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Shigeru Miyamoto

Zelda Wii U photo
Zelda Wii U

Nintendo nearly unveiled Legend of Zelda for Wii U at E3


Perhaps a Tokyo Game Show reveal is in the cards
Jun 12
// Kyle MacGregor
Nintendo has an ace up its sleeve. It is, of course, a new Legend of Zelda title for Wii U. However, according to series creator Shigeru Miyamoto, the company isn't quite ready to play that card at this stage of the...
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Ogle some Nintendo's finest E3 titles, and cat people!


There's that trademark Nintendo flair!
Jun 11
// Jason Cabral
Nintendo sure has been sharing a lot on the great titles they have on the table for this year! From the return of Super Smash Bros. to the nostalgic feeling The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds, Nintendo is really hitti...
Nintendo @ E3 photo
Set for June 11 at 10:30AM
Nintendo won't be hosting a traditional E3 press conference as in years past. Instead the company intends to host smaller events focused on the software lineup for the US market. This we knew, but we were left to wonder what ...

Luigi-moto photo
Rolling Stone sits down with the affable Nintendo designer
GameSpot? Time? New York Times? And now Rolling Stone? Everyone wants a piece of Shigeru Miyamoto! If he's so willing to speak to anyone and everyone, why hasn't he spoken to us yet? We need to arrange a pow-wow as soon as po...

Miyamoto photo
Miyamoto

Miyamoto nixed all the original Luigi's Mansion 2 bosses


'He wanted bosses that could only be in Luigi's Mansion'
Apr 04
// Brett Makedonski
Shigeru Miyamoto may not have had direct day-to-day involvement in the development of Luigi's Mansion 2, but that didn't stop him from waltzing in and acting like a total boss.  During an interview with IGN, Bryce Hollid...
Wii U's future photo
Wii U's future

Miyamoto: Wii U has a long future


Nintendo man shockingly says Nintendo product is okay!
Mar 13
// Jim Sterling
Game designer Shigeru Miyamoto has reemphasized his belief that the Wii U is going to be okay, despite its less-than-overwhelming performance. Predicting a long future, the Nintendo brain says he's not worried about the syste...
Pikmin cartoon photo
Pikmin cartoon

Nintendo is working on Pikmin animated shorts


You'll need a 3DS to watch them
Mar 11
// Jordan Devore
In an effort to "give more life to the Pikmin characters," Nintendo has plans for original animated shorts that are being created alongside an external animation studio and overseen by designer Shigeru Miyamoto, reports Polyg...

Shigeru Miyamoto believes in a Wii U future

Mar 08 // Tony Ponce
He sort of dodges the question regarding pressure from smartphones and tablets, instead reiterating that people just need time to get accustomed to the GamePad. In fact, the only other big hurdle he sees is storage space: "[S]ince we've designed the system in a way that allows people to simply add the amount of storage media they need to supplement Wii U, we think it essentially gives people the greatest flexibility within a single device to really make the most of their entertainment in the living room." A very weak response to be sure, as it assumes that consumers at large will definitely warm up to the whole system sooner rather than later, if at all. Miyamoto represents Nintendo, so it's obvious that he would act very optimistic about the Wii U's long-term prospects. Nintendo admitted to being slow to understand the console's higher-spec infrastructure compared to that of the Wii, which in turn "drew on some of the same resources that might have been spent developing games," hence the less than optimal launch. Still, he sounds genuinely confident about the company's ability to provide consumers and developers a stable environment in due time. The interview winds down with a reflection upon how the gaming landscape changed or stayed the same over the past 30 years: "[I]n the past, people would get their information about how to play the game over the phone from help lines or from strategy guides. They had very limited access to sources of information about how to play a game or what they could do in a game. Now what we see is that there are a wide variety of ways to encounter that sort of information, and so the breadth of communication itself becomes an element that can be a part of the gameplay as well." As we are already aware, the Wii U capitalizes on this through services like Miiverse or browsing the Internet on the GamePad while a game runs in the background. Despite all of Nintendo's ups and downs, Miyamoto is amazed at far gaming as a whole has come, especially in how technology drives this space harder than any other consumer electronics sector. Amidst studio closures and all other kinds of bad news we've been hearing lately, the thought gaming still has so much potential should ease some of those worries. Miyamoto: The Wii U GamePad Gives Us Advantages over Tablets, Smartphones [Time]Miyamoto: I Couldn't Have Imagined Where We've Ended Up [Time]
Miyamoto is my homeboy photo
Miyamoto talks to Time about smartphone competition and how gaming has changed
Shigeru Miyamoto is a busy little beaver, isn't he? First a chat with GameSpot, and now a two-part interview with Time? Where does he find the energy? That's why I'm convinced that the man will outlive us all. I'm honestly a ...

Shigeru Miyamoto feels creatively satisfied

Mar 07 // Tony Ponce
Of course there's no escaping the image problem currently facing the Wii U, so Miyamoto took a moment once again to talk about communicating Wii U's value to customers. But when asked how he plans on doing that, he impishly points to the PR and marketing folks in the room and says, "Ask these guys." Oh, you scamp! The interview winds down with the topic of retirement, which we already know Miyamoto isn't planning on entering just yet. In fact, at 60 years old, he has the same volume of work as ever. With his presence felt in so many projects, there is the tendency for younger staff to rely too much on his guidance. Thus, "[W]hat we're doing internally is, on the assumption that there may someday be a time when I'm no longer there, and in order for the company to prepare for that, what I'm doing is pretending like I'm not working on half the projects that I would normally be working on to try to get the younger staff to be more involved." He later adds, "[A]s I like to say, I try to duck out of the way, so that instead of them looking at me, they're looking at the consumer and trying to develop their games with the consumer in mind rather than me in mind." It's good to see that Miyamoto is still bursting with postive energy and passing that raw, gung-ho spirit on to future generations. Saw whatever you will about Nintendo's struggles, but here is a guy with a good head on his shoulders. Miyamoto: 'I'm Creatively Satisfied' [GameSpot]
We <3 Miyamoto photo
Nintendo's top think-tank talks about upcoming software and Wii U happenings
Perennial star child Shigeru Miyamoto has had an illustrious career, no doubt about that. From creating Donkey Kong to busting on stage with Link's sword and shield equipped, he has cemented himself as one of the most influen...

Luigi's Mansion video photo
Luigi's Mansion video

Iwata and Miyamoto star as the Luigi brothers


Now that would be a movie worth watching
Feb 19
// Fraser Brown
I'm ridiculously excited about Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon, as the lanky member of the Mario Bros. duo will always have a special place in my heart, much more so than his showboating, portly brother. Miyamoto has th...

Nintendo claims to finally understand HD development

Feb 05 // Tony Ponce
Despite the extensive knowledge of third parties, the fact remains that the Wii U is completely new hardware that requires a learning period no matter who you are. Iwata explained that the final version of Wii U dev kits weren't available until the later half of 2012, after which all developers working on the hardware had to undergo a trail-and-error phase. Nintendo was no exception, hence the lack of "hardware-pushing" first-party software out the gate. "I think that this [trial-and-error stage] is true for third-party software developers as well as Nintendo's," Iwata noted. "The home consoles of other companies are six or seven years old and software developers have sufficiently studied them and know how to take full advantage of them well. As Wii U is new to them, some developers have already acquired the knack and made good use of its features and others have not. You might see this gap among the games that are currently available." Hence relative jankiness of several pieces of launch software, regardless of how well the games run on the 360 or PS3. Iwata isn't too worried because all developers need is time to get a feel for the hardware. "Actually, we believe that our in-house development teams have almost reached the next stage," Iwata boomed with confidence. "It is not true that we are deadlocked with a lot of trouble in our development. Otherwise, we could not aim for 100 billion yen or more in operating profit for the next fiscal year." Sounds like Iwata and Miyamoto believe the Wii U is going to be alright in the coming year, thanks to a deeper understanding of this new level of technology. Will it pay off? Tune in next week! Same Bat-time, same Bat-channel! Third Quarter Financial Results Briefing for the 73rd Fiscal Term [Nintendo via VideoGamer]
Unlock the power of HD photo
Nintendo leveraged third parties to better learn HD tech like shaders
Throughout the day, we've been highlighting notable points from Nintendo's recent corporate management policy meeting, such as Animal Crossing: New Leaf's success, cloud gaming, and communicating Wii U's value. Nintendo CEO S...

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Miyamoto: Nintendo hasn't communicated Wii U's value


Developer believes Wii U could be promoted better
Feb 05
// Jim Sterling
Addressing the Wii U's slow market performance, Nintendo developer Shigeru Miyamoto has admitted his company could have promoted it better. Citing a failure to "communicate" the features and value of the system, the impish de...

Review: The Legend of Zelda: Hyrule Historia

Jan 30 // Chris Carter
The Legend of Zelda: Hyrule Historia (Book)Writers: Shigeru Miyamoto, Eiji AonumaPublisher: Dark Horse BooksReleased: January 29, 2013MSRP: $34.99 From cover to cover, the physical book is wonderfully crafted. The word "tome" actually is fairly accurate, as the book feels fairly weighty, and almost a steal at the asking price. It has a beautiful minimalistic cover that represents the elements of the Zelda series, and colored in the perfect shade of green, it's a great conversation starter as someone walks over to it and sees the resemblance to Link's classic tunic. The first thing you might notice when you open the book is the inclusion of a letter by one of the most famous faces in Zelda history: Shigeru Miyamoto. It's a nice little section that explains what the Zelda series means to him, and what some of the basic tenets of the series are. Towards the end, Eiji Aonuma also gets to weigh in. Both of them are fairly lengthy and from the heart, detailing how the Zelda series came to be and what it means to both of them. These were crucial additions that really added to the overall package, letting you know that this wasn't just a cheap cash-in. Do keep in mind that this is a straight translation of the Japanese book that dropped in 2011, so a few parts are not going to be up to date. The first major section of the book is the portion on Skyward Sword. And when I say "Skyward Sword," I mean nothing but. There are sketches, artwork, character profiles, and a general overview of every single area in the game -- in fact, I'd go so far as to say that this is basically a complete book in its own right with regards to this particular Zelda iteration. My favorite aspect of the Skyward chapters is probably the little tidbits of information, like the fact that they specifically removed a sense of regality from Skyward's Zelda character design, but at the same time had to figure out a way to make her stand out. [embed]242743:46434[/embed] Or the reason why the Pumpkin Landing bar doesn't serve milk is because Skyloft doesn't have "ground themed" animals on it. If you've played it, you probably noticed that, but at the same time it's nice to see how much thought was put into the game. In addition to factual nuances, the writers also have a bit of fun too. Like when they suggest that Sheik's harp from Ocarina of Time may be the same one as in Skyward Sword, or that the Timeshift Stones might be made out of the same blue material as the iconic blue Ocarina. The artwork is plentiful and beautiful, and there are a lot of quotes that bring to light how much creative freedom was given with the game. You'll get to see early concepts, like the creatures that were supposed to be the original Kikwis, and a rejected Zora-like race. There are tons of Skyward-related sketches, factoids, and art on display in this section. If Skyward is your absolute favorite game in the series, you'll be in heaven, and it's probably worth a purchase for that alone. Personally, I wasn't the biggest fan of Skyward Sword, so I would have appreciated some elongation of the other three portions of the book. At the same time, this first section was so well done that I gained a bit more appreciation for the game, and I even had the itch to play it again. Plus, you have to keep in mind that this book was released in tandem with Skyward Sword and the 25th anniversary celebrations. Next we move onto the "History of Hyrule" section, which everyone will probably remember as the initial controversy-starter a while back that brought Hyrule Historia so much buzz. While this may seem like a standard retrospective at all of the Zelda games, it's a bit more than that. This is the "big deal" that everyone was referring to a few years back, when it was said that Nintendo would take on the "official" timeline theories that have been circulating for years. The book explains how there is initially one timeline that eventually splits into three different realities. Whatever your take is on the "official" stance, Nintendo does a decent job explaining how each game fits without getting too ridiculous -- the key is that Ocarina splits into three branches -- and that's really all you need to understand. Each game is roughly equally represented, from fan favorites like Majora's Mask and Ocarina of Time to underrepresented games like The Minish Cap. All of the stories more or less weave into each other, with sufficient reasoning given for the split-timeline theory. The only bad part about the this section is that it doesn't include any spinoffs, but that's understandable as this section is mainly presented in order to establish an official canon. Next we move onto "Creative Footprints." This section is my absolute favorite, and I even wish it was a little longer. You get to see insane drawings (some of which have never been shown before), like the original developmental maps by Shigeru Miyamoto. These sketches in particular resonated with me, as I vividly recall drawing my own segmented grid-based maps. When Hyrule Historia constantly reiterates that Miyamoto had a hand in nearly every aspect of the original Zelda, it shows. This section is heavily in favor of the more famous titles, so there are lots of materials from Ocarina of Time, The Wind Waker, Twilight Princess, and the original The Legend of Zelda (Twilight Princess has more art than any other game in this portion). "Creative Footprints" mirrors some of the best parts of the first Skyward portion, with new concepts that never made it past the drawing board. Like the existence of an Oracle of Seasons/Ages Ganondorf that blew my mind (as opposed to Ganon, who did appear), and "GameCube Island" in The Wind Waker. Since the popular games are featured, some sections are shorter than others. For instance, if you love Phantom Hourglass but hate Spirit Tracks, you're going to be disappointed, as PH only gets a scant few pages while ST gets around 20. Plus, since a little under half of the book is dedicated to Skyward Sword with the first and fourth sections, you're going to be disappointed if your favorite game isn't represented here. At the end of "Creative Footprints" is a list of games in the series. Again, some spinoffs aren't included, which is a shame as this was the perfect opportunity to do so. The only additional titles this section covers is the GameCube Collector's Edition, Master Quest, and a very brief overview of the Satellaview Zelda games and Link's Crossbow Training. This was probably the weakest part of the book and almost felt like an afterthought. After all is said and done information wise, Hyrule Historia ends with a comic read manga style, right to left. The comic itself is a prelude to Skyward Sword, which might immediately turn some people off. It features a a few beautiful full color pages, then the rest are traditional black and white. The story itself teeters on the edge of one of the more mature tales in the Zelda universe, but it's over so quickly that it loses its luster a bit. While I wouldn't say it's completely forgettable, it's not really a must-read nor is it something that will stick in my mind every time I think of Skyward Sword. In the end, I kind of wish it was a bit more fleshed out and had a few more color pages. So given all of this information, should you get Hyrule Historia? If you're a general Zelda fan, it's a no-brainer. There's a decent amount of new information here, the art is beautiful, and the timeline section is great to have as a general reference for whenever you want to re-learn or decipher the story of one of your favorite franchises. But if you're a more casual Zelda fan and only gravitate towards a few select titles (like one of the more underrepresented ones), I'm not sure you'll be wholly satisfied. The book contains so much Skyward Sword that, if you don't like it in some capacity, you may be disappointed. If you have no appreciation of the retro titles as well, the impact may be diminished, especially the portions involving Miyamoto and Aonuma. Even still, Hyrule Historia is a great read. I learned some things both old and new, and I got to enjoy some beautiful art. What more can a Zelda fan ask for?
Hyrule Historia review photo
It's dangerous to go alone... take this
You'd be hard pressed to find a Nintendo franchise more storied than The Legend of Zelda. Although Mario and Pokémon have far surpassed the series in terms of raw sales, Zelda fans are among the most passionate fans in...

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Nintendo planning massive restructure for 2013


Miyamoto to lead smaller team, among other changes
Nov 28
// Tony Ponce
According to various publications like Guardian UK, Nikkei, and Wired, Nintendo CEO Satoru Iwata will institute a massive company restructure starting in December, which will involve expanding old divisions, creating new ones...
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Ol' Grunkle Miyamoto turns 60 today


Happy birthday to Nintendo's dream weaver
Nov 16
// Tony Ponce
And he doesn't look a a day over 50! How does he manage to stay so young? There are many notable game developers who have influenced the course of the industry, but arguably none are more well-known and beloved than Shigeru M...
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Miyamoto wants a Wii U Metroid and Star Fox most of all


Jul 10
// Chris Carter
IGN had a moment with Miyamoto himself, and quizzed him on potential franchises he would like to see on the Wii U. Out of all of the great series and IPs that Nintendo has to offer, Miyamoto focused on just two: Metroid and S...

The 'geek' question: hobbyist vs. intellectual

Jun 20 // Ryan Perez
Gamer? My theory is that hobbyist geeks (gamers like us) tend to force a relation between themselves and scientific minds because both parties can sometimes live reclusive and socially awkward lifestyles, and also because intellectuals are generally admired by society during their adult years, whereas gamers are still usually seen as lazy and indolent. Because of the former, the temptation to adopt the latter is more prevalent. Albert Einstein used to piss his pants because he was too busy solving an equation, whereas I pissed myself because I was too busy wearing down that 2+ million HP boss. Score! We're so much alike! This is obviously something not exclusive to geek lifestyles. Plenty of people constantly associate themselves with other sources of admiration, whether or not they have a direct connection to that source. The truest form of this could be considered nationalism -- feeling a sense of pride for the accomplishments of individuals sharing your national identity and/or country of origin. If a term for this kind of behavior exists, I don't know it, so I'm just going to make one up for the sake of this study: Michael-Phelps-ism. It actually rolls right off the tongue, when you say it quickly. So the Michael-Phelps-ism regarding gamers/comic lovers and science geeks carries a rather obvious distinction. A hobbyist geek is someone who typically adopts pastimes and means of entertainment that are not only manageable without any sort of social interaction but also sometimes encourage it. The term "single player" is difficult to find in other avenues besides gaming. This is why the general public will often shy away from these hobbies (at least for now), no matter how fun they are. Plenty of evidence exists to back up the assumption that these hobbies can and will become mainstream eventually, but for the sake of this study, let us all agree that we're still the minority here. An intellectual geek, on the other hand, is someone who dedicates the majority of their personal time to study within one or several scholarly and scientific fields. Yes, this lifestyle often doesn't require anything past solitude as well, and sometimes encourages it, but we must not forget that it's easy to be a gamer, whereas it takes a lot of hard work to be a genius. Just because they have one or two things in common does not make them directly linked to each other. To sink down to my natural level here, I have a penis that works fairly well, but I'm not going to even pretend I could handle being a porn star, even if we have the same equipment. Therefore, I humbly tip my hat to the Bob McHawks and Richard McCrackins of the world and openly admit that they can do what I cannot. Just because I'm American doesn't mean I get to pat myself on the back for World War II. I may be ambidextrous, but that doesn't mean I can feel gratification over any of Shigeru Miyamoto's accomplishments. You get the idea. This was his reaction after Hamza and Niero invited me to join Dtoid. You'd think that would be enough, right? To many of you out there, I'm stating something as obvious as "birds fly, fish swim." But because hobbyists find a lot of comfort and validation in relating the effort it takes to play a game to the effort it takes to learn differential calculus, as well as the lifestyles associated with them, people will often ignore common sense to protect their reassuring views. Since critical thinking and deductive reasoning shatter these views, and since I love ruining people's blissful assumptions about life, I figured I'd take this a step further and gather some hard evidence. As stated before, I proposed two questions to the people at E3, be they exhibitors or attendees. The first set of questions were basic trivia that any typical gamers would know. Some examples: - In the popular puzzle game Portal, what are the two colors that your portals appear in? - What is the name of the main protagonist in Metal Gear Solid for the original PlayStation? - What is the common term for the diving suit-clad behemoths in the game BioShock? I know, these questions make you smack your forehead. You have to remember, though, that to know them requires us to be somewhat steeped in gaming culture -- especially if we've never played these games before. So anyone who doesn't really care about gaming (i.e. our parents), won't know what the hell a "Big Daddy" is ... besides some mothers, but that's a different story. On the flip side, however, I also asked these same people basic trivia that anyone mildly knowledgeable in the sciences would know. These are questions that the average person might forget by the time they exited high school but that an intellectual would know due to their learned lifestyle and the proximity of their peers. Examples are: - What is Newton's third law of motion? - What is the measure of acceleration of Earth's gravity? - What does the acronym "DNA" stand for, and what are the names of its four nucleotides? I know, some of you are smacking your foreheads again. But I must remind you that, while some of us gamers have retained this knowledge from our school days (those currently in grade school need not apply), the majority of people in the world require general scientific knowledge in the same sense that someone in New York City requires a car to get to work. If it's not necessary to get on with life at its most basic level, most individuals won't bother giving a shit. If I can't add or subtract in 2012, I'm pretty screwed, but if I can't name every element on the Periodic Table, what concern is that of mine? This fact is only more prevalent when I tally up the results of my E3 experiment. Gamers might know what this is from, but they sure as shit don't know what it means. I asked a total of 193 people one of the 15 questions in both categories. Why 193? Because I was at E3 doing the whole journalism thing -- going to appointments, demoing games, interviewing people, etc. -- thus I didn't have a lot of time to indulge this little experiment of mine. And because 194 can kiss my ass. We're not on good terms. Of the 193 people, 176 of them answered the "hobbyist" question correctly. Oddly enough, the most missed question was the one pertaining to the portal colors ... even though the answer is on the cover of Portal 2. Eh, people are weird. Among those same individuals, only 36 answered the "intellectual" questions correctly. The most commonly missed question of this category: Approximately how old is the planet Earth, according to modern science? Good thing Neil deGrasse Tyson doesn't read gaming blogs. He'd probably be a bit disappointed at that result, especially considering the common geek's love for time travel and planetary matters. So what does all this mean? Well, essentially, they are not us and we are not them. As much as we love to consider ourselves the same as the weird, quirky academic champions who the majority of the world respects, we simply have less in common with them than we like to assume. The necessary fundamentals that make up a gamer and a genius are just too different. It doesn't take smarts to be a gamer, any more than it takes dexterity to be a theoretical physicist. This is also not an asthma inhaler, even though lungs are involved. It's not difficult for one to see how such a misconception can exist, though. Plenty of us gamers are old and passionate enough to have had childhoods where we were constantly criticized and belittled for our geeky hobbies on a regular basis. It only makes sense that plenty would develop the habit of looking at venerated scholars who likely suffered similar childhoods and thinking, "He too was teased yet ended up awesome. I must be as well." Also, at one point, the very nature of science fiction (before it became more mainstream) appealed to the aspiring scientific minds of the future, regarding what they could eventually accomplish and create. So some of what we gamers love today did previously appeal mainly to actual bookworms. Unfortunately, that just doesn't seem to be the case these days. Now, the expected thing for me to do here is go off on anyone who consistently falls into this habit of misguided association. As easy as that would be (plus, I think I sort of already did it at the head of this feature), that's not really the point of this article. Feeling some small sense of pride for other people's accomplishments -- though a bit dishonest -- doesn't really hurt anyone. In fact, most athletes enjoy a good fan club (it usually results in a higher paycheck). No, I'm not here to be a complete dick by calling everyone out on their bullshit; I'm here to be a half-dick by proving that their bullshit is indeed bullshit. I merely wanted to uncover a particular aspect of the gamer/geek identity, and, what the hell, I also wanted to provide a bit more perspective on the constituents of this young and ever-growing industry. My theories are indeed still theories, and there's no way for me to prove exactly why gamers act the way they do most of the time. But I do think I've provided some decent evidence that we're not so much like the inquisitive individuals who we revere so much and a lot more like the basic, average folks whom we attempt to distinguish ourselves from. We just happen to enjoy a relatively unpopular pastime at the moment, that's all. Get rid of the gaming paraphernalia, and you can fill in the blank with anything. Finally, before any of you ask, "If your goal was to affiliate gamers with 'normal' people, then why didn't you ask the general population these same questions?" That wasn't my goal, though I did consider that. I then thought to myself, "Wait a minute, what if the walking accidents at the Pinkberry and Apple Store know the correct answers to the science questions?" A lot of gamers would probably find that rather depressing, including myself. In fact ... if you'll excuse me, I need to go Google whatever the fuck Newton's third law is.
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The one thing that has always bugged me the most about sports is the use of the word "we." As in, "We won!" No, you didn't win, John Sofaturd from Nothingsville, Ohio. You didn't do anything except sit on your ass and obtain ...

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No online multiplayer in Pikmin 3


Jun 12
// Jim Sterling
Those looking forward to herding dead-eyed plant monsters with friends around the world are in for a disappointment. Nintendo has no intention of exploiting the Wii U's increased online focus with Pikmin 3, as the game shall ...
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Non-Specific Action Figure has the last word of E3


Jun 09
// Jim Sterling
Seriously, with all the nothing going on in terms of announcements, Non-Specific Action Figure really did do the best job.   Also, I love how this entire segment looks and sounds like a WWE backstage promo.
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Official Kirby doodles from way back in the day


May 26
// Tony Ponce
Back in 1993, a strategy guide for the recently released Kirby's Adventure appeared in Japan. Inside, three of the big men responsible for the new game decided to sketch the little pink puffball. There's contributions by Masa...
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Miyamoto: PS Vita isn't a very strong product


May 04
// Jim Sterling
Shigeru Miyamoto isn't against slagging off the competition in the friendliest way possible, with the Nintendo loyalist criticizing Sony's PlayStation Vita efforts. The Mario creator believes the Vita isn't a strong product, ...
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Miyamoto muses on some new juicy first-party prospects


Apr 12
// Chris Carter
Shigeru Miyamoto recently had a conversation with Edge, and I think most of you Nintendo fans are going to want to hear what he had to say. Sometime last year, it was revealed that Miyamoto would love to remake the original A...
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Miyamoto loves Angry Birds, wishes he'd made it


Apr 12
// Jim Sterling
Love it or hate it, Angry Birds is still a massive deal, as evidenced by the ludicrous amount of merchandise surrounding it. While it's become cool to despise, legendary videogame developer Shigeru Miyamoto has taken its side...
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Miyamoto is heading up an 'undisclosed original title'


Jan 06
// Jordan Devore
Nintendo EAD manager Shigeru Miyamoto has a few projects in the pipeline, one of which has yet to be revealed. In an interview with the Associated Press, the designer reiterates that Pikmin 3 and Luigi's Mansion 2 are still c...
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Miyamoto in a life-sized Mario Kart makes my day


Dec 10
// Dale North
Shigeru Miyamoto was already in California to attend tonight's Spike Video Game Awards, so he took some time out from his trip to...go to the mall? The legendary game maker is shown in the photo above behind the wheel of a IR...
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Miyamoto accepts Hall of Fame award for Legend of Zelda


Dec 10
// Dale North
At tonight's Spike VGA awards, Shigeru Miyamoto took the stage to accept an award for the induction of The Legend of Zelda into the hall of fame. He took the stage like a champ, coming out of the floor and fog to accept the a...
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Miyamoto responds to retirement talk


Dec 10
// Liam Fisher
We had a bit of excitement earlier this week with word coming from Wired that Nintendo superstar Shigeru Miyamoto would be taking his leave of the company. In the time since shareholders have wavered, Nintendo has been quick ...
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The DTOID Show: Miyamoto's Retirement, Amalur's Lore


Dec 09
// Max Scoville
Hey guys! If you missed the live show today, Tara's out of town antique shopping or something, so we had New Challenger host and dear, beloved homeboy Anthony Carboni come hang out.  Today's topics include: 1. Is S...
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Miyamoto NOT retiring, role at Nintendo isn't changing


Dec 08
// Jim Sterling
It turns out that Shigeru Miyamoto's "retirement" yesterday was the result of a misunderstanding at Wired. The legendary Nintendo designer is not stepping down from his current position, although he will be training a new bre...
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Miyamoto to 'retire' from current position at Nintendo


Dec 07
// Jordan Devore
[Update: There was a bit of a misunderstanding on Wired's part, because Miyamoto will still be around for a good while.] Speaking with Wired.com, Nintendo's iconic game designer Shigeru Miyamoto revealed he will be retiring f...

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