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Shmups

Aerobat photo
Aerobat

My brain can't handle this 'absurdly high-speed arcade shmup-like'


Let's get this through Steam Greenlight
Jan 23
// Jordan Devore
Not ten seconds into watching this video for Aerobat, a shoot-'em-up about "reckless self-endangerment," I fired off a staff email to call dibs on posting it. Holy shit! Gimme. Your pilot's ship doesn't have enough power to ...
Starr Mazer Kickstarter photo
Starr Mazer Kickstarter

Point-and-click shoot 'em up Starr Mazer now on Kickstarter


Starrmazing
Jan 22
// Darren Nakamura
A couple days ago Steven told us that Mega Man composer Manami Matsumae would be contributing to Starr Mazer, and that she would not be alone in that endeavor. Indeed, the huge list of composers on the Starr Mazer Kickstarte...
A Quiver of Crows photo
A Quiver of Crows

A Quiver of Crows looks lovely, seeks Greenlight approval


Flying skeletons and laser-firing birds can have all of my votes
Jan 10
// Rob Morrow
Although I'm not a shmup aficionado by any stretch of the imagination, I do enjoy playing them from time to time. The ones that I tend to go for are typically on the unusual end of the spectrum. They either stand out du...
Resogun photo
Resogun

Resogun weaves its way onto PS3 and Vita tomorrow


Portable voxels incoming!
Dec 22
// Kyle MacGregor
Resogun is coming to PlayStation 3 and Vita tomorrow with cross-buy support. Dale North gave Housemarque's voxel-charged shoot-'em up a glowing review when it first arrived on PS4. He called it "the ideal system launch g...
Atomic Santa photo
Atomic Santa

Dropsy's Jay Tholen presents Atomic Santa: Christmas Omega


A satirical sleigh ride into the weird world of paranoia culture
Dec 21
// Rob Morrow
From the strange and fertile imagination of Jay Tholen (Dropsy the Clown) comes a very special holiday treat this Christmas season. A harrowing tale of two brave individuals willing to stand tall aga...
Resogun photo
Resogun

Looks like Resogun is also coming to PS3


It's like Defender except I don't hate myself afterwards
Dec 03
// Jordan Devore
Housemarque's arcade shooter Resogun was the first PlayStation 4 game I played and, a year later, I still think that was the right choice; someone had to save those humans and it might as well have been me. Did they all survi...
PlayStation Plus photo
PlayStation Plus

Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut free with PS Plus in December


Injustice on PS4 and Hitman HD Trilogy on PS3, too
Nov 26
// Jordan Devore
A whole new audience is about to experience the delightful oddities of Deadly Premonition: The Director's Cut (PS3) once it joins PlayStation Plus. They don't know what they're in for, Zach. Hitman HD Trilogy (PS3), which inc...
The Blue Flamingo photo
The Blue Flamingo

The Blue Flamingo is a ridiculously adorable shmup


Might and Delight exemplify handcrafted Indie games
Nov 18
// Rob Morrow
Swedish game studio Might and Delight really knows how to make games that stand out visually. Its attractive-looking paper art style on the Shelter series is, in my mind, unmistakable. I can recognize the stud...
Bullet Hell iOS photo
Bullet Hell iOS

Bullet Hell Infinite looks like a neat indie iOS shooter


Coming to Android as well
Nov 03
// Chris Carter
Nicolas Bevillard has spent quite a bit of time crafting his own take on the bullet hell genre, and the fruits of his labor is Bullet Hell Infinite -- which is out now on iOS, and in development for Android. It's basically a...
Resogun PS Vita photo
Resogun PS Vita

Resogun coming to PlayStation Vita (Update)


Off-the-cuff announcement
Oct 30
// Kyle MacGregor
Today over at the PlayStation Blog, Sony Xdev Studio Europe detailed some new additions to Housemarque's PlayStation 4 shoot-'em-up, Resogun. (Photo mode incoming!) Funnily enough, though, the article's most enticing piece of...

Review: A City Sleeps

Oct 21 // Nic Rowen
A City Sleeps (PC [reviewed], Mac)Developer: Harmonix Music Systems, IncPublisher: Harmonix Music Systems, IncReleased: October 16, 2014MSRP:$14.99 A City Sleeps is an experiment for Harmonix, and it very much feels like it (with all the good and ill that implies). While the side-scrolling arcade shoot-'em-up genre is a total departure from its previous body of work, the studio's fixation with music remains present as ever, cleverly blending the action on screen to the soundtrack. Both the player and the enemies fire in time with the music, creating a synesthesia-like experience of sensory interplay; listening is often as important as watching closely, and getting into the rhythm of the soundtrack can mean the difference between successfully anticipating attacks and being in the right place at the right time, or dying a clumsy embarrassing death. More than any other shmup I've played, when it's at its best, City encourages the sublime trance-like experience of total concentration that enthusiasts of the genre know and love. Which is why it's a shame there are so many small annoyances and flaws that will frequently, and rudely, snap you out of that hypnotic state. City casts the player as Poe, a sort of dream-exorcist who is able to dive into the sub-conscious minds of others and purge them of their personal demons. The game is set in a super-slick techno-future where the line between "person" and "personal computer" has blurred to a point of non-distinction. The dreamlike imagery focuses on that tension, calling up visions of ruined cities, clockwork machinery, and teaming insects representing the hivemind grid the entire population is plugged into. The soundtrack alternates between the synthy-electronica of living inside a computer and sombre, ambient sounds that bring to mind isolation and disconnection. It has a great, hip futuristic sensibility reminiscent of Transistor (always a good thing). [embed]282861:56040:0[/embed] Sadly, those interesting visuals are as much a stumbling block as an asset. Each screen is cluttered with a barrage of visual information. Dull, frequently static and unanimated enemies get lost in the backgrounds, often colored too similarly to stand out against them. Enemy fire and obstacles dissolve in a mess of sheer sensory overload, with too many competing colors and flashing lights assaulting your eyes at once. It's frustrating to constantly smack into unseen attacks even after replaying a Dream several times over. Adding to the visual clutter are the Idols, a key gameplay mechanic unique to City that sets it apart from other shmups. As a dream-exorcist, Poe has a collection of helpful Ghosts that can be plugged into Idols, large floating, abstract objects such as statues or railway cars, to provide various support effects also in time with the music. You start with the Ghosts of Anger and Mercy, which act as an extra damage dealer and a healing fountain respectively, and unlock more exotic options as you complete the Dreams on higher stages of difficulty. Poe can only carry three Ghosts at once and each Ghost has two different functions depending on what type of Idol it is slotted into, creating a variety of tactical choices to consider. While offering an intriguing element of depth, the Ghosts are also visually overwhelming. The Idols take up a massive amount of the screen, and when active, emit a large colored highlight around themselves, as well as spew out whatever effect the Ghost is producing. The screen is soon dominated by colossal shock-waves, a smattering of orbs, and tons of other visual garbage that betray not only the cool aesthetic of the title, but the ability to proficiently play it. The Idols and Ghosts are a fantastic idea, but the execution leaves a lot to be desired. Difficulty is always a personal thing, especially in a niche genre like shmups that tends to cater to a hardcore, specialized audience. I consider myself a shmup enthusiast; while I've never 1-CCed a game, I'm in deep enough to know and care about what a 1-CC is (clearing the game on a single credit or continue for the uninformed out there). I can safely say, this game is hard (and not in a fun way). There are five stages of difficulty to play through, and the curve is severe. City is unsatisfyingly breezy on the lowest difficulty setting, but quickly escalates to near-impossibility. The confusing visuals are compounded by slippery controls that don't respond quickly or accurately enough to deal with the lattice-work of death you'll frequently contend with. Furthering the frustration is Poe's anemic firepower, that is often unable to defeat larger enemies before they simply wander off after torturing you for a while. I eventually managed to beat all three Dreams on the forth difficulty setting and two of them on the fifth by the very skin of my teeth (from the leaderboard information, it seems only one person has conquered the most demanding Dream on the highest difficulty at the time of this review). While hardcore shmup nuts will appreciate the challenge, many players will likely find themselves stymied and unable to progress deeper into the game. This is doubly frustrating as City locks alternate Ghosts and passive upgrade Relics behind successfully completing higher difficulties. These Ghosts and upgrades offer some of the coolest mechanics in the game, and in many ways seem necessary to enjoying it. For example, the Master Ghost and its associated Relic allow you to apply devastating damage to enemies through skillful, and risky, screen positioning based on where you are relative to the possessed Idol. It's a great mechanic. On one hand, it adds another layer of strategy and thought onto an already hectic and stressful situation, but if you use it right, you'll be able to eliminate enemies before they can overwhelm you. It quickly became my favorite tool. Handy as it is, some players might not ever be able to unlock it, and this seems to be a constant theme. As you progress you get speed-boosting passives, an upgrade that makes the healing Ghost substantially more effective, and damage perks that all combine to offset much of the earlier frustration. It's understandable that Harmonix wanted to include some element of progression and reward for tackling the bigger challenges, but it seems like all the best toys are hidden in the back-end of the game, past the point where many players will likely throw up their hands and uninstall. Adding insult to injury, you can take those unlocked Ghosts and perks back to earlier tiers of difficulty. So players stuck at one point can't even amuse themselves trying to crack the leaderboard. A player that has unlocked all the goodies can just circle back and ace those difficulties to a degree that's impossible to compete with if you only have the default loadout. There are only three Dreams and three interactive soundtracks to enjoy. While the higher difficulty levels do offer some degree of replayability, it's hard not to feel left wanting by the paltry amount of content available. It feels like the game is just starting to roll when you hit the credits, the record scratching to a sudden unexpected stop. The whole experience is frustrating, because there is a genuinely cool game hidden somewhere in there. As an examination of other ways to apply rhythm and sound to gameplay mechanics, it is a solid proof of concept. There were moments while I was playing it that the world around me seemed to fade away and I didn't even think about the controller in my hand. But then I'd hit one of the many snags, die another frustrating unfair death, and the experience would be soured. A City Sleeps feels like a half-made game. Perhaps if they had a little more time or budget to add a few more Dreams, and even out the experience for players of all skill levels, it might have been something special. As it is, A City Sleeps is strictly for hardcore shoot-'em-up fans and people who are intensely curious about the future of rhythm games (an interesting Venn diagram for sure).
A City Sleeps review photo
Flat note
[Disclosure: Nick Chester, who is currently employed at Harmonix, previously worked at Destructoid. As always, no relationships, personal or professional, were factored into the review.] It's a weird time to be Harmonix. It i...

A City Sleeps photo
A City Sleeps

A City Sleeps still looks enchanting, available now on Steam


A challenging bullet-hell shooter for the rhythmically inclined
Oct 17
// Rob Morrow
Harmonix's chaotic-looking but nonetheless stylish music-driven shoot-'em-up A City Sleeps is now available on Steam and there's currently a 10% discount bringing the price to $13.49. While I typically shy away from bullet-h...
Castle Of Shikigami photo
Castle Of Shikigami

Castle Of Shikigami is on iOS today in Japan


For 600 yen
Oct 03
// Chris Carter
One of my favorite shoot 'em up series comes to iOS today. If you happen to have a Japanese account handy you can pick up Castle of Shikigami for 600 yen. Like most shmups on iOS it has auto-fire controls to facilitate t...
Söldner-X Vita photo
Söldner-X Vita

Söldner-X 2: Final Prototype is coming to the Vita with 'next to no load times'


Beyond that it's basically a port
Oct 02
// Chris Carter
I don't know why but the PlayStation 3 version of Söldner-X has always had a special place in my heart. Maybe it's because it's one of my most-played games on the PS3 back in an era when it didn't have as many choi...
Raiden V photo
Raiden V

Raiden V coming to Xbox One next year


Trailer coming soon, we'd bet
Sep 18
// Dale North
If things work out as we expect them to, you'll soon see a trailer for Raiden V popping up on YouTube and our front page. The next in the line of shmups will come to the Xbox One next year in Japan, and most likely beyond.  There's a trailer running at Microsoft's Tokyo Game Show booth today. Stay tuned -- I'm sure we'll have it soon. 
Japanese indie games! photo
Japanese indie games!

Revolver 360 RE:ACTOR shoots up PC tomorrow


Doujin shooter set to arrive on Playism's English storefront
Sep 11
// Kyle MacGregor
Revolver 360 RE:ACTOR launches its attack on PC tomorrow for $9.99, Playism announced today. The shoot-'em-up comes by way of doujin studio Cross Eaglet, and is most notable for its eponymous swivel mechanic. The t...

Bullet-hell and rhythm fans will both like Harmonix's new game

Aug 29 // Brett Makedonski
The underlying brilliance behind A City Sleeps is its accessibility. Most players familiar with twin-stick shooters will feel an instant comfort controlling it. Left stick to move, right stick to shoot. Easy enough. However, complications start to arise when the game asks you to not only be skilled, but to factor in technique as well. A City Sleeps tells the tale of Poe as she enters the dreams of citizens of SanLo City in an attempt to save them from their unending nightmares. If it sounds confusing, that's because it kind of is. Harmonix's Nick Chester told us that the team hasn't quite figured out how it'll convey the story, but it'll likely be through cutscenes or text. The build that we played contained neither, so we were unable to glean any of that on our own. Moving through dream worlds as she does, Poe has control over three ghosts -- Anger, Mercy, and Master. The catch is that these spirits can only be unleashed at certain idols that appear at predetermined spots as the level progresses. Doing fine on health but have some nasty enemies on the screen? Anger will deal an area-of-effect attack that damages anything in its radius, or Master will significantly weaken anything between you and the idol. Conversely, Mercy will shoot out bursts of oft-needed health, for those in the mood to sacrifice offense for defense. [embed]280339:55479:0[/embed] It all sounds basic enough, but music is the element that ties everything together. Without it, it'd be a frantic mess. However, the musical score is dynamic, leading to sections that are slightly slower or faster depending on the action on the screen. Likewise, Poe's shot speed follows the speed of the score, as do the idols which will disburse their assigned power-ups usually on the downbeat of a measure. It culminates in an experience that is entirely predictable for the musically inclined, but still difficult enough for even seasoned bullet hell players. Getting into a groove and knowing which idol you need to be by at any point in a measure, while dashing around and doling out damage can be supremely rewarding. Any break from the rhythm will leave you scrambling to dodge projectiles, but regaining the momentum instantly puts you back in sync. Although music is so integral to A City Sleeps, Chester thinks that shoot-'em-up fans will find a real challenge here. Given some time with the game on an easier difficulty, we're inclined to agree. It's certainly no cakewalk, as we felt the heavy hand of failure more than once. Juggling ghosts, shooting at enemies, and avoiding bullets is a lot to ask of even the finest multitasker; the music's just there as a fine guide.
A City Sleeps photo
Hands-on with A City Sleeps
Music has always been at the heart of what Harmonix does. From Rock Band to Dance Central to the extremely experimental Chroma, the studio's made sure that whatever the player's doing, they'll nod their head and tap...

 photo

Harmonix announces A City Sleeps, a musical shoot 'em up


For $13
Aug 29
// Dale North
Harmonix announces A City Sleeps, a musical twin-stick shoot 'em up a heaping helping of anime and bullets. It's like a musical Geometry Wars. Harmonix says that soundtrack synchronization drives projectiles, movement, bulle...
Touhou photo
Touhou

Touhou 14 now available via Playism Japan


But is an official localization on the horizon?
Aug 16
// Kyle MacGregor
Touhou Kishinjou: Double Dealing Character is now available for Windows PC via Playism Japan. Initially released last summer at Comiket 84, Double Dealing Character is the fourteenth official entry in the Touhou Project,...
Ubusana photo
Ubusana

Ikaruga director developing new PS4 shooter


M2 announces Ubusana
Aug 14
// Kyle MacGregor
Ikaruga director Hiroshi Iuchi is working a new shoot-'em-up for PlayStation 4 called Ubusana. The project comes from M2, the studio behind the Xbox 360 version of Cave's Bug Princess and Sega's remastered classics ...

Review: Steel Empire

Aug 05 // Chris Carter
Steel Empire (3DS)Developer: TeyonPublisher: Starfish SDReleased: July 31, 2014MSRP: $29.99 What you see is what you get -- Steel Empire is a horizontal shoot-'em-up with seven levels. It follows the tried-and-true "shoot and bomb" configuration of so many shooters before it, where the vast majority of time is spent on dodging bullets while keeping a continuous stream of fire going. The story is rather inconsequential, as it involves your typical "rebel versus empire" plot device -- but like pretty much every other shooter on the market, the proof is in the gameplay. Right off the bat, you have the option of choosing between the Etopirica, a swift yet small plane that lacks firepower, or the cumbersome Zappellon, which hits like a truck and moves like a snail. Each plane allows you to play with a completely different style, which lends itself well to multiple completions. I personally prefer the Zappellon, as it operates with a wholly unique movement pattern that isn't found in most genre staples. Steel Empire is not a bullet-hell shooter, as it follows the more traditional pattern of providing more enemies to deal with than bullets, which can get just as tricky at times. Said foes can come from the sides, the sky, or even the ground -- the latter of which can be particularly difficult to hit with your ground shot, which strikes every time you fire your weapon. One hit doesn't mean instant death, as you have a health bar that slowly drains as you take damage. As you can imagine the Zappellon is a bigger target with a larger hitbox, but it can also take a beating due to its increased health pool. [embed]278964:55102:0[/embed] Power-ups litter the field, granting you extra firepower, bombs, bonus points, more health, and so on. What I like about how Steel Empire handles these pick-ups is that it never really goes overboard with them. The "P" tokens will slowly upgrade your standard shot over time and reward players who manage to avoid death, but it's entirely possible to beat the game with your standard ship and some skill. It's a very well balanced mechanic. In terms of its presentation, Teyon has lifted the game perfectly from its source material. It looks, sounds, and feels great on the 3DS, and is a natural fit for Nintendo's portable. The 3D effect is more pronounced than many other eShop games, and the user interface is wonderfully minimal. The same could be said about the retro soundtrack, which is phenomenal. The stages have a ton of character to them however, and every theme is memorable in its own way. From soaring through the beautiful cloud-filled skies to dank cavernous ruins, it's easy to get drawn into an individual level and the appropriately themed enemy models that accompany it. In terms of extras, you're really not getting a whole lot -- you can adjust the difficulty level to your liking, up your total lives and continues, and change your button configuration. That's ... about it. You're going to get most of your enjoyment out of playing on the hardest difficulty setting and going for the most amount of points in score-attack fashion, although there are no leaderboards. If you have a Sega Genesis, you'd probably be better off just picking up the original cartridge for less than $10 online. The 3D effects and dual-screen interface simply aren't enough to warrant a full $20 upgrade, but the fact remains that the game is as classic as ever and worth playing. If you're a shoot-'em-up junkie you likely won't feel the sting of the price tag, but everyone else will want to wait for a sale.
Steel Empire photo
A pricey classic
Steel Empire is a game that not many people were able to experience, sadly. As a child, you likely only had access to either a Super Nintendo or Sega Genesis, which cut out a ton of potential classics for you to play and cher...

Mighty Tactical Shooter photo
Mighty Tactical Shooter

Mighty Tactical Shooter is a rad looking turn-based shmup


On Kickstarter with a week left in the campaign
Jul 24
// Darren Nakamura
Usually when one thinks about shmups, precision motor skill and quick reaction are what come to mind. Mighty Tactical Shooter turns that completely on its head. Though precision movement and shot placement is still required,...
Steel Empire photo
Steel Empire

Steel Empire will hit the 3DS next week for $30


That's a pricey pricepoint
Jul 24
// Chris Carter
Publisher Teyon has just confirmed to Destructoid that Steel Empire, the Sega Genesis and Game Boy Advance shoot-'em-up, will arrive on the 3DS eShop next Thursday. It's a classic steampunk-themed shooter that will feature f...
Cuphead! photo
Cuphead!

Cuphead is 40% done, going to be a trilogy


Glass half full
Jul 07
// Steven Hansen
I can't believe Cuphead has only been in my life for less than a month after its quick E3 showing. I'm so attached to it already. It's the game I didn't know I needed. Forget these tired, 20-year old nostalgia trips. Ev...
Resogun photo
Resogun

Resogun's new massive update gets a stylish trailer


Also, a sale
Jun 25
// Chris Carter
Recently a free update dropped for Resgoun that added new features to the game, like a ship creator and full-on local co-op. Now we're getting a DLC in the form of Resogun Heroes, which adds two new modes and a new game worl...
Resogun photo
Resogun

Free Resogun update adds ship editor, co-op


Also, more trophies
Jun 23
// Chris Carter
Resogun is still one of the best games on the PlayStation 4, and over the weekend, it got a free update that added quite a bit of content. In addition to a pretty badass ship editor (which people have already gone to town wit...
Rhythm Destruction photo
Rhythm Destruction

Shmup shmup revolution: Rhythm Destruction is on Steam now


Alternate title: Spacedock Band?
Jun 16
// Darren Nakamura
We never covered the Rhythm Destruction Kickstarter, but it did fine without us, making more than 120% (wow!) of its $2000 (oh) goal. Mashing up a shmup with a rhythm game seems a little weird to think about, but after watch...
Astebreed photo
Astebreed

Astebreed is coming to the PlayStation 4


Along with TorgueL and Revolver360
Jun 11
// Chris Carter
Astebreed is coming to the PS4! Sony has announced that it will be coming to their newest console, along with Revolver 360 and TorqueL. In case you aren't aware, the former two are shoot 'em ups, and the latter is a 2D platfo...

Review: Astebreed

May 31 // Kyle MacGregor
Astebreed (PC)Developer: EdelweissPublisher: PlayismReleased: May 23, 2014MRSP: $19.99 Astebreed is an old school shooter, the kind you've seen in arcades for decades now, but this STG (shooting game) is anything but anachronistic. Vaunting some of the most gorgeous art you'll see in the genre, it's real calling card is a dynamic camera that deploys three distinct vantage points in a constant state of ebb and flow. Throughout the campaign, the perspective shifts seamlessly between horizontal, vertical, and over-the-shoulder angles that go a long way to craft a resplendent visual showcase. The experience fluctuates from moment to moment. It can resemble Gradius or Ikaruga for minutes at a time, with top-down or side-scrolling slants and the accompanying gameplay one might expect, only to smoothly pan into the third-dimension for sequences more akin to Sin & Punishment. This constant shakeup always seems to keep things interesting, breathing new life into these classic formulas, and looking nothing short of amazing all the while.  Far from just a pretty face though, Astebreed backs up the sleight of hand with deep and absorbing mechanics and even makes a decent attempt at a story -- something shoot-'em-ups typically reserve for manuals or eschew altogether. The premise isn't all that inventive, mind you, focusing on a talented young mech pilot and a galactic conflict between humanity and a relentless alien race, but there's actually some depth behind it. [embed]275197:54012:0[/embed] The tale unfolds in a natural way, gradually revealing itself to the player through mid-mission dialogue and the occasional cutscene, and is generally light on exposition. It can be a tad confusing though, as the voicework, while well acted, is delivered solely in Japanese, and your eyes will frequently be too preoccupied with bullets to bother reading text. That said, the narrative is entirely optional, and the game is just as lovely in arcade mode, if you'd rather skip out on the story. Okay, let's get down to the nitty-gritty. Your mech is equipped with several cannons that can dispense justice in a myriad of ways. The standard attacks include a concentrated stream of bullets and a spread shot, each of which can be charged up to deliver a homing attack that will harass enemies for a limited time, and give you some breathing room. These are implemented in different ways, though. One is a long range attack with a narrow area of effect. It can be aimed in any direction, but is somewhat finicky. The other automatically targets enemies within a small radius. This one is easier to use, but is a lot slower, and requires players to get up close and personal with their attackers. The lock-on attacks can also be used to target enemies on different planes, even when the camera is in a 2D perspective, which allows you to do things like strike enemy battleships in the distance or take out oncoming swarms before they have a chance to return the favor. Mastering how and when to use these techniques amidst the chaos will likely prove to be the key to victory when all is said and done. That said, my favorite implement of destruction is the sword. Both a means of offense and defense, it packs a punch in close quarters and can also be used to swipe away certain types of oncoming fire. This encourages an aggressive style of play, where players will want to be in the thick of battle, slashing and shooting at point-black, rather than hanging back at the edge of the screen. It's exhilarating, to say the least. In terms of challenge, there are a swath of difficulty settings that should be both inviting to newcomers and veterans alike. The pacing is pretty much perfect too. It's fairly accessible at the outset, allowing folks to get their bearings before gradually turning up the heat. Toward the end of the six stage campaign, it culminates with a finale that forces players to implement everything they've learned along the way in one last desperate final battle. It will test you, and might even push you to your limits. But it all comes together, and it's a pretty brilliant thrill-ride.  It's a fairly forgiving experience though, one that doesn't throw up a lot in the way of roadblocks like game over screens. The game checkpoints between and during levels, ensuring that players can tackle tricky sections until they figure it out. It's by no means a cake walk, rest assured, but you probably won't be tearing your hair out in frustration either. Doujinsoft studio Edelweiss accomplishes just about everything it sets out out to do with Astebreed. It's inventive, beautiful, and absorbing. The music is catchy and perfectly fitting. I have no major complaints, really. It's an endearing experience from start to finish, one that I look forward to enjoying again and again for years to come. This is one of my favorite shoot-'em-ups in years, and fellow STG enthusiasts would be remiss to overlook such a gem. Astebreed is a masterstroke. Spread the word.
Astebreed reviewed! photo
A slice of bullet heaven
The rising prominence of independent games has been oft described as meteoric. The center of gravity has shifted over the course of a single generation. As hardware becomes exponentially more powerful and development costs sp...

Shooters photo
Shooters

Space shooter Futuridium EP Deluxe coming to PS Vita, PS4 in July


Here's a fresh trailer
May 30
// Jordan Devore
Arcade shooter Futuridium EP Deluxe looked like a good time last we saw it and here's another, better trailer to go with news of its impending Cross-Buy release on PlayStation 4 and PS Vita. Developer MixedBag has announced ...

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