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Spider-Man

Spider versed photo
Spider versed

Bayonetta 2 director would like to make a Spider-Gwen game


Spider versed
Mar 13
// Steven Hansen
Bayonetta 2 director Yusuke Hashimoto, daydreaming on Twitter, expressed interest in making some kind of Spider-Man, or "Spider-Verse," game. "If I had to work with an existing IP," Hashimoto said, "I'd want to make a game in...
Deals with Gold photo
Deals with Gold

Xbox discounts Spider-Man, 1001 Spikes, and a lot of Mass Effect DLC


For Gold subscribers only
Sep 23
// Brett Makedonski
As part of this week's Deals with Gold promotion, Microsoft's slashing prices by a third across three Xbox One games. Web-slinging Amazing Spider-Man 2 ($40.19), shadowy noir Contrast ($10.04), and death s...
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But what is Miles Morales' rap name?
Max and Bill stop by to check in and drop some knowledge before heading of to Seattle for PAX Prime this week! Twitch got bought out by Amazon, not Google. Pokemon gets a fighting game, that you can only play in Japanese arcades. Bill gets hype on Donald Glover playing Spider-Man. And of course, our PAX Prime plans.

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Featuring bold new flavors!
Max and I set out to review The Amazing Spider-Man 2 videogame. But, we didn't receive a review copy, forcing us to instead review a Spider-Man themed board game Max picked up at a weird Chinese shop.

Review: The Amazing Spider-Man 2

May 01 // Chris Carter
The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (3DS, PC, PS3, PS4 [reviewed], Wii U, Xbox 360, Xbox One)Developer: BeenoxPublisher: ActivisionMSRP: $59.99Released: April 29, 2014 First things first: The Amazing Spider-Man 2 manages to do web slinging right -- something practically no other 3D Spider game has in years. The idea is simple in that the left and right triggers control left and right webs respectively, forcing you to actually see a physical anchor point before swinging around. Yep, that's right, invisible air swinging is no longer an option for the most part. This allows Spidey to maneuver about with grace, since you can let go of the button early to fling yourself to and fro with the new physics engine. It actually feels pretty great and achieves a sense of speed very close to the films -- and that's not even mentioning the slingshot move that can shoot you forward at high speed, or the returning slow-mo move that lets you pinpoint certain jump points. So while movement around the game's open world is great, everything else is kind of a mixed bag. Combat in particular is part of that mixture, as it takes cues from counter-based systems like the Assassin's Creed and Arkham franchises, but a lot less inspired and clean. Hits as a whole lack an impact, and despite the fact that the framerate remains fairly consistent, Spidey's animations are incredibly poor, and on top of that you'll have to watch the same few combos over and over. All you really need to do to win is mash the attack button and occasionally press the counter button to dodge and counterstike -- there isn't much to it. [embed]273999:53706:0[/embed] Stealth scenes also return, and again, especially considering the Detective Vision-like Spidey Sense, heavily evoke feelings of the Predator scenes from Arkham. Having said that, I actually enjoy these scenes as Spider-Man a little more-so than the caped crusader, because he can crawl on walls, slither down a web like a spider stalking his prey, and so on -- which gives these portions a unique and interesting feel. Pace-killing Peter Parker scenes occur a little too often though, and while they don't last all that long they do feel pointlessly injected. Speaking of pacing, the script is kind of all over the place for the roughly 10-hour affair. What starts off as a decent setup and film tie-in becomes its own mess entirely. Spider-Man begins chasing Uncle Ben's killer (which is a simple enough premise), and quickly finds himself in the middle of an attack on Oscorp. From there, it feels like the writers found any and every excuse to just pack in every villain they could find (of which there are seven) regardless of how well they worked. Having said that, there is a good amount of fun to be had here, especially since new villains are introduced every half hour or so, and in-between them, exploring the city is quite fun. It all feels like a mess, but a fun mess nonetheless if all you want to see is Spider-Man beat up and web-up some bad guys. It's tough to really call The Amazing Spider-Man 2 a current-generation game -- because it's not. While the aforementioned consistent framerate is definitely a plus on the PS4, the game doesn't look all that great, or detailed for that matter. The city feels relatively lifeless, and the UI and menus feel cluttered and a little too retro for their own good. A lack of polish isn't doing Amazing 2 any favors. Peter's old friend "Stan" returns from the first game, and this time we get to see him in the flesh operating his comic shop. It's here that you'll be able to access all of the game's extras, including a training simulation, figurine collectibles, and real comic books that you can collect throughout the city. You can also opt to change out your costume in Peter's room (pre-order bonuses range from the Venom Suit to Spider-Man's Cosmic outfiit. While it's more than a lot of other open-world games offer, nothing is compelling enough to collect or pursue unless you really want to read those comic books. The sidequests in general (fighting petty criminals and taking pictures) are simply a bore, only rewarding you with a generic 10-second clip of the Daily Bugle heralding Spidey's heroic actions. Whereas games like inFamous: Second Son, Saints Row IV, and Prototype offer up unique objectives and rewards to entice you into completing them (as well as a fun sandbox to romp in), Beenox dropped the ball here. The Amazing Spider-Man 2 isn't a complete disaster, and I can easily see fans of Spidey enjoying it at a deep discount. It's just a shame that Beenox somehow got worse at making Spider-Man games over time, and that the powers that be insist on rushing them as movie tie-ins. Somehow, someway -- we will get our Arkham of Spider-Man games again. Until then, you can just pick up a used copy of 2004's Spider-Man 2.
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Not so amazing
Spider-Man games used to rule the roost when it came to licensed comic book properties. Spidey led the way in fact on the NES, and continued his streak into the SNES with classic brawlers like Separation Anxiety and ...

Spider-Man 2 photo
Spider-Man 2

It looks like The Amazing Spider-Man 2 isn't delayed on Xbox One


It's right there on the Xbox Store
Apr 29
// Chris Carter
Earlier this month, we obtained a statement from Activision noting that The Amazing Spider-Man 2 had been delayed on Xbox One. Apparently it was the only version that wouldn't make the launch, for undisclosed reasons. But tod...
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PlayStation 3

500 GB PS3 and Spider-Man movie bundle is amazing for the sake of this pun


Don't sass Spidey, pick up his bundle
Apr 18
// Brittany Vincent
Were you sitting around thinking "Gosh, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 looks like a great game!" or "I really wish I had a PlayStation 3?" Well, you better be, because Jamie Foxx wasn't, and then Spidey had to flex on him, as ...
Spider-Man 2 photo
Spider-Man 2

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 game will not launch on Xbox One


Everything else is okay though, even Wii U
Apr 18
// Chris Carter
The new Amazing Spider-Man 2 movie tie-in game was all set to see a release on the PC, PS3, PS4, 360, Xbox One, Wii U and 3DS platforms in the near future, but it appears as if one of them will not make it in time. Apparently...
Amazing Spider-Man 2 photo
Amazing Spider-Man 2

Kingpin seems to be the...kingpin of The Amazing Spider-Man 2 game


Ha
Apr 07
// Chris Carter
The new Amazing Spider-Man game is coming soon to every console under the sun (yes, even Wii U), and this new video shows off some of baddies. You'll also find a heap of characters from the universe in general, inc...
Spider-Man photo
Spider-Man

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 doesn't look half bad


In terms of it being a fun-looking game, that is
Mar 27
// Jordan Devore
It's hard to look at what Rocksteady has done with Batman and not want the same treatment for Spider-Man. For better or worse, long-time developer Beenox has once again taken charge, this time for The Amazing Spider-Man 2, a...
Spider-Man 2 photo
Spider-Man 2

The Amazing Spider-Man 2 game looks the same as the first, only shinier


Current-gen-Man
Mar 24
// Chris Carter
The Amazing Spider-Man 2 game is set to drop in April to coincide with the second film, and this new footage gives us a look at what to expect -- basically, more of the same. Honestly, that's not a terrible thing in my mind ...
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Amazing Spider-Man 2 to have pre-order bonus at GameStop


Four costumes for the fashionable superhero
Mar 04
// Conrad Zimmerman
Activision has announced an offer you can take advantage of at GameStop if you plan to purchase The Amazing Spider-Man 2. The "Web Threads Suits Pack," available free with pre-order on PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, ...
DTOID News photo
DTOID News is part of a balanced breakfast
Here's Max to cap off the week of videogame news. He claims his laptop battery is almost out of juice but I think he just wanted to get the weekend started early. I'd have done the same thing. The new Thief and Middle-earth:...

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Spider-Man

Become the ultimate hunter in The Amazing Spider-Man 2


Totally different than Man-Spider
Jan 23
// Brett Makedonski
A new The Amazing Spider-Man movie is set to hit theaters this May, and unsurprisingly, a videogame tie-in will launch right alongside it. Aptly titled The Amazing Spider-Man 2, developer Beenox is again at the helm aft...
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The Amazing Spider-Man 2 game announced at NYCC


Set for 2014
Oct 14
// Dale North
Marvel's New York Comic-Con panel this weekend revealed that new game The Amazing Spider-Man 2 will launch Spring 2014, coming from developers Beenox. It's set to come to PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, Wii U, 3DS and PC, hitt...
Spider-Man Wii U photo
Spider-Man Wii U

The Amazing Spider-Man: Ultimate Edition is Wii U bound


All of the DLC included
Feb 15
// Chris Carter
In case you didn't experience it already, The Amazing Spider-Man, that decent Spider-Man movie tie-in game, will be headed to the Wii U on March 8th. Just like Darksiders II, this release includes previous DLC, in addition to...
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League of Legends Harrowing event officially begins


So many spiders, not enough fire!
Oct 26
// Sterling Aiayla Lyons
A week ago, Riot Games teased its new Halloween event while keeping a good bit of detail secret. Now, not only are more details available, the event has gone live and is in action! There's a new champ out, new harrowing-them...
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New DLC available for The Amazing Spider-Man


Sep 26
// Conrad Zimmerman
Activision has announced the arrival of new download content for Beenox's The Amazing Spider-Man for PC, PS3 and Xbox 360. The "Oscorp Search & Destroy Pack" adds two mini-games to Spidey's smartphone, which sounds u...

Review: The Amazing Spider-Man

Jun 27 // Jim Sterling
The Amazing Spider-Man (PC, PlayStation 3, Wii, Xbox 360 [reviewed])Developer: BeenoxPublisher:  Activision Released: June 26, 2012 (August 10, 2012 PC)MSRP: $59.99 Interestingly, The Amazing Spider-Man is not so much based upon the upcoming movie of the same name as it is an epilogue to the film's events. It doesn't spoil much about the plot, focusing mostly on a new story in the aftermath of the Lizard's Manhattan rampage, but do be warned that there might be minor giveaways. Unless, for some reason, you're laboring under the impression that the Lizard defeats Spider-Man at the end of the movie, there's no reason that this game will ruin your theatrical experience.  Curt Connors (the human half of the Lizard) is incarcerated as Oscorp sets about destroying all his cross-species research. Our adventure begins with a first-person walk through Oscorp's science labs, where Peter Parker and Gwen Stacy come face to face with some of the company's more disturbing creations: the half-human Rhino, Scorpion, and Vermin. Naturally, all hell breaks loose shortly after Parker's arrival, and the hybrids escape, along with the highly contagious disease they carry that can turn regular humans into cross-species monsters.  As a story, The Amazing Spider-Man's tale of science gone wrong isn't too enthralling, although it gets points for a rather nice portrayal of Alistair Smythe. Spider-Man's other opponents -- the aforementioned Rhino, Scorpion, and Vermin -- are rather disappointing in that they're not really the same characters from the comic books. They share names and vague likenesses, but they're all mindless monsters that only possess thematic similarities and exist mostly to pad out the boss roster. With that in mind, the game does what it's supposed to do: provide some sort of conflict for Spider-Man that can and will be easily discarded when the movie gets its inevitable sequel.  [embed]230233:44198[/embed] Amazing provides a healthy mixture of indoors and open-world sections, with Spider-Man web-slinging his way across New York and entering interior environments to undertake crucial missions. The simple ability to swing through the streets and skyscrapers of New Work is as enjoyable as it's always been, aided by some surprisingly nice visuals and fluid animations. Aiding the web-slinger in his quest is a new "Web Rush" power, which allows Spidey to zip from walls to ceilings to predetermined locations at the press of a single button. The button can also be held to slow time and more carefully select destinations and enemy targets, who can be rushed into for extra damage. Though Web Rush serves as an interesting new mode of transportation and augments the traditional web-swinging movements nicely, savvy players may notice something familiar about it, and once they do, everything else clicks into place -- this is basically Batman: Arkham City, with Spider-Man standing in for the Dark Knight.  To say the game copies Rocksteady's Arkham games is to put it mildly, as Beenox has essentially scavenged everything it could from Spidey's industry rival. The Web Rush is Batman's grappling hook, but that's just the first similarity. The combat system, too, has been taken wholesale from Arkham, with players button mashing and hitting counter-attacks as soon as they see a visual cue on screen. There are boss encounters mimicking Batman's fight against Bane in Arkham Asylum, there are shielded enemies that must be jumped over and hit in the back. There are even photography sections in which players take pictures based on vague cues, à la The Riddler's challenges. By far the most significant link between Spider-Man and Arkham comes in the predatory stealth sections. Just like Asylum and City, Parker will enter rooms in which heavily armed thugs patrol and must be taken out one by one. If Spidey is exposed for too long, the guards will open fire and he'll die pretty quickly. However, he can hit a quick-escape button to leap back into the shadows -- again, just like Bats -- and resume his hunt as the enemies grow more paranoid and panicky. The mimicry on display is utterly shameless, to the point where Beenox had to know we'd spot it, and just didn't care.  The thing is, though ... I don't much care, either. Unoriginal or not, the gameplay works with the wall-crawler standing in for the caped crusader. With Parker able to crawl on almost any wall and ceiling, he's afforded more flexibility than Bruce Wayne, and it's never unsatisfying to land a sweet stealth takedown, cocooning unwitting opponents and dragging them to the rafters. Fact of the matter is, the same predatory stealth that worked so well for Batman is just as perfect for Spider-Man, and since Beenox has used it pretty damn well, I can't fault the studio one bit.  Admittedly, it lacks some of the polish and tightness of the Arkham games. The camera, in particular, can be quite awkward to deal with, especially when Parker's stuck to ceilings. It can be quite hard to navigate the environments, with no mini-map for indoors environments, and the constant perspective shift as the player traverses multiple surfaces can be rather disorienting. The combat system, too, doesn't do quite so good a job of providing player feedback, and the customary Spider-Sense visual cues can be a bit too subtle and brief to effectively help counter opposing attacks. With Spider-Man's superior flexibility in the stealth arena, some players may find the action isn't very challenging, either. The game rarely provides much in the way of resistance, existing purely to make players feel like badasses, which it pulls off fairly well.  The Amazing Spider-Man differentiates itself from Arkham City in a number of impressive open-world boss fights, as Spidey takes on Smythe's "Spider Slayers" and other twisted machinery. Some of these robots are huge in scale, requiring Parker to swing across entire city blocks as gigantic metal snakes and other creatures smash half of New York apart in an effort to get to him. Again, these battles aren't too hard, and most of them involve repetitive action (shoot webbing, rush to weak point, hammer button, repeat), but the sheer scale of these conflicts still manages to keep each fight exciting and makes excellent book-ends to methodical interior sections.  The main game will take between six and eight hours to beat, but there's plenty of optional content to keep things running longer. The city is full of sick pedestrians, petty crimes, and car chases to deal with, and there are side missions that Parker can trigger in order to find new upgrades for his combat abilities. Bruce Campbell is also on hand to provide some "Xtreme Challenges" consisting of acrobatic displays, timed checkpoint races, and other distractions. There's a wide variety of stuff to do, although many of the tasks on offer are repeated to a significant degree.  The Amazing Spider-Man is a good game, but being chained to the movie painfully holds it back. Unable to introduce any iconic villains in any real context, and forced to work off the back of the film's plot, one gets the constant feeling that this game is restrained and never allowed to be all that it could be. It takes many good things from Arkham, but one aspect it fails to exploit is the deft use of a rogue's gallery. One of the biggest joys of Arkham Asylum and City was waiting to find out which villain would turn up next, or which memorable location would be discovered. There is none of that here, bound as it is by a universe that has only introduced Kurt Connors as a true antagonist. The fact is made even more egregious when one realizes that not a single cast member from the movie shows up to provide any voice acting -- this could well have been its own thing, and should have been, but had to bolt itself onto Hollywood in the name of money.  Money is what The Amazing Spider-Man will make, and some of that cash will be deserved. However, something tells me this game is merely establishing itself as the foundation for a better product somewhere down the line. I will be surprised if Activision doesn't announce a standalone Spider-Man game in the future, taking the elements from this title and putting them in something that can take far better advantage of them, with a more original story and a wider range of characters. The publisher would be stupid not to, as what we have here is fun, and could truly be great if applied to a more flexible title.  At any rate, The Amazing Spider-Man is still a good game, even if it does feel like a wasted creative opportunity. It steals liberally from the Bat, but it does so with a high enough degree of skill and style that it can be forgiven. If you've ever played one of the Arkham games and felt that you'd enjoy yourself more in blue-and-red as opposed to black, then The Amazing Spider-Man will provide you with plenty of harmless fun for a good few hours. Since that's better than most Spider-Man games have done in the past few years, I'm happy with it. Happy, but certainly longing for more.
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When there's a new movie on the horizon, Activision's usually on call to bring us the obligatory videogame tie-in. As is the creed of the obligatory videogame tie-in, the product is rushed, slapdash, visually unimpressive, an...

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Live show: Swingin' in Amazing Spider-Man on Mash Tactics


Jun 26
// Bill Zoeker
Oh yes, it is time for the new Amazing Spider-Man game on Mash Tactics today! If you're as big a Spider-Man fan as me, you're excited to see if this game lives up to the fan-projected promise of being as good as Spider-Man 2 ...
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Bruce Campbell gets extreme in The Amazing Spider-Man


Jun 22
// Jim Sterling
Will The Amazing Spider-Man be a good videogame? Well, it's a licensed game made to coincide with an upcoming blockbuster, and Beenox is making it. Draw your own conclusions.  Good or bad, however, everybody's favorite ...
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NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE


Jun 21
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Like all superhero games, The Amazing Spider-Man will feature multiple unlockable costumes. HeroHQ got a peek at one of the outfits called the "Spider-Morphosis," and it's horrifying. The man-spider transformation is based from issue #437 of The Amazing Spider-Man comic, and all I have to say about that is NOPE! Alternate Costumes: Cross-Species Spidey Suit [HeroHQ, via Siliconera]
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Stan Lee shows web slinging skills in Amazing Spider-Man


Jun 21
// Kyle MacGregor
With The Amazing Spider-Man coming to theaters later this summer you can bet your sweet ass that Bobby Kotick is licking his lips in anticipation of all the cash Activision's latest movie tie-in is about to generat...
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The key villains of The Amazing Spider-Man


Jun 12
// Brett Zeidler
So, I'm not liking what I've seen of The Amazing Spider-Man film. On the other hand, the game appears to be coming along perfectly. With a combat system inspired by the Rocksteady Batman games, an open-world setup similar to ...
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Seriously, just watch the video that's made up of all in-game footage. It feels so good knowing there's an open world Spider-Man game once again. Hopefully the end products ends up being worth it. What I played was awesome, ...

E3: Putting the 'amazing' back in The Amazing Spider-Man

Jun 05 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
The Amazing Spider-Man (Xbox 360 [previewed], PlayStation 3, Wii, PC, 3DS, DS)Developer: Beenox / Griptonite Games (DS)Publisher: ActivisionRelease: June 26, 2012 (US) / June 29, 2012 (EU) By pressing the Web Rush button, Spider-Man will move toward whatever your reticule is pointed at. He'll swing, run, crawl, and do everything it takes to get to the destination you selected all on his own. It's important to note that you're not locked into the path you just made, and you can either press the Web Rush button again to move somewhere else or just take control of things yourself by moving the analog stick. Additionally, holding down the Web Rush button will slow all the action down to a crawl, allowing you to carefully plan a route by either highlighting a pre-selected option (indicated by a yellow Spider-Man silhouette) or just looking and pointing at an area yourself. Beyond the Web Rush stuff, merely swinging around the beautifully recreated New York City is just so much fun. The camera stays tightly on Spider-Man, in a cinematic-like fashion which makes web slinging that just more enjoyable. The camera can get jarring at times, and those of you who can easily get dizzy will want to take some breaks while playing. Combat-wise, the action is very fast paced. Spider-Man makes use of Lucha libre type attacks that are performed with ease. Plus he can stun enemies with his webbing attack, which you'll be happy to know won't be tied to any sort of web cartridge-based limitations. I took on a few missions during my demo time, the main mission being the Rhino fight. You can't hurt the Rhino directly, instead you have to get him to charge at you and jump at the last possible second so he slams into a heavily armored SWAT truck, thus getting stuck and allowing you to wail on him for a bit. You have to do this a few times, with the last attack on Rhino sending him flying up into the air. A fun fight, but it sucked that the battle was limited within a small enclosure. I would have enjoyed the fight more had it been out in the open-world setting. I hope this was not an indication of how the other main boss fights will play out. On that note, however, the last thing I did was fight against a robot drone that was flying through the city. The robot is unleashing all sorts of attacks toward Spider-Man as the player gives chase. You need to jump on its back when near enough in order to knock it out of commission. The battle is pretty chaotic, to the point where it was hard to keep track of the drone's location at times. This is the sort of battle I'm hoping we see throughout the game. All in all, I'm really looking forward to The Amazing Spider-Man. The game picks up just after the events of The Amazing Spider-Man movie, and you can be sure to expect plenty of classic villains, and a lot of side missions, too. You'll even be able to find and collect a variety of Spider-Man comics, all of which will be readable in the game. Developer Beenox is taking the series back to the direction they should have never veered off course from to begin with. While it's hard to state for certain this early if they'll match what Rocksteady did with the Batman series for comic videogames, I can at least say they're putting the Spider-Man franchise back on the right path again. Plus, you can play as freaking as Stan Lee. How cool is that?!
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The Spider-Man videogames have been a roller coaster of real fun highs and "Why did I just waste $60 on this?" lows. Thankfully, The Amazing Spider-Man is somewhere in the "real fun highs" category, at least based on what I ...

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The Amazing Spider-Man's Web Rush ability detailed


May 22
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The Amazing Spider-Man game is looking great, and one of the cool new features you can expect is the Web Rush ability. Beenox's Executive Producer, Brant Nichols, details the feature and gives a first look at how it will wor...
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Pre-order The Amazing Spider-Man to play as Stan Lee


May 09
// Jordan Devore
I'm taking a wait-and-see approach with The Amazing Spider-Man, so pre-ordering isn't exactly on my mind in any meaningful capacity. That said, the game does interest me more than the last few to come out, and the (Xbox 360- ...

Preview: The Amazing Spider-Man

Mar 14 // Conrad Zimmerman
The Amazing Spider-Man (PC, PS3, Wii, Xbox 360)Developer: BeenoxPublisher: ActivisionRelease: June 26, 2012  One of the most apparent changes to the web-slinging formula is a greater focus on Spider-Man on screen. The camera has been pulled much closer than it has been in past games and Spidey pretty well dominates the screen (particularly when perched somewhere). He looks fantastic, with a ton of detail applied to his costume. While invincibility had been enabled for the purposes of our hands-off demonstration, we were told that Spider-Man's costume will take battle damage and look even better as the game is played. The close-up also has an interesting effect on web-slinging. While flying about, Spidey can occupy up to as much as the center third of the screen and as the camera is focused on him, everything surrounding him moves by in a vertigo-inducing blur. It's a cool effect, but one which I would expect to be a bit of a challenge to try and navigate or control until you've managed to get the hang of processing all the visual information. Spider-Man's "Web Rush" move will help with this, though. It's a refinement of the "Web Zip" we've seen in nearly every game in the franchise for the last ten years, in which Spider-Man fires webbing and pulls himself swiftly toward his target. Using Web Rush, the player will be able to quickly navigate an environment by targeting where you want go and pressing a button to execute an animation which gets you there. When using the ability, the game suggests places to move, but any surface can be targeted and Spider-Man will perform a series of jumps, flips and flings which make use of surrounding terrain to reach this destination. It's pretty cool to see in action, full of all the high-flying contortions one has come to expect from the character. The implementation looks promising as well. While you will be able simply target and go, players will be able to ease themselves in to using this ability by pausing the action and surveying their environment before committing to an action. The HUD even pops up with helpful indicators of suggested places to move or environmental objects which can be interacted with. The open exploration of Manhattan is back in full effect, including "crime in progress" events in which Spider-Man can intercede. You'll get to chase after people escaping in cars, disabling their vehicles in a QTE sequence, same as it ever was. Peter Parker's camera will be returning to the series as well and you'll be able to snap pictures of Spidey, reviewing them later on a laptop in the game. Interior action is feeling like a much more significant change. At one point in our demo, we were shown a mission where Spider-Man infiltrates an Oscorp building to recover some stolen research and, all of a sudden, I realized that I was now watching a demonstration of Batman: Arkham City where everyone was wearing the wrong costumes. Spider-Man may be climbing on walls, but that just confers an additional stealth advantage as he can move literally anywhere to perform a silent takedown. Combat mechanics, too, seem almost directly lifted from that other comic book game, using a very similar freeflow system. As Spider-Man fought a crowd of foes, flipping and jumping, the inspiration remained apparent -- even driven home as we were shown how to use Web Rush to escape combat and enemy attention to resume stealthily eliminating foes. None of that should be construed as a criticism of Beenox. If you're going to make a comic book game at this point, Arkham City is the lead to follow and our demo of The Amazing Spider-Man suggested it could be every bit as much fun to play. Some elements of the build we were shown were still pretty rough around the edges in terms of animations, and there are a lot of elements still being worked on. This concerns me a little bit, given that the game is scheduled to be released just a few months from now on June 26, a week prior to the arrival of the new film in theaters. Potential exists, however, that this will be remembered as more than just the Spider-Man game which released in 2012.
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The Spider-Man franchise has seen its share of highs and lows, due in no small part to Activision's effort to make sure there's always another title on the horizon. And with a reboot of the film series coming this summer, the...

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The Amazing Spider-Man villain: Re-imagined Rhino


Feb 24
// Dale North
Activision has revealed the first villain for upcoming game The Amazing Spider-Man with this new trailer. Here you'll see Rhino and Spidey go at it in New York, at first in slow motion, and then in crazy mode,...

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