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Sam and Max

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Sam & Max season 3 poaches pre-order price cut on PSN


Mar 19
// Joseph Leray
Alright, let's be frank here -- I'll take any chance I can get to pimp Telltale Games' Sam & Max games. The justification this time is that some new-fangled PlayStation Network pre-order starts today. As in right now. If ...
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Sam & Max season three outed as The Devil's Playhouse


Feb 09
// Jim Sterling
It would appear that Telltale Games is preparing a brand new adventure for Sam & Max with a third season of mindbending puzzles and faintly embarrassing witticisms. It's called Sam & Max: The Devil's Playhouse. A...
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Take a survey, get a free Telltale game


Jan 29
// Conrad Zimmerman
Seeking some input on the next Sam & Max season, the fine folks at Telltale Games want to know about what kinds of games you're playing and have set up a survey to ask exactly that. They're not only fine, but they're smar...
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Dear Telltale: I love you, but ...


Jul 22
// Chad Concelmo
For helping make point-and-click adventure games popular again and for single-handedly proving that episodic gaming could be a successful and creatively fresh way of releasing videogames, I will always love Telltale Games. Th...
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Sam and Max Save the World gets an XBLA release date


Jun 13
// Joseph Leray
Telltale Games have been burning both ends of the wick recently: they just launched the first episode of Wallace and Gromit on XBLA, announced Tales of Monkey Island, and are about to release Sam & Max Save the World. The...
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You read that headline right -- Telltale has announced that Sam & Max will be coming to Xbox LIVE Arcade this year. Season one and seasons two -- already released for PC and Wii -- will be made available as full-seas...

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Symbiote Studios announces the Sam & Max statue


Jan 28
// Colette Bennett
I've kept an eye on Symbiote Studios ever since they took the commendable step of transforming Dr. Tran into a collectible I could actually buy and decorate my desk with, and it seems that they are aiming to please even more ...

Destructoid review: Sam & Max Season One

Oct 28 // Conrad Zimmerman
Sam & Max: Season One (PC, Wii [reviewed])Developed by Telltale GamesPublished by The Adventure CompanyReleased October 14, 2008Since some of the episodes in Season One are over two years old by this point, I'll try to keep my thoughts on the game's story and humor to a minimum. Suffice it to say that there is a lot of funny in Sam & Max and it ranges across a fairly wide spectrum. Numerous comedic devices, including parody, dry wit and slapstick combine to form a clever and hilarious series. Some of the jokes reference pop culture elements which might wind up dated before long but, for the time being, work quite well.When you fire the game up on Wii, you are presented with the full six episodes in a menu. Each can be played independently, but they feature a cohesive story arc and you will almost certainly find yourself confused by some jokes and reoccurring characters if you choose to skip ahead. Sam and Max have always been fairly straightforward as characters go, following in the footsteps of classic comedic pairings like Felix Ungar and Oscar Madison. They trade quips like boxers exchange punches and are often wry, cynical and brilliant. The supporting cast, however, really steal the show in a lot of instances. Whereas the titular characters maintain their roles with little variation throughout, I found myself looking forward to seeing the new career path Sybil Pandemik was on and what Bosco's next, fruitless attempt to disguise his identity would be.Puzzles are a big part of adventure gaming and this is no exception. Most of them are not particularly challenging and, even with some stumbling, the game can easily be completed in ten to twelve hours. There are a few instances where you may be madly clicking, trying every combination of inventory items and the environment to progress, but most challenges can be approached in a logical manner. In addition to the standard gameplay of trying to pick up everything that isn't nailed down and trying to figure out how to make it work for you, Sam & Max features a more action-oriented mini-game or two in several episodes. These simple diversions serve to enliven the pace of the game a bit, but are not really anything special. Car chase sequences stand out as being the most intruiging but are also the most simplistic, usually requiring only a click or two to complete. It's unfortunate that there isn't more to these, as the potential is there, but keeping them incomplex does assure that the games are accessible to just about anyone. The Wii remote is a pleasure to use, as one would expect from a system that can literally produce a point-and-click control scheme. Particularly nice is a new feature which allows the use of the d-pad to scroll through dialogue options, eliminating the annoyance that comes from accidentally selecting the wrong response. The only time it ever felt awkward came when I wanted Sam to run somewhere. Double-clicking the A button to make him run was unresponsive at times, but it's a minor gripe when everything else works so well.Not all is rosy, however. Sam & Max: Season One runs into some rather annoying technical issues on the Wii. Framerate issues occur with a surprising frequency during utterly mundane moments such as walking from one place to another. Voice dialogue often cuts out in the last half-second before its conclusion, which is a bit jarring and noticeable enough to take the edge off of jokes. And, in rare instances, the game can completely crash the console, making it totally unresponsive until you've cut power to your Wii. Telltale tossed a couple of bonus features on the disc in the form of a gameplay tutorial and concept art. The art is quite cool, particularly the images showing how the design of certain characters evolved. The tutorial, on the other hand, is completely pointless. Aside from Sam breaking the fourth wall in explaining controls a bonobo could grasp easily through experimentation, the tutorial consists entirely of the first puzzle in episode one, something you're just going to wind up doing anyway when you start actually playing the game. It is a missed opportunity to provide some additional value to the Wii release. At the end of the day, Sam & Max Season One is an excellent game with enough punch to overcome its deficiencies. If you have yet to experience the episodic adventures of this dynamic duo, you really should pick up the first season and give it a whirl. While the improvements to control are nice, however, I'm inclined to recommend that you snag the PC release instead, if possible. The glitchy feel on Wii makes it feel a good bit less polished, making it harder to suggest in light of a superior product being available. Score: 8 -- Great (8s are impressive efforts with a few noticeable problems holding them back. Won't astound everyone, but is worth your time and cash.)
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Games that strictly approach from a comedic angle are rare these days. In a time when interactive entertainment predominately consists of badass protagonists wielding large guns, it's refreshing to see that there is still a p...

PAX 08: Hands on with Sam and Max Season One ... for the Wii, OMG!

Sep 01 // Nick Chester
Playing the Wii version of the title you’ll only be using the remote, pointing at and clicking (with the A button) various objects in the environment with a paw pointer, similar to that seen in the classic, Sam and Max Hit The Road. It’s fairly simple, works well with the Wii remote, and really doesn’t feel much different than the PC version which only utilized the mouse. Some tweaks have been made to the controls, like the ability to hold down A and move the point to have Sam follow it, or double tapping it to make him run. The cardboard box icon in the corner of the screen remains and can be opened by interacting with it, but you’re also able to tap the minus button and then scroll through your items with the d-pad. I found myself gravitating towards clicking on the box, only because I was used to it from playing the PC games; it seems the minus/d-pad combo is a quicker, more efficient way for item selection. Visually, the game doesn’t look quite as sharp as it would on some high-end (and maybe even some "low-end") PCs, but it doesn’t look awful running on the Wii; Telltale’s quirky style and visual comedy still comes through. It should also be noted that the game will support widescreen mode, something that the PC version of Season One did not. I did notice some slight frame rate issues while moving about the environment, which was troubling considering the version that was available to play was final code, recently submitted to Nintendo for approval. Considering the game isn’t entirely about twitch action, this really isn’t a huge issue, but it’s definitely something to note. Curious, I asked Telltale’s Emily Morganti why they made the decision to bring Sam and Max Season One to retail rather than deliver it episodically to WiiWare. She notes that it would be possible to bring to the episodes to WiiWare, but with another episodic title of theirs, Strongbad’s Cool Game for Attractive People, already available, they want to bring something to the retail space. Additionally, she likens it to a television series coming to DVD; using The Sopranos as a reference, she questions how many people were watching single episodes on re-reruns, rather than simply picking up the DVDs and watching them as a whole. Many personal nights (and full weekends) of plowing through television show seasons I missed makes her point seem pretty valid. There’s no release date set in stone, but with the game about to ship off to Nintendo for final approval, it should be within the next few months. It’s likely we’ll be seeing Sam and Max Seasons One come to the Wii in October or November of this year.
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After its PC debut on Gametap nearly two years ago, the entirety of Sam and Max Season One will be making its way to the Wii this fall. And considering the game has been rumored to be coming to Nintendo’s console for ju...

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Sam & Max Season Two getting a collectors DVD, other stuff


Jul 23
// Justin Villasenor
Telltale Games announced today that Sam & Max, everyone’s favorite pair of anthropomorphic animal investigators, will be getting a collectors edition DVD for their second season of downloadable episodes. This DVD wi...
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Sam and Max Wii trailer and screenshots


Jul 17
// Brad Nicholson
We’ve known for a good while that Sam and Max: Season One was headed to the Wii. What we still don’t have is good indication of a release date. The newest information that we have is that the gmes is still slated ...
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Sam & Max coming to the Wii this August (now with box art!)


May 23
// Chad Concelmo
As someone who has the worst PC on the planet (seriously, it barely runs Notepad), I was more than excited about the news that Sam & Max – Season 1 would be coming to the Wii. As everyone was enjoying ...
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Original Telltale developed games in the works


Apr 14
// Nick Chester
So look -- Telltale Games' Sam & Max Seasons are consistently pretty awesome. And the forthcoming WiiWare title, the hilariously-named Strong Bad's Cool Game for Attractive People episodic series, definitely has our atten...
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Sam & Max season finale available today


Apr 10
// Topher Cantler
Sam & Max Season 2 finishes up today, with the conclusion of the five-episode season now available on GameTap. Episode 205, What's new, Beelzebub? finds the duo de la awesome bargaining with the devil for control of Bosco...
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Is this the first image of Sam & Max running on the Wii?


Apr 09
// Chad Concelmo
Although the news broke last week about Sam & Max: Season 1 coming to the Wii, it looks like the first image of the game actually running on Nintendo’s point-and-click friendly console slipped through the ...
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You crack me up, lil' buddy: Sam and Max officially confirmed for Wii


Apr 04
// Anthony Burch
Holy jumping weasel fritters on a hot cross bun! Now all you people who have Macs don't have to kill yourselves over your previous inability to play the Sam and Max episodes (they're really good)!Today, Telltale games offici...
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Kind of a rumor, but not really: Sam and Max coming to the Wii


Jan 13
// Nick Chester
Since late 2006, PC fans have been enjoying the triumphant return of world-famous anthropomorphic detective duo, Sam and Max. Its point-and-click style has been a hit with gamers since the 1993 release of Sam & Max Hit th...

Destructoid review: Sam and Max Episode 202: Moai Better Blues

Jan 11 // Anthony Burch
Sam & Max Episode 202: Moai Better Blues (PC)Telltale GamesReleased January 10th, 2008 I should seriously hope this review is completely redundant for your purposes – that you’ve already purchased Sam and Max Season Two, and eagerly await each new episode with the enthusiasm of a twelve year old on Christmas Eve. The previous Sam and Max episodes, to put it briefly, are fun. Moai Better Blues is no different. Mostly. This time around, everybody’s favorite anthropomorphic duo has to save Easter Island from an impending volcano eruption through use of portals, gongs, and talking Moai statues. The previous episodes were pretty damned funny, and Moai Better Blues is no different: the dialogue is crisp and funny as ever, the new supporting characters (many of which happen to be infant versions of some famous missing persons – don’t ask) are great, and the identity of the evil archenemy Sam and Max meet halfway through the game is so surreally wacky that I couldn’t bear spoiling it here. Gameplay-wise, very little has changed; but again, this isn’t particularly awful. Moai’s action is confined almost exclusively to Easter Island this time around, with only two or three necessary detours to Bosco’s and Stinky’s. Other episodes forced the player to spend a significant time in and around Sam and Max’s neighborhood; Moai keeps the player almost exclusively inside Easter Island. This is not a huge difference, as none of the previous Sam and Max episodes have required a great deal of location-hopping, but it is a somewhat noticeable one. Personally, I preferred the change of scenery: getting used to the new characters and unusual puzzle logic of Easter Island made for a fresher, more immersive puzzle-solving experience. As I wasn’t constantly worried that I’d have to run back to Bosco or Sybil to get a necessary item, I felt more at ease, and subsequently more interested, with my tasks on Easter Island. The unusual, somewhat out-of-place action sequences from Ice Station Santa are back, and they’re more irrelevant than ever. They’re kinda fun at times – the “rhythm minigame,” which requires the player to drive into bagpipe icons as they speed down the road, is interesting in its simplistic marriage of music and gameplay – but they’re not deep or challenging enough to really leave much of an impression, and (considering Sam and Max is, you know, an adventure game) it’s not as if fans of the series have been clamoring for these little twitch-reliant minigame distractions. Moai Better Blues’ action minigames are occasionally fun, but completely unnecessary and forgettable – they’re the Jennifer Aniston of videogames. I’d hoped Sam and Max’s second season would feature some seriously increased difficulty; having completed the first two episodes of this year, however, it appears my wishes (and the wishes of many other die-hard Sam and Max fans) must go unfulfilled. The helpful, intuitive hint system is still around, but there’s never been less of a reason to use it: Moai Better Blues is, to my mind, the single easiest Sam and Max episode ever released. I only paused to really think things through once or twice throughout the entire 3-4 hour running time, and my initial puzzle-solving instincts were never wrong. I say this not as an adventure gaming master – I literally need a walkthrough in order to progress through any LucasArts or Sierra adventure title – but Moai’s puzzles are disappointingly easy (perhaps due to the fact that many problems revolve around use of portals, a game mechanic many of us have just had a great deal of experience with). Beyond its simplistic, obvious puzzle solutions, Moai Better Blues sadly neglects to include one of the greatest staples of the Sam and Max episodic series: the boss showdowns. Every other Sam and Max episode climaxes by placing Sam and Max in some sort of seemingly impossible situation they cannot escape, where they have to (through a mix of wits and violence) defeat the episode’s main antagonist. In Situation: Comedy, Sam had to trick a hypnotized talk show host into knocking herself unconscious. In Ice Station Santa, the duo had to face off against an evil, SMG-toting Santa Claus. In Moai Better Blues, our heroes have to, uh, throw a specific item into a portal. This episode ends with a whimper, where all others ended with a bang; considering how funny and odd the episode’s antagonist is, I would have loved to see a puzzling boss showdown, but instead the developers opted to conclude the story with a boring, nondescript, slightly tweaked version of a puzzle from earlier in the episode. To be honest, it almost feels like Telltale ran out of time and/or money and were forced to end the game prematurely. All things considered, Moai Better Blues is a fun, entertaining, but unfortunately disappointing entry in the Sam and Max series. It retains the great writing of the other episodes, but its considerable lack of difficulty and completely lackluster ending make this episode the worst in the series thus far. Granted, being the worst Sam and Max episode is like being the ugliest Playboy bunny or the least bitchy co-host on The View; it’s generally effective at what it sets out to do, and fans of the other episodes will still find a great deal of enjoyment out of it, but Moai Better Blues could stand to be much better.Destructoid Review Final Verdict 6.0
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Another month, another Sam and Max episode. If you haven't subscribed already, you should have; if you have, you might wanna know what you're in for; if you don't know what I'm talking about, then shame on you and shame on t...

Destructoid review: Sam & Max Episode 201: Ice Station Santa

Nov 09 // Joseph Leray
Sam & Max Episode 201: Ice Station Santa (PC)Telltale GamesReleased November 8, 2007 OrcistFor you whippersnappers that aren't familiar with Sam & Max, here's a quick breakdown: Sam is a dog, and Max is a rabbit, and they are freelance policemen. Max also happens to be the President, but that's largely irrelevant. While each episode's narrative is completely self-contained, there is an over-arching plot tying all of them together. As for Ice Station Santa, it seems like the result of The Nightmare Before Christmas and Dickens' A Christmas Carol fused together: Santa Claus has gone crazy, and it's up to Sam and Max to save Christmas by righting a few unknowingly committed wrongs. It's hard to be more specific without spoiling it, as there's not just a whole hell of a lot narrative here -- don't forget that this is only the first episode of a longer series. A capable player could probably play through this at a leisurely pace in about 4 - 6 hours. I managed to play through it in one sitting, interrupted only by food and class.Sam and Max made a graceful jump into 3-D with Season 1, and nothing's really changed in Season 2 -- the art style is classic, the colors are vibrant, and the animations are fluid and smooth. There are, however, some new locales to explore, including Santa's Workshop and Stinky's Diner. Old haunts such as Sam and Max's office and Bosco's Inconvenience Store make up the rest of the game. As far as the gameplay's concerned, it's not exactly neurosurgery. While the point-and-click genre has always had relatively simple game mechanics, Telltale have streamlined the process even further. While most adventure games incorporate a few different actions available for any particular item -- observe, use, listen, fellate, etc ... -- Sam & Max just wants you to point, and then click. If Sam can use it, he will. If not, he'll just say something snarky about it. Period. At no point will the player ever use an item in the wrong place, or even more than once. It either works, or it doesn't. Initially, this means that solving puzzles is relatively straightforward -- just stick item A in slot B and be done with it. No need to worry your little head about finding alternate ways to solve puzzles or advance the game. By the end of the game, however, I yearned for different ways to approach things. Because my thought process didn't line up exactly with that of the game developers, I found myself stuck on the penultimate puzzle for a substantial amount of time. I won't tell you how long because it's embarrassing. That being said, I hesitate to call Sam & Max hard. The puzzles aren't self-contained, meaning that you'll have to travel back and forth between different areas to gather enough items to progress, but it's never tedious or overly-complex. It's certainly challenging and invites the player to use critical thinking skills, and the solutions to problems can be rather vague and esoteric, but it's not hard. In fact, puzzles seem insultingly obvious, but only after you've solved them. More than once, the team at Telltale made me feel rather silly and dense, but in a chummy, adorable, Socratic kind of way.  As someone entirely unfamiliar with the adventure genre, it was strange that there were no real "rewards" for solving puzzles -- no points, or sweet armor, or a "Mission Complete!" screen. The reward is wholly intellectual, tied up in feelings of personal accomplishment and being allowed to progress further in the game. Often times, the end goal of any given scenario is immediately obvious -- the question is never "what do I do?" but rather "how do I do it?" I often found myself working backwards from the end of a puzzle. For example, at one point near the end of the game, I realized that I had to get a particular item from Stinky, the owner of a diner near Sam & Max's office. In my head, I had already planned out how to use that item which I knew would set off a (rather long) chain of events allowing me to finish the game. Unfortunately, it took me like four millenia to figure out how to get said item, effectively halting my grand ideas in their proverbial tracks. Finding that one action to serve as a catalyst to propel myself into the next segment of the game was like a personal victory over those lovable, ingratiating Telltale chaps. This is where the most fun in Sam & Max is derived -- gathering clues, plotting out a course, and then setting it all in motion, like an adorable Rube Goldberg machine. If you can't tell, I'm pretty worthless as an adventure gamer and spent a lot of time stuck -- knowing exactly what to do, but not how to do it. This wasn't all bad, however, as it gave me a chance to explore in minute detail the various locales of the Sam & Max-iverse. By extension, it gave me a lot of time to revel in one-liners and hilarious dialog. When I spoke with Telltale at PAX, I had this to say about the game's humor: "The jokes are funny without being over the top, clever without being pedantic, and the slapstick is endearing, but not stupid." I stand by this now, as well -- the writing is spot-on, and I literally laughed out loud several times. Literally. Interestingly, it occurred to me that each section of the game had an accompanying brand of raunchy humor: the Office was home to allusions to Season 1 and fan service; the dialog at Bosco's rife with sexual innuendo; Stinky's serves as a soapbox for social critique and not-so-subtle jabs at Condi Rice and Tricky Dick Cheney; and finally, Santa's office is a booze-soaked, drug-addled Christmas fest, where Christmas spirit comes in a bottle. Another feature touted by early press for this game was the inclusion of new gameplay features designed to break up the repetitive pointing and clicking that is so indicative of the point and click genre. These new "features" really just mean a few mini-games thrown into the mix for good measure. The mini-games are twitchier than the majority of the game and do, in fact, break up the gameplay for a nice change. They also change the reward trope that I mentioned earlier. Instead of "solve this puzzle and take joy in your accomplishment," the game becomes "overcome this reflex-based challenge and win an item." I suppose, in the grand scheme of things, this may be a small distinction, but the tone and the gameplay of the mini-games represent a stark contrast to the clue-gathering and character interaction of the rest of the game.Unfortunately, they seem kind of shoe-horned right into the middle of the game. About the time I started feeling comfortable with how the game works, I get a bunch of mini-games thrown at me, one after the other. Where they really could have been useful was in the last stretch of the game, as the puzzles become more complex, when a break would have been appreciated instead of jarring. In a game that does so well at creating a seamless combination of puzzle-solving and narrative, the mini-games seem kind of ham-handed. It's not that they're bad, but they could've been better.Ultimately, Sam & Max is a finely crafted, hilarious adventure game with classic gameplay whose moments of frustation are overshadowed by the moments of unadulterated joy that they eventually lead to. By the end of the game, the same, tired mechanics may seem a little stale and the conclusion seems a bit anti-climactic in that it's just another puzzle, but the funny writing and the overall feeling of accomplishment more than make up for it. While I may've been unacquainted with Sam & Max before now, Episode 201: Ice Station Santa has made a fan out of me, and I'll be hard-pressed to pass up the next installment. Rating: 8.0 Reverend AnthonyUnlike Orcist, I'm a huge adventure gaming fan. Sam and Max Hit the Road is my favorite adventure title of all time, and I loved Sam and Max Season One intensely. Going in to Season Two, then, I was curious as to how many of the flaws Telltale Games would improve upon from the first season. You see, while Season One stands as one of the single most satisfying experiments in episodic gaming in, well, ever (episodes were released on time every damn month), it also had some problems -- the most notable of them being that the puzzles just weren't that hard.Unfortunately, Season Two doesn't really improve upon this problem. While only a few of the puzzles are outright easy, none of them will cause an experienced adventure gamer to scratch his or her head in pleasant confusion. The limited number of locations (as with Season One, there's only about four or five different areas the player can travel to) means you'll always have a pretty general idea of what you're supposed to do and how you're supposed to do it. The puzzles in Ice Station Santa aren't necessarily easier than the ones in Season One, but they certainly aren't any harder.  So, if the puzzles, number of locations, and length haven't been changed, what has? Well, Sam can now run from object to object with a simple double-click, which will be useful to Season One vets who no doubt remember how excruciatingly slow Sam used to walk. A new hint system has been implemented, which should really only be used by total adventure novices: the hints are wonderfully subtle and in no way solve the entire puzzle for you, but I really have to wonder why they'd include such a helpful hint system in a game with such generally simple puzzles. I'd really like to see this hint system utilized in an episode with much, much more difficult puzzles, as it's really quite pleasant to use. Finally, the Telltale guys saw fit to add in the action minigames Orcist spoke of to break up the gameplay. Orcist's problem was that they were okay, but could have been better; my problem is that they're present at all. In an episodic game whose running time doesn't exceed four hours, I don't really need to have the gameplay broken up. I buy Sam and Max for adventure gameplay, and that's what I'd like. The twitch minigames aren't awful, but they're just not what an adventure gaming fan plays Sam and Max for. However, I don't want to give the impression that Ice Station Santa represents a nosedive for the Sam and Max episodes. The writing, for example, has actually managed to get even funnier -- quite a feat, considering how funny the first season was. Overall, Ice Station Santa doesn't really improve upon the lacking difficulty of Season One, and I could have definitely done without the unnecessary minigames, but the heart of the Sam and Max episodes is still there. The game is still awfully damn funny, the characters are interesting, and the puzzles are fun (if simple) to solve. If you enjoyed the first season, there's literally no reason not to pick up Ice Station Santa as well. Just don't expect anything drastically different. I definitely look forward to seeing what the rest of Season Two has to offer. Rating: 7.0 Destructoid Review Final VerdictFinal Score: 7.5Verdict: 
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Gather round, lads, it's full disclosure time: I didn't play Sam & Max Season 1. I didn't play Sam & Max Hit the Road. I'm only perfunctorily acquainted with the entire adventure genre. I have failed you.This, along ...

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PAX 2007: Sam and Max Season Two impressions


Aug 31
// Topher Cantler
Admittedly, I've never been part of the PC adventure game crowd. Now before you browse through your inventory for a torch and lighter, or enter things like "/pitchfork", let me explain what I mean. It's not that I d...
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The quiet genius of Steve Purcell


Aug 29
// Eliza Gauger
If you thought I was done relating uncomfortable anecdotes from San Diego Comic-Con, you would be wrong.Sometime after my humiliation at the LucasArts booth (to which I subjected myself for the Cause), I found myself strollin...
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Sam and Max: Season Two coming this Fall!


Jul 25
// Anthony Burch
I am not an exclamatory sort of guy. I rarely, if ever, choose to exclaim things. And even when I do, I usually never go through the trouble of adding an exclamation mark, instead letting the period (and all the cool, dispas...
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Sam and Max: Season 1 to hit retail with bonus content


Jun 07
// Nick Chester
Subscribers of Gametap have known what's up for awhile -- the digitally distributed Sam and Max: Season 1 was a blast for fans of the point-and-click adventure genre. Now that the six episode season has wrapped, Season 1 ...
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Sam & Max episodes coming to Xbox Live Arcade and Virtual Console


Mar 20
// Chad Concelmo
In an interview with Shacknews, Telltale CEO Dan Connors has revealed that he has hopes to bring the popular and critically adored Sam & Max episodics to Xbox Live Arcade and the Wii’s Virtual Con...
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Sam and Max possibly coming to 360, Orbach possibly coming back from dead


Feb 25
// Earnest Cavalli
Gamespot has done some investigative snooping only to come up with the hypothesis that the recent Sam and Max games may be heading to the Xbox 360. While it is just a rumor, signs including Telltale's (the developers beh...
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Gametap is cheap and easy, like a good whore should be


Feb 22
// Colette Bennett
A few days ago, superstar editor and sometimes gastrointestinal specialist Aaron Linde said to me, "You know, I want to check out Myst Online: Uru Live and Gametap is having an introductory special where the first mont...
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Fake Game Friday: Forgotten Toys


Dec 15
// Tom Fronczak
Last week Dexter345 brought you Gears of Wario Ware, this week reader Marky7474 sends us yet another game idea: his epic RPG filled with toy heroes. "Think FF7 with Source engine graphics." With Homer plush toys, me...
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New Sam and Max Episode 2 gameplay video


Dec 04
// Joseph Leray
Gametap and Telltale have released the first gameplay video for the new, appropriately-titled Sam and Max episode, "Situation:Comedy". This episode takes place in a TV studio, and the video shows Sam and Max hos...

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