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Remakes

HD remakes photo
HD remakes

What is your take on HD remakes this generation?


I'm for them, depending on the situation
May 19
// Chris Carter
Are you ready for some remakes? Capcom is, as are a ton of other publishers. It feels like every other week there's an announcement for a "remastered" or "definitive" edition of a recently released game, and at times, it can get a bit ridiculous. I've seen a lot of talk recently regarding this practice, and I figured it was time for a discussion.
Capcom photo
Capcom

HD remakes from Capcom will now be a 'key business activity'


Please look forward to it
May 19
// Chris Carter
After the success of Resident Evil HD, it makes sense that Capcom would start gearing up for even more HD remakes. As word would have it, that's just what they're going to do. In a recent Q&A regarding their financials, t...

Early Access Review: Black Mesa

May 10 // Nic Rowen
Black Mesa (PC)Developer: Crowbar CollectivePublisher: Crowbar CollectiveReleased: May 5, 2015MSRP: $19.99 Now that I've had a chance to replay the original (selectively edited) Half-Life through the incredible reproduction effort of Black Mesa (which had its first part released roughly three years ago), I'm not sure that choice was so wrong. In the end I think I broke even. Half-Life was a monumental game that will always be rightfully remembered as a masterpiece for its time, but its probably not as fun as you remember it (headshots on the other hand are, and forever will be, a timeless source of joy). First thing's first, the Crowbar Collective has done an astounding job of dragging Half-Life into the modern age. This is not a mere port like Half-Life Source which used all the same assets as the original with a bit of spit and polish added in the form of a higher resolution and some dynamic lighting. Black Mesa is a remake, built from the ground up to fully realize the vision of what Half-Life could be on modern machines. More than a straight remake, the Crowbar Collective has played with the nuts and bolts of the game. Black Mesa rebuilds, trims, and expands different parts of the original for a smoother experience, while still staying true to what fundamentally made Half-Life what it was. There are new puzzles to work through, new and expanded areas to explore, and the availability of ammo and supplies has been bumped and nudged by a team that has spent ages agonizing over the pacing of the game. Action scenes are frantic and aggressive, with plenty of ammo doled out to deal with the additional enemies and larger set-pieces provided by Black Mesa. But when the action slows down and Gordon is guided towards evasion and caution, supplies dip to an almost survival horror level of scarcity. The push and pull of tension and action, going from a rat in the walls to a one-man army was one of the most intriguing things about Half-Life, and Black Mesa nails it better than the original. Some areas like the On A Rail sequence that infamously overstayed its welcome in the original, benefit from editing. Sometimes more isn't always better and Black Mesa makes some smart cuts getting rid of the fluffier and more frustrating aspects of the original. All of the edits are an improvement to the game. In fact, I'd say they could have probably brandished the razor around a bit more. Maybe we were just more tolerant of rampant amounts of bullshit back in 1998. Or, I suspect our memories of Half-Life benefit from a healthy helping of nostalgia and a lofty appreciation for everything that game did for modern game design. Half-Life basically wrote the book on immersive storytelling, first person exploration and strategically minded A.I for enemies, it had to be fun, right? Kind of? There are great times to be had in Black Mesa. When the game works, you can easily tell why Half-Life is so highly regarded as a classic. But then there is a looming dark side; a great number of hours when the game stubbornly refuses to be fun. The overly long underwater sequences that have you searching about in the darkness for some nook or cranny you missed as the last of your oxygen bubbles out of your lungs. The obnoxious clunkiness of trying to just MOVE around on physics enabled debris, let alone when the game demands you try to make a specific jump or escape from a screen rattling auto-turret under those conditions. The arbitrary insta-kill traps and monsters that force you back into loading screens and more than a couple “gotcha” moments that you couldn't hope to avoid without active precognitive abilities. Even with careful editing and a mind towards evening out the pace of the original, Black Mesa still traffics in an almost unconscionable amount of backtracking and finagling. There were several sequences where the solution to the predicament I was in was so awkward and stilted that I was sure I was doing it wrong. Of particular disdain was a protracted sequence set in a waste disposal facility that merged all the “joys” of water exploration, insta-death traps, pinpoint jumping between moving conveyor belts and confusing map design into a single ultra dense black-hole of anti-fun so terribly dark and spirit crushing that I'm still not sure I fully escaped from it. Maybe I'm being tough on it, but I remember Half-Life being smarter. I remember liking its world and characters better. Maybe it's age or maybe games have just moved on, but this time around I was more exasperated than amused by the shenanigans of the Lambda research team. The game has one joke -- you wander up to some poindexter in a lab coat, he says something silly/smug/abrasive, then immediately runs headlong into bullets/fire/devouring jaws (whatever option would make what he said seem more ironic). I like to imagine Freeman giving the leftover blood smear a knowing smirk each time. Granted, it's a funny goof the first two or three times it comes up, but when you're nine hours deep into the game and Professor Egghead is still predictably blundering into the crossfire, the dismemberment gets a little rote. I think its interesting that almost all of my criticism for Black Mesa is directly related to content from the original Half-Life. Every other effort is fantastic. This game looks great, especially considering its roots as a community driven mod. The soundtrack of original compositions is fucking banging. Every edit and change they made to the game was for the better. It almost makes me wish Black Mesa wasn't a remake-with-cuts of Half-Life. I wonder if the team would have been better served making their own thing, or maybe a “inspired by the events of Half-Life” complete re-imagining of the original game. The way I see it, there are two potential audiences for Black Mesa. There are the players who missed the original in its heyday because they were too young, or didn't have a PC, or thought Freeman's goatee on the box art made him look like a barista stooge, but love Valve's other games and want to check out the legendary classic that started it all. Then, you also have the true-blue fans of the original, the generation that cut their teeth on Half-Life and remember it as a wonderful and mind expanding experience who would love to recapture the joy of those heady days. I'm in the slightly uncomfortable position of telling both of those camps that they can probably take a pass on Black Mesa, even though I truly respect the work that the Crowbar Collective team has done with it. If you want to play a great Half-Life game that has aged fairly well, Half-Life 2 and its accompanying chapters are fantastic and Valve practically gives them out every Steam sale. Those games have all the best parts of the original Half-Life, while cutting out most of the chaff that bogs it down. If you didn't play Half-Life back in the day, I can't really imagine someone enjoying it as a game. Maybe as an academic curiosity, but not as a play experience. If you absolutely loved the original, you may very well find something worthwhile in Black Mesa. It really is the singular best way to play Half-Life. That said, you could also find something you don't like. A terrible truth, an awful secret, the knowledge that one of your favorite games is actually kind of a pain in the ass to play. It might be best to leave those pleasant memories as they are. There is still more Black Mesa to come; the game is in early access and right now the story concludes on a cliffhanger right before the Xen levels, where Freeman is thrust into an alien world of annoying platform jumping and floating alien bastards. The Crowbar Collective is actively working on that final chapter and plans to include it in the full release. Considering that even the most stalwart fans of the original generally concede that “the game was perfect (except for the Xen levels)” I don't think those last levels will really swing my personal opinion on the game. I will say this though, I can't wait for whatever the Crowbar Collective does next.
Black Mesa photo
Half as good as you remember
Half-Life was like a magic trick. It was a game you could show to people who weren't gamers and they'd get into it, a gateway drug. A real game (not some glorified puzzle book like Myst) that had the cinematic flair and prese...

Turok photo
Turok

Night Dive Studios might be remaking Turok


Open the door, get on the floor
May 08
// Joe Parlock
Dinosaurs! Radical! Nineties! Yeah! Turok was great. And now it might be coming back, according to an interview by TechRaptor with Samuel ‘Kaiser’ Villarreal. Kaiser is currently working on porting the retro FPS P...
Resident Evil photo
Resident Evil

Resident Evil HD Remaster has a million sales under its umbrella


Ella ella ella ay ay under its umberella ella ella ay...
Apr 24
// Brett Makedonski
As it turns out, people still love some old-fashioned scares. That's evident by the latest news coming out of Capcom's camp: Resident Evil HD Remaster has broken one million units sold since its January release. That's a...
Legend of Kay Remaster photo
Legend of Kay Remaster

Does anyone remember Legend of Kay?


If you do, is it a classic?
Apr 22
// Jed Whitaker
Legend of Kay is a 3D platformer action-adventure title starring Kay, a cat who uses his claws in "meow-tial arts" as well as weaponry to fight evil gorillas who have been oppressing cat kind. So the game is about a species w...
God of War photo
God of War

No plans to PS4 remaster other God of War games


For now, it's just God of War III
Mar 23
// Laura Kate Dale
Last Friday, Sony Santa Monica announced that God of War III will be getting a PS4 remaster coming out this July. For any of you who were hoping they might be able to catch up on the whole series on PS4 however, you may be ou...
Final Fantasy X | X-2 PS4 photo
Final Fantasy X | X-2 PS4

Final Fantasy X | X-2 HD Remaster hits PS4 this May


Yo dawg I heard you like remasters
Mar 03
// Jason Faulkner
Square Enix has announced final details on Final Fantasy X | X-2 Remaster HD's improved port to the PlayStation 4. This release was announced in December of last year, but since then Square Enix has been mum about it. The port will come with new features and improvements that address some of the qualms many people shared about the original release.

Very Quick Tips: Homeworld Remastered Collection

Mar 02 // Jason Faulkner
Camera and movement: You’re in full control of the camera, so if you’re not careful it can be easy to suddenly find yourself disoriented. Use the arrow keys to pan the camera instead of holding the mouse on the edge of the screen. This allows you to quickly snap the camera in another direction and lets you still use the mouse to control your units. Pressing spacebar brings up your sensors manager, which allows you to see a representation of all resources and units, both friendly and enemy on the field, and issue orders and select units. If you’re plotting long-range attacks or movements, this is the screen to use. Don’t forget to utilize vertical movement. After pressing ‘M’ to bring up the movement disc, you can hold shift and move the mouse up and down to set which height you want to move as well as horizontal movement. Waypoints are your friend. Don’t wanna move straight through a minefield on the way to your destination? Use waypoints to plot around it. Fleet management and resources: The most important concern while playing is to ensure you have a steady supply of resource units (RU). If you lose all your resource collectors to the enemy and you’re out of RU then you’re going to have to start retiring units to get enough money to build more. Your best bet is to build a few and keep them docked via the Launch Manager so that if an enemy takes your mining operations out, you can jumpstart a new RU flow. Make sure your resource collectors aren’t having to sit around with the cargo bays full waiting to land. Build multiple resource controllers and keep them as near resources as possible to maximize collector turn-around time. Researching and building ships takes a ton of time and RU. Find which ships fit your playing style and research their technologies first so you’ll have a template for the fleet you want in your head before you start the game. If you try and research and build every ship, you run the risk of having an unbalanced attack force and being overwhelmed. Spread ship construction between your mothership, carriers, and shipyards. This can make the difference between getting the jump on your enemy and getting caught with a meager force. Combat: Unfortunately, Homeworld Remastered Collection uses the Homeworld 2 engine, so you have to baby your units a little more than fans of the first game may remember. Setting formations is very important, otherwise your ships are going to head full-speed towards the location you command them to. Ships in formation together will advance towards their destination at the speed of the slowest ship in their flotilla. Use the right ships for the right job. A flight of interceptors isn’t going to take down a heavy cruiser, but you don’t want to send a heavy cruiser to take out a single frigate. Using the group command, I suggest you split your main fleet(s) into subsections that you can split off for specialized attacks. Make sure you use those carriers for what they were made for. Docking fighters and corvettes to a carrier and hyperspacing to your destination is the best way to carry them into battle to support the rest of your fleet. While in hyperspace, you can hit the “auto-launch” command and when your carrier appears at its destination it will immediately disperse your fighter and corvette groups. Have a few units that can make repairs on standby either ready to jump in, or guarded by escorts. Make sure if your fighters are getting hammered to press “D” to have them dock with a carrier, mothership, or support frigate, they’ll touch down and launch fully repaired. Advanced tactics: Your fleet will exit a hyperspace jump in the same orientation they entered it in. You can use this to arrange your units in a square and jump in surrounding your target. This will expose less of your units to the enemies firing arcs and allow you to disperse the maximum firepower you can. Hide your Mothership by either moving straight up or straight down and away from your starting position. Most players will only send their probes in a straight horizontal path to search for others and you can evade that search pattern by moving into an unorthodox location. Minelayer corvettes can be used to deny resources to an enemy. Even if you don’t plan on setting up operations in an area, send a few minelayers to saturate it with mines. That way when an enemy comes to use it, their resource collectors will be destroyed. Salvage and capture every thing you can. Every ship you salvage or capture is one ship the enemy doesn't have and one ship that you didn't have to pay for. When playing Kushan or Taiidani, I typically designate a carrier with salvage corvettes docked along with four to six frigates as escorts as a quick strike capture force. You'll want to use around six corvettes per unit to capture ships the most efficiently. The marine and infiltrator frigate serve the same purpose for the Hiigarians and Vaygr and only require a light corvette for fighter escort.
Homeworld tips photo
The Mothership is standing by
Although Homeworld Remastered Collection is classified as real-time strategy, there are some elements that set it apart from its brethren. The 3D camera and movement add another whole axis to worry about that some may find di...

Review: Homeworld Remastered Collection

Mar 02 // Jason Faulkner
Homeworld Remastered Collection (PC)Developer: Gearbox SoftwarePublisher: Gearbox SoftwareReleased: February 25, 2015MSRP: $34.99Rig: AMD FX-6300 @ 3.5 GHz, with 8GB of RAM, ATI Radeon HD 7950, Windows 8.1 64-bit Starting on the desert planet Kharak, Homeworld follows the tribal peoples of the Kushan. The discovery of the ancient starship Khar-Toba in one of the planet’s vast deserts confirmed what many already speculated: Kharak was not the origin of the Kushan people. The Guidestone was recovered from the ruins of the ship and carved upon its chipped face was a map of the galaxy leading to a distant star inscribed with a single word: “Hiigara.” No translation was needed as every Kushan knew it. The map was pointing “home.” Over the next hundred years every man, woman, and child worked toward one objective: to complete the ship which would carry over 600,000 of them to their ancestral home planet. It would be equipped to overcome any adversity and be the first Kushan space-faring vessel to be capable of faster-than-light travel thanks to the salvaged Hyperspace Core found on the Khar-Toba. You are Fleet Command, and the Kushan are depending on you to lead them to Hiigara. Along the way you’ll face off against the corrupt and despotic Taiidani Empire, trade with the enigmatic Bentusi, and discover the past of your race as you attempt to reclaim your rightful place in the stars. Your exodus across the galaxy is a relentless struggle against the odds and is one of my favorite campaigns in video game history. By the time you make it to the end there is a true feeling of satisfaction. Even though most of the story is told through voiceovers and the movements of starships, I felt truly connected with the Kushan as if I actually went through the journey with them. [embed]288437:57575:0[/embed] Unfortunately, Homeworld 2’s story is of less consistent quality. Without spoiling the excellent saga of the original, all I can say is that it takes place 100 years after the conclusion of the first game. Although it’s still interesting, it can’t compare to the tenacious flight of the Kushan. I found to to be a bit tangential, and the antagonists of the game, the Vaygr, don’t evoke the same raw anger that the Taiidani did. I highly recommend that if this is your first time playing the series to play them in order, as the charm of the original makes the second one shine a bit brighter than if it was played on its own. However, gameplay between the two is very similar, and in Homeworld Remastered Collection, the lines are further blurred as both games now use the same engine. Up to the release of this collection, unlike the gameplay and plot, graphically the series was showing its age considerably on modern computers. Although changing a .ini file will enable 16:9 on the original games, it’s simply not a big enough change to do the game justice. However, Gearbox’s new models, effects,  cutscenes, textures, and skyboxes have brought the series back to life. They remain faithful to the original while fitting in enough subtle changes to make them interesting. Those expecting revolutionary visuals though will be disappointed. The new textures do have a bit of a muddled look about them, but with the amount of models that can be on screen at once, it may be for the best that they didn’t go overboard. The series is played on a completely three-dimensional field. Unlike Starcraft or Command and Conquer, you’ll have to worry about enemies from above and below you as well as on all sides. Even though these games are 12 and 16 years old, no game series since has replicated this formula, leading them to still feel as fresh as any game coming out this year. Your focal point will be your mothership, and its survival comes above all else. Typically, you’ll need to concentrate on collecting and refining resources from the various asteroids and gas clouds which dot the map, and use them to build your fleet. At its core, combat depends on a rock-paper-scissor system of effectiveness and is easy to get into, yet offers quite a bit of tactical finesse. One thing I liked a lot was that during the campaign, ships you’ve built or salvaged will transfer to the next mission. It adds a huge incentive to actually shepherd your units, and I found myself giving carriers and Assault Frigates names and characterization and reveling in their victories and yelling at the screen when my favorites were blown apart because I made a mistake. Although the movement system is still top notch and unique to this series, but the A.I. that controls the ship could use some work, particularly with formation settings. Both games are in the Homeworld 2 engine which had a distinctly inferior formation and posturing system than the first and unfortunately it’s made for a ton of frustration. I found myself having to micromanage my ships when moving a large fleet because even when I put in the command to fall into a formation, they sometimes refused to stay with the group. In particular in my last session, my fleet of over a hundred ships flew together in formation perfectly except for two Support Frigates. Instead of falling into their battle line and matching speed with the rest of the formation, they wanted to race ahead towards wherever the fleet’s destination was with not a care in the world that they were the weakest frigate-class ships in the game. Although I was able to get them to rejoin the fleet if I ordered formation again after each movement command, it was frustrating to worry if my units were going to race blindly to their death whenever I had to pay attention to another situation. One of the big changes with Homeworld Remastered Collection is that the games are somewhat combined. Playing vs. A.I. or online multiplayer, instead of having to choose from either the Kushan and Taiidani, or Hiigarians and Vaygr, you can choose from all four. I was afraid that this would throw the impeccable balance that the game’s combat depends on off, but they’re all similarly matched, and the dynamic that the combination of both game’s playable races create ended up making the game more interesting. Steam Workshop support makes installing mods a cinch as well, so not only do your have the unique dynamic between these four races for the first time, but you can easily add new material. There’s quite a few of the more popular mods on the workshop for the original versions of the games, and before too long you can be sure we’ll see ports of mods and new mod. Online multiplayer is currently in beta, and requires a Gearbox SHiFT account, which is free and fairly easy to sign-up for. Once I linked my SHiFT account to Steam I really didn’t notice any interference from it when I played online. The first couple days I had the game it was shaky, with the service sometimes unavailable and a few game crashes. However, although I didn’t notice a patch, something must have been changed on Gearbox’s end because I have now played four online matches with no issues. When committing to playing online, just remember, it can take two or three hours depending on the map and number of players to actually complete a match on Homeworld Remastered Collection. Although I absolutely love the feeling of victory after facing down three other players, I hope that future updates add an option to get a match done a bit faster. The major disappointment I had with the collection is the absence of the excellent Homeworld: Cataclysm. The reason given by the developers was that the source code was lost or incomplete, but having a copy of the original or even a cinematic giving its backstory would have been great, especially for new fans to the series. Honestly, I found the fight against the Beast to be a more engaging story than that of Homeworld 2’s artifact hunt, and the changes in units and gameplay were much more interesting than the sequel’s replication of the first’s formula. Hopefully the success of these remasters will inspire Gearbox to attempt to reconstruct Cataclysm, and maybe even create a continuation of the series. Seeing these classic games back in print is wonderful. It’s always saddened me that these two titles, along with some of the best games of the late ’90s and early 2000s, are impossible to get. My adolescence was spent playing titles from industry icons Sierra, 14 East, Interplay, and Black Gate, and I hope that the recent storm of successful and well-made remasters gives someone the incentive to revive even more greats from the past. Whether you’re a fan of sci-fi, real-time strategy, or simply just video games in general, Homeworld Remastered Collection is a must-have if you haven’t played the series before. For those who spent years guarding their precious pressings of these classics, it’s time to rejoice, the Homeworld series is just as good as you remember it. [This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]
Homeworld Remastered photo
Lost and found and turned around
In 1999, I was 11 years old. It was a time when every video game purchase was a gamble. The best you could do was to read a review or watch a grainy, minute-long Quicktime video that you spent an hour to download on 56k while...

Homeworld Remastered photo
Homeworld Remastered

Homeworld Remastered's new vid is a modern trailer for a modern launch


The Age of S'jet begins again
Feb 25
// Josh Tolentino
My Steam clock tells me that Homeworld Remastered Collection unlocks in less than nine hours, but that just means there's just enough time left to put up this here launch trailer, which is brimming with all the bombast ...
#darksiders2 photo
#darksiders2

#darksiders2: Darksiders II current gen remaster confirmed


Skull fucked
Feb 17
// Steven Hansen
I'm sure Darksiders 2 is a fine game if you've dry humped behind a Hot Topic counter after a date at Orange Julius, but my favorite thing about its existence is #darksiders2, which Occams blessed us with all those y...
RE HD photo
RE HD

Resident Evil HD broke all sorts of sales records


Cash cow classic
Feb 09
// Brett Makedonski
Given how much cash they bring in, it's tough to fault publishers for continually focusing on gussying up beloved titles instead of moving forward with new games. Resident Evil HD is just the latest example, as plenty we...
Majora's Mask photo
Majora's Mask

Yet another Majora's Mask 3D trailer to tide you over


This one's for the fine folks in the UK
Jan 16
// Brett Makedonski
Nintendo sure has hit the marketing hard for Majora's Mask 3D in the few days since its wildly popular Direct. It seems like the 3DS remake has been everywhere lately. There's just under a month to go until release, and it remains to be seen whether there's enough steam to push the hype train at full power for that long. Final stop: Termina.
LSD remake photo
LSD remake

This awesome son-of-a-gun is remaking LSD: Dream Emulator


They're doing God's work, if you ask me
Dec 22
// Brittany Vincent
I’ve been in contact with Osamu Sato, the creator of the illustrious LSD: Dream Emulator for a tell-all about his games and legacy for a feature at VICE Motherboard for a few months now. This means I’ve been inves...
Resident Evil photo
Resident Evil

New Resident Evil: Remastered video has four improvements to show you


The catch is it's in Japanese
Oct 30
// Brett Makedonski
Alessandro told us last week that Resident Evil was a difficult game to remaster. That's because it's more than a simple upgrade to HD. This Japanese video gives a bit of first-hand insight as to some of the features that Ca...
Sleeping Dogs photo
But it's still a very good open-world game
Tomorrow, Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition will be released to the public. It's basically the same idea as Tomb Raider: Definitive Edition -- a re-release with promises of enhanced visuals for current-gen systems ...

Sleeping Dogs photo
Sleeping Dogs

Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition trailer is definitively definitive


'Definitive Edition means just that -- definitive'
Sep 25
// Brett Makedonski
All those other trailers you've seen for Sleeping Dogs? Forget those. They weren't nearly as definitive as this definitive trailer for Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition is. This is the be-all end-all of Sleeping Dogs&nb...
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Wort wort wort!
I recently got to check out Halo: The Master Chief Collection at an Xbox event, which gave me a big ol' happy, because I love me some sweet, sweet Covie-killing action. In 343 Industries' presentation, they spent half of the...

Metal Gear photo
Metal Gear

Metal Gear fan remake is cancelled, developers release trailer narrated by David Hayter


Konami pulls the plug
Aug 18
// Alessandro Fillari
Well, this is awkward. Back in June, Konami gave a group of Metal Gear fans its blessing to produce a free remake of the original MSX Metal Gear. The project attracted a lot of talent, including those who've worked on such ti...
Sleeping Dogs photo
Sleeping Dogs

Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition coming to PC too, has an odd trailer


But it's more than just shiny graphical enhancements
Aug 08
// Brett Makedonski
Technically, the existence of Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition was just a rumor up until now, outed by a telling Amazon listing. Square Enix confirmed everyone's suspicions today by formally announcing the remake and p...
Sleeping Dogs photo
Sleeping Dogs

Sleeping Dogs will also be re-released on new consoles


Because why not?
Aug 06
// Brett Makedonski
Thus far, the most obvious trend that's accompanied the transition from legacy to current generation consoles is the upgrading and re-release of some of the more recent titles that were only available on PlayStation 3 and Xbo...
Resident Evil photo
Resident Evil

Resident Evil headed for PS4, Xbox One, PC, PS3, and Xbox 360


A remake of a remake
Aug 05
// Brittany Vincent
Capcom has announced a brand new remastered edition of the original Resident Evil, coming to PC, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Xbox 360, and Xbox One as a digital-only title for early 2015. The port is based off the original...
Bladestorm remake photo
Bladestorm remake

PS3/360 strategy game Bladestorm getting remade for some reason


From Dynasty Warriors' Akihiro Suzuki
Jul 21
// Steven Hansen
Next you're going to tell me someone is remaking Runaway with Tom Selleck and Gene Simmons. Well, that would be less surprising. What's a random movie from 2007? Someone's going to remake Stardust? In the Name of th...
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They probably shouldn't tinker with the multiplayer
During 343 Industries' stint at RTX 2014, they announced some multiplayer game modes which will appear in Halo 2: Anniversary Edition, coming by way of the Halo: Master Chief Collection to the Xbox One this Fall. They also announced a modified version of Halo 2's Mongoose vehicle, called the Gungoose.

The rest of us photo
The rest of us

Sony: 'Huge portion' of PS4 owners never played The Last of Us


The rest of us
Jul 07
// Steven Hansen
It's easy to get up in word arms -- "milking," "cash grab" -- about re-releases, but I am generally for them. No one is saying you have to buy Final Fantasy IV again, but a lot of people still haven't played it. No one w...
Kingdom Hearts photo
Kingdom Hearts

Here's a new Kingdom Hearts HD 2.5 ReMIX trailer to tide you over


Not much longer to wait now, seriously
Jul 02
// Brittany Vincent
Can't wait for Kingdom Hearts HD 2.5 ReMIX to arrive this December 2? You're not alone. Kingdom Hearts 2 was the best of the series for me, and I thoroughly enjoyed my time with it. I can't wait to take a walk down memory la...
Halo 2 HD comparisons photo
Halo 2 HD comparisons

Halo 2: Anniversary comparison hits right in the nostalgia


A full decade of technology has done wonders
Jun 09
// Brett Zeidler
As part of the Master Chief Collection that was announced this morning, Halo 2: Anniversary is getting a fully remastered face lift just as Halo: Combat Evolved did three years ago with Halo: Anniversary. So, the game lo...
Night Trap photo
Night Trap

FMV game Night Trap to live on with re-release


A product of its time
May 19
// Jordan Devore
Controversial "ultra-violent" '90s full-motion video game Night Trap will, according to director and current rights holder James Riley, "come back, in better resolution and game play than before. We just want to be sure it's ...
NOLF photo
NOLF

Trademark spotted: No One Lives Forever may live again


Nothing's gone forever
May 02
// Steven Hansen
No One Lives Forever's rights disappeared last year. Activision said it didn't have them and, in short, no one seemed to have them. Siliconera spotted trademarks for No One Lives Forever, The Operative, Contract J.A.C.K. and ...

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