news, thoughtful original pieces, and all sorts of other great content off of the front page. Check here every Saturday for my attempt to rectify that.]

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A grand social experiment: Final Fantasy XIV's monster hunts photo
A grand social experiment: Final Fantasy XIV's monster hunts
by Chris Carter

For those of you who haven't played Final Fantasy XIV, a new patch just arrived that implemented a major mechanic into the game -- worldwide monster hunting. The concept is simple enough. Across the world in each zone, various rare monsters randomly spawn throughout, granting those who kill them extra bonuses and rewards.

These encounters are not instanced -- or -- they do not take place in separate locations for each party. They are on the same world as every other player, leading to conflicts, jolly cooperation, and everything in-between.

They're also one of the most fun things I've ever played in a game.

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Review in Progress: Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn (Patch 2.3) photo
Review in Progress: Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn (Patch 2.3)
by Chris Carter

MMOs are constantly evolving beasts. Particularly in the subscription realm, developers are always searching for ways to keep players hooked, usually in the form of major updates -- big content patches that help ease the wait between even bigger expansions. The latest MMO to get an overhaul is Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, which is seeing its "Defenders of Eorzea" patch this week, bringing up the current version of the game to 2.3.

Since this update is even bigger than the vast majority of $60 retail releases, I'll be looking at everything it has to offer to supplement to our already existing review of A Realm Reborn, which covered up to patch 2.2.

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Who wants a code for the Destiny beta?! photo
Who wants a code for the Destiny beta?!
by Mr Andy Dixon

[Update: Contest over! Check your PMs to see if you won!]

We've recently come into a hefty heap of Destiny beta codes, and we're going to hand them out to the Destructoid community!

There are three ways to win:

  1. Comment in this very thread, and we'll be drawing 30 of your names at random! You have until tomorrow at noon Pacific time to enter.
  2. Retweet this and follow @Destructoid on Twitter! 30 of you retweeters will win codes at random.
  3. Become a Destructoid Huge member! I'm going to be sending 20 of these codes to random Huge members at noon tomorrow, so get your name in the hat now!

These beta codes are good for your choice of Xbox 360, Xbox One, PlayStation 3, or PlayStation 4! Good luck!

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I messed around in the bizarre, experimental reboot of Rust photo
I messed around in the bizarre, experimental reboot of Rust
by Jordan Devore

I first played Rust back in January. It was at times scary, confusing, and frustrating, which is to be expected in an anything-goes online multiplayer game about naked men trying to survive with rocks and crudely-fashioned hatchets while others possess pistols, assault rifles, and explosives.

Thanks to its players and their chaos, Rust was entertaining in a way that a scripted game could never be -- up until the point at which it wasn't. It eventually got old. I stopped playing.

More than that, I quit paying attention to all of the updates in the pipeline for this Steam Early Access game. At about 16 hours of play time, I had gotten my fill, thanks. So I left, impatient and somewhat unsatisfied, unsure if I'd ever truly return to the game.

But I have, now that Facepunch Studios is rebooting Rust. Work has ceased on the original version most players know while the team rebuilds the game from scratch in what it is calling an experimental branch. It's playable now and as janky as things are, it's promising.

Let's take a look! (Warning: there will be some butts.)

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Review: Dynasty Warriors: Gundam Reborn  photo
Review: Dynasty Warriors: Gundam Reborn
by Brittany Vincent

When I was a kid, I loved watching Gundam Wing and the original Mobile Suit Gundam on Cartoon Network. The mecha genre has always been a personal favorite of mine so I tried to capture the same feeling while playing a video game as I had watching Gundam anime and pretending that I was Heero Yuy or Amuro Ray.

With interest in Gundam on the rise in the US after the Cartoon Network runs, some of the games were finally localized for North America. I thought I’d finally be able to play through the stories I loved so much, picking up Mobile Suit Gundam: Journey to Jaburo as soon as it came out and the disappointment I had in that game resonates with me today. It sure didn’t feel like I was in command of the mobile suit that won the One Year War. I felt like I was in control of a robot-shaped RC car.

Luckily, I was finally able to find the game that would finally reproduce the warm and fuzzy feelings that viewing Gundam for the first time did so long ago, and who would have thought it would have come in the form of a Dynasty Warriors game?

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Review: The Wolf Among Us: Cry Wolf photo
Review: The Wolf Among Us: Cry Wolf
by Chris Carter

The Wolf Among Us has been one hell of a ride. Although Tellltale's The Walking Dead managed to craft a grimdark world worth seeing time and time again, Wolf has a more nuanced take, with larger-than-life fairy tale characters who have decidedly human problems.

All of it comes to an end here with Cry Wolf, the last episode of the series. While I'll refrain from spoiling anything in particular, I will say that is indeed a satisfying conclusion.

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