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The Simpsons

In a better world, these games exist

Jun 06 // Nic Rowen
Street Fighter vs Mortal Kombat Released on the Dreamcast in 2002 to belatedly settle the fighting game rivalry that defined the 90's arcade scene, Street Fighter vs Mortal Kombat remains a legend in the fighting game community. Still considered the finest example of 2D sprite art and animation from its era, the silky smooth and obsessively detailed characters of SF vs MK set an impossible bar to follow. The almost decadent use of special purpose one-off animations and frames only adds to the visual splendor. Vega's sublimely gory “Shadowloo Slicer” fatality still elicits screams from the audience at EVO. As fierce as the fighting between the World Warriors and the forces of Outworld got, the battle behind the scenes is said to have been even bloodier; a runaway budget, arguments over almost every aspect of the design, and frequent shouting matches characterized the prolonged five year development cycle. Despite the astounding success and popularity of the title, a sequel has never been attempted. Ed Boon and Yoshinori Ono refuse to even speak to each other to this day for reasons neither of them will discuss. The licensing snake-pit of copyrights and legal redtape has prevented any other ports or remakes from ever being produced, spurring a cottage industry of Dreamcast re-sales and custom made fightsticks for the console, supported almost entirely by SF vs MK's diehard audience. Alan Wake: The Fear That Gives Men Wings One has to imagine the lengths Sam Lake and his team at Remedy had to go to to protect their secret, their lips held firmly tight, unable to tell anyone what they were really up to. Keeping things under wraps despite the kind of scrutiny placed on what would be the flagship launch title for the Xbox One. The kind of pressure they must have been under to tease even a bit of what they had up their sleeves. But, somehow they managed it, and the fourth wall shattering reveal of Max Payne as a playable character in the second act of the game will go down in history as one of the most surprising and surreal moments in gaming history. Max is every bit as cynical and bitter as ever. But this time he isn't raging against an indifferent and unfair universe with a vague sense of living a cliché. This time he can direct his anger against the very man who wrote the script of his sorry fate. The scene where he crushes Alan's writing hand with the butt of his pistol is almost unbearable to watch. Reportedly, Sam Lake spent the night of the launch locked in his office suffering an intense panic attack, a crisis of artistic confidence. He spent the last five years of his life calculating this surprise, this single plot twist. If the game failed it wouldn't just be the end of his career, it would end his self-image as an artist and writer. Hideo Kojima, no stranger to pulling a controversial character rope-a-dope called him that night and consoled him in his hour of need. From that experience, the two men formed a bond that eventually led to them collaborating on Snatcher 2, another smash success. City of Heroes: Issue 25 “Messages from a world ending” In the waning days of City of Heroes' lifespan, most of the development and design talent in Paragon Studios carefully made their exit to greener pastures. As everyone else was jumping off, one man climbed aboard the sinking ship to take over as lead designer. There would be no budget, a small (and rapidly shrinking) team to work with, and low expectations from fans and critics already aware of Paragon City's impending doom. He was supposed to be just folding up the socks and towels, putting the game to bed. Instead, Austin Grossman created one of the most memorable final chapters to an MMO ever seen. Relying on his background as a writer, Grossman set out to recast the tone of CoH to better fit the looming ennui of a world coming to an end. CoH's final storylines were not the Silver Age dust-ups that characterized most of the game's lifespan. Instead, Grossman wrote introspective questlines laced with sharp humor about heroes and villains looking inward. What compels someone to point a laser at the moon? What drives someone else to put on a cape and jump in front of that laser? And who gives a shit about the moon anyway? Couldn't these miracle men born of science and magic be doing something better with their lives and isn't this all a little bit silly and embarrassing when you step back from it? With no money to craft new areas or other big gameplay draws, Grossman had to get clever to generate new content. Flipping the familiar Giant Monster concept on its head, instead of creating new and impressive Godzilla-esque monster for players to rally against, he instead turned a single random player into an unstoppable force of destruction. An artifact known as Mournblade, a cursed black sword, would be “gifted” to a player once a month, immediately giving them an exponential boost to their stats, constantly depleting health that could only be regenerated by killing with the sword, and flagging them as a PvP target no matter what zone they were in. When the player fell, the next nearest player would inherit the blade, and the carnage would continue until a heroic sacrifice was made -- the deletion of the character currently holding the blade. In the final hours of the game's life one lone hero remained, wielding the Mournblade against a cataclysmic invasion of blatantly overpowered alien invaders. The beauty and value of struggling against inevitable darkness was CoH's final message. A fitting tribute for the beloved and fondly remembered MMO. Springfield Rockstar has always played it's cards close to it's chest but no one could have guessed that the schoolyard based Bully was a testbed for a much more ambitious project several years in the making. When Rockstar announced it's partnership with Fox to make an open-world Simpson's game where nearly every single NPC in the game was a known and beloved Simpsons cast member, the response was a mixture of unbridled excitement and raised eyebrows. Those eyebrows stayed raised as Rockstar made design choices so bold they bordered on absurd. Rather than make Bart or any of the other predictable Simpson family members the protagonists, Rockstar reached back to its tradition with mute characters and allowed players to make their own avatar, a recent transfer student to Springfield Elementary known only as “The Kid.” The game was structured similar to GTA and Bully, but with a Simpsons twist with “The Kid” taking on all kinds of missions from notable Springfield residents. Hijinks ranging from helping Comic Book Guy try to woo a regular customer (it ends poorly), to covering up an accident at the nuclear plant for Mr. Burns (it ends poorly), to trying to elevate Bumblebee Man's stature as an actor (you guessed it, it ends poorly). 400 hours of dialog, quips and jokes make Springfield a real, living place filled with the characters you know and love. Most precious of all, though, were the inclusion of previously unused and forgotten recorded performances from the late Phil Hartman, allowing a final farewell for beloved characters such as Lionel Hutz and Troy McClure. [embed]293426:58849:0[/embed] Those are games I see when I close my eyes at night. Games that I know could never have existed for a number of perfectly sound reasons, but still can't shake the feeling that we should have had them. Do you have any games like this? Titles that stick in your imagination and make you wish things had happened differently?
Dream games photo
All great ideas go to Heaven
Silent Hills was a dream game. Specifically, it was my dream game. If you asked me before P.T. crept onto the PSN servers what series I'd most like to see rejuvenated in a bold new way, I would have probably told you Silent H...

LEGO Dimensions photo
LEGO Dimensions

LEGO Dimensions has Chris Pratt, the Doctor, and the Companion Cube

And a partridge in a pear tree
May 11
// Joe Parlock
LEGO Dimensions is a game we all know is going to be absolutely huge. It's little, way too expensive LEGO with Disney Infinity glued on to it, and if that doesn’t print money I don’t know what will. Despite that, ...
Minecraft photo

Alex player skin comes to Minecraft on consoles this week

And The Simpsons on PlayStation
Apr 27
// Jordan Devore
The millions of people playing Minecraft on consoles are well acquainted with the default character Steve -- talk about merchandising might! -- but on Wednesday they'll have another option: Alex. "Now, everyone loves Steve --...
The Simpsons photo
The Simpsons

Paul Robertson's Simpsons tribute is surprisingly safe for work

And unsurprisingly outstanding
Feb 02
// Jordan Devore
Paul Robertson, whose work you might have seen in games like Scott Pilgrim vs. The World or Mercenary Kings or in crazy-ass gifs like this, has teamed up with fellow animator Ivan Dixon and musician Jeremy Dower for a heartf...

Minecraft photo

The Simpsons' Minecraft intro isn't exactly timely

But it's well done nonetheless
Apr 07
// Jordan Devore
The Simpsons has finally featured a full-blown Minecraft parody for its opener and yeah, Simpsons, Minecraft is a thing millions of people enjoy. Uh huh. It's worth approximately 30 seconds of your time if you're wondering w...

Five most notorious videogame ripoffs of all-time

Feb 22 // Vito Gesualdi
Zynga wasn't even creative enough to come up with their own RGB skintone values... Thing is, the laws regarding which aspects of a video game are covered by copyright are actually quite fuzzy, and unfortunately, EA and Zynga have settled the matter out of court, failing to establish the precedent so badly needed in this legal gray area. Just one look at the app store and you'll find hundreds of blatant clones, quick hack jobs thrown together to capitalize on the success of other popular games. Though if you dig deeper into the history of the industry, it becomes obvious that ripoffs have been a big part of the gaming industry since its very beginning. So, as a bit of a history lesson, here are five of the most notorious game ripoffs of all-time. The Great Giana Sisters When Super Mario Bros. first released in 1985, it revolutionized gaming forever; the wildly successful game laid the foundations for the side-scrolling platformer and showed off just how powerful Nintendo’s Famicom system was. In fact, the Famicom was actually more powerful than many home computers of the time, something made very apparent by Hudson’s disgustingly ugly PC port of Nintendo's most famous game. Who needs sidescrolling when you've got screen flicker? Interestingly enough, though developers eventually figured out how to make sidescrollers work on the PC, by that point Nintendo was no longer interested in porting their games, even turning away a spot-on a Mario demo put together by id Software (who would go on to use the technology in Commander Keen). So, with PC gamers eager for their own Mario game, it seemed obvious that someone would eventually come along with a simple clone to help fill this hole in the market. What people didn't expect is just how blatant they'd be about it. See, Time Warp Productions might’ve almost gotten away with cloning Mario if they’d had the sense to not make their lifts so painfully obvious. Despite some minor graphical changes (diamonds instead of coins, owls instead of goombas), The Great Giana Sisters looks exactly like Super Mario Bros. In fact, the first stage of the game is an almost perfect copy of the first stage of Mario, with the few extra pits thrown in before the final flag not enough to fool Nintendo's copyright lawyers. See, our warp pipes are orange. It's a totally different game. Though Nintendo never took any legal action against Time Warp, they did make it very clear to retailers that those continuing to peddle this blatant Mario clone might find their orders for Nintendo product going strangely unfulfilled. As a result, the game was quickly removed from store shelves, and is now quite a desired item for Atari ST and Amiga collectors.   However, the strangest thing about The Great Giana Sisters is that this strange, forgettable clone survived to the modern age. While as recently as 2009 the series was still ripping off Mario, the latest Giana Sisters’ game was actually a wholly unique puzzle/platformer. Though the series will likely always carry the stigma of having ripped off gaming’s most beloved franchise, it’s definitely interesting to see a series finally trying to find its own identity.    Most of Square's early game catalog Though Square (now Square Enix) has earned a reputation as one of the finest purveyors of RPGs (at least until Final Fantasy XIII…), there was a time when this fledgling game company was barely a blip on the radar. It wasn’t until Square got approved to develop games for the original Nintendo system that they really got to work… ripping off Sega. And don't ask why a company named Square has a stylized Triangle in their logo... See, in the mid '80s Sega had some of the most popular arcade games around, but the home ports were only available on their own Master System console. Square saw the chance to cash in with some quick clones and capitalized on it. One of their first releases, 3D World Runner, was a terrible ripoff of Space Harrier which kept most of the action on the ground, only letting you fly around and shoot dragons (see: the fun parts) during the tragically short boss battles. Not long after came Rad Racer, a blatant copy of Sega's arcade racer Outrun, which, despite being a minor hit, wasn't enough to pull Square's revenues out of the red. With Square’s money running out, company director Hironobu Sakaguchi decided to take a risk on ripping off the work of a different company, now looking to Enix’s wildly popular Dragon Quest (itself a ripoff of Origin’s Ultima series) for inspiration. Knowing that if the game failed he’d quit the game industry and head back to school, Sakaguchi realized this ripoff could be his “Final Fantasy.” Ms. Pac-Man When Pac-Man first hit American arcades in October of 1980, the little yellow circle immediately began gobbling up not just power pellets, but quarters as well, quickly becoming one of the most popular arcade games of all time. Given this wild success, North American distributor Midway was eager to put out a sequel, though the developers at Namco were strangely dragging their feet. Around this same time, three young programmers were realizing the potential market for arcade conversion kits. Arcades were constantly purchasing new games in order to keep players interested, but each new machine was a risky investment, as a bad game might not bring in enough money to cover the cost of the machine. Conversion kits were the perfect solution, letting arcade operators upgrade games that they already knew players would like, while costing much less than a new machine. The trio quickly formed the General Computer Corporation (GCC) and set to work making plug-in boards. The original Plug n' Play game. Unfortunately for the boys at GCC, their idea wasn’t too popular with arcade manufacturers, who stood to lose plenty to this new technology. Atari was the first to react, taking GCC to court over Super Missile Attack, a mod of Missile Command. Though the two parties settled, GCC realized it could be fairly risky to continue with their new venture. However, they’d already sunk much of their time into a ripoff of Pac-Man, called Crazy Otto. With nothing to lose, they decided to see if Midway would consider buying their mod. See, it's like Pac-Man with legs! Totally new! What happened next is gaming history. Midway liked Crazy Otto so much they actually signed a deal behind Namco’s back, rebranding the game as Ms. Pac Man and quickly releasing it to arcades. Though Namco’s own sequel, Super Pac-Man, would release later that same year, the souped-up ripoff of the original Pac-Man’s code was the better game by far. What’s even more interesting is that GCC would later take Midway to court over their game Baby Pac-Man (a similarly unauthorized sequel), claiming they were originally responsible for the idea of a Pac-Man family. I mean, it’s one thing to ripoff a game, another to have your ripoff become the game’s official sequel, and another entirely to sue the company who helped make your ripoff an official sequel because they liked your ripoff so much they started making their own ripoffs based on it. GCC makes laser printers now, which seems like a much less confusing industry. Angry Birds If you think you're sick of seeing crappy Angry Birds merchandise littering your local shopping mall, imagine how the developers of Castle Clout must feel, having devised the simple game formula which has now made Rovio millions of dollars in app sales and licensing deals.  This ranks right below Decca Records not signing The Beatles on the "missed opportunity" list. Though Castle Clout is definitely a bit rough around the edges, all the basic elements of Angry Birds are in there. Structures waiting to be toppled, various bad guys to be squished by the falling blocks, and a big catapult firing off a variety of projectiles. Though Angry Birds added some serious polish, and replaced the awkward catapult mechanism with some wonderfully responsive slingshot touch controls, at heart, it's still a clear evolution of this now forgotten flash game, and you hope they'd at least have the courtesy to send the guy a free t-shirt. Indeed. Thing is, it’s kind of hard to be upset at Angry Birds. After all, the mechanic of using catapults to knock down structures can be traced back to, oh I don’t know… the ancient greeks? If anything, the real moral of the story is that if you have a successful flash game, get that thing on mobile phones as soon as possible, preferably adding a bunch of crappy cartoon animal mascots to it, so you can later brand every piece of merchandise known to humankind. The Simpsons: Road Rage The Simpsons: Road Rage is what happens when you have the rights to one of the most successful television franchises of all time and zero total creativity. I like to imagine that someone in the planning meeting for this game asked, “Why would the Simpsons be driving taxis?” before being dragged down to the basement and bludgeoned to death with sacks of money. Remember, this is Electronic Arts: the same guys who invented a bunch of crappy original characters just so they could try to ripoff Marvel vs. Capcom. The same guys who wanted to make their own Goldeneye and came up with the idea of a guy with an actual golden eye.  This is unfathomably stupid. Point is, EA is full of dangerous psychopaths who care more about money than logic, and if they say the Simpsons are going to be driving taxis then you best shut your mouth and start programming. So, you might be wondering what makes Road Rage a notable ripoff. After all, there are plenty of crappy licensed titles which blatantly steal their ideas from other games, with The Simpsons having copied everything from Tony Hawk's Pro Skater to Grand Theft Auto without incident.  See, our game has a hand instead of an arrow. totally new! What Electronic Arts didn’t know is that, unlike the other developers they stole from, Sega actually owned patents on some very specific Crazy Taxi features. For instance: pedestrians that jump out of the way of a car, or giant floating arrows which show the player where to go. That’s right, Sega owns the rights to people not wanting to get hit by cars and arrows that point at things. They should’ve really pushed their luck and tried to get a patent for cars that drive really fast. Rather than take a chance on forfeiting all the money they’d made from the million or so copies of Road Rage sold, EA choose to settle the eventual lawsuit, much like they did this month in response to Zynga's counter-suit (saying it's okay that The Ville ripped off The Sims Social, because The Sims Social was ripping off CityVille to begin with). It seems that until a big company like EA decides to grow a pair and actually fight it out in court, small game developers are pretty much forced to accept that their original ideas will be endlessly cloned, as has been the case in this industry for decades now. Now, if only we could pass some laws outlawing crappy Simpsons games…
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Okay games, great lawsuits
When I first heard that Electronic Arts was suing Zynga over The Ville, a rather blatant ripoff of EA’s The Sims Social, I was pretty excited to see the outcome. After all, there’s nothing worse than a company whose only business model is to steal the works of small game developers, and given some of The Ville's obvious lifts, it seemed as though EA had a very solid case.


Christopher Walken, master of the 'Let's Play'

Apr 13
// Tony Ponce
Sometimes, a joke is just so simple that you wonder why no one else had done it before. That's what was running through the mind of our old pal Sean Carey when he discovered "Christopher Walkenthroughs" by Game Society Films...

Live show: Springfield City Imposters on Mash Tactics

Feb 13
// Bill Zoeker
It's 'Multiplayer Monday' on Mash Tactics, and King Foom is bringing you double the trouble. Foom will be calling all viewers to join him in Gotham City Imposters on Xbox 360 or PC(depending on viewer majority), and The Simps...

Review: The Simpsons Arcade Game

Feb 03 // Jim Sterling
The Simpsons Arcade Game (PlayStation Network, Xbox Live Arcade [reviewed])Developer: Konami, Backbone EntertainmentPublisher: KonamiReleased: February 3, 2012 (XBLA) / February 7, 2012 (PSN)MSRP: 800 Microsoft Points (XBLA) / $9.99 (PSN) The Simpsons Arcade first hit bowling alleys and leisure centers in 1991, back before the TV show got legitimately funny. The highly contrived plot sees Maggie replace her pacifier with a diamond, which Waylon Smithers is trying to steal for Mr. Burns because of reasons. Rather than remove the diamond, Smithers decides to steal an entire baby, prompting the rest of the Simpsons clan to give chase.  Part of the joy of The Simpsons Arcade is in just how ridiculous it is. When we were children, nobody considered the implications of a bespectacled man (wearing an inexplicable cape) joyfully kidnapping a child, or the randomness of Mr. Burns having an entire army of goons that try to kill a whole family -- including an eight-year-old girl -- for want of a diamond that he could likely have easily afforded. In fact, with the amount of money he wasted on trying to actively murder one of his employees, Mr. Burns could have bought the diamond outright for a lot less.  Not to mention the fact that both Smithers and Mr. Burns sound like Peter Lorre as opposed to themselves. Oh, and Marge's weapon -- a vacuum cleaner -- looks woefully sexist in a modern light. It's a true highlight of this game to examine just how insane it actually is, despite us all taking it for granted back in the day.  Using the same engine as TMNT, Konami's classic coin guzzler is a straightforward, simplistic beat-em-up, and some players may be surprised by just how rudimentary the action is. Playing as either Bart, Lisa, Homer or Marge (who is still the best character, thanks to the reach of her vacuum), the only real commands are walking, jumping, and hitting. Pressing jump followed by attack creates a diagonal kick, while pressing the two buttons together causes a more powerful maneuver. If two players attack together, they can perform team attacks. There are also rare weapon drops, such as a slingshot or bowling ball, and a few trash cans to pick up and fling, but otherwise the eight stages consist of walking, punching, and getting punched a lot.  It almost seems redundant to say that a twenty-year-old game has aged, but it's a warning players need to be reminded of. This was a game designed around killing the player as cheaply as possible in order for an arcade machine to grow fat on quarters, so the simplistic combat is married to frustratingly overwhelming odds that were designed to test patience and pockets instead of skill.  To counteract this on a console, Konami has allowed players to customize their own virtual credits. The default is forty, which is more than enough to beat the game, and a team of players can either share a single credit pool or have their own. There are also difficulty settings and a one-life survival mode, and a stage select screen is added as new levels are unlocked.  Other extras include sound tests and character screens, as well as the ability to unlock a Japanese ROM of the game once the American version has been beaten. There are also options to smooth over the traditionally blocky graphics and toggle the screen size, though I much prefer the defaults. The game is nicely presented in a virtual arcade cabinet, which looks better than the screenshots in this review imply, and you can choose to remove it if you wish. Once you add online play and leaderboards into the mix, you've gotten a definitive version of a game still beloved by many gamers who fondly remember it.  Fondly remembering The Simpsons Arcade is the caveat, though, as nostalgia is a key component to enjoyment. Objectively, by today's standards, The Simpsons Arcade is not very good. It's a brainless button-masher that is beaten through sheer attrition, and is so numbingly repetitive that one's thumb will feel arthritic despite the incredibly short length. To anybody playing this game for the first time, it's not going to be looked upon favorably in the least.  However, Konami didn't release it for people new to the game. This is for those who lost their pocket money trying to get past that infuriating Krusty balloon, who made it all the way to Smithers before being obliterated by one of his thousand bombs, and who still remember Princess Kashmir as a legitimate Simpsons reference. For them, this is a loving HD re-release of a game that's very dear to their hearts. For such people, playing The Simpsons Arcade is a joy that no amount of aging can quite take away. 

Any gamer of a certain age will be able to bore you extensively talking about two particular arcade games: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and The Simpsons. The classic TMNT game arrived on Xbox Live Arcade years ago, but as wit...


The Simpsons Arcade Game hits XBLA and PSN soon

Feb 01
// Jordan Devore
The Simpsons Arcade Game is set to grace Xbox Live Arcade on February 3 -- that's this week! -- and PlayStation Network on February 7. It's free for PlayStation Plus members and a reasonable $9.99 (800 Microsoft Points) for t...

The Simpsons Arcade likely coming to consoles

Nov 09
// Jim Sterling
The Simpsons arcade game is considered by many to be a true beat 'em up classic, and while most of that is due to blind nostalgia, it's still a neat little button masher. Sadly, it's never come to consoles, but the Australian...

EA scraps Dead Space 2 Wii, Simpsons games

Apr 05
// Jim Sterling
Electronic Arts had a Wii port of Dead Space 2 game planned, along with a follow up to the utterly awful The Simpsons Game. Both titles have been scrapped in favor of other projects. I'm no analyst, but I'm willing to bet tha...

Off-Brand Games: The Simpsons Road Rage

May 08
// Tony Ponce
[Many video games build upon the concepts and mechanics of their forerunners. Off-Brand Games examines those that draw just a little too much... inspiration.] The Simpsons is an institution. Its relevancy over the years cou...

Dead Rising 2 may have up to 6,000 zombies on-screen

Mar 28
// Jonathan Holmes
Izmeth Siddeek of Blue Castle Games recently remarked that he and his team are aiming to pack Dead Rising 2 with up to 6,000 on-screen zombies at a time. Upon first hearing this news, I immediately thought, "YEAH! I can'...

WINNERS!!!Destructoid Contest: Win the new Simpsons game!

Nov 18
// Colette Bennett
I apologize for the late announcement on this one, guys -- I've been working on some very special surprises for everyone for December and I completely forgot. Soon enough you'll find out much more about that, but for now, the...

Grand Theft Scratchy remains unstolen

Nov 01
// Jim Sterling
In an almost ironic twist, EA's The Simpsons Game has garnered a lot of press attention through recent controversy after drawing the ire of a company that, well, gains press attention through controversy. Rumors have been fly...

EA slams Rockstar over parody issue: Rockstar responds with drawing of a penis

Oct 30
// Earnest Cavalli
The gaming biz moves one step closer to becoming an episode of Days of Our Lives with the recent news that EA -- specifically a group of writers on The Simpsons Game -- has fired back with a salvo of verbal hot fire in respon...

Humor in videogames? The Simpsons Game delivers

Oct 23
// Jordan Devore
Admittedly, if you don't find the brand of humor found in The Simpsons TV show very funny, chances are The Simpsons Game isn't going to win you over anytime soon. Or will it?The latest Simpsons-based game not only manages to...

Rockstar = whining pussies? GTA developer caused cuts to Simpsons Game parody

Oct 04
// Jim Sterling
Yes, you read that right. Rockstar Games, makers of the Grand Theft Auto series -- a franchise famed for its merciless parodies and satire -- apparently complained to Electronic Arts about The Simpsons Game and its Grand Thef...

The Simpsons Game takes us on a Neverquest

Sep 28
// Jim Sterling
We've already seen Wolfenstein and Medal of Honor spoofed, but it's not just war games that come under the lampooning eye of The Simpsons Game. The Simpsons, set to parody a variety of famous and well-known titles, shares its...

The Simpsons: Grand Theft Scratchy gameplay

Sep 06
// Dale North
We've already seen Bart and Homer's take on World War II video games in The Simpsons: Medal of Homer, so now let's see what the female half of the family can do to parody Grand Theft Auto.Eh, while it's not as good as the Me...

The Simpsons: Medal of Homer trailer

Sep 01
// Faith
Best. Trailer. Ever! If playing the demo for Electronic Arts' The Simpsons wasn't enough to make me want to buy it, then this trailer sealed the deal. Making fun of other World War II games, the newest Simpsons game trailer t...

X'07: Hands-on with The Simpsons

Aug 29
// Faith
Sometimes I feel like the last person on Earth who stills loves watching The Simpsons, but after seeing what Electronic Arts has done with this amazing cartoon franchise, I expect to see a lot of past The Simpsons fans comi...

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