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Shigeru Miyamoto

Wii U photo
Wii U

Miyamoto's three new Wii U games in action


Star Fox, robots, and home invasion
Jun 11
// Jordan Devore
Nintendo's Shigeru Miyamoto has new projects in development for the Wii U that use both the GamePad and television screen, and here he is introducing three of them at E3 2014. Project Giant Robot puts you in the cockpit of a...
Miyamoto games photo
Also, 'Project Giant Robot,' and 'Project Guard'
Well that didn't take long. Nintendo has sent over word to Destructoid that three games have been confirmed from the mind of Shigeru Miyamoto -- Star Fox, Project Giant Robot, and Project Guard. All of these will be on t...

Mario photo
Mario

Super Mario 3D World was designed with the New SMB crowd in mind


'There’s still a lot more room for discovery and invention,' says producer
May 01
// Jordan Devore
Having finally gotten a Wii U, my goal this week has been to play Super Mario 3D World and at least try not to burn through it too quickly. It's tough, though, with the promise of something new pushing me to continually do "j...
Mario photo
Mario

Super Mario 3D World's Double Mario power was an accident


And other tidbits from the development team
Nov 14
// Jordan Devore
The end of the recent Iwata Asks about Super Mario 3D World made it clear that more Super Mario Galaxy is a definite possibility, which was probably the biggest news of the piece -- but there are other behind-the-scenes tidbi...
Mario Galaxy not dead photo
Mario Galaxy not dead

Mario Galaxy is not dead, says Shigeru Miyamoto


Thank goodness
Nov 14
// Chris Carter
I'm not sure how many of you thought that Super Mario 3D World signaled the end of the Galaxy sub-franchise, but Miyamoto has seen fit to put a stop to any rumors that may be milling about out there. In the latest Iwata asks,...
Nintendope photo
Nintendope

Nintendope: My fantasy hang-out session with the Big N


Promoted from our Community Blogs!
Nov 09
// Preposterous Whitey
[Dtoid community blogger DoctorHair shared this... uh... well, he... yeah... just read it. It's goddamn hilarious. --Mr Andy Dixon] Welcome to Fantasy Blunt Scenarios: A new, ongoing original series concerning groups of peopl...
Nintendo photo
Nintendo

Miyamoto wants to get more involved with smaller projects


'Little chance that he could take the time to work on the next Mario'
Nov 03
// Jonathan Holmes
In a recent interview with French outlet Gamekult, Nintendo's spritely King of old man magic voiced plans to move away from headlining the Mario franchise -- "Creating a game of the caliber of Super Mario 3D World takes a lot...
Pikmin photo
Pikmin

There's a code hidden in Pikmin 3, according to Miyamoto


Okay, fine, I'll go find all of those memos
Aug 01
// Jordan Devore
Nintendo designer Shigeru Miyamoto has taken to the Miiverse to tease a code in Pikmin 3 that can be found by collecting Secret Memos scattered throughout the game: "Did you know that once you've collected ten of these Secret...
Nintendo photo
Nintendo

Miyamoto: Nintendo working on new franchise


Aiming for a spring 2014 release
Jul 10
// Kyle MacGregor
Exciting news, everyone! Nintendo has new franchise in development and it'll be here sooner than you think. In the latest edition of Weekly Famitsu, company man Shigeru Miyamoto decided to be a big old tease, letting slip jus...
Nintendo photo
Nintendo

Miyamoto on why Nintendo is slow to create new characters


'Focus first on creating fun and new gameplay'
Jul 08
// Jordan Devore
In an interview with Game Informer, Nintendo designer Shigeru Miyamoto spoke about where the company's priorities lie in terms of creating new intellectual properties. There are a lot of familiar franchises coming up for Wii ...
Conan O'Brien photo
Conan O'Brien

Conan O'Brien visits E3, hilarity ensues


He gets to chat with Miyamoto as well
Jun 26
// Chris Carter
As part of his "Clueless Gamer" series, Conan O'Brien visited E3 this year, and checked out the PS4, Xbox One, Wii U, and pretty much everything else he could get his hands on. He spoke with Sony's Aram Jabbari, Microsoft's ...
Nintendo Direct Pikmin photo
Nintendo Direct Pikmin

Watch the entire Nintendo Direct Pikmin presentation here


20-minute Pikmin presentation shows off footage
Jun 26
// Chris Carter
This morning, Nintendo put on a special Japan-only Nintendo Direct specifically for Pikmin 3. It's basically a "Let's Play" for the game starring Miyamoto, as he leads someone through a demonstration of a typical level. For ...
Nintendo photo
Nintendo

Majora's Mask remake still on Miyamoto's mind


I shall consume. Consume... consume everything...
Jun 22
// Kyle MacGregor
Nintendo is still thinking about a potential remake of The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask. Speaking with IGN, series creator Shigeru Miyamoto said "they're still in my memory" of Zelda fans that have long clamored for an enha...
Nintendo photo
Nintendo

Nintendo increasing staff to forge more games and new IPs


Shigeru Miyamoto explains the future of Nintendo's game development
Jun 22
// Wesley Ruscher
Would you like to see a new Metroid, Wave Race, or Star Fox game? Perhaps some Chibi-Robo love? Hell, maybe even a new IP? Well, apparently nothing is out of the question with Nintendo as they look to build and strengthen the...
New F-Zero unlikely photo
New F-Zero unlikely

New F-Zero unlikely, Miyamoto unsure where to take series


Nintendo's idea man doesn't have ideas on how to make F-Zero 'great again'
Jun 20
// Steven Hansen
Mario Kart 8 is extending into a less traditional direction after the somewhat tired Mario Kart 7, but it appears the future isn't so bright for Nintendo's lesser-known, higher-octane racing series, F-Zero. The Mario Kart ser...
Miyamoto on Zelda photo
Miyamoto on Zelda

Miyamoto wasn't pleased with his work on Zelda II


I was, however
Jun 19
// Chris Carter
After following up on a comment legendary Nintendo designer Shigeru Miyamoto made about making a "bad game," Kotaku got a fairly surprising answer: that game was Zelda II. Miyamoto confirms this outright stating, "I wouldn't ...
Pikmin photo
Pikmin

Miyamoto talks about attacking eyeballs in Pikmin 3


He speaks English and is adorable
Jun 12
// Jonathan Holmes
Nintendo continues to show that they don't give a rat's ass about following trends, and I think it's fantastic. While Capcom is working to make the next Dead Rising appeal to the Call of Duty fanbase and Namco Bandai wants t...
Zelda Wii U photo
Zelda Wii U

Nintendo nearly unveiled Legend of Zelda for Wii U at E3


Perhaps a Tokyo Game Show reveal is in the cards
Jun 12
// Kyle MacGregor
Nintendo has an ace up its sleeve. It is, of course, a new Legend of Zelda title for Wii U. However, according to series creator Shigeru Miyamoto, the company isn't quite ready to play that card at this stage of the...
 photo

Ogle some Nintendo's finest E3 titles, and cat people!


There's that trademark Nintendo flair!
Jun 11
// Jason Cabral
Nintendo sure has been sharing a lot on the great titles they have on the table for this year! From the return of Super Smash Bros. to the nostalgic feeling The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds, Nintendo is really hitti...
Nintendo @ E3 photo
Set for June 11 at 10:30AM
Nintendo won't be hosting a traditional E3 press conference as in years past. Instead the company intends to host smaller events focused on the software lineup for the US market. This we knew, but we were left to wonder what ...

Luigi-moto photo
Rolling Stone sits down with the affable Nintendo designer
GameSpot? Time? New York Times? And now Rolling Stone? Everyone wants a piece of Shigeru Miyamoto! If he's so willing to speak to anyone and everyone, why hasn't he spoken to us yet? We need to arrange a pow-wow as soon as po...

Miyamoto photo
Miyamoto

Miyamoto nixed all the original Luigi's Mansion 2 bosses


'He wanted bosses that could only be in Luigi's Mansion'
Apr 04
// Brett Makedonski
Shigeru Miyamoto may not have had direct day-to-day involvement in the development of Luigi's Mansion 2, but that didn't stop him from waltzing in and acting like a total boss.  During an interview with IGN, Bryce Hollid...
Wii U's future photo
Wii U's future

Miyamoto: Wii U has a long future


Nintendo man shockingly says Nintendo product is okay!
Mar 13
// Jim Sterling
Game designer Shigeru Miyamoto has reemphasized his belief that the Wii U is going to be okay, despite its less-than-overwhelming performance. Predicting a long future, the Nintendo brain says he's not worried about the syste...
Pikmin cartoon photo
Pikmin cartoon

Nintendo is working on Pikmin animated shorts


You'll need a 3DS to watch them
Mar 11
// Jordan Devore
In an effort to "give more life to the Pikmin characters," Nintendo has plans for original animated shorts that are being created alongside an external animation studio and overseen by designer Shigeru Miyamoto, reports Polyg...

Shigeru Miyamoto believes in a Wii U future

Mar 08 // Tony Ponce
He sort of dodges the question regarding pressure from smartphones and tablets, instead reiterating that people just need time to get accustomed to the GamePad. In fact, the only other big hurdle he sees is storage space: "[S]ince we've designed the system in a way that allows people to simply add the amount of storage media they need to supplement Wii U, we think it essentially gives people the greatest flexibility within a single device to really make the most of their entertainment in the living room." A very weak response to be sure, as it assumes that consumers at large will definitely warm up to the whole system sooner rather than later, if at all. Miyamoto represents Nintendo, so it's obvious that he would act very optimistic about the Wii U's long-term prospects. Nintendo admitted to being slow to understand the console's higher-spec infrastructure compared to that of the Wii, which in turn "drew on some of the same resources that might have been spent developing games," hence the less than optimal launch. Still, he sounds genuinely confident about the company's ability to provide consumers and developers a stable environment in due time. The interview winds down with a reflection upon how the gaming landscape changed or stayed the same over the past 30 years: "[I]n the past, people would get their information about how to play the game over the phone from help lines or from strategy guides. They had very limited access to sources of information about how to play a game or what they could do in a game. Now what we see is that there are a wide variety of ways to encounter that sort of information, and so the breadth of communication itself becomes an element that can be a part of the gameplay as well." As we are already aware, the Wii U capitalizes on this through services like Miiverse or browsing the Internet on the GamePad while a game runs in the background. Despite all of Nintendo's ups and downs, Miyamoto is amazed at far gaming as a whole has come, especially in how technology drives this space harder than any other consumer electronics sector. Amidst studio closures and all other kinds of bad news we've been hearing lately, the thought gaming still has so much potential should ease some of those worries. Miyamoto: The Wii U GamePad Gives Us Advantages over Tablets, Smartphones [Time]Miyamoto: I Couldn't Have Imagined Where We've Ended Up [Time]
Miyamoto is my homeboy photo
Miyamoto talks to Time about smartphone competition and how gaming has changed
Shigeru Miyamoto is a busy little beaver, isn't he? First a chat with GameSpot, and now a two-part interview with Time? Where does he find the energy? That's why I'm convinced that the man will outlive us all. I'm honestly a ...

Shigeru Miyamoto feels creatively satisfied

Mar 07 // Tony Ponce
Of course there's no escaping the image problem currently facing the Wii U, so Miyamoto took a moment once again to talk about communicating Wii U's value to customers. But when asked how he plans on doing that, he impishly points to the PR and marketing folks in the room and says, "Ask these guys." Oh, you scamp! The interview winds down with the topic of retirement, which we already know Miyamoto isn't planning on entering just yet. In fact, at 60 years old, he has the same volume of work as ever. With his presence felt in so many projects, there is the tendency for younger staff to rely too much on his guidance. Thus, "[W]hat we're doing internally is, on the assumption that there may someday be a time when I'm no longer there, and in order for the company to prepare for that, what I'm doing is pretending like I'm not working on half the projects that I would normally be working on to try to get the younger staff to be more involved." He later adds, "[A]s I like to say, I try to duck out of the way, so that instead of them looking at me, they're looking at the consumer and trying to develop their games with the consumer in mind rather than me in mind." It's good to see that Miyamoto is still bursting with postive energy and passing that raw, gung-ho spirit on to future generations. Saw whatever you will about Nintendo's struggles, but here is a guy with a good head on his shoulders. Miyamoto: 'I'm Creatively Satisfied' [GameSpot]
We <3 Miyamoto photo
Nintendo's top think-tank talks about upcoming software and Wii U happenings
Perennial star child Shigeru Miyamoto has had an illustrious career, no doubt about that. From creating Donkey Kong to busting on stage with Link's sword and shield equipped, he has cemented himself as one of the most influen...

Luigi's Mansion video photo
Luigi's Mansion video

Iwata and Miyamoto star as the Luigi brothers


Now that would be a movie worth watching
Feb 19
// Fraser Brown
I'm ridiculously excited about Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon, as the lanky member of the Mario Bros. duo will always have a special place in my heart, much more so than his showboating, portly brother. Miyamoto has th...

Nintendo claims to finally understand HD development

Feb 05 // Tony Ponce
Despite the extensive knowledge of third parties, the fact remains that the Wii U is completely new hardware that requires a learning period no matter who you are. Iwata explained that the final version of Wii U dev kits weren't available until the later half of 2012, after which all developers working on the hardware had to undergo a trail-and-error phase. Nintendo was no exception, hence the lack of "hardware-pushing" first-party software out the gate. "I think that this [trial-and-error stage] is true for third-party software developers as well as Nintendo's," Iwata noted. "The home consoles of other companies are six or seven years old and software developers have sufficiently studied them and know how to take full advantage of them well. As Wii U is new to them, some developers have already acquired the knack and made good use of its features and others have not. You might see this gap among the games that are currently available." Hence relative jankiness of several pieces of launch software, regardless of how well the games run on the 360 or PS3. Iwata isn't too worried because all developers need is time to get a feel for the hardware. "Actually, we believe that our in-house development teams have almost reached the next stage," Iwata boomed with confidence. "It is not true that we are deadlocked with a lot of trouble in our development. Otherwise, we could not aim for 100 billion yen or more in operating profit for the next fiscal year." Sounds like Iwata and Miyamoto believe the Wii U is going to be alright in the coming year, thanks to a deeper understanding of this new level of technology. Will it pay off? Tune in next week! Same Bat-time, same Bat-channel! Third Quarter Financial Results Briefing for the 73rd Fiscal Term [Nintendo via VideoGamer]
Unlock the power of HD photo
Nintendo leveraged third parties to better learn HD tech like shaders
Throughout the day, we've been highlighting notable points from Nintendo's recent corporate management policy meeting, such as Animal Crossing: New Leaf's success, cloud gaming, and communicating Wii U's value. Nintendo CEO S...

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Miyamoto: Nintendo hasn't communicated Wii U's value


Developer believes Wii U could be promoted better
Feb 05
// Jim Sterling
Addressing the Wii U's slow market performance, Nintendo developer Shigeru Miyamoto has admitted his company could have promoted it better. Citing a failure to "communicate" the features and value of the system, the impish de...

Review: The Legend of Zelda: Hyrule Historia

Jan 30 // Chris Carter
The Legend of Zelda: Hyrule Historia (Book)Writers: Shigeru Miyamoto, Eiji AonumaPublisher: Dark Horse BooksReleased: January 29, 2013MSRP: $34.99 From cover to cover, the physical book is wonderfully crafted. The word "tome" actually is fairly accurate, as the book feels fairly weighty, and almost a steal at the asking price. It has a beautiful minimalistic cover that represents the elements of the Zelda series, and colored in the perfect shade of green, it's a great conversation starter as someone walks over to it and sees the resemblance to Link's classic tunic. The first thing you might notice when you open the book is the inclusion of a letter by one of the most famous faces in Zelda history: Shigeru Miyamoto. It's a nice little section that explains what the Zelda series means to him, and what some of the basic tenets of the series are. Towards the end, Eiji Aonuma also gets to weigh in. Both of them are fairly lengthy and from the heart, detailing how the Zelda series came to be and what it means to both of them. These were crucial additions that really added to the overall package, letting you know that this wasn't just a cheap cash-in. Do keep in mind that this is a straight translation of the Japanese book that dropped in 2011, so a few parts are not going to be up to date. The first major section of the book is the portion on Skyward Sword. And when I say "Skyward Sword," I mean nothing but. There are sketches, artwork, character profiles, and a general overview of every single area in the game -- in fact, I'd go so far as to say that this is basically a complete book in its own right with regards to this particular Zelda iteration. My favorite aspect of the Skyward chapters is probably the little tidbits of information, like the fact that they specifically removed a sense of regality from Skyward's Zelda character design, but at the same time had to figure out a way to make her stand out. [embed]242743:46434[/embed] Or the reason why the Pumpkin Landing bar doesn't serve milk is because Skyloft doesn't have "ground themed" animals on it. If you've played it, you probably noticed that, but at the same time it's nice to see how much thought was put into the game. In addition to factual nuances, the writers also have a bit of fun too. Like when they suggest that Sheik's harp from Ocarina of Time may be the same one as in Skyward Sword, or that the Timeshift Stones might be made out of the same blue material as the iconic blue Ocarina. The artwork is plentiful and beautiful, and there are a lot of quotes that bring to light how much creative freedom was given with the game. You'll get to see early concepts, like the creatures that were supposed to be the original Kikwis, and a rejected Zora-like race. There are tons of Skyward-related sketches, factoids, and art on display in this section. If Skyward is your absolute favorite game in the series, you'll be in heaven, and it's probably worth a purchase for that alone. Personally, I wasn't the biggest fan of Skyward Sword, so I would have appreciated some elongation of the other three portions of the book. At the same time, this first section was so well done that I gained a bit more appreciation for the game, and I even had the itch to play it again. Plus, you have to keep in mind that this book was released in tandem with Skyward Sword and the 25th anniversary celebrations. Next we move onto the "History of Hyrule" section, which everyone will probably remember as the initial controversy-starter a while back that brought Hyrule Historia so much buzz. While this may seem like a standard retrospective at all of the Zelda games, it's a bit more than that. This is the "big deal" that everyone was referring to a few years back, when it was said that Nintendo would take on the "official" timeline theories that have been circulating for years. The book explains how there is initially one timeline that eventually splits into three different realities. Whatever your take is on the "official" stance, Nintendo does a decent job explaining how each game fits without getting too ridiculous -- the key is that Ocarina splits into three branches -- and that's really all you need to understand. Each game is roughly equally represented, from fan favorites like Majora's Mask and Ocarina of Time to underrepresented games like The Minish Cap. All of the stories more or less weave into each other, with sufficient reasoning given for the split-timeline theory. The only bad part about the this section is that it doesn't include any spinoffs, but that's understandable as this section is mainly presented in order to establish an official canon. Next we move onto "Creative Footprints." This section is my absolute favorite, and I even wish it was a little longer. You get to see insane drawings (some of which have never been shown before), like the original developmental maps by Shigeru Miyamoto. These sketches in particular resonated with me, as I vividly recall drawing my own segmented grid-based maps. When Hyrule Historia constantly reiterates that Miyamoto had a hand in nearly every aspect of the original Zelda, it shows. This section is heavily in favor of the more famous titles, so there are lots of materials from Ocarina of Time, The Wind Waker, Twilight Princess, and the original The Legend of Zelda (Twilight Princess has more art than any other game in this portion). "Creative Footprints" mirrors some of the best parts of the first Skyward portion, with new concepts that never made it past the drawing board. Like the existence of an Oracle of Seasons/Ages Ganondorf that blew my mind (as opposed to Ganon, who did appear), and "GameCube Island" in The Wind Waker. Since the popular games are featured, some sections are shorter than others. For instance, if you love Phantom Hourglass but hate Spirit Tracks, you're going to be disappointed, as PH only gets a scant few pages while ST gets around 20. Plus, since a little under half of the book is dedicated to Skyward Sword with the first and fourth sections, you're going to be disappointed if your favorite game isn't represented here. At the end of "Creative Footprints" is a list of games in the series. Again, some spinoffs aren't included, which is a shame as this was the perfect opportunity to do so. The only additional titles this section covers is the GameCube Collector's Edition, Master Quest, and a very brief overview of the Satellaview Zelda games and Link's Crossbow Training. This was probably the weakest part of the book and almost felt like an afterthought. After all is said and done information wise, Hyrule Historia ends with a comic read manga style, right to left. The comic itself is a prelude to Skyward Sword, which might immediately turn some people off. It features a a few beautiful full color pages, then the rest are traditional black and white. The story itself teeters on the edge of one of the more mature tales in the Zelda universe, but it's over so quickly that it loses its luster a bit. While I wouldn't say it's completely forgettable, it's not really a must-read nor is it something that will stick in my mind every time I think of Skyward Sword. In the end, I kind of wish it was a bit more fleshed out and had a few more color pages. So given all of this information, should you get Hyrule Historia? If you're a general Zelda fan, it's a no-brainer. There's a decent amount of new information here, the art is beautiful, and the timeline section is great to have as a general reference for whenever you want to re-learn or decipher the story of one of your favorite franchises. But if you're a more casual Zelda fan and only gravitate towards a few select titles (like one of the more underrepresented ones), I'm not sure you'll be wholly satisfied. The book contains so much Skyward Sword that, if you don't like it in some capacity, you may be disappointed. If you have no appreciation of the retro titles as well, the impact may be diminished, especially the portions involving Miyamoto and Aonuma. Even still, Hyrule Historia is a great read. I learned some things both old and new, and I got to enjoy some beautiful art. What more can a Zelda fan ask for?
Hyrule Historia review photo
It's dangerous to go alone... take this
You'd be hard pressed to find a Nintendo franchise more storied than The Legend of Zelda. Although Mario and Pokémon have far surpassed the series in terms of raw sales, Zelda fans are among the most passionate fans in...


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