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Preview: Two Worlds II (it's actually fun!)


Jun 21
// Jim Sterling
There are children yet unborn who weep within the bellies of their mothers, knowing they are to be thrust into the same world that gave us Two Worlds. The original RPG from Topware Interactive is so atrocious, so unutterably ...

E3 10: Hands-on Nail'd

Jun 20 // Jim Sterling
Nail'd is essentially about quad bikes zooming through filth and getting into all sorts of high speed silliness. Realism has been thrown out in favor of unbelievably high jumps, riding on the roofs of trains, and going faster than anybody should. Its controls are standard, you don't have to worry about things like drifting, and altogether Nail'd comes across as a racing title for people who generally don't like racing games. It's pretty cool, actually.  I don't drive, and I hate worrying about realistic driving physics in my racing games. If I wanted a realistic driving experience, I'd get into a real car. Nail'd most definitely appeals to somebody like myself, a person who enjoys the speedy thrills of a racing title, but doesn't really want anything else.  Aside from the racing, the only other thing to be concerned about is a boost meter and the tricks required to fill it. Filling the boost is fairly simple -- you pull off certain easy tricks, such as jumping through hoops of flame, landing well after a big jump, or even landing on an opponent's head. The boost fills up pretty quickly, meaning you'll always have a reserve of extra speed nearby. It's pretty essential too, as Nail'd can wind up pretty difficult if you're not paying attention.  Steering is important, especially in the air, where you have to try and land without hitting anything dangerous. Crashing is a regular part of Nail'd, but the excess boost always gives you a fighting chance. With so much to avoid and watch out for, it's pleasant to note that the steering is really responsive and forgiving, again driving home the theme of not having to worry about anything other than the pure racing aspect.  My time with Nail'd was brief but encouraging. It's not the most refined racer out there, but it's very fast and it's pretty damn fun, which is what really matters at the end of the day. There's not really much else that needs to be said.
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I typically don't get along with "realistic" racing games, but I'll love any good racer that does something a little over-the-top. This is why I am somewhat drawn to Nail'd, a new bike racing game from Southpeak Interactive. It trades in realistic physics for sheer speed, and surprisingly it works out quite well. Read on for some hands-on impressions of Nail'd.

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Two Worlds II debut trailer is all epic n' stuff


May 27
// Jim Sterling
Two Worlds II is a game with a hard job. It's got to convince people it's worth buying despite its status as a sequel to the worst RPG made this generation. It's shocking to think Two Worlds ever got a sequel, but watching t...
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Here's who won the Dementium II/Astro A30 contest!


May 20
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Our second Dementium II and Astro A30 contest was a huge success. Every single entry was just beyond amazing. It was tough picking who would win but we were able to narrow down our choices down to Mitchell and Jenki. Congratu...
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This week we're giving away another copy of Renegade Kid's and South Peak's Dementium II. The survival-horror title is now out in stores and you can win yourself a copy, plus a signed poster for Dementium II and an Astro A30 ...

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We think Dementium II is trying to tell us something


May 11
// Jim Sterling
Southpeak just sent over a review copy of its DS horror game Dementium II, with a mysterious message attached. As you can see in the above image, it came packed with a diaper and a label that reads, "Seriously... just trust m...
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This week we're giving away Renegade Kid's and South Peak's Dementium II. The survival-horror title is hitting the DS tomorrow and you can win yourself a copy, plus a signed poster for Dementium II and an Astro A30 gaming hea...

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Two Worlds II coming out on September 14


May 03
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Two Worlds II, that sequel that no one asked for but is surprisingly looking really good, will be out on September 14 for the PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and PC. The game will have a simultaneous release here in North America, Ca...
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Shop smart, shop Dot-Mart


Apr 07
// Conrad Zimmerman
3D Dot Game Heroes doesn't try to hide what it is and I respect that. One can call it a Zelda clone and they'd be falling right in line with the marketing. Take this brilliantly funny European trailer as an example. The...
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This new Dementium II trailer is yucky


Mar 23
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
A brand new Dementium II trailer was released and it's pretty damn gross. The whole time you're looking at little screens sewed into someone's body. That's pretty messed up Southpeak and Renegade Kid. You guys are freaking s...
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New Dementium II screens are full of horror and violence!


Jan 27
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Dementium II is delayed so Southpeak and Renegade Kid have sent over some new screens to make up for the sad news! These aren't some p*ssy screenshots either! They're full of gore, horror and violence! Look at that guy with a...
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Dementium II delayed to April


Jan 26
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
Due to some kind of manufacturing delay, Dementium II has been pushed back from its February 16 release. We can now expect the handheld survival horror title to come out on April 20, 2010. Jools Watsham, the creative directo...
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Section 8 'Seek and Destroy Map Pack' DLC available now


Jan 19
// Brad Nicholson
Remember Section 8? It’s TimeGate Studios’s twitch-FPS, featuring mind-melting swivel action and massive dudes in robot armor that drop from space planes. Keep that last fact in mind a bit longer, because now the...
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3D Dot Game Heroes coming to Europe!


Jan 14
// Jim Sterling
Every time we've posted a 3D Dot Game Heroes story, at least one reader asks the same question: Will it come to Europe? A fair question, since Demon's Souls is still due a European release date, and the PAL territory always s...
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Blood Bowl hits retail PC, Xbox 360 and PSP in 2010


Dec 29
// Jim Sterling
Just when I was wondering what on Earth happened to Blood Bowl, here comes Southpeak to announce that the Warhammer-flavored football game is due for a retail release in January 2010. Previously only available as a downloadab...
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Dementium II to terrify retail on February 16


Dec 17
// Nick Chester
SouthPeak has announced that Dementium II for the Nintendo DS will hit shelves on February 16. This means that it can finally stop sending me horrifying post cards in the mail. It's kind of freaking out my post lady.  S...
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Two Worlds II launched online advent calender with prizes


Nov 30
// Jim Sterling
You know what they always say: It's not Christmas unless Two Worlds II has launched an online calender. Now that Topware has done this thing, we truly know that the season of good will is here! Two Worlds II will be counting ...
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SouthPeak 'crosses the line' with TNA for DS, PSP


Nov 30
// Nick Chester
Already mentioned in some fancy financial report, SoutPeak Interactive has now officially announced TNA iMPACT!: Cross the Line for PlayStation Portable/PSPgo and Nintendo DS. Not much info is known about the game outside of ...
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Two Worlds II pushed back to Spring 2010


Nov 16
// Jim Sterling
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! The latest victim of the big 2009-to-2010 exodus is highly-anticipated RPG sequel Two Worlds II. Greatly hyped for its innovation, graphical achievements and r...
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SouthPeak to publish TNA wrestling titles in 2010


Nov 11
// Nick Chester
As Midway Games crumbled and was eventually gobbled up by Warner Bros., the fate of franchises and licenses hung in the balance. Games like Mortal Kombat, Spy Hunter... we were all concerned. But for those concerned about the...
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Video interview: Dementium II


Oct 30
// Daniel Husky Lingen
 I won't lie, I've done my fair share of interviews in strange places, however this one takes the cake. In the basement of the Bright Dawn Treatment Center, I had the opportunity to speak with Aubry Norris, product marke...
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Dementium II debut trailer will chill you to the bone


Oct 29
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
The debut trailer for Dementium II is upon us and it will creep you out. The video begins with scenes from the first game and then jumps over to the sequel. The Doctor, main bad guy of Dementium II, narrates the trailer as w...

Going to Hell and back in Dementium II

Oct 28 // Hamza CTZ Aziz
Dementium II (DS) Developer: Renegade Kid Publisher: Southpeak To be released: February 2010 Dementium II picks up right where the last game ended; however, you don’t need to know what happened in the first game to enjoy the sequel. The game begins with main character William Redmoor waking up in a recovery room. A nurse tells William that he’s been out for a few weeks after undergoing brain surgery, and that she has taken William back to his cell -- oh yes, you’re in a prison. More specifically, the Bright Dawn Treatment Center, which is located in a small town in Michigan. As soon as the player is given control of William, the game sends you into an alternate dimension. This happens throughout the game -- you’ll be jumping back and forth between the real world and this Hell dimension a lot. Everything in the Hell dimension has a different look and design compared to the normal world. For instance, the bars that were keeping you in your cell room have a little opening now. You’ll find yourself hesitant in using this opening, though, as there’s a guillotine right above it. The entire touch-screen interface has seen a vast improvement compared to the original Dementium. L or R is still used to shoot, the D-pad/face buttons are used to move (double tapping the buttons will let you run) and you’ll move the camera with the touch screen and stylus. In the center of the touch screen is now a mini-map showing where you have and haven’t visited. Below the map is your weapon and item storage. When you go to select a gun or item, you’ll touch and hold the inventory button and then slide the stylus to what you want. The game pauses when you’re in the inventory and resumes as soon as you lift the stylus from the screen. On the right of the screen is your reload button and an up/down arrow. The up arrow makes your character jump (double tapping the screen also jumps) and the down arrow lets you crouch. After crouching to get out of the cell, you’ll start to make your way forward, where you’ll come across your very first weapon, the shiv. You’ll be able to hold ten weapons at a time, including pistols, shotguns and flamethrowers. You’ll still have a flashlight that you need to use, but it won't take up a weapon slot now, and it’s possible to dual-wield the flashlight and weapons. But there are some weapons that you can’t dual-wield with the flashlight, such as the sledgehammer, which can also open up blocked passageways. Once you have the shiv, you’ll encounter a few Chest Maw enemies seen from the first game. There are around a dozen new enemy types on top of all the bosses; the Chest Maw and the Mollusca (worm-like creatures) are the only ones being brought back from the first game. You won’t have to worry about enemies endlessly respawning like in the first game, either. Once a room has been cleared, it will remain clear upon revisiting the room. As you make your way forward, a cutscene takes place, showing someone being hung by his arms from the ceiling. A couple of doors then open, and you get your first glimpse of the first boss as it runs through the room, eats the guy in one bite and runs away. As you’re fighting in this Hell dimension, you’ll come across a lot of -- and this is the best way I can describe this -- fucked-up shit. One room had a guy on a table as chains were being forced through various parts of his body. After moving forward a little more, William is then transported back to the normal dimension, but it’s not safe here, either, as there are prison guards out to get you. Back in the real world, I came across a red vortex, which is where you can save your progress. The saving system from The Ward was the number-one complaint about the original, and Dementium II completely solves that issue by having the game auto-save every time you’ve gone through a door. So there's no more back-tracking through the entire level if you die. Saving at the red vortex points will fully recharge your health, and you can now store health pills in your inventory, too. You’ll eventually come across a operating room where you’ll meet the main baddie of the game, The Doctor. The Doctor tells William that whatever was in his head is now loose on the entire place, but before The Doctor can finish talking, the player is popped into the Hell dimension again and an evil version (more eviler version?) of the Doctor greets you. He basically talks some shit to you and then sets loose the first boss of the game. The boss is rather easy, but it takes a while to kill, since the only weapon you have is the shiv. The creature can crawl on the walls and ceiling, attacks you with its claws and occasionally vomits up Mollusca at you. After defeating the boss, your goal is to get out of the prison. Along the way, you’ll come across some new enemies, such as the black cloud-like creature called the Whisperer (think Lost's Smoke Monster.) It will slowly hunt you down wherever you move, and it can’t be killed. You have to avoid it at all costs -- if you touch it, you’ll instantly be transported to a room where several Chest Maws await you. After defeating the Chest Maws, you’ll be transported back to the same room, where you can try again to get out. The audio quality in Dementium II is superb and you’re doing yourself a giant disservice if you don’t hook up a surround sound system or use headphones to listen to the audio and music. I seriously got creeped out by the Whisperer as it whispered spooky things. Renegade Kid is really pushing their engine in Dementium II, and we’ll see a lot of different environments this time around. After getting out of the prison, you’ll set foot in a forest as snow falls. Your next goal is to get to the nearby town’s cemetery, where you have to dig up the grave of your dead daughter. Your wife has told you that you need to get your daughter’s body and bring it back to a specific location. You are literally using a shovel to dig up graves in an attempt to find your daughter’s body. You have to dig up the right grave, too; otherwise, you’ll get attacked by enemies. After you’ve dug up your daughter’s grave, you find a doll in place of her body. You now have to take the doll and place it on an altar; upon doing so, a giant blade comes down on the body and blood comes pouring out of the doll. It’s at this point that you, the player, start to really question your sanity. Was this really a doll? How could a doll bleed like this? Which dimension is the real one? You don’t have much time to think this over, though, as the next boss in the game comes flying at you. That blade that pierced the doll is now usable -- it’s supposed to be the weapon that can really harm the Wendigo Witch boss. There will be a number of limited-time weapons like this; you’ll discard them once they’ve served their purpose. The Wendigo Witch boss takes place in a completely pitch-black room. The witch will fly at you from a random direction, and you have only a couple of seconds to figure out where she will be coming from. There’s an on-screen prompt that will clue you in, and her eyes glow red (you can see them off in the distance before she strikes). The witch can also have these walls come up from the ground that will hurt you on impact and make you drop your weapons. The goal is to strike the witch with the special knife, but halfway through the battle, I realized the shotgun worked a hell of a lot better in inflicting damage on her. Towards the end of the battle, the witch completely disappears and you see your wife crying on the ground. As you get closer to her, she turns into the witch and strikes at you. I knew that was going to happen, yet I still jumped in fear when it did. After the battle, the witch transforms back into your wife and you’re not sure whether she really was your wife or really the witch this whole time. Dementium II will really fuck with your mind. The first game mostly just creeped people out, but Dementium II really wants to make players question their every action. Renegade Kid once again pushes the DS to its limits and I can’t wait to pick this up next year. There’s going to be around 12 hours worth of gameplay including some light puzzle elements, all running at 60 frames per second. Three difficulty levels and a survival mode round out this horrific package. [Editor's note: The UI for the touch screen is different in the demo I played compared to the images in the gallery. Also, there was no health bar or a note of what weapon you have on the top screen. Some of the images are from an earlier build.]
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Dementium: The Ward was the first game by the folks at Renegade Kid. It was an impressive first outing for the company -- they were able to make a great first-person shooter and survival horror game on the Nintendo DS, of all...

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Southpeak responds to our Section 8 review, finds a bug


Sep 12
// Jim Sterling
I'll give Southpeak credit where it's due. We've torn many of their games to shreds, but not once have they ever complained, demanded a re-review, or thrown bitter accusations at us. That said, one of our more positive review...

Review: Raven Squad

Sep 07 // Jim Sterling
 Raven Squad (Xbox 360 [reviewed], PC)Developer: Atomic MotionPublisher: Southpeak Games/Evolved GamesReleased: Out now MSRP: $49.99Raven Squad is both a first-person-shooter and a real-time-strategy. It's two games rolled into one, with the player able to switch between both styles of play at any time. Save for a few select moments where players are forced into one particular game type, the game can essentially be played from beginning to end as either an FPS or RTS, or things can be switched up depending on what the situation calls for. As an experiment, Raven Squad is a success. The game deserves a golf clap for marrying two completely unrelated genres together and creating a game that is both cohesive and very playable. Being able to switch between both a first-person and overhead perspective should be a confused mess, but the developers surprisingly did quite well in this regard. The FPS controls are a little awkward and unlike what most shooter fans will be used to (mapping reloads to the bumper button is ludicrous and using special abilities in RTS mode is bemusing), but the control scheme is surprisingly simple for the most part and it's actually very convenient to be able to zoom out and see the lay of the land in RTS mode, planning a course of action to perform in FPS mode. The trouble is that while Raven Squad successfully married an FPS to an RTS, it didn't marry a good FPS to a good RTS. Both the first-person shooting and real-time strategics are sub-par at best. The game is a slow and dull affair, regardless of the perspective, with both gametypes playing like something dredged up out of the nineties, completely ignoring any advancements made since the days of Command & Conquer or Quake. Just because the overall premise of the game is unique, that didn't give the developers an excuse to make the individual parts sub-standard. Unfortunately this is what happened, and so Raven Squad's good idea is spoiled by the fact that it was used to stick two very below-average games together. Both the enemy and ally A.I are horrible. Your squadmates will sometimes just run into danger without a care in the world, ignoring your orders, and commanding them in RTS mode can be astounding in terms of how badly they carry out commands. At one point, I directed a squad to blow up some explosive barrels. Rather than do the smart thing and stay at a safe distance, the squad shot the barrels while practically standing on top of them, killing themselves in the process. Your soldiers are completely ineffectual fighters in RTS mode, and give you no backup when you take control of one of them in FPS mode. They won't complete objectives on their own, they won't revive fallen allies unless directed in RTS mode (which they will do twice as slowly for some reason), and they won't get into cover or obey any rules of self-preservation. What's worse, the game completely loses its mind toward the end of the game. In the latter chapters, Raven Squad becomes a clusterfuck as the entire squad dies at checkpoints for no reason whatsoever, or allies randomly glitch a mile away from the rest of the team and get themselves killed. The more the game goes on, the less sense it makes, and the more frustrating it becomes trying to corral wandering comrades and fight dogging enemies that wander around with very little purpose. Players take control of two squads, an Assault and Infiltration unit, although there's no real difference between them outside of each member's weapon and special ability. Having an Infiltration unit is useless because the enemy AI is so spotty that they'll usually see you from miles away or simply know that you're there for no reason at all. The weapon variety is quite cool, but ultimately having two squads to command just makes the experience twice as annoying, especially when your frail soldiers constantly die and require badly placed medkits. Oh, and if everyone dies, you have to hear a horribly boring mission brief over and over while the game enjoyes an unjustifiably long load time.  Raven Squad is horribly made in every area of development. Graphically, it's incredibly poor, with bad animation that glitches frequently, sparse environments, and character models that should never be seen in a supposedly current-generation game. As if to punctuate how bad the production values are, the voice actors sound like friends of the developers, if not the developers themselves. They barely manage to beat out the voice actors from the original Resident Evil in terms of bizarre inflection and making each line sound inappropriate and nonsensical. I'm also fairly certain that some of the accents used in the game could qualify as borderline racist, too. The industry is indeed full of good ideas that never realized their full potential, and Raven Squad is certainly that. With how poorly put together the whole experience is, I doubt this particular game ever had a chance to be anything resembling a halfway decent title. Despite the success of the overall premise, the dismayingly poor quality of the individual elements ruin any sense of accomplishment and amount to a staggering failure of a finished product. If indeed a game this underwhelming could be considered "finished." Just another ruined idea to throw on the ever-increasing pile. Not even the fact that one of the lines includes the term, "Satan's little piss-pot," could save this. Score: 3.0 -- Poor (3s went wrong somewhere along the line. The original idea might have promise, but in practice the game has failed. Threatens to be interesting sometimes, but rarely.)
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The medium of interactive entertainment is full of good ideas that, for some reason or another, never realized their full potential. Either the required budget just wasn't there, pressure from publishers restricted developmen...

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Maybe find traces of pubic hair in Crime Scene for the DS


Aug 27
// Nick Chester
I'd imagine that being a detective is a stressful, yet sometimes rewarding career. You head out to a crime scene, you find pubic hair on the toilet, you match it up with the creepy guy you found peeing in the bushes, and BAM!...
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Section 8 pushed back a week [Update]


Aug 26
// Jim Sterling
Section 8, Southpeak's sci-fi shooter that is blatantly better than Velvet Assassin, is being pushed back a week. I know you were all looking forward to playing it, as evidenced by the fact that every time I play the demo, no...
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Section 8 demo available today on Xbox Live, mo fos


Aug 21
// Hamza CTZ Aziz
A demo for Section 8 is now available for stealing up some space on your Xbox 360 harddrive. The demo consists of one multiplayer map where you’ll be able to touch down into some 16 player frag fests. You can also play...
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Scandal: Former Gamecock CEO says SouthPeak is not paying up


Aug 16
// Matthew Razak
Ok, stick with me on this one because Destructoid is about to get all serious business on your ass. Late last year Dementium: The Ward and Insecticide developer Gamecock sold itself to competitor SouthPeak and all was happy t...
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What the armor says: Section 8


Aug 14
// Brad Nicholson
A column of flames plummets from an orbital ship. The scorching pillar smashes into the middle of a boisterous battlefield laced with rocket fire, magnetic rounds, sensor arrays, war walkers, and lumbering tanks. What fell wa...

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